Tag Archives: heroin detox

How Much Will Insurance Cover For Heroin Detox?

Heroin addiction is a devastating disease that afflicts many people today including teenagers and adults. One of the questions that we are asked frequently at our center is whether or not insurance will cover a heroin detox. We hear from many people who are interested in getting clean and staying with us for a heroin detox, but they worry about coming up with the money.

Insurance companies often have provisions that include heroin addiction. These coverages typically involve treatment at a reputable facility that has a detoxification process and a recovery process. One of the reasons insurance companies cover heroin detox programs is because of the devastating health effects of heroin use. Heroin use causes both mental and physical problems with the latter including liver and kidney diseases.

 

How Do I Find Out if My Insurance Company Covers Heroin Detox Programs?

The best way to find out if your insurance company covers heroin detox programs is to speak directly with an agent. Sometimes speaking to an agent over the phone can be difficult and we recommend speaking with an agent in person if possible to review the coverage for your particular plan. Once you find out which programs are covered by your insurance provider and the type of coverage you can expect to receive, you can contact the rehab center to set up additional payment plans for any fees not covered by your insurance company.

What affects the type of coverage you will receive for heroin detox programs?

  • State You Live In
  • Your Insurance Provider
  • Your Insurance Plan
  • Program Type: Inpatient Vs. Outpatient

When reviewing health insurance guidelines for heroin detox coverage, you will also want to ask your provider about inpatient vs. outpatient therapy. Most heroin detox centers start with inpatient heroin detox therapy to ensure that patients are following all steps of treatment including therapy sessions and abstaining from the drug. Most patients benefit from starting with inpatient detox programs before moving to outpatient detox programs because of the undivided one-on-one attention. The outpatient therapy detox programs are best for patients who have better control over their addiction and are simply looking for additional support.

Ready to take action and beat your addiction today? Contact 800-737-0933 to get started. We know that reaching out isn’t easy, but it is the first step towards a life of freedom. You deserve to experience everything that life has to offer and we want to help you reach your potential living a heroin-free life.

Why Does Heroin and Other Opiates Cause Constipation?

Opioids and opiates are drugs that depress your central nervous system. This means your breathing and other bodily systems slow down. But opioids are notorious for causing constipation. Why is this?

Your gastrointestinal system also slows down when you take opioids. Not only this, your GI tract has receptors for the opiates that you produce naturally. The opiates and opioids that you take then bind to these receptors. This causes the usual contractions in your large and small intestines to decrease. Opioids may also paralyze your stomach so that it cannot process food the way it usually does. Food not only stays in your stomach, but opioids interfere with the enzymes needed to break it down. Even if everything else was working, opiates even reduce the urge to move your bowels. When you do try to move your bowels:

  • The feces are hard, dry and painful. This is because the longer it takes for the stool to pass through your large intestine, or colon, the more water your body absorbs from them.
  • You have to strain at stool.
  • Even when you do have a bowel movement, it feels incomplete. There is actually a word for this: tenesmus.

The constipation that happens when you take opioids can occur at any time when you are taking the drug. It also doesn’t go away over time like other side effects, because you GI tract doesn’t adapt to the drug the way the rest of your body does. Indeed, the longer you take the drug, the worse your constipation gets. Moreover, the usual remedies that help normal constipation do not work well when you are constipated from opioid use.

Complications of Opiate Caused Constipation

The complications of constipation caused by opioid use is rarely life-threatening, but can be very uncomfortable, and degrade your quality of life. Common complications include:

  • Hemorrhoids, which occur when the veins in the rectum or anus dilate and fail due to straining.
  • Diverticulosis, which are tiny pouches in the wall of the large intestine. If these pouches become inflamed, it can lead to a condition called diverticulitis. Diverticulitis can be serious.
  • Fecal impaction, which happens when a large amount of hard stool simply cannot be passed. This is often accompanied by a watery discharge from the rectum, nausea and malaise.

Call Genesis House for Help

If you need detox for your opiate use and its complications, give us a call at Genesis House. Our number here is 800-737-0933

What Happens During Heroin Detox?

Heroin is one of the most addictive drugs, and the detox period can be tough. However, once you’re through the detox stage, you’ll be on the road to recovery. Although detox is slightly different for everyone, it can be helpful to have a general idea of what happens.

The severity of the withdrawal symptoms will vary depending on how dependent the brain is on the substance. Common withdrawal symptoms include:

  • Muscle pain
  • Insomnia
  • Sweating
  • Nausea and vomting

Heroin greatly increases dopamine levels in the brain. After prolonged or repeated use, the brain becomes unable to produce sufficient amounts of dopamine on its own and has to readjust to functioning without the drug. Therefore, many people also experience psychological withdrawal symptoms, like anxiety, agitation, and paranoia.

Timeline of Heroin Detox

Heroin withdrawal symptoms usually start between six and 12 hours of the last dose. The symptoms usually peak around the second day. By the third or fourth day, the symptoms typically subside a little, but the discomfort isn’t completely gone. It’s important to eat properly during this time to help your immune system. Many people experience shivers and abdominal cramping during the third, fourth, and fifth days.

Withdrawal symptoms often end after about seven days. For those who were severely addicted, the symptoms may last for 10 days, but they rarely last for longer. However, some symptoms, like trouble sleeping and loss of appetite, may persist for a few more days.

Although the acute withdrawal stage typically ends in under 10 days, the entire detox process can last for several months because the brain changes caused by heroin take a long time to reverse. This is known as PAWS, or post-acute withdrawal symptoms.

If you begin a supervised detox program, the process will typically begin with an intake and evaluation, which will let your healthcare providers determine an appropriate treatment plan. You’ll probably have a physical exam and be asked questions about mental health symptoms. Then, your medical professionals will come up with a plan for your immediate detox and long-term treatment.

Even though the effects of detox and withdrawal are rarely fatal, it’s very important to go through detox under medical supervision. This reduces the risk of relapse and provides medical care in case there are complications. If you or a loved one is struggling with a heroin addiction, call us at 800-737-0933 for the care you need.