Recovery

Why Does Heroin and Other Opiates Cause Constipation?

Opioids and opiates are drugs that depress your central nervous system. This means your breathing and other bodily systems slow down. But opioids are notorious for causing constipation. Why is this?

Your gastrointestinal system also slows down when you take opioids. Not only this, your GI tract has receptors for the opiates that you produce naturally. The opiates and opioids that you take then bind to these receptors. This causes the usual contractions in your large and small intestines to decrease. Opioids may also paralyze your stomach so that it cannot process food the way it usually does. Food not only stays in your stomach, but opioids interfere with the enzymes needed to break it down. Even if everything else was working, opiates even reduce the urge to move your bowels. When you do try to move your bowels:

  • The feces are hard, dry and painful. This is because the longer it takes for the stool to pass through your large intestine, or colon, the more water your body absorbs from them.
  • You have to strain at stool.
  • Even when you do have a bowel movement, it feels incomplete. There is actually a word for this: tenesmus.

The constipation that happens when you take opioids can occur at any time when you are taking the drug. It also doesn’t go away over time like other side effects, because you GI tract doesn’t adapt to the drug the way the rest of your body does. Indeed, the longer you take the drug, the worse your constipation gets. Moreover, the usual remedies that help normal constipation do not work well when you are constipated from opioid use.

Complications of Opiate Caused Constipation

The complications of constipation caused by opioid use is rarely life-threatening, but can be very uncomfortable, and degrade your quality of life. Common complications include:

  • Hemorrhoids, which occur when the veins in the rectum or anus dilate and fail due to straining.
  • Diverticulosis, which are tiny pouches in the wall of the large intestine. If these pouches become inflamed, it can lead to a condition called diverticulitis. Diverticulitis can be serious.
  • Fecal impaction, which happens when a large amount of hard stool simply cannot be passed. This is often accompanied by a watery discharge from the rectum, nausea and malaise.

Call Genesis House for Help

If you need detox for your opiate use and its complications, give us a call at Genesis House. Our number here is 800-737-0933

How Bad is The Heroin Epidemic?

Opioids are the the most prevalent cause of drug overdose in the US, and overdose rates continue to increase. From the year 1999 to the year 2008, heroin overdose rates increased by 400%, and rates have quadrupled again since 2010. Heroin overdose rates increased by over 20% from 2014 to 2015 alone. We are in the midst of a crisis, and opioids are to blame

Many heroin addictions begin with prescription opioids. In fact, three out of four new users report abusing pills first. For years, doctors prescribed them more freely. In more recent years research on their addictive properties and overdose rates has caused doctors to reduce, and sometimes cut off, prescriptions. Addicts can buy opioid pills, but they are very expensive. Heroin is less expensive and much stronger, so addicts sometimes turn to it out of desperation.

It is estimated that around 70,000 people report using heroin each year, but the number is likely much higher. Many addicts do not seek treatment on their own and would not answer questions about heroin use honestly. Demographically, the average heroin user is white, male, low-income, has abused prescription drugs in the past, and between the ages of 18 and 25.

Do you suspect that someone you care about is abusing heroine? Learn the signs.

Signs of heroin use include:

  • tiny pupils
  • appearance of sleepiness
  • flushed skin
  • paraphernalia, such as burnt spoons, baggies of a white substance or syringes
  • runny nose
  • track marks, or always covering arms
  • lack of self care, such as eating and grooming
  • nausea or vomiting
  • scratching

Health risks of heroin use include damage to the lungs, heart and kidneys, as well as severe impairment of the ability to think.

Because the potency of heroin varies and addicts often use more to achieve a stronger effect, overdose rates are very high. Often times, the difference between the amount needed for the desired effect and the amount that could cause a fatal overdose is very small. Because of this, all heroin users are at risk of overdose.

Do you or someone you care about need help overcoming addiction? We at Genesis House are here for you. You can reach us, 24 hours a day, at 800-737-0933

Opiate Dependence Versus Opiate Maintenance

Opiate dependence versus opiate maintenance, is there a difference? A lot of people wonder if it is possible to be addicted to a drug such as Oxycontin or Oxycodone form simply taking a drug as directed. The answer to this question is “yes”, however, the answer is much more complicated in reality.

Addiction is usually physical, mental and behavioral in nature. One symptom is being physically dependent on the drug and using more and more of it to get high — also known as building a tolerance. Regular use will cause this tolerance even if you don’t abuse it, so this isn’t the only factor. Opiate dependence means that a person is addicted – which means they’re using it to get high, and they are using it to function normally. For the sake of this article, opiate dependence and opiate addiction will be used interchangeably.

Here are some questions to ask yourself if you’re worried about opiate addiction:

  • Are you using opiates to get “high”, rather than for pain? If you’re using opiates to get high, that’s abuse and you’re a candidate for addiction.
  • Do you need more and more of the drug to get the same “high”?
  • Have you tried doctor shopping or illicit means to get more of your pills so you don’t run out? Do you run out of your prescriptions early?
  • Have you avoided certain people, places or activities because you would rather be somewhere that you can be high without scrutiny?
  • Has your family or your doctor expressed worry about your pill use?

Addiction is a disease that is progressive in nature. A person with a substance abuse disorder will start to display drug seeking behaviors when they are running out of their drug and choice. As withdrawal — which is quite physically uncomfortable and sometimes painful — sets in, an addicted person may become desperate. They may feel the need to doctor shop, purchase drugs on the street or steal leftover pills from family members to get their “fix”.

Do You Have a Problem with Opiates?

Addiction can affect anyone from any walk of life, even when there is no history in a family. There are many signs and symptoms of addiction that can and should raise red flags for addicted persons and their loved ones.

If you or somebody you love is suffering from the disease of addiction and needs rehab, there IS a way out. Recovery is not only possible, it’s amazing!

We can help you reclaim your life and put the pain of addiction behind you. All calls are 100% confidential, please call us today at 800-737-0933

Why Do Most Rehabs Teach The 12 Steps?

In healthcare it is generally agreed that alcoholism and addiction are a disease. While there is no outright cure, the most effective treatment modalities involve a holistic approach that targets your physical, mental and emotional health. This often includes engagement with a twelve-step program. Nearly 75 percent of drug and alcohol treatment centers teach patients these programs. Why is this and are they effective?

Alcoholics Anonymous and similar programs that engage the 12-step model are the only method that have been proven to work in promoting long-term mental health and relapse prevention. Inpatient care, medication and healthy lifestyle choices can improve your physical condition, but the twelve steps aim to provide you with the tools, community and support you need to make lasting change.

Most people have heard of such programs, but their practice is actually more complex than you might know. At first the process can seem confusing and daunting. Learning about the steps while in treatment provides a safe environment and individual attention to learn about the steps, the benefits of the program, and get you connected in the recovery community outside of treatment.

Benefits of the 12 Step Program

While the twelve steps are designed to treat alcoholism and addiction, they more broadly focus on improving your quality of life. Strong treatment programs will teach you about the twelve-step program to provide a foundation of skills and knowledge that are necessary for working the steps thoroughly, in treatment and afterwards. These are some of the benefits that come with working a twelve-step program.

  • Encourage self-esteem, self-help, and responsibility
  • Builds support network with other alcoholics and addicts
  • Simple, actionable steps reduce overwhelming problems into manageable actions
  • Promotes honest introspection and interactions with others
  • Assists in repairing relationships
  • Collective strength of shared experience, strength and hope

One of the major benefits of working a twelve-step program is the community provided by meetings. Since the founding of Alcoholics Anonymous, clinicians and alcoholic alike have stressed the importance of working with other alcoholics as an integral part of the recovery process.

Attending meetings and engaging with the community offers the opportunity to share experience, strength, and hope with others. Early in recovery, this means connecting with people who have been in your shoes, and understanding how the program has worked in their lives. Are you ready to see how it can work in yours? Call us now at 800-737-0933

Cocaine and Crack: What’s The Difference?

Crack cocaine received lots of media attention as it became more common in the 1980s. Politicians spoke about crack being the most dangerous drug in America, tearing apart communities, and causing violent crimes. Cocaine, although still considered a harmful drug, didn’t receive as much attention. What’s the real difference between crack and cocaine?

Crack and powder cocaine are both cocaine, but they’re different forms of the drug. Powder cocaine is made from HCL, or hydrochloride, a type of salt. Crack, which is usually in rock form, has been processed to remove the HCL, which makes it more rapidly absorbed into your system.

Cocaine is typically more expensive than crack, which explains why most people associate crack with lower-income communities. Crack also carries harsher prison sentences. There’s a minimum of five years in prison for possessing 28 grams of crack, while the minimum sentence for 500 grams of cocaine is also five years. The average prison term for crack possession is much longer than cocaine possession.

Crack and Cocaine Addiction

The effects of cocaine hit within five minutes, peak in 30 minutes, and usually last for an hour or two. However, the effects of crack hit in less than one minute, peak in five minutes, and last less than an hour. This is mostly due to a difference in administration, not a difference in how the drugs are created or processed. Powder cocaine is usually snorted, while crack is usually inhaled by smoking. Crack is also sometimes injected, which also brings about immediate and powerful effects. If powder cocaine is injected, it hits you as quickly as crack does.

Both drugs have similar short-term effects, but crack is typically more powerful because your body absorbs it so quickly. They also have similar long-term effects, including:

  • Cardiovascular damage
  • Respiratory problems
  • Seizures
  • Hyperpyrexia (high fever)

There is some debate on whether crack is more addictive than cocaine. Crack may be more psychologically addictive because of the immediate and powerful effects and because of the need to use it repeatedly to maintain the effects. However, both have very similar physiological effects on the body. Overall, there is no difference in physical addiction or dependence between crack and cocaine.

Although there are some differences between crack and cocaine, both are very harmful and addictive drugs. Addiction to either requires professional treatment for a successful recovery. If you or a loved one is struggling with an addiction, call us at 800-737-0933 for help.

If I Have HIV, Can I Still Get Into Drug Rehab?

Almost everybody who struggles with substance abuse has other underlying issues that need to be addressed. Sometimes these are emotional problems that drive people to experiment with drugs and alcohol, and in other situations there are physical issues at play. Any successful drug treatment program needs to address all of the issues that affect a person’s health, and that includes HIV and AIDS.

Even though HIV is often thought of as a sexually transmitted infection, it often goes hand-in-hand with drug abuse. This is why it is not uncommon for someone with a substance abuse problem to be HIV-positive. It can also make treatment more complicated for a number of reasons. First of all, HIV and AIDS obviously compromises a person’s health and immune system, which can make any kind of medical treatment that much more difficult. Many people who are addicted to drugs and alcohol are also much less likely to remain compliant with other medications that they need to take to be healthy. For someone living with HIV or AIDS, that can be deadly.

Of course, there’s also the stigma surrounding HIV and AIDS. It’s not nearly as severe as it once was when the AIDS epidemic was at its worst, but it’s still there, and it can make one hesitant to seek treatment for their substance abuse problems. While it’s totally understandable why you would keep quiet about being HIV-positive, you can still seek treatment at a drug rehab center. It’s still an important step that you need to take to be healthy and reclaim your life, but you shouuld seek out a program that is geared toward those who are living with HIV or AIDS. Fortunately, programs such as these are more common than you might think; all you need to do is seek them out.

If you live with both HIV and drug addiction, there is always help available to you. We at Genesis House have safe and nurturing drug rehabilitation programs available for anybody who wants to be free of their addictions. Visit us online to learn more about our many treatment programs and how they can help you. If you need immediate help for yourself or a loved one, don’t hesitate to call us at 800-737-0933. No matter who you are, always remember that there is help available to you, even when things seem hopeless.

Are There Any LGBT Specific Substance Abuse Treatment Centers in Florida?

While the disease of addiction is equally devastating for all sufferers and their loved ones, seeking a specific type of addiction treatment may be more beneficial for you or your loved one. The common specific types of addiction treatment are gender-specific treatment, faith-specific treatment, and even LGBT-specific treatment. There are certain issues that are specific to certain groups of sufferers of addiction, and LGBT-specific treatment will address issues that are specific to you or your loved one as a LGBT individual.

Florida is the epitome of a recovery environment because of the warm climate and beach scenery, which makes it a desirable healing environment. It is the recovery capital of the United States because of its plethora of addiction treatment centers and massive recovery community. Since Florida has a plethora of treatment centers, there is a wide variety of treatment centers to choose from in Florida.

There are many inpatient and outpatient LGBT specific substance abuse treatment centers throughout Florida. The majority of them are in the central region and southern region of Florida.

There are also several in the northern region of Florida. In addition to substance abuse treatment centers, there are also community centers where the LGBT recovery community can congregate.

 

The Benefits of Choosing an LGBT Specific Substance Abuse Treatment Center

If you or your loved one is suffering from addiction and identifies as LGBT, there will be certain LGBT specific underlying issues that will need to be addressed in the recovery process such as bullying, family misunderstanding, intimacy issues, etc. It is most beneficial for you or your loved one to start the recovery process in an environment that is fully devoted to the LGBT community. Along with a focus on LGBT specific issues, there are also several benefits to choosing an LGBT specific substance abuse treatment center.Non-Biased Counselors and Staff

At an LGBT specific treatment center, you or your loved one will not have to worry about having to deal with counselors and staff who are biased against or do not understand LGBT people. All of the staff at an LGBT treatment center will be objectively focused on helping you or your loved one without LGBT being an issue.

Judgement-free Environment

All of the other clients at an LGBT treatment center will also be LGBT, so you or your loved one will not have to worry about dealing with judgement and mistreatment from other clients in the treatment center.

Connecting with Recovering Peers

Community is a significant part of recovery. People tend to connect best with those who relate to them. Being in an LGBT Treatment Center will provide you or your loved one with a strong sense of community because the others in the treatment center can easily relate to you or your loved one.

If you or your loved one identify as LGBT and are suffering from addiction, Genesis House is a treatment center in Lake Worth Florida is a great option. Call today at 800-737-0933 

How Does a Christian Drug Rehab Program in Florida Differ From a Traditional Treatment Center?

When you or someone you know abuses drugs or alcohol, it’s an attempt to relieve severe discomfort. The source may be unbearable pain, fear, guilt, or shame. At the root of addiction is trauma to the mind, emotions, and body.

Both traditional and faith-based rehab programs address the causes of addiction. However, Christian facilities empower recovery through a personal relationship with Jesus Christ. Such fellowship brings inner rest, replacing the need for drugs and alcohol to handle torment.

Christian Recovery Methods

Like traditional rehab facilities, Christian treatment centers ease the reliance on addictive substances through medical detoxification. Both models of recovery teach skills for managing challenges. However, Christian facilities are designed to help clients accept the grace and leadership of Jesus Christ. Included in the faith-based approach are:

  • Christian counseling
  • regular Bible study and prayer
  • church attendance
  • applying Christ’s teachings to everyday situations

In a Christian setting, you experience the restoring love of Jesus. You gain a positive self-image, realizing the beautiful virtues residing within you. Christ-centered teaching fosters a clearer understanding of yourself and how to stay serene when faced with stress. Many Christian programs utilize the “12 Step” recovery model, a series of actions that bring healing from trauma and addiction, with the help of a higher power.

Reflecting the person of Jesus, the atmosphere at a Christian facility is caring and nonjudgmental. You connect on a deep level with other believers, receiving their spiritual support. Just like traditional programs, you have the benefit of individual and group therapy. Family sessions are also available, by which to work through relationship problems. Christian counselors, doctors, and nurses assist your recovery.

Additionally, Christian treatment centers focus more on aftercare than traditional programs. Strengthened by biblical principles and leaning on Jesus, you’re less likely to relapse after Christian rehab. You have coping skills plus the Lord’s help to plow through temptations and overcome weakness.

Our staff is available round-the-clock to welcome you to our facility. You needn’t be a Florida resident or a Christian. Clients come to our program from across the country.  With the grace and wisdom of Jesus Christ, you can gain lasting freedom from addictive substances. Call us now at 800-737-0933. We understand dependence and have the resources to help you break the cycle. Start your healing process today.

If I Am Starting Over With Everything, What Happens After Rehab?

In your active addiction, life centered around drugs and alcohol. As a recovering addict who is ready to start life over finding a new focus is a complicated step. You may have questions about what happens after you leave rehab. When is it okay to start a relationship? Can I continue my old friendships with people that use? What types of activities can I do to pass the time? Early recovery is a time to breathe and take things slow. There is a saying among the sober, “recovery is a process.”

Aftercare should be your primary aim upon completing rehab. The daily routine of a rehab program cannot last forever. You will need to find a way to maintain your long-term sobriety. Spend the first year in recovery focusing on you. Now is not the time to begin a romantic relationship. Avoid old friends that continue to use as they may trigger a relapse. One of the biggest worries among addicts is boredom. Explore new hobbies and places that you do not associate with drug use. An essential aspect to your aftercare is support from others. Some people in recovery see a therapist while others attend group meetings. To be successful, you need help to lean on throughout your recovery.

Steps to a Successful Recovery

Early recovery is a critical time in your newfound sobriety. You may feel lonely and vulnerable. Below are suggestions to keep your recovery on the right path:

  • Meeting people with years of sobriety is an excellent way to build support. It will also help you establish a network of friends with whom you can enjoy sober activities.
  • Visit the doctor and assess your mental health. As an addict, you were too focused on drugs to care for yourself. Now is the time to take care of your physical and mental health.
  • Watch out for anything that may trigger a relapse. Many addicts become too comfortable in their recovery. They think that it is okay to have one drink or one pill. Vigilance is vital to your recovery.

Recovery is a process that will last your entire life. Take things slow and enjoy the possibilities. If you are ready to start your journey towards recovery, please feel free to contact us 24 hours a day at 800-737-0933

What Are The Benefits of a Long Term Drug Treatment Program in Florida?

Making the choice to seek help is the first step in the long road to recovery. Living a healthy, sober life is a long yet worthwhile personal journey that takes time and dedication. Deciding on the right treatment facility can be a challenge. In Florida, drug treatment facilities are many, with a variety of options for individuals struggling with addiction.

Inpatient residential treatment facilities are the most suitable for individuals suffering from chronic drug abuse. In these situations, the abuse has made a significant impact on the person’s daily life, and a total change in environment is beneficial. While each facility will differ regarding rules, procedures, and strategies, providing a safe and controlled environment for patients to recover in is the universal goal of long-term treatment.

Benefits of Long Term Treatment in Florida

A Lack of Time-constraint Pressures

It may feel daunting to place a time limit on yourself. Recovery is not a race, and choosing a long-term program allows you to have the time and space to process and heal over an appropriate period of time. Experts have found that undergoing treatment for at least 90 days increases the likelihood of maintaining sobriety.

Breaking the Cycle of Dependence

By committing to living in a controlled environment for a longer period, patients enable themselves to stay in a safe space without the distractions that occur in everyday life. Removing outside interference allows the patient to focus solely on recovery, the most difficult step in this already demanding process.

Identifying Behavior Patterns

Long-term programs have the advantage of being able to focus on and identify destructive behaviors and patterns. Examining these patterns allows you to inspect and understand the underlying issues that caused the addiction internally and explore ways to cope positively, empowering you to avoid potential relapse.

Patients (and their families) will undergo interviews and screenings to discuss individual circumstances, desired outcomes, and how to best set the person up for success. Detox and withdrawal comprise the first phase of rehabilitation, with qualified medical staff providing supervision and support during this extremely trying period.

Afterward, the focus is on therapy and recovery. Patients receive counseling in both individual and group settings, investigating the core of the addiction and learning to identify and address potential triggers that could arise once the individual returns to his/her outside environment.

Healing is an ongoing process. If you’re ready to start your journey to recovery today, call us at 800-737-0933