Chronic Pain

What Are the Pain Medications that Most Often Form Habits?

Chronic pain can be quite distressing. Many people go to the doctor’s office to get help for their ongoing struggle. One of the best ways to combat discomfort is with opioid pain-relieving medications. Unfortunately, these medications are very addictive and can easily be misused. It’s important to know what drugs to use and which ones to avoid should you ever be faced with agonizing pain that won’t go away.

How Do Pain Relievers Becoming Habit-Forming?

While pain can ruin your life, taking a drug that you can become addicted to will do the same. Even if you take a medication as it’s prescribed, you can still quickly develop a habit. When the medications enter the bloodstream, they block pain receptors. Not only does the discomfort subside, but many get a euphoric feeling too. It’s that sensation that people want to experience again and again.

Many are shocked to discover that the misuse of pain medications is the number one form of drug abuse in America. It can happen because a doctor prescribed something too strong, prescribed too much, or prescribed them for too long of a period. Another common factor is that the person had a predisposition to addiction, and they didn’t know the drug would affect them this way.

The Opioid Crisis Intensifies

The number of people addicted to opioids continues to rise. When the doctors stop prescribing, and the supply runs dry, then people turn to the black market to find a compatible solution.

Shockingly, as many as eight out of 12 people that are prescribed an opioid pain reliever will become addicted, and four of those 12 people will use heroin as their drug of choice. Is it any wonder that more than 115 people die each day in this country from drugs? While efforts are in place to reduce the number of opioid prescriptions, the problem has become so out of control that it has little effect.

The Most Addictive Painkillers

As your body adjusts to the medication, you will need more to get the same effects. What was once therapeutic has crossed the lines into an addiction. Many painkillers can become addictive, but here are the top ten:

•OxyContin
•Oxymorphone
•Demerol
•Fentanyl
•Dilaudid
•Hydrocodone
•Percocet
•Codeine
•Morphine
•Methadone

Signs of Addiction

Though these medicines are prescribed for legitimate reasons, they should be used with caution. How do you know if being properly medicated is turning into an addiction, well it can start as simple as not feeling the same benefits from the smaller dose, so you adjust the amount you take to enhance your experience.

If you are taking more than prescribed, then it’s is a significant warning sign. Another thing you may notice is that you feel like you always need to have the drug with you. It becomes a safety net, and you can’t live without it.

You may find yourself calling the doctor’s office asking for more medication because you’ve used more than the allotted amount. Medical centers are very wise to drug-seeking behaviors, and they will stop giving these medications to anyone displaying concerning signs. If you have asked friends or family if they had any opioid prescriptions, or have turned to the black market, then you know the problem is getting out of control.

How long it takes to become addicted to a pain killer? The answer varies depending on the person, the amount their taking, and other genetic factors. However, you can build a tolerance to the drug in as little as eight days. The longer you take the medication and the higher the amount you take can all impact these timelines.

Some folks say they develop an addiction after the first dose, and others can take them for a month or more without issue.

Knowing When To Get Help

If you’ve seen any of these signs, and you use prescription opioids, then you need to get help. You cannot simply stop taking these medications safely. You need the help and support of a medical rehabilitation center that is trained in the detox process from these harsh drugs.

South Florida is the perfect area to get clean. You are surrounded by Mother Nature and the loving care of a staff that knows what you’re going through. Each team member is strategically placed to enhance your visit and help you get better. If you realize that you have an addiction to opioids, and you’re ready to get help, then call today at 800-737-0933. Our support staff is standing by 24/7 waiting for you!

Can a Detox Center Help if I’m Afraid of Pain from Detoxing from Drugs and Alcohol?

There are hundreds of reasons that people become addicted to drugs. For many, experiencing chronic pain caused by medical conditions can create the need for pain relief that fuels addiction. While addiction can actually make the pain worsen, it won’t go away once you get clean in a detox center. You will still have that underlying pain and that’s one reason many people are reluctant to seek help in getting clean. If you are afraid of how you will deal with the pain, you should be aware that medication isn’t the only way to manage your pain.

As you begin a detoxing from drugs, you may feel alone, but your caregivers in the facility will be there to help you. In addition to helping you flush the drugs out of your system, they will also help you to address the causes of your addiction. For those suffering from chronic pain, this means helping you find healthier ways of coping with your pain. This doesn’t always mean you won’t be given medication, but you will also be encouraged to look for other methods for managing your pain.

Beginning Detox as a Chronic Pain Sufferer

Once you decide to participate in a medically supervised detox, there is a procedure you must follow. You won’t just jump into treatment without preparation. Instead, an intake procedure will allow your caregivers to evaluate your condition. While one focus of this process is to determine the type and severity of your addiction, the intake will also be used to evaluate your health status. This means evaluating any mental illnesses that may be affecting you, as well as determining what physical medical conditions you may be experiencing.

This examination will also help them determine how much pain you typically experience. In addition to conducting a physical examination, they will also ask you questions about your medical conditions and your pain levels. Through this process, they can determine how best to address your pain issues as you detox from drugs or alcohol. While you may think your caregivers don’t understand, they are experienced in dealing with chronic pain patients and it’s important for you to trust them.

No Painkillers Doesn’t Always Mean No Drugs

Typically, doctors prescribe opioid painkillers to help patients manage chronic pain. While these medications are effective in managing pain, they’re also highly addictive and today’s doctors are looking for alternative methods of managing pain. In the detox center, your caregivers may find that your pain level is severe enough that you do need some type of medication, though they will not continue feeding your addiction with opioid-based painkillers. Instead, they may prescribe non-addictive painkillers, such as those used to treat depression and epileptic seizures. Sometimes, methadone or buprenorphine may be prescribed as a replacement drug, but these drugs will be administered at low, controlled dosages.

You may also begin attending therapy sessions in the detox center. These sessions will provide psychological counseling that will help you address the causes of your addiction. As such, you’ll receive therapy designed to teach you healthier coping mechanisms for your pain. Your therapist will likely begin behavioral modification therapy to help you manage how you react to pain.

Exploring Other Alternatives to Painkillers

While you may not believe it, there are actually many natural ways for dealing with pain and some maybe even more effective than the painkillers you were taking. Since these are natural treatments and therapies, you won’t experience the negative side effects that the drugs caused. Each facility will offer different resources, so it may be helpful to discuss the pain management options in advance. If you can find a detox center that offers the pain management options that you find interesting, you may be more open to benefit from those types of treatment.

By way of an example, acupuncture and chiropractic care have been found to be very effective in helping to treat pain caused by a variety of chronic medical conditions. You may also benefit from massage therapy. Your caregivers may also encourage you to begin working out and using weights. In addition to benefiting your overall health, regular physical exercise will help you strengthen your bones, muscles, and tissue, which will reduce the inflammation that causes pain.

The first step to recovering from your addiction is getting clean, but you don’t have to take on that challenge without help. To learn more about the detox process, call our counselors at 800-737-0933. We can answer your questions and help you get started in the recovery process.

How Does Hydrocodone Dependence Work?

Not all addictions begin because of intentional behavior. There is a time when people are using legitimate medications, make a few judgment errors, and end up with a full-blown addiction to the drug in question.

Yes, there’s an opioid addiction epidemic in the United States. It was created from a mixed bag of causes with one of the primary culprits being prescription painkillers. Among that group of substances is a painkiller that goes by the generic name hydrocodone. For anyone out there reading this information, the drug’s brand name is Vicodin. Clearly, that’s a well-known name among people in the medical community and on the streets.

When used as directed by a physician, hydrocodone is very good at doing what it is intended to do. It provides relief from severe pain issues. Unfortunately and not surprisingly, it’s highly addictive. If someone sticks to their prescription, they shouldn’t have any problems. However, making the decision to increase doses or frequency without a doctor’s guidance is like playing with fire. Opioids are notorious for creating dependence, which is only a small step away from a full-blown addiction.

In the section below, we want to discuss how dependence works. That includes how it begins and how quickly it can turn into an addiction.

About Hydrocodone Dependence

Before the discussion begins, there’s a very important distinction between dependence and addiction that needs to be clarified. Dependence occurs when the body and mind have a strong craving for a substance. It becomes an addiction when the body goes through withdrawal symptoms when it’s denied the substance it craves. Simply put, the possibility of withdrawal symptoms is the fine line between dependence and addiction.

The truth about hydrocodone dependence is it usually starts innocently enough. A person has pain issues, their doctor prescribes Vicodin, and the patient starts taking the drug as the doctor prescribed. The problem is people usually enter this “contract” with unreasonable expectations. The reality is the pain relief is never quite as fulfilling as the individual expected it to be.

Their solution? They start taking the drug in higher doses or more frequently. As the amount of drugs builds up in their system, the body begins to develop an expectation that the drugs will always be there. What the body wants and needs is relayed to the brain, and the brain tells its owner, hey, we need more Vicodin. That’s the essence of dependence.

The Signs of Hydrocodone Addiction

As dependence progresses and the individual acts to fulfill their cravings, addiction stands in the wings waiting. FYI: Here’s a few signs of hydrocodone addiction:

  • Withdrawal from personal relationships
  • Unkempt personal hygiene
  • Obsession with pursuing drugs or money for drugs
  • Escalating need to take larger doses more often
  • Destructive and criminal behavior
  • Inability to handle personal responsibilities

Treating Hydrocodone Addiction

If an addiction to hydrocodone does form, the addiction sufferer only has one viable option for recovery: They have to submit themselves to an addiction treatment program with a reputable addiction treatment center like ours.

With an addiction to an opioid substance, the incoming client should expect to have to spend time in a detox program. The withdrawal symptoms associated with an addiction to said substances are quite dangerous. It just makes more sense to participate in a medically-monitored detox program where medical staffers are monitoring client progress and making sure they are safe during the detox process.

After successfully clearing withdrawal and any residual cravings for their drug of choice, the client should be ready for counseling. During counseling, they will get the opportunity to work with a counselor on their issues. During the process, they will hopefully learn a lot about their addiction. That should include the driving forces behind it. At the end of the day, the goal of counseling is to identify the root causes of addiction and subsequently provide the client with the life and coping skills they will need to get around temptation and their personal triggers. That stands as the key to making sure there are no relapses in the future.

We can sympathize with the bad things you are experiencing from your addiction to hydrocodone (Vicodin). With that said, we can help you get past your addiction on the way to leading a better life. If you would like more information about our services and facility, you can contact one of our administrators at 800-737-0933.

How Can People With Chronic Pain Quit Heroin?

You can manage chronic pain and quit heroin while learning how to reduce the risk of substance abuse. Painkillers or its derivatives are adequate for most and as the pain worsens relief demands more frequent doses leading to potential drug dependency.

Too often individuals attempt to self-medicate and trigger more serious health conditions. There are effective non-opioid drugs combined with different types of therapeutic and medical procedures for treating chronic pain and addiction.

The approach is multi-disciplinary; transitioning from heroin to a non-opioid medication, treatments for pain, and the introductions of precautions to prevent drug relapse.

More Than Just Pain

A vast majority of individual’s suffering with chronic pain are unaware they have a substance abuse problem. Besides the health considerations that will worsen over time substance abuse interferes with the body’s genetic makeup and biological functions. At this point, reversing the effect is difficult without some form of professional assistance.

For most, addiction to heroin occurs with long-term use as the chemicals change how our body responds. Did you know?

  • Heroin does not heal or repair the cause of chronic pain.
  • Heroin offers only short-term intervals for relieving chronic pain.
  • Heroin can cause mild to extreme side effects that interfere with day-to-day functions.

Heroin and other painkillers belong to the same class of drugs called opioids. Opioids attach to receptors found on the nerve cells in the brain interfering with the signals that alert the body to pain. For some, it may decrease the level of pain temporarily and prompt a feeling of euphoria.

Non-Opioid Pain Treatments

Heroin isn’t the only chronic pain treatment option. Like heroin, all medications or illegal drugs have potential risk factors. Contributing to these risks are personal health status and family medical disorders.

  • Do you know if other types of substance abuse or psychiatric disorders exist?

The outcome could be affected when one or more of these factors exist. This information helps to select the combinations of medicine and therapy for the individual’s lifestyle and level of pain.

Addiction programs incorporate specialized doctors and alternative health teams to help cope with the situation. Depending on the severity of heroin use the withdrawal process can cause:

  • Cold flashes
  • Insomnia
  • Muscle or bone pain
  • Restlessness

Treating chronic pain without heroin involves physical, psychological, and occupational therapies along with a medical supervisor of nonopioid pain treatments or medicine.

Getting Rid of The Pain Without Heroin

Chronic pain is manageable with medications and alternative practices achieving fewer adverse effects on your health. Treatment starts with understanding that both the physical and mental components of one’s health are involved in recovery.

Facts of treating pain with heroin:

  • The body builds a tolerance to heroin with long-term use
  • The pain remains.
  • Opioids (heroin) are addictive, dangerous and life-threatening.

Technology and medical advances address the source of the pain collectively with non-opioid medications and therapies. Recovery centers provide a safe and caring environment.

Residential programs offer personal and group follow-up care. The goal is to help teach individuals how to live life without addiction through a continuum of care.

Managing Life One Day A Time

The good news, physical dependence on heroin is reversible. By focusing on the cause of addiction and responding to chronic pain, you can learn how to deal with it and quit heroin.

  • It’s not a process that you can maneuver alone.
  • You need the help of trained professionals.

Recovery is a long journey and treatment to the addiction is only the first phase. To quit heroin, you must continue to maintain your physical and mental health one day at a time. See your doctor regularly for the pain to prevent a relapse. More important, if you experience a relapse urge, seek support – it happens from time to time.

Dealing with chronic pain is unbearable but blocking out the pain with heroin can only cause more damage to your health. Rather than live with addiction, there’s help available to minimize the effects of withdrawal and teach you how to manage a life with chronic pain instead.

Using heroin to quite chronic pain comes with a wide range of potential risks and side effects. Call our office at 800-737-0933 if you find yourself thinking about taking higher doses or more powerful drugs for pain.

How Doctors Are Contributing To Increased Admissions In Prescription Drug Rehab Centers

Prescription drugs are given to patients to help them with a medical condition and improve their health. However, when doctors prescribe medications for mental health conditions or pain people tend to abuse these drugs. These types of medications are highly addictive and can cause unpleasant withdrawal symptoms when it comes time to stop.

Drug addiction does not discriminate, and people of all ages abuse prescription medications. They take these pills to feel good, experiment or to be accepted by others. Since physicians are prescribing these medications, patients believe they are safer than street drugs and legal. That is not true because people are overdosing and abusing these drugs every day. Here is some information about how doctors are contributing to increased admissions in prescription drug rehab centers.

What is prescription drug addiction?

When someone takes prescription drugs without following the physician’s instructions, that is called prescription drug abuse. If you have ever taken a higher dosage than prescribed or used your medication for another reason, you are abusing your medication. Crushing, snorting or injecting your medication is also considered prescription drug abuse.

Unfortunately, many doctors give strong pain relievers, tranquilizers and sedatives to people because they suffer from mental or medical conditions. Patients suffering from ADHD, anxiety, sleep disorders and depression need medications to help with their symptoms. But instead of using the drugs as prescribed patients are abusing them.

How to identify prescription drug addiction?

Since drugs stimulate the reward system in the brain, it is easy to become addicted. The introduction to drugs, even when prescribed by a doctor, can change the brains chemistry. This change can release the neurotransmitters in the brain that cause drug addiction.

When drugs are taken, they produce an intense euphoria that teaches the brain to seek them out regardless of the consequences. These are some of the signs of prescription drug addiction:

When drugs are taken they produce an intense euphoria that teaches the brain to seek them out regardless of the consequences. These are some of the signs of prescription drug addiction:

• You keep taking the drug longer than prescribed and make excuses to get it.
• Your tolerance is built up for the drug causing you to need more to get high.
• When you stop taking the medication, you become physically ill.
• You become obsessed with the drug and disregard your friends and family.
• When you take prescription drugs, you drink alcohol and other drugs.

The most common abused prescription drugs

Even though prescription drugs are given to patients by physicians, they one of the leading causes of drug abuse. They are abused more than cocaine, heroin and methamphetamine. More than 46 people die daily from prescription opioid overdoses. Here is a list of the most commonly abused prescription drugs:

Pain relievers

Oxycodone, methadone and hydrocodone are opioid drugs that inhibit the brain’s capacity to process pain. They target the brain stem and affect your body’s ability to control breathing, sleeping and heart rate. These drugs are highly addictive and cause severe withdrawal symptoms when the user stops taking them.

Stimulants

Ritalin, Adderall and Dexedrine affect your attention span, energy and can make you more alert. Physicians prescribe them for people diagnosed with ADHD, narcolepsy and depression. They increase the levels of dopamine in your brain, raise blood pressure and elevate the heart rate. When taken other than prescribed, they can cause seizures and irregular heartbeats.

Tranquilizers and sedatives

Xanax, Valium and Librium are central nervous depressants that are prescribed for anxiety, panic attacks and sleep disorders. This medication is also known as barbiturates and benzodiazepines because they make the user sleepy and reduce anxiety. When abused these pills can cause your heart and breathing rate to slow down and lead to seizures.

Many substances abusers mix their prescription medications with alcohol, which can increase the risk of drug interactions. These interactions can include internal bleeding, heart problems and labored breathing. The elderly are becoming more susceptible to prescription drug abuse as well as young women, adolescents and teens.

Although your physician has prescribed medications to you, does not mean you will become addicted. If you take your medication as prescribed, you should not develop an addiction. When you are taking medication, keep your pills in a safe place. Do not share your pills with anyone, including your friends or family. Many people hide their problem with prescription medications, and if you have pills, they will steal them.

If you do find yourself or someone you know dealing with prescription drug addiction, please call us. Our counselors are available 24 hours a day. Call 800-737-0933

How Drug Detox Centers in South Florida Handle Opiate Withdrawal

You probably already know that feeling you get when you have not used opiates when you typically do. You start feeling like the flu because you start having body aches, vomiting, diarrhea, shakes, etc. Not feeling sick is the reason that you keep using opiates despite the repercussions. You want to be free from your addiction, but having to go through withdrawal scares you. Detox centers in South Florida are trained to make withdrawal as safe and comfortable as possible for you.

Drug detox centers in South Florida Handle Opiate Withdrawal by:

Medication

Detox centers will give you medication to treat your symptoms (e.g. rapid heart rate, hypertension, pain, etc.). In addition, they also understand the importance of having to have your body come down off the drugs slowly; therefore, they may give you opiate replacements (e.g. suboxone) to slowly bring your body back down to a normal internal state.

Monitoring Vitals

The medical staff will be monitoring your vitals constantly. They will make note of every change, regardless of how minor they are. Some withdrawal symptoms can be fatal if not treated. You may even be woken up in the middle of the night to have your vitals checked.

Therapies

In addition to basic medical care, these centers will also use holistic therapies (e.g. healthy diet, chiropractic care, acupressure, bio sound therapy, etc.) to make withdrawal faster and more comfortable.

The Importance of Drug Detox

Addictions to drug and alcohol is physiological almost always physiological. The repeated use of the substance makes your body feel like you need use the substance in order to survive. When you do not use drugs or alcohol, you start feeling sick because your body is not receiving what it thinks it needs. Your body lets you know when it is in trouble. Drug detox is necessary because you cannot go from one extreme to the other. You need to slowly come down off the addictive substance. Withdrawal can be physically and emotionally trying if you do not go through it under proper medical supervision. In some cases, withdrawal symptoms can be deadly. Alcohol withdrawal is the only withdrawal than can definitely kill you; however, that does not mean withdrawal symptoms from other drugs can kill you as well, especially opiates because they are similar to alcohol.

Genesis House is a detox program that is located in Lake Worth, Florida. We are committed to helping you the genesis of your new life. Call us today at 800-737-0933

Reasons To Avoid Opiate Addiction Doctor And Work Towards Complete Detox

People who have undergone substance abuse know that it is really simple for others to advise that they just quit at once. The process of letting go of addictive substances is just that — a process.

Getting started on the process of overcoming addiction can be the toughest part that many find hard to overcome on their own. Withdrawal symptoms of different substances can range in strength and nature. These include:

  • Shaking and tremors
  • Chills/Fever
  • Sleep Pattern Change
  • Pain
  • Sweating
  • Anxiety, depression, and other uncomfortable emotional/mental reactions
  • Appetite fluctuations

To avoid these symptoms and stop taking addictive stubstances, many go to their doctor to prescribe them an opioid medication. The substnces in these medications bind to the same receptors that the abusive substance does. This temporarily fulfills the craving and before one knows it, they are addicted to something else.

Why Choose Detox Over Medication

The alternative to taking addictive opioid medications is going for detox therapy. Detox therapy is the first part of healing and curing addictions. The detox aims to clean out all of the addictive substances and toxins out of your body. These substances in the blood are precisely what causes the withdrawal symptoms.

Detox helps you transition safely from the state of addiction towards therapy so that you can concentrate on the protocol of the therapy instead of fighting with yourself over the cravings.

There is a great comfort in knowing that there is someone who knows what they are doing when you are experiencing a withdrawal crisis. You don’t have to do it on your own. In the cases of alcohol and benzodiazepine addictions, the symptoms can be potentially dangerous, and when under supervision, medication can be administered to help you overcome it safe and sound.

Even if you do not require medical interventions, you can still benefit from a detox. The clearing of the addictive substances from your body will help carry you through in your decision to stop for good. The confidence of making it through something that you didn’t think you could earlier will give you the motivation for further therapy.

Detox and therapy are a healing process that has a goal of curing your life at the root and the things that triggered your addiction in the first place. You can receive help along this healing journey for a new life. Call us today 800-737-0933

Does Your Drug Treatment Facility Treat Pain as Well as Addiction?

Addiction is an unfortunate reality faced by millions of Americans, men and women alike, of various age groups. Rates of addiction have surged, in part due to the pharmaceutical abuse epidemic, making it a topic of paramount concern. Unfortunately, many of the approaches enacted to combat this crisis are flawed in their inherent outlook and methodology. A proper treatment regimen should consider the nature of the addiction in order to develop an effective strategy that supports the afflicted individual in all respects of their rehabilitation.

What Is Addiction and How Should It Be Treated?

While the types of addiction are diverse, ranging from illicit drug dependence to alcohol abuse, the hallmarks of addiction are relatively constant and should be intimately understood for the purposes of developing effective treatment plans. Addiction involves two primary features:

• Mental dependence
• Physical dependence

It is crucial to understand that addiction is characterized by both mental and physical changes. The psychological effects of addiction are profound and can adversely affect an individual’s capacity for work and socialization. It is often misunderstood that addiction is purely a mental affliction. In reality, addiction almost always involves physical components, which make overcoming it that much more challenging. Prolonged abuse of a substance initiates a series of complex metabolic and hormonal changes within the body, which eventually render it dependent on the substance to maintain homeostasis. Homeostasis describes the vast number of processes that the body undertakes to keep its internal environment sustainable in a changing external environment. This is exactly why drug addiction is so dangerous; abruptly ceasing the use of the substance in question usually results in various complications and side-effects, collectively known as withdrawal. Withdrawals are potentially fatal physical responses that occur because the body is finding difficulty maintaining homeostasis without adequate consumption of the substance. Withdrawals can be extremely painful and may last longer than 7 days. Common symptoms include:

• Depression
• Restlessness & anxiety
• Excessive perspiration
• Disruptions in sleeping pattern
• Headaches
• Vomiting
• Tremors
• Confusion
• Hallucinations (auditory and/or visual)
• Seizures
• Significant blood pressure irregularities

Clearly, addiction and the process of rehabilitation are very sensitive matters which require proper treatment to avoid excessive complications and reduce the associated risks. A licensed drug treatment and rehabilitation facility will be fully equipped to handle all aspects of the rehabilitation process. Initially, a comprehensive assessment will be performed, which will lay the subsequent groundwork for a successful program. The next phase involves a complete detoxification in which the substances are eliminated from the body. This phase typically involves withdrawals, making it critical to be at a facility that can mitigate the pain and possible complications. Detox should then be followed by a complete rehabilitation period which includes education and behavioral augmentation. Lastly, an effective treatment facility will offer some form of post-treatment care, sometimes referred to as “extended care”. Together, these factors facilitate a rehabilitation process that can successfully treat both pain and addiction.

Ready to get started? Call us today at 800-737-0933; our counselors are available 24/7.

single mother

How Does FMLA Work While You’re In Substance Abuse Treatment?

The Family and Medical Leave Act (FMLA) provides job security for 12 weeks during medical or caregiver leave, whether you have an illness or injury, are caring for a family member who is sick or injured, or are caring for a newborn baby or adopted/foster child. For the purposes of FMLA, substance abuse is considered a serious medical issue, which means that under this law you may be able to take time off to go to rehab without losing your job.

Eligibility Requirements

Certain factors determine whether you are eligible for FMLA coverage. You must:
-Work for an employer covered under FMLA laws. This includes any private employer with at least 50 full-time employees within 75 miles; any government agency; or any public or private K-12 school.
-Have worked for a covered employer for at least 12 months.
-Have worked at least 1,250 hours during the previous 12 months.

If you meet these requirements, the next step is to request FMLA coverage so that you can attend substance abuse treatment. Although FMLA protects your job for 12 weeks, this leave is unpaid unless your employer opts to pay you for time off. In most cases, you’ll need to give your workplace at least 30 days advance notice of your leave.

Although you may want to tell your employer about the medical reason for taking leave, you are not legally required to do so. After you request FMLA leave in writing, your employer must respond to the request within five business days. Your employer can legally request certification of the need for leave from your medical provider, which you must provide within 15 days if requested. However, this also does not need to detail the exact reason for your leave. Keep in mind that it is illegal for your employer to terminate you if you request FMLA leave to treat a substance abuse issue.

To qualify for FMLA leave, substance abuse treatment must be recommended and/or provided by a qualified health care practitioner. If your loved one is attending substance abuse treatment and needs care, you may also qualify for FMLA leave for this purpose if you work for an eligible employer.

Call us at 800-737-0933 if you or a loved one is struggling with substance abuse. Our counselors are available 24 hours a day.

Drug Detox Program For People Who Have Become Addicted To Medications Prescibed By A Doctor

How could something so good turn out to be so bad? That’s a question often posed by prescription medication users who become addicts. Yes, doctor prescribed painkillers to help patient’s get relief from pain. When those medications are misused or abused, the results can become tragic.

Pain medications almost always contain some form of opiate. Opiates are the operative ingredient found in heroin. Heroin is one of the most highly addictive illicit drugs on the planet. Along with a bevy of distressing side effects, opioids also produce some rather dangerous withdrawal symptoms. Anyone addicted to painkillers has to be conscious of these withdrawal symptoms should they choose to stop using. Here’s a sampling of said withdrawal symptoms:

  • Severer muscle and stomach cramps
  • Respiration and pulmonary issues
  • Diarrhea and vomiting
  • Convulsions and tremors
  • Hallucinations

Under no circumstance should someone addicted to painkillers try to stop on their own. It would be prudent for the individual to seek help from a professional, reputable drug rehab facility.

The Detox Process

Prior to getting help for any personal issues that may have led to their addiction, most addicts need time to detox. Detox can be administered in-house at a rehab facility or through a dedicated detox facility. Clinicians will generally prescribe a detox program based on the depth and longevity of the patient’s addiction.

The primary objective of detox is to get patients through the withdrawal process with a minimum of discomfort. This can be a real challenge for patients addicted to painkillers. For the most part, they are placed in a medically monitored detox program. Under the watchful eye of medical professionals, patients are monitored on a constant basis. If a patient starts to show signs of distress, doctors have the ability to prescribe medications that should help the patient move forward.

During the detox process, there are three primary concerns:

  • Patients will have difficulty breathing
  • Patients will exhibit a substantial loss of appetite
  • Patients will have difficulty sleeping

It might take a patient up to a week to clear the most serious withdrawal symptoms, but once the patient gets clear, they should be ready to focus on therapy and counseling.

If you are ready to seek help for your addiction, we are ready to provide that help. You can get started on recovery by calling us at 800-737-0933