Alcohol

How Do You Know If an Alcohol Treatment Center in Florida Takes Your Insurance?

It's not easy to admit you have a problem with addiction to alcohol. You've tried to overcome this struggle on your own only to slide down a slippery slope that leads to more drinking. When it gets to the point that your life revolves around finding your next drink, it's time to make a change. Accepting that this is a problem that is too big to handle on your own takes courage. Reaching out and asking for help takes even more. You're ready to enter an alcohol treatment center in Florida. One question remains. How do you know if your treatment center in Florida will take your health insurance?

Treatment Center Representatives Can Help You Navigate Insurance

Don't let concerns about insurance hold you back from getting the help you need to overcome alcohol addiction. Representatives at alcohol treatment centers can provide you with information about what types of health insurance they accept. Don't be afraid to ask questions. They are here to work with you, opening the door to effective treatment options.

Talk to Your Insurance Provider

If you are like most people, you may only be aware of the basics about your health insurance policy, such as how much your co-pay is for your doctor appointments. If you can't find the specifics about policy information or you have questions about your coverage, contact a customer service representative at your insurance company. Be sure to ask:

  • Is your alcohol treatment center of choice covered by your policy?
  • What is a list of treatment centers that are in-network?
  • How long are you covered for inpatient treatment?
  • How long are you covered for outpatient treatment?
  • What portion of your expenses will you need to pay out of pocket?

Once you have your policy information, you can share that with your alcohol treatment center.

Don't Let Financial Concern Keep You From Getting Treatment for Alcohol Addiction

Paying for treatment is a concern for every victim of substance abuse. However, you need to think of the big picture. Overcoming your addiction in order to live your best life is worth any portion of the bill that you must pay. Failing to get treatment can cost you more than your financial stability. It can rob you of your job, your relationships, and your health. If you discover that your insurance company will not cover your alcohol treatment or it will only cover a portion of your expenses, don't give up hope. You may qualify for financial assistance. You can also apply for financing at your treatment program. A sliding scale may also be possible to assist you in making your treatment more affordable.

The Benefits of Alcohol Treatment Far Outweigh the Costs

No matter what expenses result from alcohol treatment in Florida, you will be taking control of your life. It's time to move forward and surround yourself with a support team that has one goal. Highly trained professionals want to give you the resources and counseling you need to overcome alcohol addiction. Now is your chance to turn your life around. Counselors are ready to help you. Call 800-737-0933 to find out how you can get started with alcohol treatment as soon as possible.

How Can Families Support an Alcoholic in Recovery?

Alcoholism, like any disease, affects more than just the sufferer. Those close to alcoholics are also greatly impacted by the disease. It is natural and healthy to wonder how to best support an alcoholic in recovery because once one leaves treatment, continued reassurance from family and friends becomes vital to a favorable outcome.

Remaining sober is a lifelong process, and even when ample time has passed, the alcoholic will encounter roadblocks that threaten sobriety. Those close to an alcoholic must remember that although maintaining a sober lifestyle becomes less intimidating over time, it is never effortless. Recovering alcoholics have needs from their support network that go beyond verbal encouragement.

Expect Prolonged Hurdles

A prevalent mistake many make in their attempt to look after someone in recovery is believing that time spent in rehab is a cure-all. While entering a treatment program is a crucial first step in recovery, there is much more work to do upon departing rehab. In some respects, the months after leaving are more daunting than the time in treatment.

Once back out in the real world, navigating everyday life, alcoholics find themselves surrounded by triggers. Anything from passing a liquor store, to running into old drinking pals, can take a good day and throw it into a tailspin. Those hoping to provide support should respect that the alcoholic will battle triggers indefinitely and does not emerge from a treatment program magically cured of the urge to drink. Recognizing that battling alcohol abuse is a marathon and not a sprint is critical.

Maintain a Healthy Balance

Reassuring the alcoholic of ongoing support is essential, but there must be a balance. Loved ones cannot give so much of themselves that they feel as if they are losing their own identity. They should not go so far as to assume all of the alcoholic’s responsibilities. This includes household duties as well as financial obligations. Those in recovery do garner strength from those around them, but they should not be treated as if they are incompetent.

Recognizing possible codependency is mandatory for those who feel that their self-worth might be reliant on the relationship with the alcoholic. Nobody should lose their sense of self when providing care and compassion in any situation. Codependency is a learned behavior and can cause one to actually pave the way to a relapse. For this reason, it must be addressed if there is any sort of a codependent dynamic between an addict and a loved one.

Know Relapse Signs

It is not pessimistic to bone up on the signs of relapse because it can and does happen for some. Taking a drink is the final step of a slide back, and certain signs of an impending relapse are present before actual alcohol consumption takes place. One of the main signs involves the alcoholic failing to maintain the established treatment program and deeming it no longer necessary. Long after the drinking has ceased, physical withdrawal symptoms can rear their ugly head, and alcoholics will often drink in an effort to quell the physical afflictions.

In addition to knowing red flags, having an action plan in place, should a relapse occur, is imperative. Scrambling to formulate a plan after an unfortunate relapse is not ideal. Lack of preparation wastes valuable time. If bottom lines have been discussed, they must be followed for a higher likelihood of success for those who have suffered a slip. Developing a strategy should not be a secretive endeavor. The alcoholic can and should be part of the planning.

Those seeking information on how to support an alcoholic in recovery have already taken an admiral step by striving to educate themselves. If this is new territory, information is invaluable. Those with further questions can rely on our team of expert counselors who are on hand 24 hours per day at 800-737-0933.

How Can You Help an Alcoholic Parent You Don’t Live With?

It's tough when someone you love is addicted to alcohol. And when the alcoholic in your life happens to be your parent, it can be particularly difficult to know how to help -- or even whether you can make a difference. For adult children of alcoholics, watching a parent ruin their health and relationships with alcohol is often so devastating that even staying in touch is fraught with tension.

There's only so much anyone can do to help an alcoholic who is not ready to recover. But there are some things you can do to help your parent eventually make that choice. Here's how you can help and support an alcoholic parent you don't live with anymore.

How to Talk to an Alcoholic Parent

One of the best things you can do for your parent is to have an honest conversation with them. This might be a little awkward, but you, as your parent's child, have a particularly good chance of getting through to them eventually. That's not to say that your first conversation with your parent will lead to them deciding to recover. But it does mean that gathering your courage and opening a dialogue is important, and you should do it sooner rather than later.

There are a few key things to remember when you talk to your parent about their drinking. First, find the right time to talk. Don't talk to your parent when they are drunk, because that will make it difficult to have a productive conversation, and your parent will be more likely to get defensive.

Second, be sure to frame all your concerns as "I" statements. Emphasize to your parent that you love them and are concerned about their drinking habits. Don't accuse them of anything, or they will probably argue. For instance, don't say, "You're an alcoholic and you need to do something about it." Instead, say something like, "I've noticed that you're drinking a lot lately, and I'm worried about your health."

Using concrete examples during your conversation may help prevent your parent from becoming too argumentative. If your parent's alcoholism has caused problems with their finances or relationships, for example, use those as talking points to support your case. Your parent may not be happy to hear it, but the more concrete evidence you provide to support your concern, the more likely they'll be to consider what you say.

Finally, emphasize to your parent that help is available. The point of the conversation isn't to make your parent feel like they've messed things up forever. Rather, it's to help them see that they don't have to continue living in an unhealthy way. Your parent may not be ready to accept help yet, but it's important that they realize help is available in the first place.

Maintaining a Relationship with an Alcoholic Parent

It's difficult for many adult children to stay close with a parent who is an alcoholic. But, as long as you feel safe around your parent, making an extra effort to stay in touch with them could make all the difference in the world to them. Call or text your parent frequently to let them know that you're thinking of them, and plan to get together with them when you can. Find things to do that don't involve drinking. Taking your parent's mind off alcohol will be especially helpful if and when they decide to recover.

Be careful not to enable your parent. Providing unconditional love and support does not have to mean overlooking their unhealthy relationship with alcohol. Stay honest with your parent, and don't make excuses for them, especially if their alcoholism leads them to make poor decisions. Maintain your own boundaries while letting your parent know that you are there to help them with recovery.

Getting Support for Yourself

Don't forget to care for yourself while you try to help your alcoholic parent. The children of alcoholics often have emotional issues of their own, and you need and deserve support as much as your parent does. Make an effort to take care of your physical and emotional well-being by getting enough sleep, eating well, and seeing friends often. Support groups and therapy can also be helpful if you are struggling to cope with the realities of having an alcoholic parent.

Alcoholism is often called a family disease, and the children of alcoholics are affected by it even if they don't live with their addicted parent anymore. Your compassion, support, and honesty can go a long way towards helping your parent recover and live a healthier life. If it's time to get help for yourself or someone you love, call us today at 800-737-0933 to learn about options for recovery.

What Payment Plans Are Available for Alcohol Treatment in Florida?

Alcoholism affects millions of individuals and families alike in the US each year. Approximately 88,000 individuals die each year from alcohol-related deaths in the United States alone, making it one of the most deadly addictions to face and overcome.

Addiction to alcohol is not only psychological but also physical after long-term heavy use. As alcohol forms a physical addiction in the body, it becomes increasingly difficult to quick drinking and to stop seeking alcohol altogether. When you want to make a change for the better in your life but you are unsure of how to pay for the program you require, learn more about the alcohol treatment solutions and facilities that are right for you.

Alcohol Treatment Programs in Florida

Because alcoholism affects individuals in many different ways, there are various programs available to choose from when undergoing rehabilitation treatment. The most common types of treatment programs for those addicted to alcohol in Florida include inpatient rehabilitation facilities, outpatient solutions and meetings, and IOP (Intensive Outpatient Programs). Before determining which solution is right for you it is important to assess your addiction along with the type of care and support you require to steer clear from the temptation to use alcohol again.

Health Insurance

Many alcohol treatment programs and rehabilitation centers accept a range of health insurance providers to cover a portion or all of the treatment you require. If you currently pay for private health insurance or if you are receiving health insurance through your employer, research mental health and addiction services that are covered with your plan. If you are still unsure about your potential coverage, reach out to a counselor or representative at an alcohol treatment center to learn more about your qualifications and coverage options.

Private Payment Methods

If you do not have insurance or if you prefer to pay for the treatment you require upfront, private payment methods are also accepted at most alcohol treatment centers and facilities. Private payments are possible using credit cards, debit cards, and checks. Most alcohol treatment facilities provide complete privacy protection for those who are looking to pay upfront for the services they require.

Payment Plans

Whether your health insurance does not cover all of the treatment you require or if you are simply interested in paying for services on your own but do not have all of the funds readily available, consider a payment plan. Work together with an alcohol treatment inpatient facility or outpatient support program to set up a payment program that works for you financially based on the services you need and your current financial status.

Choosing the Right Alcohol Treatment Center for You

Inpatient alcohol addiction facilities are optimal for those who have struggled with alcoholism for years or even decades and for those who have an extremely high tolerance for alcohol. Because alcohol has the ability to cause adverse effects on the body, it is highly recommended to seek out an inpatient alcohol facility if you believe you are at risk. Alcohol withdrawals can range from nausea and vomiting to tremors, seizures, heart failure, heart attacks, coma, and death. Inpatient rehab facilities provide medically-monitored detox solutions to ensure your health and safety while eliminating the substance from your body.

Outpatient programs along with IOP (Intensive Outpatient Programs) are viable treatment solutions for those who have emotional and moral support outside of the program itself. Outpatient programs do not require you to relocate, miss work, or miss out on your everyday life. Attend outpatient meetings, group sessions, and individual counseling appointments to gain valuable insight into addiction and how to overcome it with the right support. Outpatient programs are optimal if you have the willpower to avoid temptation and want to move forward with your life without the need for intensive inpatient care and monitoring.

While paying for alcohol treatment in the State of Florida may feel daunting or overwhelming, it does not have to feel impossible. Overcoming an addiction to alcohol is never easy, but it is possible with an alcohol treatment center or program that works to fit your needs. With the right assistance and guidance, discover an inpatient or outpatient alcohol treatment program that works for you and provides you with the necessary support to make long-term changes to your life.

Our counselors are available 24 hours a day. Call 800-737-0933 to learn more about the alcohol treatment centers near you in the State of Florida and to discover which program is right for you today.

What Are Your Most Important Patient Rights When Completing a Program at an Alcohol Rehab Center?

One of your primary concerns when entering treatment for drugs and alcohol is what rights you will have while in treatment. The thought of treatment is scary for most, as it is seen as a place where you are giving up certain freedoms in order to obtain freedom from addiction. As this is a struggle for many struggling with addiction to drugs and alcohol, the rights of you the patient become very important.

Just what rights do you have as a participant in an addiction recovery program? While the final answer varies from program to program, some of the underlying philosophies of patient rights look the same across all types of treatment. Let's look at a few of these rights that you, the patient, will look to in order to feel empowered and confident in your recovery:

Patient right #1: Your privacy

Thanks to HIPAA, you have the right to almost complete privacy with respect to your treatment. You work with your recovery specialists to uncover a plan for disclosure that is on your own time and within your comfort zone. While you may have to alert family members and your place of employment in order to gain support for your treatment, only those who must know of these plans will be notified, and they must hold up privacy laws on your behalf as well. This leaves you freedom to enter recovery knowing that disclosure happens on your timeline.

Patient right #2: The right to refuse or to give consent to any type of therapy

Many patients begin treatment under the assumption that they must participate in all aspects of care, and while it is expected that you are a willing participant in most activities and treatments that are suggested for you, you still have the right to refuse care or to give consent to any type of care that is presented to you as an option. Looking over your detailed care plan with qualified professionals and having them explain aspects of care that may make you uncomfortable or resistant to complete treatment might help dispel any notions that this is not the right step for you to take. Enter these meetings with an open mind, and know that the professionals in your program have your best interests and your total health in mind when creating your plan.

Patient right #3: The right to have access to your medical records

As a patient in recovery, it is essential that you know where you begin, and what types of obstacles you might be facing in recovery. You have the right to be informed of your condition, and to be able to make decisions based on what you feel is best for your healing journey. Don't be afraid to ask some difficult questions of your care team, and to courageously open yourself up to the truth of your physical and mental condition so that you can begin to finally heal.

Patient right #4: The right to participate free of discrimination

You deserve to have a care experience that is free from all acts of discrimination or withholding of care based on age, sex, religion, ethnicity, or disability. Quality programs make accommodations for all entering participants, and they provide individualized care based on client need, not program preference.

Patient right #5: The right to know about cost of services

Knowing how treatment will impact you and your family financially is a very important step in determining what kind of care you will receive. Your program should fully disclose the cost of all services, whether those services are funded through insurance, and what portion of care, if any, you will be responsible for. Being able to financially plan for care will take additional stress off of everyone involved and allow you, the patient, to relax knowing that payment will be taken care of.

You've made the courageous step to enter treatment and begin healing; don't let anxiety about your rights as a patient slow down or stop this process from happening. Don't hesitate; give us a call today at 800-737-0933 to begin the exciting process of recovery and reclaiming your life. You deserve total health!

Will Alcoholism Rehab Help Mend Damaged Relationships With Your Loved Ones?

Given enough time, a person's addiction will eventually start causing collateral damage. Unfortunately, that collateral damage usually involves the addict's family, friends and co-workers.

When looking at the immediate people surrounding a addict's life, we find four groups of people. These groups include:

  • People who are totally oblivious to what's taking place
  • Blind supporters and enablers
  • The supporters who are trying to encourage the addict to get help
  • The people who get victimized in some way, leading to hurts feeling, anger and estrangement

The first group of people are usually oblivious because they are either naive or they simply don't want to know what's going on. These are the folks who rationalize the strange things they see and assign addiction traits to things like unrelated health issues or temporary difficulties.

The second group of people, the enablers, present the biggest problem for the addict. These are the folks who are acutely aware their loved one has an addiction, yet try to show support by acquiescing to requests for money, space, understanding and even bail money if associated crimes occur. Anyone who would behave in such a manner is simply guilty of giving the addict a license to continue their addictive behavior.

The supporters form an interesting group. These are the people who show concern and actually make efforts to convince the addict to get. They seem to have an acute awareness that they can't enable the addict to maintain their addictive behavior and instead, make efforts to clear the way for the addict to get help. This is the group of people that would most likely put together an intervention.

For the addict, the final group is the most difficult group with which they have to deal. These are typically people that have been embarrassed and/or victimized by the addict's action. The resulting feelings of estrangement and anger set the stage for more issues in the future. This would be particularly true with loved ones who have important relationships (spouse, parents, siblings) with the addict and could be important supporters during recovery. It's this group that might cause the addict to seek treatment in the hopes it will help them mend broken relationships.

Can Rehab Help Mend Relationships?

If you find yourself isolated and alone because of your addiction, that's certainly a good reason to seek addiction treatment. With that said, it would be better if you wanted help regardless of your relationships. The reality is your overall well-being should be your number one focus. Why should anyone care about you if you can't show some level of concern for yourself?

If you are willing to admit defeat and submit yourself for addiction treatment at a top rehab facility, it's reasonable to assume there's a possibility you'll get a chance to mend fences and fix relationships. Here's a few ways that might happen:

  • Your loved ones will come around when they see your efforts
  • As you learn about your addiction, you can use that information to educate your loved one
  • Many top rehabs offer family counseling

Let's look at these in more depth.

Loved Ones Come Around

After a successful stint in rehab, you behavioral issues should show improvement. If your bad behavior prompted the relationship problems, there's a good chance better behavior will prompt them to forgive your transgressions. You might get an opportunity to help this process if you take time to try to make amends, perhaps through a 12-Step program.

Educating Your Loved Ones

Sometimes, the estrangement occurs because loved ones don't understand what the addict is going through. Instead of investigating, they simply decide to distance themselves from the addict. As you learn the truth about your illness, you might be able to salvage damaged relationships by passing that educating on and hoping for a new level of understanding.

Family Therapy

If your loved ones are willing to participate in the healing process, there's some really good family counseling programs available through rehab. Working with a qualified addiction counselor, loved ones can come together to learn more about addiction, enabling, the importance of open communication and the importance of family support to help the recovering addict stay clean.

If you are hurting due to loss and damaged relationships, you can start the healing process by seeking help for yourself. For more information about addiction treatment and family counseling, please give us a call at 800-737-0933.

When Can You See Your Family During Alcoholism Rehab?

Making the commitment to participate in an inpatient alcohol treatment program can be an unnerving experience. It means stepping away from everything you know only to put your care in the company of strangers. That sense of uncertainty can actually be frightening to some and stirs many questions about how family relationships will be managed. Taking the time to understand how family is handled in a rehab environment can go a long way toward setting your mind at ease.

Depending on your familial relationships, your loved ones may be equally concerned with whether or not they will be able to see you in the facility. After all, treatment typically lasts 28 days or more and that can be a long time to go without seeing a parent, sibling, spouse, or child. Fortunately, visitations are permitted in most cases, though they're regulated by laws and the facility's own rules.

You Will Not Be Alone

As you begin treatment, you will not be permitted to see your family members. This is not a decision made out of cruelty or malice, but out of a concern for your recovery. The early phase of your treatment will be the most difficult and visits from loved can be distracting and counterproductive. This is a time for you to focus on yourself and on getting well.

Meanwhile, your family members may try to find out about your situation and may feel frustrated that the treatment center's representatives won't disclose any information about you. The treatment facility likely has its own rules on confidentiality that prohibit revealing this type of information, but there are federal laws in place as well. This ensures your privacy is protected, while you're attempting to get well. You can share your experiences with your family, once you can begin visitations.

Eventually, Family Involvement Will Be Encouraged

In the early phases of rehab, you'll rely on the support offered by other recovering alcoholics. While this is certainly helpful and encourages open sharing, peer support can't replace the support offered by family. This is why family visitations will be permitted down the road. Getting support from family members goes a long way toward reducing the risks of a relapse, so treatment facilities try to get family members involved in the recovery process.
Some treatment centers offer a family day on a regular basis. This allows you to stay in touch with your loved ones, but also benefits your recovery process. There are three primary ways family involvement aids the recovery process:

  • Accurate Assessment - Family visitations let caregivers see how the recovering addict associates with family members.
  • Encouragement - Visitations motivate recovering addicts to continue to improve, so they can return home as soon as possible.
  • Rebuilding Trust - This is also an opportunity to address the relationship issues caused by alcoholism. It's an opportunity to begin rebuilding relationships.

Talking to Your Children About Rehab

One of the biggest concerns the treatment process raises is in how to talk to your young children about your addiction treatment. This is something that needs to be addressed, because you will have to explain to them why they won't see you for awhile. This may involve explaining that they will have to live with another family member, as well. It's important to set aside the time to discuss the situation, so your children will have a good understanding. Otherwise, they may blame themselves for your absence.

Prior to this discussion, take the time to familiarize yourself with the facts about addiction and alcoholism. Your children will have many questions, so you will want to be prepared to answer them. You should also think about how you'll speak to them. If you use medical jargon or talk too far above them, they may have difficulty understanding your answers. Instead, use words that are more appropriate for their ages. When answering their questions, be honest and as open as possible, while stressing that they aren't the cause of your addiction. This will be a difficult discussion and it's important to make sure your children aren't left feeling responsible for the situation. They should simply be made to understand that you're going away to heal, so you'll be healthier and happier.

When you are ready to get help for your alcoholism, you can contact one of our counselors at 800-737-0933. We're available 24 hours a day to answer your questions and schedule a consultation. Making this call is the first step towards recovering from your addiction.

What Do You Need to Take Care Of Before Going to an Alcohol Rehab Center?

Choosing to seek treatment for an addiction to alcohol is a brave and wise decision for you to make. If you have struggled with alcoholism for many years, you are likely seeking help for the addiction now because you have realized you need help and would like to live a much healthier life. Before leaving for treatment at a rehabilitation center, there are certain things you are going to need to take care of.

Certain arrangements must be made prior to you leaving your home and traveling quite the distance to go to a place where you can get all the support and guidance you could possibly want and need. If you make these arrangements in advance, you will have less to stress over and more to look forward to, such as becoming sober and learning new ways to cope with your stress while handling the temptation of having a drink when things start to get a bit rough.

Make Arrangements For Your Children

If you are a parent, you are going to need to figure out where your children can stay while you seek treatment. Although the thought of leaving your children behind may cause you to feel worried and sad, you need to remind yourself that you are seeking treatment to become a healthier version of yourself. If you are a healthier version of yourself, you can be everything that you need to be for your children, such as a positive influence and role model in their lives. Reach out to your closest loved ones to see if they would be able to watch your children and take good care of them while you are away at a rehab center for treatment.

When you know your children are in good hands because they are staying with their grandparents, aunts and uncles, or other reliable relatives, you can focus more on taking the right steps to becoming sober rather than worrying about what is going on with the children. Anyone who loves and cares about you and your kids will have no problem watching them so that you can do the right thing and seek help for your addiction to alcohol.

Take a Break From Your Job

If you are currently working, you are going to need to take off from your job. You may have vacation days that you can use up while you are seeking treatment. However, if you do not have many vacation days available, you should be honest with your employer and let him or her know why you are going away. In many instances, employers are understanding of the situation. While you may not get paid time off, your employer could be willing to give you your job back when you get back home after staying at a treatment center for a certain period, such as 30 days or even 60 days.

Taking a break from your job is not always ideal, but it is something you are going to need to do if you are serious about becoming sober. No job is worth ruining your chances of getting help for a problem you have suffered with for such a long time.

Before heading off to any treatment center, there are certain things that must be handled. If you are a parent, you need to make arrangements for your children so that they have safe and comfortable place to stay while you are away and working on yourself. In addition to making arrangements for the kids, you will need to plan on taking a break from your job by letting your employer know that you will need to take time off. If you dream of living a sober life and you are ready to take the first steps, our counselors are ready and waiting to speak to you both day and night. Reach out to our counselors today at 800-737-0933.

Court-Imposed Treatments for DUI/DWI Convictions

If you've been convicted of a DUI or DWI, your court order may include enrollment in drug or alcohol treatment as part of your sentence. What kind of treatments do courts typically impose? In this article, we'll take a look at some of the more common ones and what you can expect from each.

We encourage you to take this opportunity to reflect on your life and decide if it's time to make a change. Although it's a difficult and embarrassing situation, many people view a DUI/DWI conviction as a wake-up call to get the treatment they need. Once you're in treatment, you'll learn that you have nothing to be ashamed of and that many other good people are struggling to find the peace of recovery.

Typical Court-Ordered Treatments for a DUI/DWI Conviction

State-Certified Alcohol and Drug Courses

If you're a first-time offender or your offense did not involve an additional major crime, you will probably have to attend a state-certified alcohol and drug education course. Depending on your state and the court's ruling, this could be a course that runs anywhere from 12 weeks to 24 weeks.

  • You'll attend weekly or twice-weekly meetings at the treatment center.
  • Classes are held as group sessions with other people who have been convicted or are awaiting trial for a DUI.
  • You will have to pay for the sessions and the price varies by center.
  • Most of these treatment centers conduct random drug and alcohol tests.

Attendance at Alcoholics Anonymous or Narcotics Anonymous

In addition to inpatient or outpatient treatment, you may also be required to regularly attend meetings of Alcoholics Anonymous (AA) or Narcotics Anonymous (NA). Here's what you need to know about AA and NA.

  • The meetings are free of charge.
  • AA and NA are based on the "12 Steps" program of recovery.
  • Although these programs include a religious element, religious belief is not obligatory and many nonreligious people attend AA and NA.
  • Meetings are held at all times of day and night in many different locations.

Inpatient Rehabilitation

If your sentence includes compulsory enrollment in an inpatient rehabilitation center or "rehab," you'll have to complete a 30-day, 90-day or 180-day program. In some cases, the court may impose a longer term of inpatient care.

You may be panicked or frightened at the thought of rehab. Will you have to go to another state, will you have to leave behind your friends, family and job? Will it be like going to prison?

Your fears are understandable, but please know that for many people, inpatient rehabilitation is a lifesaver. Let's face it. If you have a conviction for DUI or DWI, your life probably hasn't been going the way you want it to for quite some time. Why not see this as an opportunity to get it back on track? Here's how inpatient rehabilitation can work for you.

  • You'll be in a new environment, away from the pressures and influences that kept you using or drinking.
  • You'll be with other people who are sharing the same hopes, fears and struggles that you are.
  • You'll have access to proven programs and techniques that millions of people have used to successfully stop their addictions.
  • You'll have the structure and support that are necessary for recovery.
  • You'll withdraw safely, under medical supervision.
  • Many addicts and alcoholics suffer from undernourishment and untreated medical problems. In rehab, you'll get the healthy meals and medical care that your body needs.

Are You Ready for your Chance to Change?

You might feel that your addiction has become hopeless. But millions of people have felt that way at one time or another, yet they all managed to beat their addiction, embrace recovery and live with joy. Don't you deserve the same thing?

If you didn't make the choice to go into treatment, treat your court-imposed rehab as the opportunity it is. Inpatient rehabilitation offers you the best chance at getting and staying sober.

If you're ready to end your addiction, we can help. Our counselors are available 24-7 to take your calls and answer your questions. Don't wait another moment to change your life. Call us today at 800-737-0933.

Are Treatments for Drug Addicts and Alcoholics Different?

People are often curious if treatments for drug addicts and alcoholics are different or if they're the same. The answer isn't quite as straightforward as you might think. There are ways in which they're the same and there are ways in which they're not. Drug addictions are characterized by a person's obsession with a certain type of drug or group of drugs. Addicts typically will spend a lot of money to get the drug from a dealer and sometimes will steal from others to get the money to access the object of their addiction. Addicts will use a drug for the specific effects they get from it. For example, someone who is a heroin addict is drawn to the feeling of euphoria it gives some people. To get rid of an addiction, the person must pass through a cleansing stage of ridding their system of that drug.

Alcohol addiction is much like drug addiction, except the object of their obsession is, of course, alcohol and not a specific drug. Alcohol provides some of the same effects a drug addict seeks. It offers a person brief relief from the pain they're experiencing, whether it be physical or mental. It gives them moments of happiness where they feel they lack it in their sober state. With treatment, it's important that the person goes through a detox, of sorts, to get it out of their system so that counseling and therapy can work their magic to help them get through the addiction.

Treatments for Drug Addicts and Alcoholics

Each type of addiction offers pretty much the same kind of treatment. However, each one will have varying parts based on an individual's needs. With both types of addiction, you'll find the following programs:

  • Inpatient Treatment
  • Outpatient Treatment
  • Detox Program

The treatment facility will evaluate your situation and choosing the right treatment for your needs. They will determine what needs you have to beat your addiction, and what services best suit your situation. They will even consider whether you need to work while you go through treatment or if you have a family to support.

Inpatient Treatment for Drug Addicts and Alcoholics

For those with severe addictions, an inpatient program is best. It offers around the clock care to observe your physical and mental health while you go through the detox stage. Medical staff monitors the detox drug use, if needed, to be sure an individual isn't abusing the treatments.

Inpatient services allow an individual to stay at a residential facility, 24-hours a day for a length of time. During their stay, they will receive counseling and therapy to help them beat their addiction mentally and will have medical services for withdrawal symptoms that ultimately surface during detox

Outpatient Treatment for Drug Addicts and Alcoholics

Outpatient treatment is generally for those who have been through detox and need the long-term care of support services. Sometimes, you may have an intensive outpatient treatment program that enables you to get monitored closely, but still gives you time to go to work and time to spend with your family.

The outpatient part means you go to the center after work, or before, depending on your work schedule. Once you've spent your predetermined amount of time there, you go home to sleep in your own bed. Then return on the next scheduled treatment day.

Detox for Drug Addicts and Alcoholics

The treatment used for drug detox and alcohol detox differ due to the differences each one has. Both need intensive monitoring, though, to ensure everything goes well. Once the drug or the alcohol is out of your system, you're taught coping skills to take with you when you go home and try to live your life free of addiction.

Detox for drugs will also differ with the type of drug that one has an addiction for. Also, it depends on the severity of the addiction as well. Sometimes one will need medication-assistance to get over the addiction and other times, counselors may suggest you do it without medication. Each situation is different in how it's handled. Counselors determine the best course of action when they evaluate your situation.

So, treatments for drug and alcohol addiction are alike in many ways, but how each type is handled is somewhat different. It's more about the severity of the addiction and what's needed to beat it more than it is about the addiction someone suffers from. If you would like more information about drug or alcohol addiction treatments, call us at 800-737-0933.