Addiction

What’s a List of Pain Medications That Aren’t Habit Forming?

Each day, across this country, about 20 percent of the patients a physician sees are due to struggles with chronic pain. While the medical community once revered drugs like morphine, hydrocodone, and oxycontin as the holy grail for fast relief, recent knowledge has caused doctors to look for alternative remedies. The increase of addictions and deaths with those who use these medications has played a significant part in the opioid crisis. Though they are thought of as effective pain relievers, the side and long-term effects cannot be ignored. In the past two decades, we can see and identify the true nature of these medications.

Controlling Pain

It's easy to be unrealistic when you are dealing with chronic pain issues. People take one pill and expect their discomfort to go away completely. The medication can only reduce agony by about a third of its original state. While the medicine provides enough for people to function, their pain doesn't ever truly go away. Additionally, you must understand that pain and tissue damage are two different things. If you have pain that is caused by tissue damage, then opioids can help. However, it doesn't do that good when someone is dealing with neuropathic pain that is created from nerve damage. So what is a person supposed to take to get pain relief that isn't habit-forming and won't cause significant side effects?

•Acetaminophen

There aren't many prescription medications for pain that don't tend to cause addiction. However, you can look to over-the-counter varieties to help. Acetaminophen is an excellent medication that is great for relieving aching joints. It helps to reduce inflammation in the body as well as help with colds and flu symptoms. The side effect profile is slim, and it's considered a safe treatment for pain. The only downside is that constant use can cause liver damage that is not reversible.

•Ibuprofen

Another option for fast pain relief is Ibuprofen or the NSAID drug line. Several brand names are easily found on the shelves at any store. People turn to these medications for back pain, muscle sprains, headaches, and just about any pain out there. It's common to find strengths in 200-300 milligrams over the counter, but a doctor can prescribe them in strengths of up to 800 mg. Some say they work just as good as opioids, but they don't have all the side effects. Plus, these drugs are not habit-forming. They do a great job of reducing inflammation in the body, which helps bring relief. Though the side effects of NSAIDs are not as severe as opioids, they still can cause some issues. For instance, a person who takes these drugs chronically can develop ulcers, develop heartburn, and they can cause kidney damage. Also, they increase the chances of having a stroke or heart disease with long term use.

•COX-2 inhibitor

There is a newer product that is an NSAID, but It's a little different to other drugs in this category. The COX-2 inhibitor is a good choice for those who have gastric problems with traditional NSAID drugs. It does have the smallest risk of developing gastrointestinal problems, but it has an increased risk of having a stroke or heart attack. Some say that it's a little stronger than other drugs in its class, but it's not habit-forming and a great option for pain.

•Holistic Methods

No rule says that you must pop a pill when you are in chronic pain. Sometimes, the best way to get over pain issues is by working those strained muscles and hurting joints. An exercise is an excellent option that can help to raise serotonin levels in the brain and bring about relief. It may be uncomfortable at first, but many find that by stretching their muscle range and working those sensitive parts, the body activates its healing properties and rushes to those sites to help. Chiropractic care is another option that uses gentle manipulations of the spine to bring relief. This holistic option is well used by those with chronic back and neck pain. Putting the body back into perfect alignment can work wonders for constant pain.

Freeing Yourself From an Opioid Addiction

Did you know that one in four people in this country struggle with an opioid addiction? Are you one of them? There is a way to deal with your chronic pain without being addicted to prescription medications. We want to help you get on the right track and get your pain and addiction under control. If you would like to find out more about how our Southern Florida center can help, then call us today at 800-737-0933.

Are There Pain Medications That Aren’t Habit Forming?

America is in the midst of an epidemic of pain medication abuse. The problem is the addictive nature of prescription opioids: a recent report from the “Trust for America’s Health” found double- and triple-digit increases in synthetic opioid deaths from 2016–2017 of both males and females, from all ethnicities, and in every region of the nation. Pain is frustrating and debilitating, and it can take over your life without warning. Unfortunately, opioid-based pain medications can be addictive, which can cause an entirely new set of problems. It isn’t always simple to manage pain without habit-forming medications, or it wouldn’t be the problem it is … but there are alternatives. It’s best to be forearmed with the knowledge to protect yourself and your loved ones.

Not all Pain Medications are Habit-forming

According to government statistics, more than 47,000 Americans died from opioid overdose in 2017, a figure which includes prescription opioids, heroin, and the synthetic drug, fentanyl. Any medication requires caution, but the abuse factor makes opioids one of the riskiest. The good news is that there are safe, effective medications which aren’t habit forming—and more are in development. Also, for many types of pain, it’s been shown that opioids are not more effective than non-opioid medications.

NSAIDs

The most common non-opioid (non-narcotic) pain relievers are nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs). These are effective against mild-to-moderate pain from many different conditions, including headaches, fever, inflammation, arthritis, sprains, cramps, muscle soreness, and toothaches. NSAIDs are often available over-the-counter. Out of the nearly two dozen NSAIDs available by prescription, three are available over-the-counter in the US and most countries: • Aspirin (Bayer, Bufferin, generics) – the most common NSAID is a synthetic derivative of salicylic acid, a natural compound found in foods. Salicylic have been used for healing and pain relief since ancient times. • Naproxen (Aleve, generics) - Treats pain, fever, and swelling. Naproxen is similar to ibuprofen and begins working in just 30 minutes. • Ibuprofen (Advil, Motrin, generics) – This medicine is effective for pain and fever, and can help with swelling—but its effects wear off quickly and must be readministered every 4-6 hours. The increased risk is associated with long-term use of over three months.

Acetaminophen

This is the world’s most popular pain medication, otherwise known as Tylenol. It relieves pain by blocking the production of prostaglandins in your system that can cause inflammation and fever. If correctly managed, this is a front-line pain treatment. Acetaminophen is available over-the-counter and is generally well tolerated—though its effectiveness varies according to the pain condition and the individual's system. Though considered safe, long-term use at higher dosages does carry some risk, and serious drug interactions are possible.

Tricyclic Antidepressants

Antidepressants have proven helpful with nerve-associated pain such as with fibromyalgia and diabetic neuropathy. Tricyclics are the most common antidepressant used for pain treatment, even though their action isn't fully understood. Effects come on slowly over the period of a few weeks, not hours, and they're not habit-forming.

Other Non-Habit-forming Medications

Other non-addictive pain-relieving medications are targeted to certain conditions or applications. These require a prescription and medical oversight in the US and most countries.

SNRIs

Non-addictive antidepressants known as serotonin-norepinephrine reuptake inhibitors (SNRIs) are typically quite effective against diabetic neuropathy pain. There are several SNRIs currently on the market. • Duloxetine (Cymbalta) • Venlafaxine XR (Effexor XR) • Desvenlafaxine (Pristiq) • Milnacipran (Savella) • Levomilnacipran (Fetzima).

Antiseizure meds

Certain anticonvulsant medications seem to relieve pain by affecting calcium and GABA levels in your bloodstream. These manage pain from damaged nerves without risk of addiction. Two medications, gabapentin, and pregabalin are especially effective in treating shingles-related neuralgia, diabetic neuropathy, and pain from spinal cord injuries. Newer medications have fewer side effects than older medications of this class.

Topical Applications

Pain medicine can be applied to the skin instead of being ingested, so there isn’t a risk of addiction. One common example is the lidocaine patch that is commonly used to treat shingles-related pain. Another is capsaicin ointment, from the active ingredient of chili peppers, which is effective against joint and diabetic nerve pain.

Summary

It’s not always evident from the media's reports about opioid pain-killer addiction, but there's good news, too. A number of safe and effective non-addictive pain medications are available, and there are promising medicines on the horizon. If you have more questions or concerns, we can help: call us now 123-456-7890.

Can Florida Rehabs Help You Get Your Life Back on Track After Getting Clean?

There is a rampant addiction crisis in the US, with millions of families and individuals feeing the impact each day. Overcoming an addiction to opioids, alcohol, or even illicit drugs is never easy, even with loving friends and family to provide support. When you are considering a rehab center or facility in Florida, you may be curious about the aftercare that is provided and the type of assistance you will receive once you have completed your program in its entirety. Understanding the types of rehabilitation programs that Florida offers along with aftercare options is a way to find a solution that is best to help get your life back on track.

Types of Florida Rehabilitation Programs

In Florida, there are multiple rehabilitation programs available to assist those who struggle with a range of addictions. Inpatient rehab facilities, as well as outpatient programs, are the most prevalent types of rehabilitation solutions available in the State of Florida. Comparing both inpatient and outpatient programs is highly advisable when choosing a center or treatment facility that is optimal for you.

Inpatient Rehabilitation Centers

Inpatient rehabilitation centers require individuals in need of care and assistance to live within the center or facility itself. Those seeking inpatient care must live within the center or facility throughout the entirety of the duration of the addiction program. With an inpatient facility, you will have the opportunity to work together with both medical professionals as well as addiction specialists as they help you learn how to get your life back on track. Some of the advantages of an inpatient rehab facility include:
  • Medically Monitored Detoxing: If you are in need of a medically monitored detox, an inpatient rehab center is ideal. Medically monitored detox ensures your health and safety with proper medical guidance and observation.
  • Counseling and Therapy: Inpatient programs provide both individual and group therapy sessions which are extremely helpful for those who are seeking an outlet to share struggles and obstacles in a safe and judgment-free environment.
  • Zero-Tolerance Environment: Inpatient facilities provide a zero-tolerance environment. A zero-tolerance environment prohibits individuals from using or possessing any form of alcohol, tobacco, or drugs. Prescription medications may be provided by staff if necessary during treatment, depending on your needs.
  • Routines: Addictions can cause individuals to lose track of time while maintaining a healthy and regular routine. With an inpatient rehabilitation facility, relearn how to create and stick to a routine that is beneficial both mentally and physically. With a routine in place it is much easier to avoid temptations or finding yourself in tough situations that may cause you to relapse.
  • Activities: Relearn how to find joy in simple hobbies and activities that you once loved or cherished. Spend time socializing with others, learning a new skill, or using physical exercise as a way to keep you on the right track as you work towards a new life of sobriety.

Outpatient Rehabilitation Programs

Outpatient rehabilitation programs are also available in the State of Florida. With an outpatient program, you have the ability to continue living at home while attending work without being required to live within a facility or center. Outpatient programs often extend to therapy, counseling, and with intensive outpatient programs, monitored detoxing. Outpatient programs are ideal for those who have a strong support system or for those who have only a slight addiction with the ability to steer clear from outside temptations.

Aftercare and Support

Getting continuous treatment and aftercare is vital for those struggling with addiction, even if you have completed a 30, 60, or 90-day inpatient rehabilitation program. Aftercare solutions help individuals to reintegrate back into a normal routine with work and local resources. Additionally, aftercare solutions are also available for those who are seeking local group therapy sessions, individual counseling, and even sponsorship meetings. Before choosing an inpatient or outpatient program that is best for your needs, it is important to inquire about the type of aftercare you will receive once your program has been completed. With the right support system and proper aftercare services, feel comfortable and confident moving forward in your life as you get it back on track. Are you ready to take the next step to get your life back on track? We can help. Our counselors are available 24 hours a day. Call us at 123-456-7890 to learn more about our Florida rehabilitation programs and to discover which treatment options are right for you today.

Who Is At Risk of Abusing Opioid Medications?

America finds itself caught in an opioid addiction epidemic. Prescription painkillers, heroin and the ever-dangerous fentanyl are dominating the headlines for all the wrong reasons. If you are suffering from an addiction to any kind of opioid, you're facing some very serious long-term repercussions if you don't get help. We hope you realize that, which is why you are looking for information. With your need for information in mind, we want to encourage you to get help now. To help motivate you, we want to tell you about the treatment process. Hopefully, this will put your mind at ease and let you know what to expect. Much of our focus is going to be placed on the detox process and the use of detox medications. When you locate the right treatment facility based on your needs, you'll likely go through an intake interview. The facility's clinician is simply gathering information about your addiction profile. From this profile, they should be able to determine the proper course of treatment.

Tapering Detox Programs - The Risk of Abuse

While therapy and aftercare are important aspects of treatment, it's all predicated on the addiction sufferer successfully getting past withdrawal and their cravings. It would be a mistake to underestimate the importance of a detox program, especially for someone with an addiction to opioids. Remember, the withdrawal symptoms associated with opioid addiction can be quite dangerous. We are talking about symptoms such as:
  • Respiratory and circulatory issues
  • Severe muscle spasms in the stomach and extremity regions
  • Psychological issues such as anxiety and depression
  • Nausea, vomiting and diarrhea
  • Sleeping issues
The point of a detox program is to help clients get through these withdrawal symptoms with a minimum of discomfort. If the client does encounter discomfort, the detox facility's medical staff has the option to prescribe certain medications for relief. That brings us to a very serious discussion. There are times when a client enters rehab with a very significant addiction to an opioid substance. If the addiction is deep-rooted enough, a standard detox program might not suffice as far as keeping the client safe. That's when a tapering program becomes the best solution. In a tapering program, a doctor will prescribe medications like Suboxone or Methadone to help ease the client away from their addiction. The process could take weeks instead of months, but it's necessary for the welfare of the client. Unfortunately, tapering medications are derivatives of the substances being treated. That makes them addictive. That raises an important question: "Who Is At Risk of Abusing Opioid Medications?" The short answer is anyone who misuses the prescribed medications. Given the fact these drugs are addictive unto themselves, they must be taken as the doctor prescribes. The doctor's job is to monitor the client's progress to assure everything is going as the doctor planned. If the client takes larger doses or takes a tapering drug more often than prescribed, it's substance abuse. As you can imagine, substituting one addiction for another is not good. The client is obligated to follow the doctor's instructions or risk further problems. After going through a detox program, the client should be ready for the rest of the treatment process.

Addiction Therapy

Therapy is the meat and potatoes of addiction treatment. This is the opportunity for the client to identify the personal issues that are driving their desire to hide behind a harmful substance. To get to that point, the client has to be willing to speak openly and honestly with the therapist. With the therapist's direction, the real issues should become apparent. After identifying the issues at hand, the client has the opportunity to develop very specific coping skills they can use to combat their problems. With the right coping skills, relapses can be avoided.

Aftercare Programs

After the client has completed treatment, they have to leave rehab and begin living life on life's terms. The good news is they don't have to do that alone. The rehab facility should be able to offer them access to aftercare programs the client can use as support resources. The best support resources include outpatient counseling, sober living options and 12-Step meetings. If you have an addiction to opioids, you have to be cautious. Your overall well-being is at risk. We would like to recommend you let us help you arrest your addiction and reclaim your life. If you are ready to start treatment, please call us at 123-456-7890.

What Steps Should You Take to Use Opioid Medications Responsibly?

Opioid medications are commonly prescribed to manage pain caused by injuries and surgeries. These painkillers can be very effective, but they are also known for their addictive properties. It's important to take opioid medications responsibly to reduce the risk of dependency and addiction. Even with proper use, the potential for addiction is always present. Fortunately, there are measures you can take to use your prescription painkillers responsibly. Responsible use is important for staying healthy and successfully relieving pain. In this post, you'll discover the steps to take for proper use. Read on to learn more about safely using opioid medication.

Ask Your Doctor Or Pharmacist Questions About Your Medication

It's crucial to talk to your doctor or pharmacist about the medication prescribed to you. Opioid medications have many side effects, and they can impair physical activity. Consider writing a list of questions ahead of time. There are no silly questions, so make sure to address any concerns you have. Here are a few common questions you may ask:
  • Should I expect any negative side effects? If so, what are they?
  • Is it better to take my medication with or without food?
  • Can I take over-the-counter medications for pain relief, too?
It's crucial to get answers from medical professionals versus reading online or asking friends and family members. Your physician or pharmacist will give you accurate information that will help you use your medication responsibility.

Take Your Prescription Medication As Directed

Taking your opioid medication exactly as directed is a crucial part of responsible use. In many cases, you will be instructed to take a dose of medication every four to six hours. Do not ever take your medication more frequently than prescribed. That's the easiest yet most important tip to keep in mind. Here are some more directions and tips to follow:
  • If you aren't in pain, you may skip a dose of painkillers.
  • Do not consume any alcohol while taking opioid medication.
  • Do not take any sedative medications unless okayed by a doctor.
  • Take your medication with meals or as otherwise directed.
Make sure you read the pamphlet that comes with your medication. If you cannot find it, call your doctor or pharmacist for a replacement. You should also let your doctor or pharmacist know if you take any other prescription or over-the-counter medications. This will help you avoid the risk of potentially dangerous drug interactions.

Use Non-Opioid Pain Management Whenever Possible

Opioids are not the only option you have for pain management. You can limit your opioid use by trying out different pain management methods. Here are some examples to consider:
  • heating pads and ice packs for hot/cold therapy
  • over-the-counter NSAIDs
  • massage therapy
  • meditation and relaxation techniques
The exact methods you use depend on your specific situation. These options are generally considered safe, but it's best to use caution. Make sure to consult with your physician to ensure you choose safe non-opioid alternatives.

Dispose Of Your Leftover Opioid Medication Responsibly

When your pain is better, you may have leftover opioid medication. Getting rid of your medication in a safe and responsible manner is important. Here are some options that may be available to you:
  • local law enforcement may offer a medication take-back service; they will dispose of your painkillers for you
  • permanent collection sites for taking back medication may be available at pharmacies and hospitals near you
  • remove and destroy the medication label that contains your personal information
  • crush and mix the unused medication with dirt, coffee grounds, or other substances
  • put the crushed medication mixture in a sealed plastic bag and throw it away
Following the steps above can help reduce the risk of opioid dependency. Unfortunately, it's not always possible to completely avoid drug abuse or drug addiction. The good news is that there is help available. You can receive honest, supportive assistance without any judgment. Our counselors are available 24 hours a day. Call 123-456-7890 to get the information you're looking for.

How Are Christian Rehabs Different from Secular Rehabs?

A secular rehabilitation process often fails to accommodate the specific needs of Christian patients. This is because their strictly scientific approach neglects the power of faith, which is one of the most invaluable tools in the repertoire of a religiously oriented facility. Here are the primary distinctions between Christian recovery centers and secular rehabilitation providers:

Christian Centers Unite Patients in Collective Faith

Devout Christians who are struggling with addiction are far more likely to find support in a like-minded community. Liberation from the scourge of addiction can be achieved with the mindful counseling offered through Christian recovery centers. A spiritual kinship is established from the moment you walk through the doors. While some secular centers manage to incorporate minimal levels of religious teachings, these additions to the program are usually cursory. If Christianity is a cornerstone in the world of an individual combating addiction, it should be the foundation of their recovery and not merely an afterthought.

Spiritual Acceptance is Emphasized by Religious Recovery Groups

Although Christians won’t necessarily be ostracized in a non-religious group, their mindset might not be given the recognition it deserves. The lack of spiritual acknowledgment can be disheartening and discouraging. Although overt discrimination is rare, it is a real possibility in secular arenas. To avoid even the slightest potential risk, it is wise to seek help from those who are inclined to understand and accept your background. Even as secular treatments commonly eschew the Christian aspects of recovery, their religious counterparts do not make the same mistake. These locations are still innately informed about the latest trends arising in the academic sector. As a result, their patients receive the best of both worlds in terms of treatment.

Christian Facilities Have Extra Tools Available

Faith is an integral element to recovery that can be shunned in secular spheres, so religious individuals who are seeking help should keep their worship in mind while picking a rehab center. Here are the benefits of Christianity when battling addiction:
  • Framing the challenges of chemical dependency in religious contexts can be incredibly helpful in overcoming a negative habit.
  • Spiritual worship can be a powerful proxy for the previous need, and its positive influence will help generate a healthier lifestyle.
  • Vital prayer sessions can provide a profound link to a higher power that some addicts need.

Differences in Addressing the Consequences of Addiction

Loss is a common theme in the lives of those who deal with addiction, and these sacrifices can be properly honored in a Christian setting. Coping with these intense feelings can be incredibly difficult, especially without a pillar of faith guiding the way. Christian teachings are particularly designed to nourish the weary psyche that has had so much taken from it through addiction. Estrangements can be explained as a spiritual rite, and deaths can be accepted with an embrace of the eternal afterlife. These invaluable tactics are not typically found among secularists, and they have yet to fill the void with a meaningful substitute for faith. A secular center will often treat addiction like it’s strictly a medical issue. For some Christians, this philosophy completely fails to consider the spiritual tribulations involved in healing. Relapse may be more of a concern if the religious aspects of recovery are not properly addressed. Fortunately, a faith-based center is specifically equipped to take on the fine-tuned needs of Christian patients. With professionals who are versed in both scripture and biology, these unique facilities are tackling addiction with a versatile range of strategies at their disposal.

An Argument for Dualism in Recovery Processes

We live in a world where both types of recovery centers can coexist peacefully, especially since they cater to discrete interests and lifestyles within society. Christians should rejoice that this fine alternative to traditional recovery programs exists, and secular folks should not feel the need to scoff at a complementary methodology if it’s helping people get better.

A Note on Individualized Assessments of Treatment Facilities

While these assessments of contrasts between are representative of current trends in the recovery industry, it is important to remember that these are still far-reaching generalizations in a lot of ways. In the same way that no two secular facilities are identical, keep in mind that not all Christian centers are alike either. In addition to catering to different denominations, these centers also ascribe to their own mission statements. Individuals looking for addiction counseling should research the core tenets of a facility to make sure their program is a good fit personally.

The Importance of Getting Help Today

If you or a loved one are facing an addiction of any form, and faith is important to you, then there is no reason to fight this battle alone when highly esteemed Christian recovery centers are available. To get started on your path to healing today, call our certified counselors at 123-456-7890!

How Does Hydrocodone Dependence Work?

Not all addictions begin because of intentional behavior. There is a time when people are using legitimate medications, make a few judgment errors, and end up with a full-blown addiction to the drug in question. Yes, there's an opioid addiction epidemic in the United States. It was created from a mixed bag of causes with one of the primary culprits being prescription painkillers. Among that group of substances is a painkiller that goes by the generic name hydrocodone. For anyone out there reading this information, the drug's brand name is Vicodin. Clearly, that's a well-known name among people in the medical community and on the streets. When used as directed by a physician, hydrocodone is very good at doing what it is intended to do. It provides relief from severe pain issues. Unfortunately and not surprisingly, it's highly addictive. If someone sticks to their prescription, they shouldn't have any problems. However, making the decision to increase doses or frequency without a doctor's guidance is like playing with fire. Opioids are notorious for creating dependence, which is only a small step away from a full-blown addiction. In the section below, we want to discuss how dependence works. That includes how it begins and how quickly it can turn into an addiction.

About Hydrocodone Dependence

Before the discussion begins, there's a very important distinction between dependence and addiction that needs to be clarified. Dependence occurs when the body and mind have a strong craving for a substance. It becomes an addiction when the body goes through withdrawal symptoms when it's denied the substance it craves. Simply put, the possibility of withdrawal symptoms is the fine line between dependence and addiction. The truth about hydrocodone dependence is it usually starts innocently enough. A person has pain issues, their doctor prescribes Vicodin, and the patient starts taking the drug as the doctor prescribed. The problem is people usually enter this "contract" with unreasonable expectations. The reality is the pain relief is never quite as fulfilling as the individual expected it to be. Their solution? They start taking the drug in higher doses or more frequently. As the amount of drugs builds up in their system, the body begins to develop an expectation that the drugs will always be there. What the body wants and needs is relayed to the brain, and the brain tells its owner, hey, we need more Vicodin. That's the essence of dependence.

The Signs of Hydrocodone Addiction

As dependence progresses and the individual acts to fulfill their cravings, addiction stands in the wings waiting. FYI: Here's a few signs of hydrocodone addiction:
  • Withdrawal from personal relationships
  • Unkempt personal hygiene
  • Obsession with pursuing drugs or money for drugs
  • Escalating need to take larger doses more often
  • Destructive and criminal behavior
  • Inability to handle personal responsibilities

Treating Hydrocodone Addiction

If an addiction to hydrocodone does form, the addiction sufferer only has one viable option for recovery: They have to submit themselves to an addiction treatment program with a reputable addiction treatment center like ours. With an addiction to an opioid substance, the incoming client should expect to have to spend time in a detox program. The withdrawal symptoms associated with an addiction to said substances are quite dangerous. It just makes more sense to participate in a medically-monitored detox program where medical staffers are monitoring client progress and making sure they are safe during the detox process. After successfully clearing withdrawal and any residual cravings for their drug of choice, the client should be ready for counseling. During counseling, they will get the opportunity to work with a counselor on their issues. During the process, they will hopefully learn a lot about their addiction. That should include the driving forces behind it. At the end of the day, the goal of counseling is to identify the root causes of addiction and subsequently provide the client with the life and coping skills they will need to get around temptation and their personal triggers. That stands as the key to making sure there are no relapses in the future. We can sympathize with the bad things you are experiencing from your addiction to hydrocodone (Vicodin). With that said, we can help you get past your addiction on the way to leading a better life. If you would like more information about our services and facility, you can contact one of our administrators at 800-737-0933.

What are the Signs of Hydrocodone Addiction?

What are the Signs of Hydrocodone Addiction?

Hydrocodone is a commonly prescribed opioid medication used to treat pain which has a high potential of abuse. The use of opioids, which include prescription medications such as hydrocodone and illicit drugs such as heroin, has skyrocketed in recent decades, resulting in a widespread epidemic of abuse in the United States. It is estimated that there are currently 2 million people struggling with opioid addiction and that roughly 47,450 die every year from an opioid overdose. The crisis has been covered widely in the news, putting citizens on high alert regarding potential addiction in themselves and their loved ones. Understanding the signs of a hydrocodone addiction can be a vital step to starting down a path towards recovery. Here a few things to know regarding hydrocodone addiction.

What is Hydrocodone?

As previously mentioned, hydrocodone is a prescription opioid medication used to treat pain. It is semi-synthetic, meaning it is created in a lab rather than occurring naturally like other opioids such as morphine and codeine. Hydrocodone is generally combined with other medications, such as cough syrup to aid in reducing certain symptoms in addition to minimizing pain. It works by binding to certain receptors in the brain and altering the way the body reacts to pain. Hydrocodone can be prescribed in various forms including syrups, tablet, and capsules which are either extended release or short-acting. Outside of providing pain relief, hydrocodone can induce feelings of euphoria, making it a prime medication for abuse and addiction.

What are the Signs of Hydrocodone Addiction?

In the beginning, hydrocodone use may create symptoms of slowed heart rate, anxiety, headache and difficulty breathing. Under normal use, these symptoms are quite regular and will tend to dissipate with time. However, hydrocodone addiction occurs when an individual begins to take the medication outside of the way it was intended to be used. Your loved one may tell you that they have begun taking "just a little bit more" than the doctor has prescribed because their pain is not being absolved with the prescribed dose. This is an indication that the body has built up a tolerance to the medication and is no longer producing endorphins or aiding in pain relief without the presence of the drug and is one of the first signs that an individual is dependent on hydrocodone. Other signs of hydrocodone abuse include:
  • Seizures: Seizures can occur if an individual has used hydrocodone heavily or for an extended period of time and attempts to quit without medical assistance.
  • Depression: Your loved one may withdraw from social activities or things they once loved, especially when they are prevented from using hydrocodone. They may also begin to ignore their appearance and hygiene.
  • Confusion: A person with a hydrocodone addiction may have difficulty holding conversations or thinking logically.
  • Blurred vision: Individuals may find themselves knocking things over or running into objects due to poor vision.
  • Paranoia: Your loved one may begin to feel persecuted or illogically afraid of people and things they were once comfortable with.
It is also important to understand that individuals who have regularly used hydrocodone over a long period of time or who have become accustomed to using large doses generally experience withdrawal symptoms. This occurs when there is a significant reduction in the amount of hydrocodone used, resulting in uncomfortable and sometimes severe physical and mental symptoms including, difficulty breathing, muscle weakness, difficulty breathing, clammy skin, and severe anxiety and depression.

What Should I do if My Loved One Is Addicted to Hydrocodone?

The best thing you can do for a loved one addicted to hydrocodone is to encourage them to get help. While many may believe that they can quit on their own or "cold turkey", this method is not encouraged. Withdrawal symptoms can be quite severe for those with an even moderate addiction and enduring withdrawal without the help of a knowledgable professional can increase their risk for relapse. Thankfully there are people out there that can provide skilled and compassionate care throughout all stages of recovery. Your loved one does not have to quit on their own and there are options available to increase their chances of success. Ready to get started? Our counselors are available 24 hours a day. Give us a call at 123-456-7890.

How Long Does It Take to Get Admitted to Inpatient Drug Rehab?

It's very encouraging that you are seeking information about getting treatment for your addiction. Should you decide to go forward and do so, you'll have a bit of a fight on your hands. Fortunately, this is the "good" fight and something you don't have to do on your own. The first step towards recovery is yours to make. You have to come to terms with the reality you have an addiction. It's not a knock on your strength or character. Addiction is a disease. As such, it's not going to go away without treatment, which brings us to the second step towards recovery. You have to reach out for help. You can forget all the internet self-help solutions people are offering. They are seldom effective in the least. What you need is to enlist the services of a professional addiction treatment facility like ours. One question you might be wanting to ask is, "How long does it take to get admitted into an inpatient program?" Addiction is a very serious issue that addiction treatment facilities take very serious. As such, it's necessary for rehab facilities to streamline the process in order to efficiently get people in the door and ready for treatment. To answer your question, the admission process takes as little as an hour. In most cases, the facility's intake clinician will do an interview to determine the extent and nature of the prospective client's addiction. From there, financial considerations will be discussed to make sure the necessary payment resources are in place to begin treatment. Assuming everything goes well, there's no reason why the prospective client won't become an actual client within an hour. Of course, available bed space could become an issue. After admission, the facility's clinicians will execute the addiction treatment plan. From here, we want to discuss the entire addiction treatment process.

The Treatment Process After Admission

The modern-day drug rehab facility uses a wider range of treatment options than rehabs of yesteryear. Innovation has put a lot more treatment options in the toolboxes of treatment professionals all over the country. While treatment options are evolving, the actual process remains intact. For the most part, the addiction treatment process includes three steps as follows:
  • Detox Programs
  • Therapy and Counseling
  • Aftercare programs
For your benefit, we want to look at these steps in greater detail.

Detox Programs

When a client enters rehab within hours of their last drink or hit, they will have taken their last dose. Within 8-16 hours, they'll start to feel the effects of withdrawal. When the client's addiction is significant, the withdrawal symptoms can be quite dangerous. Clinicians will typically prescribe a medically-monitored detox program when they feel a client's health will be at risk as withdrawal takes hold. While the facility's medical staff is monitoring the client's withdrawal progress, they are hoping the client will be able to detox with a minimum of intervention. However, they are also ready to prescribe relief medication should pain or discomfort become apparent. When the detox process is complete, the client should be focused enough to handle therapy.

Therapy and Counseling

A majority of the time in treatment is spent in therapy. The client will be working closely with their therapist(s) on a mission of self-discovery. A counselor usually decides to deliver intensive counseling on an individual basis while also using group therapy as a way to get clients to interact with one another. Throughout therapy, the goal is very clear: find the driving force behind the client's addiction. When successful, it becomes easier to find solutions in the form of strong coping skills. The success of therapy is measured by the client's ability to create a strong recovery.

Aftercare Programs

The end of therapy is the beginning of recovery. In the coming months, the client is likely to encounter temptation and their triggers. The problem with that is a lot of recovering addiction sufferers are not yet ready to completely stand on their own. For that reason, rehab facilities offer aftercare programs to help keep former clients stay sober. The most prominent aftercare options include access to 12-Step meetings, additional outpatient counseling and sober or transitional living. There really is little cause for concern about the rehab admission process. As long as bed space and financial resources are available, you should be admitted within an hour or two. The important thing is to get help. If you are ready, you can reach us at 123-456-7890.

How Can the Marchman Act Help Me Get Treatment for My Loved One?

Far too many people know how painful it is to watch a loved one struggle with an addiction to drugs or alcohol. For some friends and family members, the pain is very personal because they have suffered collateral damage at the hands of their loved one's addiction. The problem is it's difficult for family members to exert any influence over a loved one who is unwilling to admit they are dealing with the cycle of addiction. Family members can only hope there will come a time when their addicted loved one comes to the realization there's a problem. At that point, there's hope the addiction sufferer will finally reach out for help. Short of that happening, the only other recourse family and friends might have is an intervention. Sometimes interventions work and sometimes they don't. If an intervention fails, loved ones don't have the option of putting a gun to their addicted loved one's head to drag them into rehab. With all that said, there is a law in Florida that empowers family members to force a loved one into rehab if they can establish the loved one's addiction makes the loved one danger to themselves or to others. The name of that law is the "Marchman Act." FYI: The Marchman Act is officially listed as the "Hal S. Marchman Alcohol and Other Drug Services Act of 1993". At this point, we would like to engage in further discussion about the Marchman Act and how it works.

Using the Marchman Act to Get a Loved One Into Rehab

Before we begin this discussion, it seems prudent to point out something that should be evident. Contrary to some people's beliefs, using the Matchman to have a loved one involuntarily placed in an addiction treatment facility is not an adversarial action. In many cases, it is being done out of legitimate love and concern for the addicted family member. Think about it for a moment. An individual is trying to survive life caught up in a substantial addiction to drugs or alcohol. Their life is crumbling before their very eyes. Maybe they are homeless or dealing with financial, health and relationship problems. They won't seek help because they either don't want help, don't believe they have an addiction or have given up hope. Left to their own devices, there's real potential these kinds of addiction sufferers are headed down the road towards prison, insanity or even death. What kind of a relative or friend would just stand by and let that happen? The Marchman Act exists for this very reason. It's not a blanket option for family members to exercise in order to remove an unwanted nuisance from their own lives. Like any other restrictive law on the books, a family member has to show just cause that their addicted loved one poses a real danger to themselves or others. Making that claim has to be adjudicated in a court of law.

Reasons Marchman Act Can Be Exercised

Remember, a family member has to show just cause as to why their loved one should be involuntarily subjected to addiction treatment. The first qualification is the addiction sufferer must show a high level of impairment whether sober or not. If they are impaired, it becomes reasonable to assume they don't have the capacity for taking proper care of themselves or making good judgments. They have basically lost the ability to control their lives. The other reason why the courts might exercise the Marchman act is if the family member can show that their loved one has made threats or is a danger to others. Under the influence of a substance, any signs of aggression should be given extra scrutiny. The Process If a family member makes the decision to attempt to have the courts invoke the Marchman Act on their loved one, there's a very specific process the family member must follow. Here are the steps in order:
  • Petition the court with a sworn affidavit
  • A court hearing is held for involuntary assessment
  • The defendant is held for up to five days for medical and mental health evaluation
  • If found impaired, the court will issue order for involuntary treatment of up to 60 days
  • If the defendant refuses, they are held in civil contempt of court
If you have concerns about the welfare of an addicted loved one living in Florida, we would like to offer our addiction treatment services. If you need help with the process, you can contact us at 800-737-0933.