Category Archives: Heroin

5 Reasons Why You Can’t Afford NOT To Send Your Son To Drug Rehab

If you are a parent to a drug addicted son, it can be devastating to see them living the life that they’ve chosen. Drug rehabilitation is beneficial in many ways, as it helps to get your son away from their harmful lifestyle and learning coping mechanisms to handle their addiction.

Here are five reasons why you can’t afford to not send your son to a drug rehabilitation center:

  1. Brighter Future

Going to rehab offers a brighter and cleaner future for your son. Drug addictions can prevent your child from getting a solid job, getting into school and living a thoroughly responsible life. Rehab can turn things around for them, teaching them how to live a full life without the need for drugs.

  1. Better Health

No matter what type of drug your son is using, it is still harmful to his health. Drug users have a higher risk of heart attacks and strokes, as well as a myriad of other health-related problems. Because of this, rehab will eliminate and prevent these issues from becoming problematic due to their drug addiction.

  1. Overdose Risk Eliminated

Overdosing is one of the scariest prospects for parents to drug addicted children. When your child is clean and free of their addiction, their risk for overdosing is totally eliminated. This prevents a premature and untimely passing due to their harmful addiction.

  1. Professional Caring Environment

A drug rehabilitation center is staffed by trained and experienced professionals who are there to help and assist your son in everything he needs to overcome his harmful lifestyle. There are also nurses and doctors on staff to handle withdrawal symptoms, so this is another benefit to them when in the facility as opposed to doing it on their own.

  1. Extra Support

Upon leaving the drug rehab facility, your son will have a support group for life. Oftentimes, they will leave with a connection of friends and staff with whom they can connect whenever they want. This makes it easier for your son to continue on the path to a healthy and clean life that he can feel proud of living.

While it’s difficult to deal with a drug addicted child, a great rehab center can turn their lives around for the better. This prevents the long-term effects of constant drug use and allows your son to live the life that you all can feel proud of.

Call The One and Only Genesis House today 855-818-6740

OxyContin

Why Medical Marijuana Is Not a Good Substitute for Pain Medication

About Medical Marijuana

In recent years, the push to legalize the growth and consumption of marijuana has been backed by those who believe it holds the key to treatment of a variety of disorders, from seizures to PTSD to chronic pain. You may have read news articles or seen videos that tell stories of people whose lives have been improved drastically since beginning to use marijuana for treatment. These stories provide hope for people with these conditions, who often relocate themselves to states where medical marijuana is legal in hopes of finding a cure for their pain.

What We Know

The excitement around medical marijuana is not completely unfounded. Anecdotal evidence shows that it does have the potential to be a strong, versatile treatment for a number of debilitating conditions. Unfortunately, this alone does not make it a good choice. Anecdotal evidence does not mean that it will hold up under clinical trials, and the questionable legality of the drug means that there are no standardized regulations in place for the industry. Marijuana continues to be illegal on a federal level, so individual states are responsible for deciding whether to legalize it and how to regulate medical marijuana. Some states require it to be sold in the form of cannabis oil at varying levels of potency, while others allow it to be sold as a plant with low THC levels, allowing patients to smoke it.

Risks

The fact that marijuana remains illegal federally means that buying and using it will always carry some legal risk. Even if you live in a state where it is legal, the federal government could overrule that legal status at any time and cut off access to the treatments. Federally approved pain medication is not in such a precarious position. Since individual states have their own, differing regulations, it is highly difficult to make sure that the dosage of cannabis is standardized. This can cause it to have unpredictable effects on the body. In addition, taking medical marijuana by smoking the plant is dangerous, as it brings potentially toxic chemicals into the lungs along with cannabis smoke. The future of medical marijuana is uncertain. It may become a safe option if stricter regulations are implemented on a federal level, following controlled research about its effectiveness and interaction with other medications. Currently, prescribed pain medications are causing addiction and the need for treatment is higher.

Let us show you how to live pain free and in recovery 855-818-6740

Beginners Guide to Understanding Why You’re An Addict

Finding out about a loved one’s addiction can be challenging. Parent’s often ask themselves where they went wrong, why their child or children made the choices that led to their addiction, and why their child is addicted. Addiction is not solely the result of non-adaptive decisions. Instead, it is often the result of genetics, psychological problems, trauma, and one’s social environment.

Genetics & Social Environment

Addiction is partly genetic. There is no single gene associated with addiction. For example, many twin studies have demonstrated that children of alcoholics are at least four times more likely to develop alcohol addiction than their peers. There are multiple genes that can influence an individual’s likelihood to develop an addiction. Some genes influence impulse control or decrease the likelihood of individual’s disengaging in substance use. Other genes influence the severity of withdrawal symptoms. Although genes cannot be changed, families with histories of addictions can work proactively to educate their children, adolescents, and adult children about the genetic risks for developing addictive behaviors. This can include helping your loved one make positive social connections in their community.

Psychological Problems & Trauma

Addiction rarely presents as a single issue. Instead, many individuals who experience addiction also have depression, significant anxiety, post-traumatic stress disorder, or other mood disorders. Addiction is often developed as a non-adaptive coping skills in order to manage the symptoms of psychological problems. This is why individual and group mental health counseling is often a key part of addiction treatment. Mental health counseling can be used during addiction treatment and in recovery to help individual’s learn adaptive coping skills so that they can manage anxiety, depression, and other mood disorders without drugs or alcohol.

Trauma

Trauma, especially childhood trauma, can significantly impact the brain’s development. Chronic stress and fear, which are related to childhood experiences of abuse and neglect,can result in cognitive, emotional, and behavioral impairments. Two thirds of addicts have experienced physical or sexual trauma during childhood. You cannot always control your child’s experiences. However, knowledge about trauma can help inform addiction treatment. There are a variety of trauma-focused therapeutic approaches which can help your adult child address his or her traumatic experiences and learn alternative coping skills.

Genetics cannot be changed. However, addiction can be conquered by addressing your loved one’s social environment, underlying psychological issues, and past traumas.

We can help, call now 855-818-6740

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Affordable Detox Center in Lake Worth FL

Are you suffering because your child is addicted to drugs, alcohol or both? Maybe he or she has a dual diagnosis with mental illness.

If so, you’re probably confused and frustrated. You might think your treatment options are limited. You might feel that you have nowhere to turn. But there is an affordable, comprehensive detox center in Lake Worth.

Hold onto Hope

If your son or daughter is suffering from addiction, detox is the first step on the road to recovery. Once it’s done, true healing from the addiction can begin.

As you know, your child is different when he or she is on drugs. That’s because addiction changes a person’s brain chemistry. You may have forgotten what your child’s true personality was like under the haze of chemicals. After detox, you’ll see that healthy, happy child you used to know.

What Detox Does

  • Purges the alcohol or drugs from the body.
  • Allows the brain and body to begin healing.
  • Lets the addict begin thinking clearly.

After months or years of abusing drugs and alcohol, a person’s body develops a dependence on it. Detox serves to break that dependence so that the addict can begin working on the psychological and emotional reasons for their addiction.

Dangers of Detox

  • Detox is a shock to the body and can be dangerous if not medically monitored.
  • At our center, we ensure that the detox is done under complete medical supervision.
  • We provide treatment of detox-related symptoms.

Symptoms of alcohol or drug detox include severe shaking, sweating, chills, vomiting and diarrhea. Since a full detox can take up to 10 days, it’s important that the detox is done in a safe, secure place under medical supervision.

Is it Affordable?

If you’re concerned about the cost of detox, keep the following in mind.

Help is at Hand

Addiction wreaks havoc on an addict and the addict’s family. Now there’s hope for you and your child. Just come into our detox center in Lake Worth, Florida, and take the first steps toward a brighter, better future.

Our experienced, compassionate counselors will walk you through the admission process and discuss options for follow-up treatment. If you need an affordable detox center in Lake Worth, call us today: 855-830-7098

OxyContin

How Suboxone is Helping Heroin Addicts Detox in Palm Beach County

Heroin has taken the United States by storm. Many heroin users start out by naively trying or being prescribed prescription opioid painkillers, of which the United States consumes more per capita than any other country. Opioid users switch to heroin because the drug is more cost-effective than prescription opioids. Tragically, heroin is deadlier than prescription opioids because, unlike prescription medications, the drug varies wildly in potency and sometimes contains ultra-powerful synthetic opioids like Fentanyl.

As many Floridians already know, Palm Beach County leads the Sunshine State in Fentanyl-related deaths. Upon ceasing use of fentanyl or heroin, painful physical withdrawal from the drug kicks in within hours, which makes getting clean difficult.

Who is most often afflicted by opioid addiction?

Younger demographics ranging from 18, or younger, to 25 years of age abuse heroin more than any other group of people. White, middle- to upper-class people and those who live in rural areas are being hit hardest by the opioid epidemic, although heroin abuse is wide-ranging and can affect users of all age, income, sex, and race.

Parents are increasingly forced to deal with heroin-addled, 18- to 25-year-old children who became opioid addicts after trying them just once. Many parents have tried before to enter their precious offspring into rehabs or quitting cold turkey. Unfortunately, these treatment avenues aren’t often effective, but starting a Suboxone regimen often does work well.

What is Suboxone?

There are prescription opioids designed specifically to help opioid-dependent persons get clean. Suboxone is one of these miracle drugs that allow opioid users to live better lives. A combination of buprenorphine and naloxone comprises Suboxone sublingual films and tablets. Buprenorphine is an opioid agonist that mimics the chemical effects of opioids while effectively blocking out opioids like heroin. Naloxone is an opioid agonist, as well, that discourages users from otherwise abusing Suboxone.

How do addicts seeking help obtain Suboxone?

Prescribing Suboxone requires physicians to obtain buprenorphine training conducted by SAMHSA, or the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services of America, requiring Several physicians in Palm Beach County are licensed to prescribe Suboxone to opioid addicts seeking help.

Parents can contact us to quickly locate physicians authorized to prescribe the wonder-drug Suboxone. The buprenorphine/naloxone mixture of Suboxone sublingual films and tablets have helped many addicts in Palm Beach County clean, and they just may help your child, too.

Call Us Today  855-830-7098

Detox for Heroin in Palm Beach County That Can Accept Most Insurance

If someone you care about is suffering from a heroin addiction, you might be wondering what you can do to help. It can be easy to feel powerless in this situation and to worry constantly about your loved one’s well-being. For someone who has a heroin addiction, seeking treatment at a detox and addiction recovery facility is the best option. Luckily, we can help.

The Detox Process is Important

First of all, it is important to understand the detox process. For someone who is an active heroin user, “just quitting” is often not easy at all. A lot of people do not understand this, but a detox facility does. Not to mention, in some cases, detoxing from heroin can be incredibly uncomfortable and even dangerous. It’s definitely something that should be done under the supervision of a team of professionals.

If your loved one comes to our detox in Palm Beach County, he or she can go through the detox stage in a safe and secure facility. Our team will do its best to keep your loved one comfortable and safe during this difficult time.

We Can Help with Successful Recovery

Along with helping your loved one through the detox process, we can also help with addiction treatment that can help in the long run. We will help work with your loved one to understand the underlying causes of his or her addiction, to provide a support system and to help with coping mechanisms that can help once he or she returns home.

We Accept Most Insurance

Paying for addiction treatment can be costly, but money should never get in the way of your loved one getting the help that he or she needs. The good news is that a lot of insurance policies do help cover the costs of detox. For this to work, however, you are going to need to find a facility that accepts your insurance. Here at our drug rehab facility in Florida, we accept most types of insurance. This can help eliminate the worry of how you are going to pay for rehab so that your loved one can get help.

If your loved one is an active heroin user, we can help. If you contact us today, you can find out more about our facility. 

855-830-7098

Pennsylvania to add Centers for Excellence to Treat Opioid Addiction

One of the issues facing opioid addicts and their families is the lack of follow-up services after an initial round of addiction treatment has been completed. Drug cravings can continue to be an issue for months after a person goes through detoxification (detox). Good quality support services are imperative if a person in recovery is going to be successful at maintaining their sobriety.

Centers Offer Assessment and Referrals to Treatment

Pennsylvania is seeking to address this issue by establishing 45 Centers of Excellence. These Centers, which will be separate operations located inside existing addiction, medical and mental health facilities, will be used to assess an addict’s needs and make appropriate referrals to treatment programs and other services. The Centers can make referrals to the following types of addiction treatment options:

• Detoxification (detox)
• Residential treatment
• Outpatient treatment
• 12-step programs
• Halfway houses

Once someone has been referred to treatment, they are treated by a team of specialists. The team will help the addict access treatment for medical and mental health concerns they are experiencing.

The Center of Excellence staff’s goal is to help the addict stay in treatment long-term, as this strategy has been identified as one of the important factors for long-term sobriety success. These Centers can also help addicts with social services, such as housing and employment, which are essential to being able to rebuild a life that is free from drugs and alcohol.

Addiction Medication Available Through Centers

The Centers will also offer addiction medication to clients. These drugs, including Vivitrol and Suboxone, are used to help curb cravings for opioids. When the medication is made available to clients in recovery, along with addiction counseling and treatment, the odds of being able to remain clean and sober are greatly increased compared to simply trying to “tough it out” without these types of support.

The state has committed $20.4 million in funding to the Centers for Excellence. The federal government will contribute an additional $5.4 million.

The Centers are expected to see about 11,500 people during the first year. Most of them will be Medicaid users; however, the Centers will accept clients with private insurance as well.

Finding Treatment Options

Many people in Pennsylvania seeking help for a substance abuse problem prefer to leave the state to focus on their recovery. This is one of the reasons that they chose facilities like Genesis House in Florida. Genesis House provides a range of individualized treatment services and continues to help people take giant leaps toward their long-term recovery. Contact Genesis House now for more information and help.

The Start of the Painkiller Epidemic?

OxyContinA recent investigation published by STAT news found what appears to be evidence of the beginning of the prescription opioid epidemic, and how efforts to stop it were thwarted by the maker of OxyContin 15 years ago.

Officials from the West Virginia state employees health plan saw a rise in the number of deaths related to oxycodone, and requested to have OxyContin placed on a list of drugs that required pre-authorization. Instead, the drug’s maker, Purdue Pharma, apparently paid off the pharmacy benefits management company via “rebates” to keep it on the regular list of easily accessible drugs. This action, combined with the fact that the drug maker was hiding information about OxyContin being more addictive than other similar drugs, started one of the worst healthcare crises in the last century.

Since that time, the number of deaths tied to opiates, including painkillers and heroin, has skyrocketed to 28,000 lives lost in a single year.

Tom Susman, who headed West Virginia’s employee insurance agency back then, stated, “We were screaming at the wall. We saw it coming. Now to see the aftermath is the most frustrating thing I have ever seen.” Unfortunately, their efforts fell on deaf ears and were chewed up by a corrupt pharmaceutical business. Now West Virginia has the highest incidence rate for opioid fatalities.

Given this and so many other stories that have risen in recent years about the drug company’s involvement in the opioid epidemic, it seems like more should be done to help save lives today. The White House recently asked for over $1 billion in new spending to treat the opiate abuse crisis. Rather than passing that off onto Congress (who gets the money from all of us taxpayers), a much better resource for that funding should come from pharmaceutical giants who make billions off of these drugs, including the ravages left in their wake.

Dangerous Combination of Opioids and Benzodiazepines Becoming More Common

journalsatA new study shows that more and more people who check themselves into treatment with an opioid addiction are also been abusing benzos. Benzodiazepines are sedative drugs that are usually prescribed to treat symptoms of anxiety, and brand names include Ativan, Klonopin, Valium and Xanax. These drugs are also among the most abused prescriptions on the street.

According to the data gathered by researchers out of Boston, forty percent of the study subjects admitted to dual benzodiazepine and opioid use or had both drugs in their system at the time of admittance. As part of the study, which was published in the Journal of Substance Abuse Treatment, the researchers polled users on the reasons for their benzodiazepine use. Many of the users stated that they took the anti-anxiety medication because of increased feelings of anxiety. Only a small amount of users stated it was to get high. This information points to a dangerous spiral that often accompanies opioid addiction.

Many people who are addicted to heroin or prescription painkillers feel intense amounts of anxiety. This can come up for a number of reasons. Some people feel anxiety due to the emotional toll of lying to their families, shirking their responsibilities, or spending large amounts of money. Other people feel anxiety because of the physical side effects from the opioids. Despite the reasons, many opioid addicts seek out benzodiazepines on the black market or from doctors, ignoring the dangers in mixing the drug with opioids. Combining opioids and benzodiazepines can increase a person’s chance of developing a more serious dependency as well as increase risk of adverse health effects such as seizures, organ failure and overdose.

“Prescribers continue to need education on the risks of combining opioids and benzodiazepines, but another important target audience is drug users themselves. Some opioid users may never cross paths with a health care provider in their pursuit of opioids and benzodiazepines, and therefore may be missing out on the diagnosis of psychiatric symptoms and alternative treatments for anxiety or depression,” commented Michael Stein, lead researcher on the study and chair of the Boston University School of Public Health.

Researchers are eager to spread this information to the public, in the hopes that it will reach those who deal with addiction on a more personal level. Family members who are aware that their loved one is mixing the two drugs may be inspired to help push for treatment. The addicts themselves are likely to be unaware of the dangers of taking benzodiazepines and opioids. Lastly, doctors must continue to be more vigilant in their prescribing habits to avoid setting up their patients for troubling situations.

Are More Controls on Prescription Painkillers Causing an Increase in Heroin Use?

prescription drugsAlthough everyone seems to agree that the prescription drug and heroin addiction problem in the United States have reached devastating levels, there are conflicting opinions still about what continues to fuel the problem as well as what are the best ways to fix it.

One way has been for lawmakers and other officials to put more restrictions on painkillers, as the explosion of these drugs on the market has a direct correlation to the rise in heroin use as well. However, some people claim that more restrictions on these drugs actually drive people to seek out heroin, and therefore don’t agree that more controls equal less people becoming addicted.

There is growing evidence, though, that indicates there is real progress being made by addressing the prescribing habits of doctors and limiting prescription drug fraud through monitoring programs.

Researchers at the National Institute on Drug Abuse (NIDA) looked into the theory that more restrictions on prescription painkillers leads to more heroin addicts and they did not find sufficient information to support this belief. In fact, they found that deaths from heroin use were on the rise before the 2009-2011 era when many of the painkiller restrictions were put in. And, even though there are plenty of documented cases where people who were addicted to heroin firs started with painkillers, there has been a major influx of cheaper, stronger heroin coming in from Mexico that has also greatly contributed.

Of course, legislative or policy changes alone will not have enough of an impact on the problem, though they can continue to help limit access to some of these drugs. The more effective routes are through implementation of better prevention programs for people of all ages and more treatment diversions so people can begin their recovery.

If you know someone who is addicted to prescription drugs, heroin, or any other kind of substance, contact us today to see how we can help.