Addiction

When Can Alcohol Withdrawal Effects Be Fatal?

Alcohol addiction is a significant problem in the United States. Statistics recently complied by the National Survey on Drug Use and Health, sometimes abbreviated as NSDUH, found that more than 15 million American age 12 and older were addicted to this substance. Many have tried to beat this dependency. However, alcohol is one of the hardest addictions to conquer.

 The Reasons Alcohol Is So Addictive

Arguably, what makes alcohol so easy to become dependent on is the impact said substance has on the nervous system. When people consume alcoholic beverages, their brains release mood-elevating hormones, such as endorphins and dopamine. That said, in some people, alcohol consumption precipitates the release of even more mood-enhancing chemicals, further stimulating their dependence.

As the habit progresses, the brain releases an increasingly greater concentration of mood chemicals. Eventually, the brain and body develop a greater dependency on the release of these chemicals to function. Ergo, a significantly greater quantity of alcohol are needed to complete that process. In fact, alcohol can alter brain chemistry to the point that pertinent actions like decision making and impulse control can be compromised.

Additionally, the availability of alcohol makes it easier to obtain. To those over 21 years of age, the substance can be purchased legally. Moreover, said the chemical is far less expensive than most other drugs and does not have to purchase in the corner of a dark alley.

 The Alcohol Withdrawal Process

Addiction experts opine that alcohol withdrawal is amongst the most difficult and serious. Withdrawal occurs in stages. The first stage typically begins within eight hours of the dependent’s last drink and might precipitate manifestations like nausea, vomiting, stomach discomfort and shakiness. During the second stage, which sets in roughly one to three days after the subject last consumed alcohol, might consist of cardiovascular symptoms like an increased pulse rate and elevated blood pressure and general manifestations like a decreased body temperature and mental problems like confusion. The last and final stage, commencing anywhere from two to four days after the consumer’s last drink, might comprise symptoms like uncontrollable tremors, hallucinations, raised body temperature and convulsions.

 Alcohol Withdrawal Can Be Fatal

Moderate to severe alcohol withdrawal processes almost always present discernible dangers and, if not properly managed, could prove fatal. There are several circumstances in which alcohol withdrawal could cost the dependent subject their life including:

When The Person Is Severely Dependent

Individuals who have consumed significant quantities of alcohol for prolonged periods stand at an increased risk of experiencing more trying withdrawal processes and potentially fatal complications.

If The Addict Possesses Any Mental Illnesses

Individuals with mental illness might not be able to bear the psychological strain associated with alcohol withdrawal.

When Co-Morbidities Exist

Chronic alcohol usage can precipitate a host of serious physical illnesses. Any of these maladies can weaken a dependent’s body to such a marked extent that they might not be able to tolerate the physical demands of withdrawal.

When The Most Serious Symptoms Manifest

End stage alcohol withdrawal symptoms can result in occurrences like uncontrollable convulsions and delirium tremens, which sends the addict into an ultra hyperactive state where they experience intense confusion and uncontrollable shaking that could quickly proceed to cardiovascular and respiratory collapse if immediate medical attention is not employed. Few people, regardless of how mentally or physically strong they are, can survive this without help.

<strong>Managing Alcohol Withdrawal</strong>

Most cases of alcohol withdrawal should be supervised through a process known as medical detoxification. During said procedure, which can take place inside a healthcare facility like a hospital or inside the confines of an in-patient rehabilitation facility, the addict is gradually weaned off alcohol in a controlled, medically monitored setting. If need be, the patient is administered medications to control burgeoning withdrawal manifestations.

Though both hospital and in-patient detoxification programs often prove effective in eliminating the alcohol from the dependent’s body, in-patient detoxification might yield better results over the long haul. This is because in-patient detox is typically followed by an extended stay inside a treatment facility in which recovering addicts are provided instruction on how to overcome the psychological factors that led to their addiction.

Contacting Us

Individuals who are tired of living an alcohol-dependent life are encouraged to contact us. Though we are located in Palm Beach County, Florida, our team of experienced staff members have helped people from across the United States conquer their alcohol addictions in a safe, comfortable atmosphere. Call us at 800-737-0933.

Can I Still Get Necessary Medication if I Do a Prescription Pill Detox?

The decision to go through detox and rehab isn’t an easy one to make. While you likely know that you need professional help, there are often certain factors that stand in your way. You may be wondering if you have to quit your job to go through rehab or if you’ll have to give up all of your activities. You may be wondering how long you will have to stay or if you can leave the facility and still receive help. Going into detox is a huge step, and you should always look for answers before you commit.

One popular question many users ask is what happens if they go into detox because of prescription medication abuse. Let’s read on to learn more about detox and to answer that question.

What can I expect during the intake process?

If you are considering detox and rehab for your prescription medication abuse, you’ll want to know what the steps are before you sign yourself in. Before your detox starts, you’ll first go through the intake process in the facility you have chosen. You’ll talk to a counselor who will ask you many questions about your prescription pill problem. He or she, along with the rehab’s doctors and nurses, will use these answers to develop your treatment plan. They will want to know how long you have been using prescription drugs, your normal dose, if you have tried to detox before, and if you are taking any pills now.

It is important to be 100% honest with the staff right from the start. This allows them to create the best treatment plan geared towards your individual needs.

What if I need medication to ween myself off of prescription drugs?

Many men and women end up relapsing when they don’t have the necessary medication to cope with withdrawal symptoms. This is a concern for many users, so don’t be afraid to talk to your therapist or doctor about it in the beginning. If you are going through the withdrawal process and are experiencing mild to severe symptoms, the rehab may provide medication that can help. The staff will make sure you are medically supervised during your withdrawals. If you choose to stay in a rehab day and night, you will have round-the-clock care. Medication for your withdrawals may also be provided if you are in an outpatient rehab program.

Certain medications are able to mimic the effects of prescription pills, quickly relieving the withdrawal symptoms and cravings you may experience. Your doctor will give you enough of the medication while you are in detox to keep your withdrawal symptoms at bay and to cut back on the physical cravings you may have for the pills. During the course of your treatment, your doctors may adjust the dosage to fit your needs.

What medications will I be given?

The type of medication you will receive will depend on the doctor, the facility, and your individual needs. You may be given the following:

Antidepressants- Your brain may not produce enough “happy” chemicals on its own. That is one reason you may have turned to prescription pills in the first place. Doctors may prescribe antidepressants to help combat the feelings of depression and anxiety you may feel once you stop taking prescription pills. Two common antidepressants are Prozac and Zoloft.

Benzodiazepines- Often called benzos, these drugs have the ability to reduce irritability and anxiety, two common side effects that happen during withdrawal. Benzos provide a calm, sedating effect that is helpful for addicts dealing with alcohol withdrawal. Your doctor will carefully monitor your use of benzos during detox because they are very addictive.

Clonidine- Clonidine is usually prescribed for alcohol and opiate withdrawals. This medication will help ease certain withdrawal symptoms, such as tremors, sweating, anxiety, cramps, and muscle aches.

Your doctor will carefully monitor you to make sure you do not simply replace one pill with another during detox. They will give you just enough medication to relieve the worst of your withdrawal symptoms during detox. From then on, you’ll learn how to deal with a life without prescription pills through therapy and counseling.

Call to learn more about our services today

Don’t let prescription medication keep a tight hold on you. We can help you get through the worst of the withdrawal symptoms with medically supervised detox services at our clinic. Our caring staff will help you every step of the way! Call us today at 800-737-0933 to hear more about our programs and to decide if we are the right fit for you.

Who Will Be Told About My Medical Detox from Prescription Drugs?

America is currently mired in an epidemic of prescription drug abuse. The abusers are medical patients with a legitimate prescription from a physical condition, as well as individuals who are buying prescription drugs right off the streets from illicit drug dealers. The drugs don’t care who is using them. Drugs like amphetamines and prescription painkillers are dominating the headlines because of how easy it is for people to get access to these types of prescription drugs.

Because of the illicit nature of prescription drug abuse, there’s a lot of addiction sufferers who are hesitant to seek help. Their reluctance comes from two sources. First, they have legitimate concerns about the detox process that could expose them to some significant withdrawal symptoms. Second, they have concerns about getting involved with law enforcement over their illegal actiona.

The concern over withdrawal symptoms is legitimate. Depending on the substance of choice and the extent of someone’s addiction, there’s a real possibility the addiction sufferer would face the possibility of some very troubling withdrawal symptoms. Using prescription opiate painkillers as an example, here’s some of the more significant withdrawal symptoms an addiction sufferer might encounter if they suddenly decide to stop using:

  • Problems with nausea and vomiting
  • A sudden escalation in both heart rate and blood pressure
  • Severe muscle cramping throughout the body
  • Loss of motor control and the ability to concentrate on normal tasks
  • Hallucinations and nightmares that interrupt sleep
  • Tremors throughout the extremities
  • Body convulsions
  • Psychological difficulties with depression, anxiety and possible suicide

With these kinds of potential symptoms, it’s best that addiction sufferers get help with the detox process. Unfortunately, the fear of legal ramifications stops some people from doing just that. In the following sections, the discussion will focus on how a client’s privacy is protected during treatment.

Who Will Be Told About My Medical Detox from Prescription Drugs?

When someone enters rehab, it’s important that they have confidence in the staff members with which they will be dealing. It wouldn’t likely sit well with a potential client if they felt their privacy was not going to be protected. That’s why most rehab facilities maintain a strict adherence to a policy of protecting their client’s anonymity and right to total privacy.

When it comes to someone becoming addicted to prescription medication, there will be staff concerns about what has been transpiring. Staff members will be fully aware that the clients are doing things they are not supposed to be doing. Of course, it’s really not their job to be judgmental. A rehab facility’s job it to treat clients and give them a realistic opportunity to fully recover from their addiction illnesses.

With all of that said, there are circumstances under which a rehab facility may want to broach the subject of reporting prescription medication abuse. Three main reasons why this might happen include:

  • With the client’s written permission
  • If the client is still involved with an illegal enterprise involving prescription drugs
  • If the rehab facility’s staff believe the client’s welfare it at risk with further prescription drug abuse

Client’s Written Permission

There are circumstances under which a rehab therapist might request access to a client’s physician if the client is abusing prescription drugs for which they have a legitimate prescription. In such cases, the client could be asked to give written permission for the contact. The client might want to consider allowing such contact if they believe it would enhance their chances of a full recovery from their addiction.

Illegal Activities

When a client enters rehab, there’s a presumption they are ready to remove their involvement from any illicit drug activities. If a client were to attempt to secure or sell prescription drugs while in rehab, the rehab’s staff would have a responsibility to contact law enforcement.

Client’s Welfare is at Risk

Once a client enters rehab for the second or third time due to abusing their prescription drugs, there’s a possibility the rehab facility’s staff will reach out to the attending physician to report the problem. They would only take this unusual step if they thought the client’s welfare was at risk.

If you have any concerns about your privacy when getting treatment in our rehab facility, you should call us and discuss your concerns. You can speak with one of our staff members by calling us at 800-737-0933.

Are All Detoxes in Florida Attached to Rehab Centers?

If you have a problem with drugs or alcohol and call Florida home, you are not alone. According to drug-rehab.org, an online resource for drug education and addiction awareness, more than 410,000 Floridians admitted to having a substance use disorder in 2014. It is also worth noting that the number of overdose cases in the state increased by over 5,000 between 2014 and 2016. That said, the substances that are being abused the most in Florida, also known as the sunshine state, include alcohol, cocaine, heroin, and marijuana.

And while prescribed for legitimate reasons, many Floridians are also abusing prescription pain relievers, namely Oxycontin and Hydrocodone. So while the state is best known for its theme parks and exciting nightlife, most will agree that Florida has a serious problem on its hands when it comes to substance abuse. It should be noted, however, that many people have begun to recognize the devastating toll that abusing drugs and alcohol can have on their lives and have sought addiction recovery services from the nearly 14,000 rehab facilities interspersed in and around Florida.

ARE ALL DETOX PROGRAMS IN FLORIDA ATTACHED TO REHAB CENTERS?

Most physicians and addiction experts will agree that overcoming an addiction to certain substances is easier than others. For example, individuals who choose to end their relationship with marijuana are seldom confronted by severe withdrawal symptoms as they go through detox. Sadly, this is not the case for those who are seeking to end their relationship with prescription-based or street-level opioids, such as heroin. The same can also be said for those trying to overcome an addiction to alcohol. In most cases, when an individual stops consuming these particular substances, they will usually find themselves having to deal with an onslaught of severe withdrawal symptoms. And sometimes, these withdrawal symptoms are so severe that many will choose to forgo their pursuit of sobriety and start using again.

Fortunately, many rehab facilities in Florida are aware of the challenges that come with ending one’s relationship with opioids, alcohol, and other hardcore substances. As such, many will offer detox assistance in both their inpatient and outpatient programs. Detox assistance in nearly all Florida rehab facilities includes prescription-based medication to help individuals cope with challenging withdrawal symptoms as well as round-the-clock monitoring by a licensed doctor or nurse. This aspect of addiction recovery will usually take place onsite; however, some facilities may choose to offer them in a separate location. This approach ensures that individuals can get focused treatments that can significantly increase their chances of completing detox successfully. That said, detox assistance can help ease the following withdrawal symptoms associated with substance abuse cessation:

  • Insomnia
  • Anxiety
  • Memory problems
  • Headaches
  • Heart palpitations
  • Profuse sweating
  • Nausea and vomiting
  • Hypertension
  • Muscle aches
  • Tremors

 

The severity of these symptoms, not to mention the type of symptoms an individual will encounter, can vary depending on how long they have been using. It is also worth noting that the specific substance that they were abusing before seeking treatment will also play a role in this regard as well.

HOW LONG WILL THE DETOX PROCESS LAST?

While the goal of any detox program is to help individuals safely and effectively achieve sobriety, the timeframe involved can vary from one person to the next. Whether they are provided onsite or via a separate location, detox programs offered by most Florida-based rehab facilities will last anywhere from 3 to 7 days. In most cases, this is enough time for drugs or alcohol to leave an individual’s system. During this time, the doctors and nurses in these programs will provide individuals with prescription-based medications to help them cope with severe withdrawal symptoms, some of which include

  • Methadone
  • Clonidine
  • Suboxone
  • Naltrexone
  • Antabuse
  • Acamprosate
  • Benzodiazepines
  • Antidepressants

The type of medication that a physician will prescribe to patients is determined based on the symptoms they are experiencing and the substance that their body is attempting to detox. Along with these popular medications, some Florida-based rehab facilities are now offering a relatively new medication called Lofexidine to help ease certain types of withdrawal symptoms. According to a study published by the National Institutes of Health, Lofexidine has been approved by the FDA, also known as the Food and Drug Administration, to help individuals cope with the physical symptoms associated with opioid withdrawal.

BOTTOM LINE

In summary, if you’re struggling with drugs or alcohol and live in Florida, there is no shortage of rehab facilities that you can turn to for help. And most of them, if not all, offer some form of detox assistance to make your journey toward sobriety slightly easier. To learn more about any of the information detailed in this article, consider reaching out to one of our friendly associates today at 800-737-0933.

What Are Some Surprising Drug Detox Effects You Might Not Expect?

Drug detox is often one of the most difficult stages in addiction recovery. The effects of drug abuse change the brain and body on a chemical level, which plays into the addiction process. Not surprisingly, you may experience a few drug detox effects that you might not expect.

Since each person’s body interacts with addictive substances in different ways, detox effects can take different forms. Knowing what to expect can go a long way towards helping you get the supports you need to make it past the detox period. Here are a few surprising drug detox effects to watch for along with a brief overview on what causes these effects.

What Causes Drug Detox Effects?

Addictive substances take an ongoing toll on the body on both a physical and psychological level. While the desired effect may be to get high or escape from the events of the day, these substances accomplish this by altering important chemical processes in the brain and body. After a certain point, the brain and body begin to rely on the drug’s effects to function normally.

Here are just a few substances that fall in this category:

  • Alcohol
  • Heroin
  • Crack, cocaine
  • Prescription painkillers
  • Benzodiazepines
  • Prescription stimulants, such as Ritalin and Adderall

Drug detox effects, also known as withdrawal effects, develop out of the chemical imbalance created when drug use stops. More often than not, the severity of withdrawal effects experienced reflects the degree of imbalance left behind by the drug’s effects. Since each person’s physical makeup interacts with addictive substances in different ways, the types of withdrawal effects experienced can vary from person to person in type and intensity.

Here are a handful of effects you might not expect to experience during drug detox:

Confused Thinking

The effects of drug addiction specifically target the brain’s cognitive processes, which include reasoning, learning and memory. As drug use continues, these systems continue to undergo chemical changes that directly impact a person’s priorities and motivations. These changes account for the incessant cravings and ongoing preoccupation with getting and using addictive substances.

Confused thinking results from the chaos that develops within the brain’s chemical system when drug use stops. In effect, the brain develops a psychological dependence on the drug’s effects in the same way the body develops a physical dependence. In the absence of the drug’s effects, it becomes difficult to carry out mental tasks that require concentration, focus and planning.

Severe Depression

Depression and substance abuse tend to go hand-in-hand. Drug abuse often becomes a form of escape from depression. On the flip-side, abusing drugs for any length of time breeds the types of brain chemical processes that cause depression. In turn, the brain’s increasing susceptibility to depression is part of the reason why a person requires increasingly larger doses of the drug over time.

For these reasons, stopping drug use typically brings on feelings of severe depression. The severity of the depression varies depending on how long a person abused drugs and the types of drugs used. In the most severe of cases, suicidal tendencies can run especially high.

Intense Anxiety

While most everyone has experienced some level of anxiety in one form or another, the experience doesn’t typically the point where it interferes with a person’s ability to function throughout the day. As a drug detox effect, anxiety levels can be overwhelming and in the most extreme cases, a person can experience full-blown panic attacks.

Signs of intense anxiety and developing panic attacks include:

  • Restlessness
  • Tremors
  • Rapid breathing
  • Increased heart rate
  • Light-headedness
  • Tightness in the chest

Extreme Moods

Extreme moods are another drug detox effect you might not expect. Changes in mood can be triggered by anything and don’t necessarily have to make sense. Addictive substances force the brain to secrete large amounts of serotonin and dopamine, which promote happiness and a sense of well-being. In effect, neurotransmitter levels are severely depleted when drug use stops.

Extreme moods to watch for include:

  • Violent outbursts
  • Aggressive behavior
  • Feelings of despair

Unfortunately, there are no shortcuts when it comes to addiction recovery. While drug detox can be a difficult experience, it’s very doable when you have the right supports in place. If you have more questions or need information on drug detox programs, call us today at 800-737-0933 to speak with one of our addiction counselors.

Can Detox Centers Help Me Get Clean if I’m Homeless?

Dealing with a drug addiction and homelessness at the same time is hard. You may worry about your safety on the streets when you are under the influence of drugs. While you may know that you need help to deal with your addiction, you might not know where to turn. There are many programs available that can offer you support, and it is reassuring to know that detox centers can help you get clean if you’re homeless. In fact, going to a detox center is the safest and most effective way to stop using drugs or alcohol when you have a serious addiction.

Your addiction might have led you to make choices that led to your homelessness, or you might have started using drugs or alcohol to cope with the pain after losing your home or job. Either way, you’ll find nonjudgemental and caring people when you go to a treatment facility. The staff at a detox center only cares about helping you get clean so that you can get your life back on track.

Go Through Detox In a Safe Environment

The detox process is often unpredictable, and you need to be prepared for having serious symptoms that could impact your safety and health. A few of the most common detox symptoms that people experience include the following:
•nausea
•seizures
•fatigue
•mood swings
•increased pain

The symptoms that you experience will depend upon the types of drugs that you use along with your body’s dependence upon the substance. You should also know that abruptly quitting certain drugs without professional assistance can lead to increased cravings. Your risk for serious withdrawal symptoms also goes up if you have ever quit and had a relapse or if you’ve had an overdose.

While it might be scary to think about having withdrawal symptoms, you can feel better knowing that they are temporary. In most cases, you will be finished with the most challenging part of the detox process within a few days to a week. After that, you will begin to work on learning how to manage your addiction so that you can stay sober once you finish the program. The benefit of going to a detox center rather than trying to get sober on the street is that you also receive personalized treatment that includes management of your withdrawal symptoms. Feeling comfortable and supported makes it easier to stay strong as your body adjusts to living without drugs or alcohol.

Get Help for Your Mental Health

The detox process is only the first step toward managing your addiction. You will also need to learn how to take care of your mental health. There are many mental health conditions that can lead to someone using drugs as a method for coping such as PTSD and depression. You may also have developed a mental health condition such as anxiety after you became homeless. Once again, this is an area where you benefit from seeking professional care.

In a drug and alcohol treatment program, you gain the ability to work with professionals who can help you figure out what causes you to drink or do drugs. You can also receive services that include intensive counseling to help you begin to feel better mentally. If you have family nearby, then your rehab program can also help you to begin healing those relationships through family counseling. Group therapy is another type of treatment that helps you to not feel so alone, and you can even participate in recreational activities that help you feel normal and healthy again.

Find Hope for the Future

Both homelessness and addiction can make the future feel bleak. Getting sober turns this completely around, and you will find that your stay at a detox center helps you to start rebuilding your belief that life is good. Your counseling team will help you to begin to put together a plan for how you can live safely and sober after treatment.

When you enter rehab as a homeless person, you are connected to resources that can help you to begin to find a job, a home and renew your family relationships. While it will not be easy, you can expect to continue to improve your life after your treatment is complete by continuing to follow the plan that your team helps you put together for getting your life back on track.

Are you ready to regain control over your life by ending your addiction? We can help you get into a detox center that changes your life. Give us a call today at 800-737-0933!

Will A Rehab In Florida Admit Me If I’ve Relapsed Before?

Reclaiming your life from drug or alcohol addiction can be a very complex and challenging process. In fact, many people try and fail in recovery multiple times before finally achieving sobriety. This is why relapse is considered a common and ultimately normal part of the recovery process. Although caving to stress, temptation, and cravings can leave you feeling like you’re incapable of getting well, it can actually mean that you’re on the path to getting better and that you just have more to learn and experience throughout treatment than you’d originally expected. Your willingness to rise above relapse and strive for sobriety again is a very positive sign. To ensure your success, you need to look for a rehab in Florida that’s capable of meeting your unique range of needs.

Each time that you try and fail in recovery, you become more knowledgeable of the different triggers and environments that have the ability to best your willpower. You also gain a better understanding of the best treatment types for your circumstances. For instance, if your first effort in recovery took place in a large outpatient program, it may be time to consider your options in long-term, inpatient treatment. With several months away from the relationships, stressors, and triggers of your current life and lifestyle, you’ll have ample time to:

  • Learn new and better coping strategies
  • Identify and address any co-occurring disorders
  • Establish long-term plans for keeping your health and sobriety on the right track

Relapse is also something that you can discuss at length with counselors, peers, and others who are present within the treatment environment. What many patients find is that each relapse is incredibly humbling. It reminds them that seeking ongoing help and support, particularly post-rehab, can be necessary for avoiding past mistakes and for maintaining the right life habits and relationships after formal treatment has ended.

You’ll Be Surrounded By Like-Minded People In Florida Rehab

One of the major benefits of enrolling in a Florida rehab post-relapse is being surrounded by people with similar goals, similar life experiences, and similar histories with relapse. Group therapy is a large part of the drug and alcohol treatment process as it teaches patients proper socialization skills, boundary setting, and strategies for safely and successfully besting cravings. You can share your relapse experiences during group therapy sessions to help others overcome the shame and self-doubt that they’re experiencing. You will also have the opportunity to glean valuable information from the experiences of those around you.

Success In Rehab After Relapse

Countless recovered drug and alcohol users have relapsed before. In fact, many of these individuals have multiple tales of relapse. It can take a while to find out which treatment style is right for you, and which treatment environments will be most conducive to your success. More importantly, for some people, it can also take several tries to fully commit to getting well. Relapsing, however, never means that you’re incapable of succeeding. It is instead an opportunity to learn, further your growth, refine your recovery plan, and build your resolve. Florida rehab centers understand that all of these things can be a normal part of the recovery process.

Inpatient treatment centers strive to provide all of their patients with safe, secure environments. With little to no cell phone use, carefully monitored facilities, and limited access to the outside world, clients have the opportunity to focus completely on getting well. These centers effectively remove drug and alcohol users from unhealthy relationships, circumstances, and other triggers that are impeding their progress. With individual and group therapy, access to treatment for co-morbidity, and many other treatments and support services, Florida rehabs are equipped to provide all that people need for successfully dealing with substance use disorder.

Identifying Needs That May Have Been Overlooked

Some people relapse simply because they aren’t ready for the rigors of recovery. Others relapse because critical needs weren’t met. For instance, if you believe that you are suffering from co-morbidity or a co-occurring disorder, dual diagnosis treatment could be an essential part of your recovery plan. This will address both substance use disorder and any chronic anxiety, chronic depression, or other mental health issues that exist. Dual diagnosis treatments eliminate the need for patients to self-medicate their pain with harmful drugs or alcohol, by treating their discomfort at its actual source.

Your Journey To Good Health Can Start Today

Relapsing shouldn’t prevent you from pursuing happiness, wholeness, and good health. All of the benefits of recovery are still await. You simply need to secure the right support services and help. From intensive, inpatient programs to flexible outpatient plans, there are many different options in Florida rehab available. If you want to find the perfect treatment center for your needs, we can help. Call us today at 800-737-0933.

Why Does Detox From Benzos Make You More Anxious?

Benzodiazepine withdrawal (frequently shortened to benzo withdrawal) is a group of symptoms that emerge when a patient decreases or stops their use of these medications. Whether prescribed or used recreationally, once tolerance has developed and physical and psychological dependence has been established, the patient will most likely experience some of these symptoms, some of which may last longer than others and vary in intensity depending on the patient’s length of use and the amount they have been using. One of the most common symptoms is rebound anxiety, which means that their anxiety feels much worse than it did prior to starting the medication. So, why does detox from benzos make you more anxious?

How do Benzos Work?

Benzos work by “amping up” the patient’s GABA, a brain chemical that blocks certain communication between nerve cells and the brain. Because low GABA levels are linked to anxiety and mood disorders, many people start using benzos for anxiety relief. In fact, about 5% of adults have been prescribed benzos in the last year, usually as a short-term bandaid during a stressful life event (death of a loved one, divorce, or other traumatic occurrences). Benzos are also often prescribed in people with chronic anxiety for short periods (generally a couple of weeks) while the patient undergoes therapy to learn healthy ways to cope with their symptoms.

However, they also produce compelling “feel-good” and sedative effects that are very appealing to many people, particularly those who struggle with anxiety. Additionally, benzos create tolerance very quickly, especially shorter-acting benzos like Xanax, the result of which is the need to take increasingly higher doses to produce these same effects. This combination creates a perfect storm for dependence to develop.

What Happens During Benzo Withdrawal?

Most benzo withdrawal symptoms begin to manifest within 24 hours of the last dose. They can last from a few days to several months, depending on the strength and quantity of the drug and the length of time it has been used. Early withdrawal symptoms, experienced within a few hours of cessation of the drug, include the swift return of anxiety.

As time away from the drug increases, more symptoms appear, including:

  • intense anxiety
  • panic
  • insomnia
  • muscle spasms or tension
  • nausea, vomiting, and other gastric upset
  • mood swings, trouble concentrating, and cloudy thinking

This list is by no means all-inclusive, and every patient is different. However, because of the uncertainty and unpredictability of the number and severity of withdrawal symptoms, it is important to seek treatment when making the decision to stop using benzos.

What is Rebound Anxiety?

During the early stages of benzo withdrawal, the patient can experience any number and combination of the symptoms listed. Even those who have been taking benzos as prescribed can, and often will, suffer from rebound anxiety along with other symptoms.

The “rebound effect” in benzo withdrawal occurs when a medication that had an effect on the symptoms it was being used to treat (whether diagnosed by a physician or as a form of self-soothing or self-medicating) is discontinued. It is characterized by intense waves of anxiety, irritability, panic, insomnia, and other mood disturbances. It can be frightening for patients who have been taking benzos for anxiety, even as exactly prescribed, to be overcome with anxiety and panic. Indeed, rebound anxiety during benzo withdrawal can lead to relapse very quickly. This is why it is important that the patient gets proper treatment and support during withdrawal.

The good news is that help is available, along with support. The need for support and healthy coping skills cannot be stressed enough when it comes to combatting dependence on benzos. As with any other recovery process, the knowledge that they are not alone, that there are people who understand and are willing and able to help, is pivotal to a successful detox and long-term recovery. There are many different treatment options available, and even the most hopeless-seeming cases can and do have successful recoveries. Life after benzos is not only possible, it can be fulfilling and rewarding.

If you’re ready to make a start, you can reach a counselor 24-hours a day by calling 800-737-0933. We’re ready to provide you with the knowledge you need to take the first steps on your path to recovery.

What Are Some Ways to Weather the 48 to 72 Hour Period of Alcohol Withdrawal?

Making the decision to check into a rehab center is one you will be grateful for the rest of your life. Whether you are addicted to alcohol or some type of substance, you’ll find the help that you need from reputable rehab personnel who only have your best interests in mind. You’ll be given personalized, one-on-one treatment that will help you get through your addiction while you move on to a better you, one step at a time.

However, you may be worried about what will happen if you go into rehab when you are addicted to alcohol. Alcohol withdrawal can be difficult, if not fatal, if you are not under the care of a professional doctor while you are going through it. Read on to learn some important ways you can weather the 48 to 72 hour period of alcohol withdrawal so that you can go on to learn how to lead a sober and fulfilling life.

Symptoms of Alcohol Withdrawal

First, you will want to understand what symptoms you may experience so that you know what to expect once you stop drinking. If you have been drinking alcohol heavily for even just a few weeks, you could experience physical problems when you decide to stop. This is known as alcohol withdrawal, and the symptoms can easily range from very mild to very serious. The symptoms you experience will depend on the amount of alcohol you have indulged in, for how long, and your level of health.

After six hours of not drinking, you may experience anxiety, nausea, insomnia, vertigo, headaches, vomiting, shaky hands, irritability, anger, sweating, and more. More serious side effects can include mild hallucinations. About 5% of men and women who experience alcohol withdrawal will have delirium tremors, or “DTs”. The DTs are serious symptoms that include very vivid hallucinations and seizures. They can also cause a fever, high blood pressure, intense sweating, confusion, and a racing heart.

Getting Through Alcohol Withdrawal

Alcohol withdrawal may be easier or harder than you think. It takes time and patience to allow the alcohol to completely disappear from your body. However, you can expect the first 24 to 48 hours to be the hardest. Read on for some tips that will help you get through the worst of your alcohol withdrawal symptoms.

Take a cold shower- Taking a cold shower can help clear your mind of your racing thoughts and the urge to drink. It can also help if you are sweating and uncomfortable. Plus, a cold shower has many other health benefits!

Avoid anyone who drinks- You must always stay away from the people or even places that will cause you to want to pick up a drink. Stay far away from anyone who will enable you during this period of withdrawal. You may even want to announce a break from people over social media so that you have a reason to ignore calls and messages from those who do not have your best interests at heart.

Eat healthy- It’s easy to go for junk food when you are in withdrawal because your body will be craving the sugar it used to get from alcohol. Balance out the sugar levels by consuming lots of healthy fruits and vegetables during the first few days of withdrawal while leaving the sugary snacks behind.

Drink plenty of water- Alcohol quickly causes dehydration to occur. During withdrawal you may feel nauseated, so make sure you are drinking plenty of fluids. While water is important, you should also drink fluids that contain plenty of electrolytes, such as sports drinks.

Exercise when you can- We know that you won’t feel like it during withdrawal, but we can assure you that exercise will help. Even a small amount of exercise will release the endorphins in your brain that create the happy and content feelings we are all chasing. You’ll also have a sense of accomplishment when you exercise- a big deal when you are struggling with addiction.

Ride out your cravings- Don’t fool yourself into thinking your cravings will immediately disappear- they won’t. You’ll think about drinking alcohol many times during the withdrawal period. Just remember, the cravings WILL go away. The first 48 hours are the hardest part of alcohol withdrawal, so keep reminding yourself that you are getting through the worst and that it will get better.

We Can Help

Remember, you never have to go through alcohol withdrawal alone. When you are ready to get started on the path to sobriety, let us pave the way. Give us a call at 800-737-0933 to learn more.

What Kinds of Alcohol Detox Programs Are Covered with Health Insurance?

Just a few short years ago, health insurance plans frequently neglected to cover alcohol detox programs. Despite the fact that alcoholism causes a tragic number of chronic health ailments and deaths each year, health insurances seemed all too willing to treat the effects of alcoholism but not very willing to cover services that would prevent those health outcomes from occurring. It is only in the past few years that health insurance providers have stepped up their responsibility and recognized that alcohol detox programs are a life-saving service. Today there are many alcohol detox programs that are covered by health insurance.

You will need to check with your specific health insurance provider to find out what facilities are covered within their network, but you should be pleased to discover that most of today’s detox programs are covered by health insurance. There are many different types of detoxes to choose from. Here are a few of the most commonly covered by insurance.

7-30 Day Medical Detox

The duration of a detox program is usually a week, and these medical detox programs are often provided in hospital settings that use medication to help ease the pain and anxiety of early withdrawal symptoms. Alcohol withdrawal has many dangerous medical complications that can occur, including seizures and delirium tremens. Many alcoholics choose to undergo medical detox, and health insurance is extremely likely to cover a medical detox that lasts between 7 and 30 days.

During a stay in medical detox, you will usually at some point also speak with a counselor who can help to ease the more psychological symptoms of detox. You’ll also have a caseworker who will help to direct you to services that might be more long-term. A medical detox treats alcoholism like any other disease, and you will likely have doctors and nurses to help you through the process.

Holistic Detox Centers

Holistic detox centers treat alcoholism with a “whole body” approach. Since your whole body suffers from alcoholism, then your whole body will benefit from healing. They will work with you to ease the symptoms of withdrawal using more natural methods. You will receive a variety of different treatments that might include:

  • Music therapy
  • Meditation
  • Nutrition guidance
  • Art therapy

Residential Programs

A residential program is more than just a period of detox, but you might be referred to a residential program after you’ve completed detox, so the residential program is an extension of the detox in many ways. These programs are long-term, and they can last for as little as 3 months to even a year or more in time. You’ll have more freedom in a long-term residential program, and you will likely be able to work outside the residential facility, have visitors, and go out and even have a normal life outside of the residential program. Drug testing and procedures to “sign-in” and “sign out” of the facility helps them to maintain a drug and alcohol-free environment.

Not every residential facility is covered by insurance, but there are other programs that often pay for these facilities and make them free for people who have limited income and resources. Even if your insurance doesn’t cover a residential program, please inquire about guidelines for receiving free entry into these programs. You’ll often find that they’re free to low-income clients or clients who meet other guidelines of the facility. As you can see, insurance covers more programs now than ever before, and your best bet is to research a program you are interested in and then contact your insurance or the program and see if insurance covers it. If you’re suffering from alcoholism, the first step is to get into a program. It can literally save your life. Over the past few years, health insurance has realized that alcohol detox programs prevent many of the severe and costly physical ailments that alcohol causes. Today they realize how important it is to pay for detoxes and get help before the consequences of alcoholism are even more costly and deadly, and their revelation about the importance of detox is your good fortune.

If you want to find an alcohol detox that can help you today, please call us now at 800-737-0933. We accept many different types of insurances and strive to work with all of the people who come to us for help on solutions to treatment. We hope you will call us and begin your journey to recovery today.