Tag Archives: detox

I Have Chronic Pain and Need Painkillers To Help Ease The Pain. How Do I Keep From Becoming Addicted?

The use of opioids in the treatment of chronic pain is very controversial. Possible addiction is one of the main reasons for this. Is the relief of chronic pain worth the potential for addiction? The consensus is yes. The fact is, most patients treated for chronic pain by a health professional qualified to do so will not become addicted to their opioid medications.

Addiction is Not the Same as Dependence

Anyone who takes opioid medication for any length of time, say, more than a few weeks, will become physically dependent upon their medication. This is a consequence of the actions of opioids on the body. They cause physical changes to take place in the brain which result in a physical dependence. This is not the same as addiction, which is generally defined as compulsive, uncontrollable use of a substance even when the negative consequences are obvious. Addicted patients often increase their use of medication without their physician’s knowledge or approval, which only makes their addiction even worse. They hide their drug use from friends, family, and employers. They become devious.

In contrast, those taking opioids as directed by their physicians rarely experience addiction. They are simply taking a drug, under medical supervision, that they need to control their chronic pain. There is no emotional dependence on the drug, no compulsion to use it beyond what is needed for pain control, and the patient remains in full compliance, taking the drug only as directed.

  • An addicted patient will often run out of medication early
  • An addicted patient will show signs of drug-seeking behavior, such as repeated requests for more pills and escalating doses when such is not medically indicated
  • Those addicted are likely to withdraw from friends and family as the drug takes over more and more of their lives

In contrast, a patient who is merely physically dependent, which is not their fault anyway, continues to live their lives normally. Their basic behavior doesn’t change and they feel no compulsion to take more and more medication. They just enjoy the relief and quality of life provided by responsible use of opioid medications.

For most people, the risk of true addiction to prescription opioids is low. In fact, the negative effects and stress of living in constant, untreated pain are more of a real concern than addiction.

Call us today 800-737-0933

Why and How Is Fentanyl Getting Into So Many Drugs?

America is in the midst of the worst drug epidemic in its history. Opiate addiction is ripping apart families nationwide, and addiction to harder narcotics like heroin is on the rise. If your family is one of those affected by opiate addiction, you may have heard of the dangers of a new, more powerful opiate called fentanyl. Unfortunately, overdoses on fentanyl have risen drastically over the past few years. So why and how is fentanyl spreading? In order to answer that question, you must understand what fentanyl is and does.

What is Fentanyl?

Fentanyl is an opioid, similar to drugs like oxycontin and morphine. In fact, all opiates are products of the poppy family of plants. Of course, this makes all of these drugs powerful pain killers. Fentanyl is roughly 10,000 times as strong as morphine, and used only in the most extreme and controlled cases for pain management. Unfortunately, as much as a quarter of a teaspoon of fentanyl is easily enough to kill a person, especially one with low or no tolerance to opioids.

 

How is Fentanyl getting into so many drugs?

As drug and law enforcement agents have become more educated on the dangers and ubiquity of opioids, they have cracked down on doctors over prescribing opiates like hydrocodone and oxycontin. Unfortunately, opioid addiction can begin as early as 2 weeks into a pain management treatment schedule, so even those with small doses of prescribed medication can become addicted. As control over prescription pills has tightened, addicts typically turn to the cheaper and more readily available heroin.

Unfortunately, drug dealers have begun cutting their supplies of heroin with small amounts of fentanyl. Fentanyl provides a stronger high for a much smaller dose, so dealers can make more money off of a smaller supply of heroin.

Why is Fentanyl put into so many drugs?

While drug and law enforcement agents have aggressively pursued the manufacturers and suppliers of street opiates like heroin, they have created another problem. Fentanyl is easier and cheaper to create than heroin, and offers a much stronger high for a much smaller amount. As addicts have a much higher tolerance to opiates than non-addicted patients, many of them will seek out the strongest drug possible: fentanyl. In order to stop fentanyl from destroying your community, it is imperative to stop opiate addiction from spreading in the first place with a visit to a rehab center.  Call Genesis House today 800-737-0933

Which States Has The Biggest Heroin Problems

The number of individuals in the United States who have a problem with heroin has increased exponentially over the past 10 years. Unlike other drug usage, heroin does not discriminate. According to the CDC, the use of heroin has increased equally amongst genders, ethnic groups, and all ages. In fact, many demographic groups that had previously escaped the heroin epidemic are now finding themselves in the midst of this addiction. Privately insured individuals and high-earners are now more commonly using heroin and other drugs, such as cocaine and prescription opioids.

Despite the unanimous issue of heroin abuse between all 50 states, some states are more prone to a population that utilizes this illicit drug. This is partly due to limited access to substance abuse clinics and programs, a lack of prevention services, and local jurisdictions whose practices are ineffective in communities where drug abuse is common. Educational foundations and occupational opportunities also often go hand-in-hand with levels of drug abuse.

States With the Biggest Increases in Heroin Usage

In 2002 alone hospitals in the state of Kentucky admitted 65 patients as a result of heroin overdoses. The number increased by an alarming 1,872% over the course of 10 years. The year 2012 presented Kentucky hospitals with a whopping 1,282 heroin overdoses.

Not far behind Kentucky lies Alaska, which has seen a 1,690% increase in rehab admissions for heroin. From 11 patients in 2002 to 197 patients in 2012 these statistics show that this drug reaches from one side of America to the other. In fact, heroin overdoses are so common in this state that the Alaska Department of Health and Human Services provides information on places where Narcan (the drug that reverses the effects of an overdoes) can be attained.

Seeking Help for a Heroin Addiction

Finding a treatment center that provides a professional environment with staff that are well-trained in heroin detox can be difficult to find. You and your loved ones deserve the best treatment available. Since 1992 The One and Only Genesis House has been providing this type of care in a residential addiction treatment facility. If you or your loved one needs help dealing with addiction, give them a call at 800-737-0933. They help individuals from near and far overcome their drug addiction. Don’t become another one of these statistics.

Call Genesis House today 800-737-0933

OxyContin

List of All Drugs That are Considered Opioids

Opioids fall into the category of narcotic pain medications. If not taken correctly, they can produce serious side effects, including addiction. The body has the ability to produce natural opioids, but when considerable pain relief is necessary, these medications may be prescribed. They work by attaching to pain receptors in the brain, spinal cord, and digestive tract. These receptors are known as opioid receptors and are part of the system that controls behaviors related to pain, reward, and addiction. Prescription opioids mimic our bodies’ natural neurotransmitters and when attached to these receptors, flood the brain with dopamine. Dopamine is the neurotransmitter responsible for thinking, emotion, and feelings of pleasure. Because prescription opioids are present in such large quantities, they create overstimulation in the brain. This leads to the reward-seeking behavior exhibited by those who have developed a dependence on these substances.

Opioid Drug List

• Abstral, Actiq (fentanyl)
• Avinza (morphine sulfate)
• Demerol
• Butrans
• Dilaudid (hydromorphone)
• Dolophine (methadone)
• Duragesic (fentanyl)
• Fentora (fentanyl)
• Hysingla (hyrocodone)
• Methadose (methadone)
• Morphabond (morphine)
• Nucynta ER (tapentadol)
• Oxaydo (oxycodone)
• Oramorph (morphine)
• Onsolis (fentanyl)
• Roxanol-T (morphine)
• Sublimaze (fentanyl)
• Xtampza ER (oxycodone)
• Zohydro ER (hydrocodone)
• Anexsia (hydrocodone/acetaminophen)
• Co-Gesic (hydrocodone/acetaminophen)
• Embeda (morphine/naltrexone)
• Exalgo (hydromorphone hydrochloride)
• Hycet (hydrocodone/acetaminophen)
• Hycodan (hydrocodone/homatropine)
• Hydromet (hydrocodone/homatropine)
• Ibudone (hydrocodone/ibuprofen)
• Kadian (morphine sulfate)
• Liquicet (hydrocodone/acetaminophen)
• Lorcet (hydrocodone/acetaminophen)
• Lortab (hydrocodone/acetaminophen)
• Maxidone (hydrocodone/acetaminophen)
• Norco (hydrocodone/acetaminophen)
• OxyContin (oxycodone hydrochloride)
• Oxycet (oxycodone/acetaminophen)
• Palladone (hydromorphone hydrochloride)
• Percocet (oxycodone/acetaminophen
• Percodan (oxycodone/aspirin)
• Reprexain (hydrocodone/ibuprofen)
• Rezira (hydrocodone/pseudoephedrine)
• Roxicet (oxycodone/acetaminophen)
• Targiniq ER (oxycodone/naloxone)
• TussiCaps and Tussionex (hydrocodone/chlorpheniramine)
• Tylenol #3 and #4 (codeine/acetaminophen)
• Vicodin (hydrocodone/acetaminophen)
• Vicoprofen (hydrocodone/ibuprofen)
• Vituz (hydrocodone/chlorpheniramine)
• Xartemis XR ( oxycodone/acetaminophen)
• Xodol (hydrocodone/acetaminophen)
• Zolvit (hydrocodone/acetaminophen)
• Zutripro (hydrocodone/chlorpheniramine/pseudoephedrine)
• Zydone (hydrocodone/acetaminophen)

If you or a loved one are experiencing opioid dependence on any of these substances, our understanding counselors can help. If you are ready to speak to someone, we are available 24 hours a day, 7 days a week. Don’t hesitate to call us at 800-737-0933

Detox Program

How Do I Know I Will Be Cured After Going To Detox?

Whether you are researching detox for yourself or for your children, you are doing so to procure a certain outcome. You want to rid the body of this addiction and live a more fruitful existence. Therefore, you also likely want to know if you will be cured after going to detox.

In order to procure an answer to your question, you should understand a few important points about detox:

  • Detox is not a cure
  • Detox is part of a process
  • You matter
  • You’ll have support

Thinking about detox as a cure might stifle your progress. Going through detox is not a guarantee that you will live a life free from addiction. The amount of effort and dedication you put into the endeavor play a significant role. Also, detox is not the only part of your recovery plan.

At the beginning of recovery, you usually go through detox to eliminate your body of the current drugs in it and to begin to break the cycle of addiction. After that, however, entering into a rehab program is advisable so that you can build the tools necessary to stay away from the drug.

 

Your Role in Your Recovery

You play an important role in your recovery. One of the most important steps you can take is to choose proven detox. During the detoxification process, your body may begin to experience withdrawal symptoms, and some of these symptoms can feel severe. You may develop a strong craving for the drug while you are in detox. Having medical supervision can help to ease some of the physical symptoms. Furthermore, you will have support around you. When you are supported by trained individuals during this process, you can significantly reduce the chances that you will take drugs.

Also, keep in mind that how much effort you put into the program after detox will play a strong role in whether or not you recover. Take advantage of the opportunities in the program even if they push you outside of your comfort zone. For example, group therapy can be tremendously helpful despite your fears about talking in public.

The answer is that you don’t know if you will be cured by going to detox and to rehab. However, you can increase your chances of recovery by taking certain steps and by calling us today at 800-737-0933 to begin your journey toward recovery.

How Accurate Are Drug Tests?

Drug tests are relatively common in the U.S. Most people have been tested at one time or another when applying for a job. Addiction treatment centers also administer drug tests to patients. But how accurate are these tests? Are they reliable?

The short answer: it depends. Some types of drug testing are highly accurate, while others are much more error-prone. There are five main types of drug test:

  • Urine tests
  • Blood tests
  • Saliva tests
  • Sweat tests
  • Hair tests

Most of these testing methods are, on the whole, accurate. In general, hair tests and blood tests are the most accurate testing methods. However, they tend to be relatively expensive, so many employers and rehab facilities do not use them. Urine tests are more commonly administered, but they tend to be a little more error-prone.

One frequently asked question is whether it’s possible to “cheat” on a drug test. Again, the answer is that it depends. Some testing methods are easier to fool than others. Urine testing, in particular, is vulnerable to cheaters. It’s much harder – if not impossible – to cheat on a blood test or a hair test.

Keep reading to learn more about each type of drug testing and its accuracy.

 

More Information on the Different Types of Drug Tests

When most people hear the words “drug test,” they think of a urine test. Urine testing is the most common form of drug testing because it’s quick and inexpensive. It’s also accurate – most of the time. Some people have found ways to tamper with urine testing, such as drinking lots of water ahead of time, mixing their urine with other additives, or even using someone else’s urine.

Hair testing is less common than urine testing. It’s more expensive and it takes longer, because the sample of hair must be sent to a lab for analysis. However, a hair test is hard to fool, because drug metabolites get locked in the hair strands permanently. Certain shampoos claim to be able to get rid of the metabolites, but there’s no evidence they work.

Blood tests and saliva tests also tend to be accurate. In fact, blood testing is the most accurate form of testing available right now. However, these tests only work within a short window of time. Most of the time, these tests are only accurate if a person has used drugs within the last few days.

A sweat test involves wearing a patch on the skin. While these tests can pick up traces of drugs in a person’s sweat, they’re also prone to giving false positives. Dirt and other substances can render a sweat test inaccurate, so these tests aren’t commonly used.

Is Addiction Truly a Disease?

Finding the courage to get help battling addiction is difficult, especially when the addict and those around him fail to see addiction as a disease. Because many addicts made a choice at some point to drink alcohol or try a drug, people often view addiction as a choice or lack of morality and willpower. This is not the case, however. Addiction is considered a disease for several reasons. Understanding them can help both an addict and his or her loved ones come to a better understanding of addiction. These are the reasons addiction is considered to be a disease.

Biology

Studies of addiction have shown that there is a 40 to 60 percent chance that an individual may be susceptible to addiction based on genetics. Those with addicts in their family tree are more likely to become addicts themselves and are likely to become addicted to a given substance more quickly than others. Mental illness also increases the likelihood of addiction as it alters the way the brain functions.

The Brain is Hardwired for Addiction

The human brain has evolved in a way that inadvertently invites addiction. When the body does something that feels good, like eating, exercising or having sex, the brain releases dopamine to encourage the behavior. These activities are necessary for survival, so the brain rewards the body for them with a hit of dopamine and positive feelings. Drugs and alcohol can overstimulate the brain, causing it to bathe itself in a sea of excess dopamine. This makes the person feel so good that they want to repeat the experience. As drug usage continues, the brain must get used to functioning with an excess of dopamine and forgets how to work without it. Over time, drug use stops affecting only the brain’s pleasure center and begins affecting other chemicals. The result is changes in all of the following:

  • Learning
  • Judgement
  • Decision-making
  • Stress levels
  • Memory
  • Behavior

Relapse Cycles

Many diseases are manageable and treatable but not curable. In this way too, addiction is like a disease. Although addictions can be overcome and beaten, staying sober requires lifelong vigilance. Once the chemistry of the brain is altered by addiction, relapse is always possible. The body may continue to crave and desire drugs and alcohol even though an individual has not been using them. This pattern is similar to other diseases that sometimes go into remission but can become active again later.

When understood as a disease, it’s east to see why addiction requires professional treatment. No one expects a diabetic or cancer patient to get well on their own, and the same should be true of those suffering from addiction. If you or someone you love is battling this disease, get help today by calling 800-737-0933. The path to freedom from addiction starts with a simple phone call.

Why Do People Start Using Drugs?

Drug use and awareness of it has become more prevalent in our society in the past few years. There’s a chance that you or someone you know has been affected directly or indirectly by some type of drug use. There is a reason that each individual addicted to drugs starts using at some point. That first step is a path towards addiction that is full of twists, turns, and unexpected obstacles.

  • Some people start using drugs because their friends are doing it. It might seem like everyone else is doing it, and choosing not to use is a choice that may make someone feel ostracized with their peers. Those who are using typically encourage others to join in on the fun, and from there use escalates in frequency and quantity.
  • Others choose to start using drugs because they are bored and the effects look like fun. Maybe it’s been a stressful day and someone wants to wind down. Sitting around and watching television or reading a book may not be nearly as appealing as having a drink with some friends or sitting in a circle smoking marijuana while socializing. After they’ve experienced the high the drugs offer, they are an appealing alternative to dealing with the everyday trials and tribulations in life.
  • Relaxation is yet another reason people give for trying drugs. Work, school, kids, family and everyday life are all common stressors in life that everyone tries to deal with in their own way. Some people exercise, others play video games and some choose to use drugs as a way to kickback and relax. The feeling can be similar to not caring, such as with marijuana, or a euphoric feeling which is experienced when someone uses opiates.
  • Curiosity and fitting in are strong reasons that addicts give for starting to try various drugs. People who feel bullied, like they don’t have a lot of friends or don’t have things in common with many people their age can have their curiosity sparked. If friends start using drugs, it may trigger a desire to try it out too in an attempt to keep a strong connection with their friends without being an outsider.

Watching a loved one, friend or family member go through drug addiction is a stressful time. There are options when an addict is ready to seek help. Give us a call at 800-737-0933 to start getting help now.

How do I Know if I Need an Outpatient or Inpatient Rehab Program?

Coming to the realization that you have a serious drug addiction problem can be absolutely daunting. At the same time, it is also an eye-opening experience and a positive step forward because you may also acknowledge that you need help. Once you decide enough is enough and that you’re ready to get help for your substance abuse disorder, you can find a drug rehabilitation facility to enter a treatment program.

Generally, there are two options available to you, outpatient and inpatient rehab programs. How do you know which is better for you? It’s worth learning about each of these treatment options and their similarities and differences to determine the answer.

With outpatient addiction treatment:

  • You are allowed to return home each night while attending your rehab program during the day
  • You are required to attend therapy sessions each week
  • You may be prescribed maintenance medication by a psychiatrist to manage your withdrawal symptoms

Outpatient treatment typically takes place in a setting that is less intensive than that of inpatient.

Overall, outpatient treatment is better suited for individuals who have more of a short-term or milder addiction. The typical client at an outpatient facility also has various responsibilities at home that they need to attend to, such as caring for their children or an elderly parent, as well as work. It works well for allowing you to take care of your everyday responsibilities while getting the help you need to overcome your substance abuse problem.

 

When You Should Choose Inpatient Treatment Over Outpatient

If you have a more severe drug addiction problem and have been battling it for years, inpatient addiction treatment is the better option for you. Inpatient rehab:

  • Is more comprehensive
  • Is situated in a hospital or residential facility that is outside of a hospital setting
  • Offers more access to medical services and clients receive around-the-clock supervision from healthcare professionals or staff personnel

With inpatient treatment, you can expect to be in a rehab program for anywhere from 28 to 90 days depending on the severity of your addiction, the drug to which you are dependent and other factors, such as if a dual diagnosis exists. Dual diagnosis is also known as a coexisting medical or psychiatric condition that may be present in addition to the addiction.

Inpatient treatment also involves detox, which involves removing all traces of drugs from the person’s system. While undergoing this period of your recovery, you will be carefully monitored while you go through the withdrawal process.

Therapy is a huge component of both outpatient and inpatient addiction treatment. Whichever type of rehab you ultimately choose, it’s important to take part in counseling sessions, whether you do individual, group or family therapy and to continue doing so well after your treatment ends. It will help to avoid a relapse and give you a better chance of retaining your sobriety.

Our counselors are available 24 hours per day. If you are ready to enter a treatment program for your substance abuse problem, contact us immediately at 800-737-0933

What I Wish I Knew Before Using Heroin The First Time

No matter how you started using heroin, it doesn’t take long for you to become hooked on the drug. But once you’ve experienced the high that comes with heroin use, you want more. You’ll get hooked before you know it if you try it once.

The High has its Problems

Heroin is associated with morphine and has a chemical structure similar to endorphins. Endorphins help the body feel happy and relieve stress and pain. When used, heroin changes an alteration in mood, consciousness, and perception. When heroin enters the brain, it is converted into morphine, which binds itself to opioid receptors and produces an intense feeling of pleasure. It’s a feeling you’ll want again and again. Before you know it, you’re hooked. Next, the withdrawal symptoms start if you don’t use heroin for several hours.

Withdrawal symptoms start very soon (eight hours) after heroin use and may include:

  • Drug cravings
  • Stomach cramps
  • Moodiness
  • A runny nose and perspiration
  • Moodiness
  • Restlessness
  • DT’s
  • Diarrhea
  • Spasms in muscles
  • Fever and chills
  • Nausea
  • Vomiting
  • Increased heart rate and blood pressure

As you continue to use heroin, your body’s ability to make endorphins stops. So the only way you can feel healthy and pain-free is by using heroin. Psychological issues also occur when you are no longer using heroin. These nasty issues can begin as early as 10 hours after your last use of the drug and may increase in intensity the longer you go without the drug. You didn’t know that your brain, your health, and your life would be permanently altered by heroin. You wish someone would have let you know what you were getting into before your first hit.

You may think it’s too late to do anything about your problems, but you are wrong. We have counselors ready and waiting to help you get off heroin safely. Detoxing alone may be hazardous to your health, and is unpleasant. But you can get off drugs with some professional help from the experts who have assisted others in getting drug-free. You can have your life, health, and sanity back.

Now that you realize that heroin destroys lives, it’s time to get off heroin and beat your addiction. We want to help you in getting off heroin for good. Contact us at 800-737-0933 for more information and start your new, drug-free life now.