Tag Archives: opioid addiction

OxyContin

List of All Drugs That are Considered Opioids

Opioids fall into the category of narcotic pain medications. If not taken correctly, they can produce serious side effects, including addiction. The body has the ability to produce natural opioids, but when considerable pain relief is necessary, these medications may be prescribed. They work by attaching to pain receptors in the brain, spinal cord, and digestive tract. These receptors are known as opioid receptors and are part of the system that controls behaviors related to pain, reward, and addiction. Prescription opioids mimic our bodies’ natural neurotransmitters and when attached to these receptors, flood the brain with dopamine. Dopamine is the neurotransmitter responsible for thinking, emotion, and feelings of pleasure. Because prescription opioids are present in such large quantities, they create overstimulation in the brain. This leads to the reward-seeking behavior exhibited by those who have developed a dependence on these substances.

Opioid Drug List

• Abstral, Actiq (fentanyl)
• Avinza (morphine sulfate)
• Demerol
• Butrans
• Dilaudid (hydromorphone)
• Dolophine (methadone)
• Duragesic (fentanyl)
• Fentora (fentanyl)
• Hysingla (hyrocodone)
• Methadose (methadone)
• Morphabond (morphine)
• Nucynta ER (tapentadol)
• Oxaydo (oxycodone)
• Oramorph (morphine)
• Onsolis (fentanyl)
• Roxanol-T (morphine)
• Sublimaze (fentanyl)
• Xtampza ER (oxycodone)
• Zohydro ER (hydrocodone)
• Anexsia (hydrocodone/acetaminophen)
• Co-Gesic (hydrocodone/acetaminophen)
• Embeda (morphine/naltrexone)
• Exalgo (hydromorphone hydrochloride)
• Hycet (hydrocodone/acetaminophen)
• Hycodan (hydrocodone/homatropine)
• Hydromet (hydrocodone/homatropine)
• Ibudone (hydrocodone/ibuprofen)
• Kadian (morphine sulfate)
• Liquicet (hydrocodone/acetaminophen)
• Lorcet (hydrocodone/acetaminophen)
• Lortab (hydrocodone/acetaminophen)
• Maxidone (hydrocodone/acetaminophen)
• Norco (hydrocodone/acetaminophen)
• OxyContin (oxycodone hydrochloride)
• Oxycet (oxycodone/acetaminophen)
• Palladone (hydromorphone hydrochloride)
• Percocet (oxycodone/acetaminophen
• Percodan (oxycodone/aspirin)
• Reprexain (hydrocodone/ibuprofen)
• Rezira (hydrocodone/pseudoephedrine)
• Roxicet (oxycodone/acetaminophen)
• Targiniq ER (oxycodone/naloxone)
• TussiCaps and Tussionex (hydrocodone/chlorpheniramine)
• Tylenol #3 and #4 (codeine/acetaminophen)
• Vicodin (hydrocodone/acetaminophen)
• Vicoprofen (hydrocodone/ibuprofen)
• Vituz (hydrocodone/chlorpheniramine)
• Xartemis XR ( oxycodone/acetaminophen)
• Xodol (hydrocodone/acetaminophen)
• Zolvit (hydrocodone/acetaminophen)
• Zutripro (hydrocodone/chlorpheniramine/pseudoephedrine)
• Zydone (hydrocodone/acetaminophen)

If you or a loved one are experiencing opioid dependence on any of these substances, our understanding counselors can help. If you are ready to speak to someone, we are available 24 hours a day, 7 days a week. Don’t hesitate to call us at 800-737-0933

Pennsylvania to add Centers for Excellence to Treat Opioid Addiction

One of the issues facing opioid addicts and their families is the lack of follow-up services after an initial round of addiction treatment has been completed. Drug cravings can continue to be an issue for months after a person goes through detoxification (detox). Good quality support services are imperative if a person in recovery is going to be successful at maintaining their sobriety.

Centers Offer Assessment and Referrals to Treatment

Pennsylvania is seeking to address this issue by establishing 45 Centers of Excellence. These Centers, which will be separate operations located inside existing addiction, medical and mental health facilities, will be used to assess an addict’s needs and make appropriate referrals to treatment programs and other services. The Centers can make referrals to the following types of addiction treatment options:

• Detoxification (detox)
• Residential treatment
• Outpatient treatment
• 12-step programs
• Halfway houses

Once someone has been referred to treatment, they are treated by a team of specialists. The team will help the addict access treatment for medical and mental health concerns they are experiencing.

The Center of Excellence staff’s goal is to help the addict stay in treatment long-term, as this strategy has been identified as one of the important factors for long-term sobriety success. These Centers can also help addicts with social services, such as housing and employment, which are essential to being able to rebuild a life that is free from drugs and alcohol.

Addiction Medication Available Through Centers

The Centers will also offer addiction medication to clients. These drugs, including Vivitrol and Suboxone, are used to help curb cravings for opioids. When the medication is made available to clients in recovery, along with addiction counseling and treatment, the odds of being able to remain clean and sober are greatly increased compared to simply trying to “tough it out” without these types of support.

The state has committed $20.4 million in funding to the Centers for Excellence. The federal government will contribute an additional $5.4 million.

The Centers are expected to see about 11,500 people during the first year. Most of them will be Medicaid users; however, the Centers will accept clients with private insurance as well.

Finding Treatment Options

Many people in Pennsylvania seeking help for a substance abuse problem prefer to leave the state to focus on their recovery. This is one of the reasons that they chose facilities like Genesis House in Florida. Genesis House provides a range of individualized treatment services and continues to help people take giant leaps toward their long-term recovery. Contact Genesis House now for more information and help.

FDA Advisory Panel Recommends Approval of Implanted Buprenorphine

FDALast week a Food and Drug Administration (FDA) advisory panel recommended the approval of a new medication designed to treat opiate addiction, called probuphine. While the main ingredient of the drug, buprenorphine, isn’t new, the controversial delivery method definitely is. The way the drug is administered is by implanting under the skin, where it then slowly releases lower doses of buprenorphine into the blood stream.

Currently, buprenorphine is one of the most popular medications to help alleviate the extreme cravings that are associated with heroin and prescription painkillers as well as to lessen the severity of withdrawal symptoms if used in a tapering process. With the continuation of the opioid epidemic, many physicians and treatment specialists welcome new methods of addressing this deadly issue.

Having an implanted device that controls the release of the drug allows for more precise administration as well as prevents skipping doses, thus theoretically reducing relapse. However, as critics pointed out, the information presented to the FDA wasn’t thorough enough.

“It is disappointing that the advisory committee set such a low bar for safety and effectiveness. Is probuphine effective? We still don’t know because the study was poorly designed and missing data,” said Tracy Rupp, a pharmacist and director of public health policy initiatives at the National Center for Health Research.

“This is not the real world of opioid addiction,” Rupp continued. “Many of these patients will require treatment for years. We need long-term safety data from diverse populations. Patients will require a new incision every 6 months, creating an ongoing risk of harm due to bleeding and infectious complications.”

There is a strong argument for medical intervention when it comes to opioid abuse, however probuphine may not be the answer. It appears that the FDA may be willing to move forward with the implant, but only with addicts who have been on buprenorphine stably and would benefit from the new way of administering it.