Category Archives: Opioids

5 Reasons Why You Can’t Afford NOT To Send Your Son To Drug Rehab

If you are a parent to a drug addicted son, it can be devastating to see them living the life that they’ve chosen. Drug rehabilitation is beneficial in many ways, as it helps to get your son away from their harmful lifestyle and learning coping mechanisms to handle their addiction.

Here are five reasons why you can’t afford to not send your son to a drug rehabilitation center:

  1. Brighter Future

Going to rehab offers a brighter and cleaner future for your son. Drug addictions can prevent your child from getting a solid job, getting into school and living a thoroughly responsible life. Rehab can turn things around for them, teaching them how to live a full life without the need for drugs.

  1. Better Health

No matter what type of drug your son is using, it is still harmful to his health. Drug users have a higher risk of heart attacks and strokes, as well as a myriad of other health-related problems. Because of this, rehab will eliminate and prevent these issues from becoming problematic due to their drug addiction.

  1. Overdose Risk Eliminated

Overdosing is one of the scariest prospects for parents to drug addicted children. When your child is clean and free of their addiction, their risk for overdosing is totally eliminated. This prevents a premature and untimely passing due to their harmful addiction.

  1. Professional Caring Environment

A drug rehabilitation center is staffed by trained and experienced professionals who are there to help and assist your son in everything he needs to overcome his harmful lifestyle. There are also nurses and doctors on staff to handle withdrawal symptoms, so this is another benefit to them when in the facility as opposed to doing it on their own.

  1. Extra Support

Upon leaving the drug rehab facility, your son will have a support group for life. Oftentimes, they will leave with a connection of friends and staff with whom they can connect whenever they want. This makes it easier for your son to continue on the path to a healthy and clean life that he can feel proud of living.

While it’s difficult to deal with a drug addicted child, a great rehab center can turn their lives around for the better. This prevents the long-term effects of constant drug use and allows your son to live the life that you all can feel proud of.

Call The One and Only Genesis House today 855-818-6740

Detox Program

Why Detox Alone Won’t Cure Drug Addiction

Detox ProgramPerhaps, you are like a number of parents with a drug dependent off-spring. You decided that going cold turkey was the best way for your child to kick the drug habit. Consequently, the drug dependent kid is locked away in their home, detoxing on their own. This is a bad, life threatening decision. The fact is that detox alone won’t cure drug addiction. The primary purpose of detox is to remove all the drugs out of the system and cleanse the body. Thus, giving the body time to heal and recover from the addiction. However, drug addiction is also a behavioral problem too. Therefore, cleansing the body and treating the person’s mental addiction is important.

Mind & Body Focus

The sobering fact is that detox in combination with treating the addictive drug behavior is vital to complete recovery. Detox alone does not end the addictive behavior. Often, the individual is unable to handle the negative symptoms that are a part of detox. They return to drugs to handle the withdrawal symptoms. A professional detox program will help your child to free their body from the drugs and clean all the toxins out of their system. An in house detox program will help the individual with their withdrawal symptoms too. However, complete drug treatment requires that the individual changes his addictive behavior. Clearly, getting free of the addictive behavior is a twofold process.

Treating Emotional Side Of Drug Addictive Behavior

Certainly, it takes a professional rehab center or private counseling to focus in on the emotional side of drug addictive behavior. The fact is that the drugs have a very strong effect on the brain’s wiring. It’s vital to focus on rewiring the brain. Generally, this involves focusing on the emotional and mental aspects of drug addiction. Rehab centers work with the individual in group sessions, private sessions, to help the individual start to heal and to clear their mind. The fact is that a professional detox program primarily focuses on healing the body, while a complete rehab treatment requires changing the addictive behavior and building resistance to drugs mentally too.

Detox is the first step to complete rehabilitation. Detox cleanses the body and prepares it for the next step. If you have a child or another family member that is addicted to drugs, a rehab facility might be required to completely end the dependency on drugs.

Call Genesis House today to get started with your first step 855-818-6740

OxyContin

Why Medical Marijuana Is Not a Good Substitute for Pain Medication

About Medical Marijuana

In recent years, the push to legalize the growth and consumption of marijuana has been backed by those who believe it holds the key to treatment of a variety of disorders, from seizures to PTSD to chronic pain. You may have read news articles or seen videos that tell stories of people whose lives have been improved drastically since beginning to use marijuana for treatment. These stories provide hope for people with these conditions, who often relocate themselves to states where medical marijuana is legal in hopes of finding a cure for their pain.

What We Know

The excitement around medical marijuana is not completely unfounded. Anecdotal evidence shows that it does have the potential to be a strong, versatile treatment for a number of debilitating conditions. Unfortunately, this alone does not make it a good choice. Anecdotal evidence does not mean that it will hold up under clinical trials, and the questionable legality of the drug means that there are no standardized regulations in place for the industry. Marijuana continues to be illegal on a federal level, so individual states are responsible for deciding whether to legalize it and how to regulate medical marijuana. Some states require it to be sold in the form of cannabis oil at varying levels of potency, while others allow it to be sold as a plant with low THC levels, allowing patients to smoke it.

Risks

The fact that marijuana remains illegal federally means that buying and using it will always carry some legal risk. Even if you live in a state where it is legal, the federal government could overrule that legal status at any time and cut off access to the treatments. Federally approved pain medication is not in such a precarious position. Since individual states have their own, differing regulations, it is highly difficult to make sure that the dosage of cannabis is standardized. This can cause it to have unpredictable effects on the body. In addition, taking medical marijuana by smoking the plant is dangerous, as it brings potentially toxic chemicals into the lungs along with cannabis smoke. The future of medical marijuana is uncertain. It may become a safe option if stricter regulations are implemented on a federal level, following controlled research about its effectiveness and interaction with other medications. Currently, prescribed pain medications are causing addiction and the need for treatment is higher.

Let us show you how to live pain free and in recovery 855-818-6740

Beginners Guide to Understanding Why You’re An Addict

Finding out about a loved one’s addiction can be challenging. Parent’s often ask themselves where they went wrong, why their child or children made the choices that led to their addiction, and why their child is addicted. Addiction is not solely the result of non-adaptive decisions. Instead, it is often the result of genetics, psychological problems, trauma, and one’s social environment.

Genetics & Social Environment

Addiction is partly genetic. There is no single gene associated with addiction. For example, many twin studies have demonstrated that children of alcoholics are at least four times more likely to develop alcohol addiction than their peers. There are multiple genes that can influence an individual’s likelihood to develop an addiction. Some genes influence impulse control or decrease the likelihood of individual’s disengaging in substance use. Other genes influence the severity of withdrawal symptoms. Although genes cannot be changed, families with histories of addictions can work proactively to educate their children, adolescents, and adult children about the genetic risks for developing addictive behaviors. This can include helping your loved one make positive social connections in their community.

Psychological Problems & Trauma

Addiction rarely presents as a single issue. Instead, many individuals who experience addiction also have depression, significant anxiety, post-traumatic stress disorder, or other mood disorders. Addiction is often developed as a non-adaptive coping skills in order to manage the symptoms of psychological problems. This is why individual and group mental health counseling is often a key part of addiction treatment. Mental health counseling can be used during addiction treatment and in recovery to help individual’s learn adaptive coping skills so that they can manage anxiety, depression, and other mood disorders without drugs or alcohol.

Trauma

Trauma, especially childhood trauma, can significantly impact the brain’s development. Chronic stress and fear, which are related to childhood experiences of abuse and neglect,can result in cognitive, emotional, and behavioral impairments. Two thirds of addicts have experienced physical or sexual trauma during childhood. You cannot always control your child’s experiences. However, knowledge about trauma can help inform addiction treatment. There are a variety of trauma-focused therapeutic approaches which can help your adult child address his or her traumatic experiences and learn alternative coping skills.

Genetics cannot be changed. However, addiction can be conquered by addressing your loved one’s social environment, underlying psychological issues, and past traumas.

We can help, call now 855-818-6740

OxyContin

How Suboxone is Helping Heroin Addicts Detox in Palm Beach County

Heroin has taken the United States by storm. Many heroin users start out by naively trying or being prescribed prescription opioid painkillers, of which the United States consumes more per capita than any other country. Opioid users switch to heroin because the drug is more cost-effective than prescription opioids. Tragically, heroin is deadlier than prescription opioids because, unlike prescription medications, the drug varies wildly in potency and sometimes contains ultra-powerful synthetic opioids like Fentanyl.

As many Floridians already know, Palm Beach County leads the Sunshine State in Fentanyl-related deaths. Upon ceasing use of fentanyl or heroin, painful physical withdrawal from the drug kicks in within hours, which makes getting clean difficult.

Who is most often afflicted by opioid addiction?

Younger demographics ranging from 18, or younger, to 25 years of age abuse heroin more than any other group of people. White, middle- to upper-class people and those who live in rural areas are being hit hardest by the opioid epidemic, although heroin abuse is wide-ranging and can affect users of all age, income, sex, and race.

Parents are increasingly forced to deal with heroin-addled, 18- to 25-year-old children who became opioid addicts after trying them just once. Many parents have tried before to enter their precious offspring into rehabs or quitting cold turkey. Unfortunately, these treatment avenues aren’t often effective, but starting a Suboxone regimen often does work well.

What is Suboxone?

There are prescription opioids designed specifically to help opioid-dependent persons get clean. Suboxone is one of these miracle drugs that allow opioid users to live better lives. A combination of buprenorphine and naloxone comprises Suboxone sublingual films and tablets. Buprenorphine is an opioid agonist that mimics the chemical effects of opioids while effectively blocking out opioids like heroin. Naloxone is an opioid agonist, as well, that discourages users from otherwise abusing Suboxone.

How do addicts seeking help obtain Suboxone?

Prescribing Suboxone requires physicians to obtain buprenorphine training conducted by SAMHSA, or the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services of America, requiring Several physicians in Palm Beach County are licensed to prescribe Suboxone to opioid addicts seeking help.

Parents can contact us to quickly locate physicians authorized to prescribe the wonder-drug Suboxone. The buprenorphine/naloxone mixture of Suboxone sublingual films and tablets have helped many addicts in Palm Beach County clean, and they just may help your child, too.

Call Us Today  855-830-7098

New Synthetic Opioid “Pink” is Tied to Recent Fatalities

The Harris County Institute of Forensic Sciences has issued a warning about a new synthetic opioid. The drug has been detected in the system of three Houston people who have died recently. It is called “Pink,” “Pinky” or even “U4.”

The drug is a white powder that can be pressed into a pill form. It isn’t packaged in any type of unusual manner. Houston authorities aren’t the first law enforcement officials to encounter Pink; police in Park City, Utah, became aware of it when they were investigating the overdose deaths of two teenagers earlier in 2016.

Fatal Intoxication when Mixed with Other Substances

The chief toxicologist at the Harris County Institute for Forensic Sciences, Teresa Gray, explained that Pink is in the same class of drugs as hydrocodone, heroin and morphine. She said that it produces a feeling of euphoria among users, but can cause the person who takes it to stop breathing if the dosage is high enough. Gray said that users mix the Pink with other substances that, in combination, can cause a fatal intoxication.

Originally Created by a Pharmaceutical Company

Unlike some other street drugs which were originally cooked up in a laboratory, Pink’s origins can be traced to a more legitimate source. It was originally called U47700 and was made by Upjohn, a pharmaceutical company that was attempting to develop a new pain reliever.

The medication was never approved for use on humans or sold to the public. The patent was registered, however, and the drug’s formula found its way onto the Internet. From there, it started being produced in laboratories set up overseas.

The drug is available for sale online, and has now reached American streets. Buyers may not be aware of what they are taking or they may be buying heroin, cocaine or other drugs that have been cut with Pink. It’s a common practice for dealers to add other ingredients to street drugs, and buyers are not aware of what they may be taking along with their drug of choice.

Pink Declared a Controlled Substance

After the news of the untimely deaths attributed to Pink in 2016, the Drug Enforcement Administration (DEA) sought an emergency order in November to have Pink designated a Schedule 1 controlled substance, making it illegal to possess, manufacture or sell it. Drugs in this category have no accepted medical use and have a high potential for abuse.

Surgeon General Releases Report on Addiction

surgeon general addiction reportThe issue of addiction has touched most people’s lives in one way or another. Due to this common association, it can often be hard to discuss it without painful emotions being stirred up. However, according to the Surgeon General of the United States, these discussions not only have to be had, but the lives of millions of people are at risk if something is not done about the substance abuse problem in our country.

In his recently released report, Dr. Vivek Murthy details how many lives are being lost to addiction and how many people suffer from the disease. He also discusses possible solutions, and appropriate ways to include the illegal drug epidemic in conversation and future policies. “How we respond to this crisis is a moral test for America. Are we a nation willing to take on an epidemic that is causing great human suffering and economic loss?” questioned Dr. Murthy

Facing Addiction in America is the appropriate title of the paper issued by the Surgeon General. Readers can learn a lot about the current situation, including that every day 78 people die from opiate overdoses. This is despite increased public awareness of the dangers of prescription painkiller abuse, first responders being equipped with naloxone, a drug that reverses the effects of an overdose, and doctors decreasing the amount of prescriptions they write for painkillers. We don’t have to wait and see until the next round of statistics is released, we can continue to do more to save lives now.

Dr. Murthy explains that drug addiction is a chronic disease that is much more likely to be handled by effective treatment. Embarrassment and stigma oftentimes keeps people from seeking rehabilitation help, thus only continuing their addiction. Another common barrier between addicts and treatment has been financial resources, but more barriers have been removed through broader insurance coverage. It is uncertain if the Affordable Care Act will be repealed with a new Administration taking office in January. “We have made progress. how do we keep that progress going? A key part is making sure people have insurance coverage,” commented Murthy.

If informative papers like the Surgeon General’s do anything, hopefully they inform millions of people and motivate enough of us to do more about his problem. If not, the reality is that any one of us could be the next to lose a loved one to addiction – something which nobody should have to experience and is preventable.

If you have a friend or family member who is battling an addiction to drugs or alcohol, contact Genesis House today and find out more about how we can help.

The Economics Behind the Illicit Drug Trade

illicit drug tradeAlthough the illicit drug market has a very complex system of production and distribution, it still follows very simple economic rules of supply and demand. Regardless of where drugs come from or how much they cost, as long as people are still seeking them someone will find a way to capitalize on their plight.

The Drug Enforcement Administration’s System to Retrieve Information from Drug Evidence (STRIDE) database is a program that collects information regarding all aspects of illegal drugs. This can include market price and drug purity. These two variables help explain what is going on behind the drug dealing scenes on the streets. For instance, STRIDE has been able to show investigators that drug prices tend to decline over time. There are a few potential causes for this decline, but one interesting one has to do with substitution. When certain regulations, law enforcement changes and laws get enacted regarding a certain drug, many users will switch to something else. This means that the demand for the original drug has dropped, thereby decreasing the price. This type of information can show investigators if policy-changes are working, and what drug the addicts have shifted their attention to.

Another important factor when it comes to analyzing drug trends is purity. Purity, as it relates to illegal drugs, means how much actual drug (like pure heroin or pure cocaine) are in the drugs being sold to buyers. Most of the time when someone buys drugs off the street, they are buying very little pure drug, and a lot of additives. Investigators are able to measure the purity of confiscated drugs to determine the current purity levels of the drugs reaching customers.

When policy makers and law enforcement can look at data, like that provided by STRIDE, and see different drug trends across the country, they are better equipped to handle the problems. However, the wildcard in the illegal drug trade has been the pharmaceutical influence. Prescription drugs have become such a problem in the U.S. and are creating as much, if not more, havoc in America. This shows that whether the drug started out as something legal or not isn’t enough of a deterrent for users.

One of the arguments of harm reduction advocates is that if you legalize all drugs, then it will remove some of the value because supply will be plenty and instead more money will be available for treatment and prevention programs. We will probably never know if this would work, but we could divert more funding away from the law enforcement side of the problem and instead invest it into providing more education and rehabilitation services.

Connection Between Opioids and Marijuana Use Among Teens

prescription painkillersResearchers may have found evidence that prescription painkiller use is linked to early marijuana use. This information comes at a time when multiple states are in the process of legalizing marijuana, or considering putting the issue on the ballot for a future election. And while no state is looking to make marijuana legal for adolescents, it would seem that legalizing marijuana would make it easier for teenagers to obtain the drug, as has been demonstrated in the rising numbers in Colorado.

In a recent survey, 11,000 children and teenagers were asked a series of questions related to their drug and alcohol use. Included in these questions was whether they had used prescription opioids in the past 30 days and if they had ever used marijuana. After the data was collected, it was discovered that out of 11,000 participants, 524 had used prescription painkiller in the last month. Of those 524 children and teenagers, 80% had also used marijuana.

While this certainly does not mean that if you use marijuana you will definitely use painkillers, it does a show a link when it comes to drug experimentation (i.e. gateway drugs) and poly-drug use. There was also a correlation with alcohol and tobacco use, indicating that these substances that are becoming increasingly available to young people are contributing to further drug use.

On a policy level, our nation is continuing to send mixed messages to America’s youth. For a long time marijuana and cocaine were major focuses of prevention efforts, yet prescription drug and synthetic drug use has surged. Now we’re working to keep kids away from prescription drug abuse but telling them that smoking weed is okay when you’re old enough.

All of this seems to be missing the point of teaching kids and adults how to live without seeking out drugs for external stimulation. Without it, the patterns will continue to repeat, even though the types of drugs may change over time.

Students Become Ill After Ingesting “Lean” Drug Drink at School

leanFour students in the Buffalo Public School District became ill recently after ingesting a drug mixture called “Lean.” According to a report, the affected 8th grade students were taken to hospital by ambulance after trying the mixture, which was brought to school by a fellow student who shared it with three friends. All four affected students were treated and released.

What is “Lean”?

“Lean” (also called “Purple Drank” or “Sizzurp”) is a homemade mixture of over-the-counter (OTC) cold medication and sleep aids mixed with soda and candy. Prescription drugs may also be used to make Lean. Kids who make these dangerous concoctions usually find instructions online.

The ingredient that creates a “high” is either the codeine in prescription-strength cough medicine or the alcohol present in an ingredient OTC cold medicines. The other major ingredient in the OTC brands is DXM (dextromethorphan), which has been abused for many years by young people and sever addicts.

Dangers of Using Lean

Young people are most likely to experiment with using Lean. It can be a dangerous experience for them because each batch being prepared is different. In an effort to try to get high, Lean users are, in effect, poisoning themselves by ingesting large amounts of cough syrup and cold medication containing other ingredients. A group of teens or younger users may not know the signs of poisoning and be mature enough to call for help if someone in their group needs immediate medical attention.

Someone who starts using Lean regularly as an adolescent or teen may be on the slippery slope toward an addiction to codeine, or lead them to seek out other drugs.

Codeine Addiction

Codeine is an opiate. Although it is in the same category as morphine or oxycodone, it is not considered as strong as either of these two medications. Codeine is used to treat pain or suppress coughs.

When taken at a higher than recommended dose or for an extended time, codeine can be addictive. Over time, a person will develop a tolerance for codeine and need to take higher more to get the same effect from the drug.

It is important for parents, teachers and other mentors to take notice of these kinds of behaviors among growing teens, as the problems will likely escalate into more serious substance abuse issues. If you have a loved one in need of treatment, contact us today for more information about our successful recovery program, whether you are from New York or any other part of the country.