Detox

Is an Opiate Detox in Florida Ever Dangerous?

Trying to withdraw from opiates on your own can be a dangerous and potentially life-threatening move. Considering the risk to health and life, an opiate detox at a Florida rehab is perhaps the safest way to end your addiction to opiates.

Professional treatment at an accredited rehab is not only safe, but it also offers an opportunity to uncover underlying reasons for your addiction. It allows you to get treatment for mental health disorders linked to drug abuse. It caters to family members and loved ones by involving them in specialized family therapy sessions. And, it equips you with tools and skills to manage drug use triggers to reduce the chance of relapse during and after rehab.

Tapering Off Opiates With Medically-Assisted Detox

Opiates, also called opioids, are drugs made from the opium poppy plant. They are commonly prescribed for treating chronic pain. Codeine, Oxycodone, Fentanyl, Morphine, and Hydrocodone are some examples of prescription opioids. However, opiates are used illicitly in a more raw and potent form and are called "street drugs."

Heroin is a widely abused "street" drug. It is highly addictive and is the reason why many individuals between the ages of 18-30 undergo opiate detox in Florida. They know that quitting opiates "cold turkey" and going through detox on their own increases the risk of relapse or overdose.

Tapering off the substance is the best way to gradually remove it from the body and allow the body and brain to slowly return to a state of "normalcy." Medication may be administered to you during detox by a trained professional to assist in managing severe withdrawal symptoms.

Opiate Withdrawal Symptoms

Opiate withdrawal symptoms may begin within 6-30 hours after the last dose. Factors such as how severe the addiction is and what type of drug is involved will determine when symptoms begin. Short-acting opiates produce symptoms within 6-12 hours while long-acting opiates do so around 30 hours following the last use. One or more of these symptoms could develop and may vary in severity from person to person:

  • Strong cravings
  • Runny nose or teary eyes
  • Nausea, vomiting, or diarrhea
  • Excessive sweating
  • Irritability
  • Restlessness
  • Insomnia
  • Persistent yawning
  • Aggressing
  • Anxiety
  • Muscle aches or stomach cramps
  • Mood swings
  • Increased heart rate or blood pressure

Opiate Withdrawal Timeline

Opiate withdrawal can be done at an inpatient or outpatient program. Inpatient rehabs allow you to live-in for the duration of treatment while outpatient centers offer you the opportunity to continue to live at home, work, and care for family members. Nevertheless, both programs have proven to provide effective detox services and therapy.

However, each person's detox experience is unique. Withdrawal symptoms and the length of time it takes to completely withdraw depend on the level of addiction, the type of drug abused, dosage, and how the brain reacts to the removal of the drug from the body. Days 1-7 is reportedly the most difficult stage. The entire detox process may last several weeks to several months.

The following is a general withdrawal timeline that may be helpful in letting you know what to expect:

Days 1-7: The first and second day is marked by symptoms such as strong cravings, compulsive drug-seeking, restlessness, sweating, trouble sleeping, and muscle aches. Other symptoms may develop around days 3-5 and may include nausea, vomiting, tremors, dilated pupil, increased heart rate, high blood pressure, and stomach ache. Some individuals experience diarrhea, chills, and abdominal cramps.

Day 7 and onwards: Around the end of the first week, there is usually a marked improvement in physical symptoms. At the same time, psychological symptoms start to kick in. Anxiety, depression, insomnia, irritability, emotional outbursts, remorse, and impulsive behaviors are common. By now, the desire to use drugs is not as strong as the first week. Once you're stabilized, you may transition into therapy to begin the second stage of addiction treatment.

Finding a Detox Center Near You

Finding the right detox center may pose a bit of challenge since you may prefer to connect with one that can provide the services to match your needs. If you live in South Florida, you can locate a treatment center and give them a call to find out what types of programs they offer and how to get admitted.

During the evaluation, the medical team will recommend either outpatient or residential treatment depending on your recovery needs. Addiction treatment programs are usually comprehensive and include referral to behavioral therapy to help reduce the risk of relapse after formal treatment ends.

Just remember that sobriety involves a desire to overcome drug addiction, a positive mindset towards treatment, and a commitment to staying sober. Call one of our counselors today at 800-737-0933.

What to Expect During Intake at a Florida Detox Center

You're tired of living with addiction. You're ready to change things and have decided to start the process by going to a Florida detox center. Now you have a whole new set of questions. What should you bring? What is the first day of intake like? Learning these details now will make the transition to life in treatment easier.

Most detox centers in Florida follow a similar process when you check in. You'll be calmer if you know what to expect on that first day. Always remind yourself that recovery is a gift you're giving yourself.

What Is Intake Like at a Detox Center in Florida?

Every detox center is different, but the majority follow a similar procedure to get you checked in and settled. Before you head out, keep these pointers in mind.

  • Medically-supervised detox is a safe, comfortable way to withdraw from drugs or alcohol. You won't get sick or have to endure any withdrawal symptoms.
  • Getting drugs or alcohol out of your system is the first step to your new, sober life.
  • The counselors are there to help you. When you start to feel nervous or shaky, talk to them. They've walked many an addict and alcoholic through their first-day fears.

What to Expect on Your First Day

When you first show up at the center, you'll be greeted and welcomed. An intake counselor will go over your paperwork to make sure that everything is in place.

You should have:

  • Your insurance card and related paperwork.
  • Your driver's license or other identification.
  • A list of medications that are currently prescribed to you by a doctor.
  • Paperwork regarding any grants or government assistance you're receiving.
  • Copy of any payment plan agreement that you signed.
  • Credit or debit card.

If you're going into inpatient rehab, you'll be shown to your room, where a counselor unpacks your bags to make sure you haven't carried in any alcohol, drugs or other prohibited items. You probably received a list of items that you can't bring to the detox center. This includes:

  • Drugs or alcohol, including alcohol in personal care products.
  • Pornography or other offensive materials.
  • Playing cards or items related to gambling.
  • Clothing or other items that promote drinking or drug use.
  • Medications or supplements that are not in sealed bottles.

During the first day, you'll also meet with the medical staff. They'll check you for any medical problems that need immediate attention. If you are undergoing medically-supervised detox or have been referred for medical treatment, you'll be given a day and time for that.

Other Types of Intake

If you're checking into a sober living home or halfway house, the intake process is similar. Your bags will be checked for prohibited substances. You'll meet with an addictions counselor to go over your goals and expectations. You'll also be given the house rules and your schedule of required meetings.

If you're attending outpatient treatment, you obviously won't have any bags to check. Remember that during outpatient treatment, just as in inpatient rehab, you will have regular, random drug tests. You'll also have a set schedule of meetings and sessions that you're required to attend.

What Type of Schedule Will You Have?

Typically, your daily schedule at an inpatient rehab, outpatient center or sober living home will include the following:

  • Individual and group counseling sessions.
  • Attendance at 12-step meetings.
  • Support group meetings.
  • Recreational and social activities.
  • Mealtimes.
  • Visiting hours.

What is Medical Detox Like?

In many rehab centers, the first part of your treatment is medical detox.

Be prepared to spend the might at the detox clinic. The time required to detox depends on several factors including the type of substance you're addicted to and the amount in your system.

  • Medical detox allows your body to get rid of drugs and alcohol without the agony of withdrawal.
  • Detox will make you feel calm and comfortable.
  • Your detox is done in a private room in a medical setting.
  • Your withdrawal is monitored by specially-trained doctors and nurses.

Find the Right Detox Center in Florida

Going into a Florida detox is the best decision you can make for yourself and your family. If you're ready to build a new life free from addiction, get started by calling our counselors anytime at 800-737-0933.

What Types of Medication Will an FL Heroin Rehab Center Prescribe to Help With Detox?

Addiction is filled with irony and contradiction. For instance, doctors prescribe medications to help patients with things like seizures, depression, sleep disorders, and pain. When taken properly, this medication can produce wonderful results, giving the patient a much better quality of life.

The irony and contradiction come because these very same medications can be very harmful if misused and abused. The line between good and bad results is indeed very thin. For a moment, let's consider pain medications like morphine or Oxycontin. The proper doses of this medication can relieve a patient's chronic pain. That's a good thing for anyone who doesn't have any other alternatives. However, these medications are opiates and opiates are highly addictive. Addiction to these medications can produce side effects like:

  • Loss of motor function throughout the body
  • Memory loss and mental lapses
  • Breathing and blood pressure problems
  • Sleeping issues like insomnia
  • Nausea and vomiting

Even the decision to stop using these drugs after an addiction has been created can cause significant withdrawal symptoms like tremors, hallucinations, convulsions, depression, suicidal thoughts and anxiety.

The reason for this discussion is because certain medications are used in the addiction treatment process. That is ironic and definitely a contradiction. The information below will address the types of medications used during the detox process and how those drugs help as well as what risks they create.

Types of Medication an FL Heroin Rehab Center Can Prescribe to Help With Detox?

When people enter rehab with a significant addiction, their minds and bodies have an extremely high level of dependence on the drug(s) of choice. Before a patient is going to be able to focus on the rigors of therapy and counseling, they need time to wean themselves off all substances. During that process, the aforementioned withdrawal symptoms come into play. The purpose of a detox program is to get patients past their cravings and withdrawal symptoms as safely as possible.

If at all possible, it's a good thing if the patient can detox as naturally as possible. Maybe good nutritional and exercise programs are all they will need to eliminate their issues. With that said, that's a best-case scenario that's usually only applicable to people with a moderate addiction. Otherwise, a medically monitored detox program is needed.

In a medically monitored detox program, patients go through detox under the watchful eye of medical professionals. If severe discomfort becomes apparent, the doctors have the ability to prescribe certain medications to help with issues like pain or sleeping issues. In the case of people with a "severe" addiction, tapering medications may be used to help the patient slowly and safely wean off drugs. Some of the common medications used in a Florida detox program include:

  • Disulfiram and naltrexone for alcohol addiction
  • Methadone or Suboxone for opiate addiction
  • Buprenorphine for opiate addiction
  • Ritalin for cocaine and meth addictions

Let's look closer at the benefits of these drugs in the detox and addiction treatment process.

Disulfiram and Naltrexone for Alcohol Addiction

These medications are often used to decrease the cravings a patient has while going through the detox process. The effects of these drugs replace the effects of alcohol, creating less desire for booze. These drugs have proven very effective in relapse prevention.

Methadone or Suboxone for Opiate Addiction

Both of these medications are used for severe addictions to heroin and painkillers. They are tapering medications that offer the body lower doses of the active ingredients found in opiates. They are intended for long-term detox programs with diminishing doses over several weeks. They are also addictive.

Buprenorphine for Opiate Addiction

Another tapering drug for heroin addiction. The difference is this drug doesn't contain opiates as an active ingredient. Instead, it's considered a partial opioid agonist, which activates the same opioid receptors but produces a much safer response.

Ritalin for Cocaine and Meth Addictions

Ritalin is a stimulant drug prescribed to treat ADHD. Doctors and scientists have found that while the drug acts to stimulate the same receptors in the brain, the intake process is much slower, which results in a lower propensity for addiction. It's good for long-term use.

If you would like more information about the medications we might use during your addiction treatment, you need to call us immediately. You can reach one of our professional staff members at 800-737-0933.

What Resources Can Help You Detox From Heroin in Florida?

If you're seeking treatment for heroin addiction, the first thing you'll need to do is detox. Detoxing usually takes about a week, but it can be a painful process. Withdrawal symptoms are often severe and, in some cases, even dangerous. Fortunately, there are a number of resources available to help. What resources can help you detox from heroin in Florida?

Florida is a state that's been hit hard by the opioid crisis throughout the United States. It's common for prescription and illicit opioids to be used illegally all over the state. Successful drug rehab is an urgent need. Drug rehabs tend to deal with the mental aspect of addiction, but you need to overcome the physical withdrawal first. This is where a detox center comes in. Some detox centers are part of a larger rehabilitation facility, while others offer detox services alone.

Detox Centers

Detox centers are, as the name implies, places where you go to safely detox from drugs and alcohol. It's important to go to one of these centers to have a medically supervised detox from heroin. Only with medical supervision can you receive the care you need to safely weather the withdrawal process. Your medical team can provide resources that help ease the pain of symptoms.

Heroin withdrawal doesn't look the same for every person. A number of factors will affect the progression. The way someone abused heroin, how long they've abused it, and the dosage they took will all affect your dependency. The more dependent you are, the more severe the withdrawal symptoms will typically be. If you've previously withdrawn from opioids or have a history of mental illness, your withdrawal might be more intense.

Withdrawal Symptoms

For many heroin users, the withdrawal process feels a lot like the flu. Mild symptoms set in first, followed by more moderate and severe symptoms as the withdrawal progresses.

Mild symptoms might include:

  • Cramping of the abdomen
  • Sweats and chills
  • Nausea
  • Runny nose
  • Aches in the muscles and bones

Moderate symptoms include:

  • Diarrhea and vomiting
  • Issues with concentration
  • Restlessness
  • Tremors and goose bumps
  • Fatigue
  • Agitation

Severe symptoms include:

  • Depression and anxiety
  • Insomnia
  • Cravings for the drug
  • Hypertension
  • Unusually rapid heart rate
  • Spasms in the muscles
  • Issues with respiration

Even severe symptoms aren't usually life-threatening, but some medical symptoms come with potential complications that can be life-threatening. For this reason, you should never quit heroin cold turkey without having mental health and medical professionals supporting you.

Managing Withdrawal Symptoms with Medication

When you go through the withdrawal process at a detox center, you may be prescribed medication to help with the symptoms. Your doctor may replace the heroin with an opioid that works for longer periods of time. You may also be prescribed antidepressants, anticonvulsants, and anti-nausea medication to help with specific withdrawal symptoms.

The FDA has approved the use of a drug called Suboxone to help with cravings during withdrawal. It can also be used to help with continuing cravings throughout the treatment process. This means it's considered a "maintenance" medication. Suboxone is used to prevent relapses by suppressing drug cravings.

With that said, there have been cases in the past where Suboxone was used recreationally. Some heroin users use Suboxone to ease their withdrawal symptoms between heroin doses. This use of Suboxone is very dangerous and can lead a person to develop an addiction.

Another commonly-used drug is methadone. This long-acting opioid can be substituted for shorter-acting heroin. In the majority of cases, methadone will be active in the user's bloodstream for a whole day. Methadone helps minimize withdrawal symptoms by activating a person's opioid receptors.

Methadone is a federally regulated drug. When prescribed, it's typically provided in pill form once per day. From there, the methadone doses can gradually taper down.

One other medication that might be prescribed is Naltrexone. This opioid antagonist blocks the brain's opioid receptors, so you don't get high even if you use opioids. This drug is often used to maintain heroin abstinence on a long-term basis.

It's important to be honest with your medical team about your history of drug use. If you don't give all the information, they won't be able to help you effectively.

If you're ready to get help for your addiction, talk to one of our trained counselors at 800-737-0933.

Will a FL Heroin Rehab Center Help With Pain Management?

Dealing with chronic pain is a huge mountain for anyone to climb. It essentially has the ability to directly affect a person's quality of life. We are talking about interfering with sleep patterns, restricting the individual from enjoying physical activities and sometimes affecting their ability to work.

There's a few different ways people can deal with pain. The Internet is filled with holistic self-help methods that sometimes work but are usually ineffective over the long haul. Surgery is always a possibility if the doctor feels it will make a substantial difference. However, how many horror stories have we all heard about regarding back surgeries that left the patient in worst condition that they were in before the surgery?

It's not surprising that the preferred method of treating chronic pain is pain medication. If managed properly by a physician, a patient has a realistic chance to get some level of relief. However, dealing with prescription painkillers comes with a significant risk. If the pain is chronic and unlikely to diminish over time, addiction to the painkiller seems inevitable.

The truth is there's a fine line between dependence and addiction. After taking prescription painkillers over a period of time, doses need to be adjusted to compensate for the patient's body building up dependence. When withdrawal symptoms start appearing after any period of abstinence, withdrawal is indicated. Since painkillers are usually opioids, here's a brief list of possible withdrawal symptoms:

  • Breathing problems
  • Blood pressure and heart-rate issues
  • Diarrhea, nausea and vomiting
  • Muscle cramping
  • Sleep issues

All of these symptoms create even more problems. Once addiction sets in, the drug user faces the distinct possibility of needing drug addiction treatment. This becomes even more likely should a patient start self-medicating and goes off-prescription to deal with their pain issues. How should someone deal with an addiction when pain medications seem to be the only solution for pain?

Addiction Treatment and Pain Management in a Florida Heroin Rehab Center

Since both heroin and painkillers derive from opiates, the addiction treatment process for both substances is the same. The good news is most of the top heroin rehab centers in Florida are equipped to deal with both treating the addiction and offering pain management options. Let's take a look at what is involved.

Opioid Addiction Treatment

Once a patient enters rehab with both an addiction and pain problem, the first task at hand is dealing with the addiction. Addiction presents a considerable risk to a patent's well-being, and it needs to be dealt with right away.

With opioid addiction, a detox program is almost always necessary. The goal of a medically-monitored detox program is to make sure the patient is safe while they go through withdrawal. If they start displaying any discomfort, the medical staff has the option to offer medicine to help with pain or sleeping issues.

After detox, the focus shifts to therapy. Where pain treatment was the overriding cause of the addiction, it's here that a meaningful discussion about pain management can start. The treatment center's counselors and clinicians will also want to address any potential personal problems that may be prompting the addiction. The final goal is to make sure the patient has the coping skills they will need to avoid relapses.

Pain Management

Managing one's pain while in recovery is very tricky. The first thing an addiction counselor in Florida will talk about with an addiction patient is the need for absolute honesty and accountability. If the patient is suffering from chronic pain issues, there's a good chance they will need to keep taking some type of medication. That's where honesty becomes important. That's what addiction counselor preach.

As long as the prescribing doctor knows the patient is in recovery, the doctor will know they need a cautious approach. They may suggest physical therapy in conjunction with lower level pain medications and see if that works. At the absolute least, they will want to closely monitor this type of patient for signs of addictive behavior. The patient might also enlist the services of a behavioral psychologist to add another level of accountability.

If the pain doctor has to increase doses or revert to stronger medications, the responsibility for being forthright falls on the patient. A good pain management plan requires good communication between all parties, including addiction counselors when necessary.

If you are dealing with pain and suspect you have an addiction problem, we can help you with both issues. For more information, please call us at 800-737-0933.

How Do You Convinced a Loved One to Visit Rehab Facilities When They Don’t Believe They Have a Problem?

It's understandably difficult to watch a loved one fighting with addiction. While they deal with the endless pursuit of their drug of choice, family and friends sit by and contemplate how to react. Some loved ones will respond with sympathy, putting themselves in position to become enablers. That's not a good situation.

There's usually another group of loved ones who decide to distance themselves from the addict. They might do so out of embarrassment or disappointment. They might also do so after being victimized by the addict's actions. No one likes to become collateral damage to someone else's personal problems. One can only hope these loved ones can somehow get past their anger.

Then there's the group of loved one's that occupy the middle ground. These are the people who understand what's going on and want to help without becoming enablers. Where the other relationships may be strained, this is the group that could have the desire and ability to truly help.

We all have to remember that most addicts aren't interested in putting down the glass of whiskey or the syringe full of heroin. They're more likely to believe they don't have a problem. They believe they are in total control of their lives and have the ability to stop at anytime without repercussions. We call this denial.

If you have a loved one who is clearly caught in the cycle of addiction but believes otherwise, convincing them to get help could be difficult. Still, you may be their only chance for recovery and should do all you can to get them into treatment. If you are wondering how? Perhaps, the following information might be useful.

How to Get a Loved One to Seek Treatment for Addiction

If your loved one is in denial or simply reluctant to seek help, you need to approach them with some level of caution. The fact you might still have open lines of communication with them is vital. Also, you might want to enlist the help of any other loved ones who still have good standing with the addict. There is power in numbers.

From least to most invasive suggestions for convincing your loved one to seek help, try these methods, after which we will go into more detail:

  • Have a personal one-on-one conversation about the issues you see. Talk to them not at them
  • Discuss possible ramifications if they continue down the path of substance abuse
  • Create an opportunity for them to speak with an addiction treatment specialist or former addict with good recovery time
  • Family/Friend intervention

Personal One-on-One Conversation

Sometimes, the personal touch can move mountains. You should try to find a time and private place where you can sit down and speak frankly about how you view their addiction issues. There's always a chance you showing concern could make them realize something might actually be wrong. Above all, you'll want to make sure you avoid lecturing or demanding action. Talk to them, not at them.

Discuss Possible Ramifications

There's a real possibility your loved one can't see the logical conclusions to their substance abuse. After educating yourself, you might want to educate them about the health and personal issues they face if they don't deal with their addiction issues. You can also use this opportunity to set behavioral boundaries to let them know there are circumstances that could cause issues with you and other loved ones. It's kind of a one-on-one intervention.

Seek Professional Support

If you are unsure how to approach this subject with your loved one, you might want to enlist help from people who have been there and done that. A private meeting with an addiction treatment specialist or recovering addict might provide an opportunity for the addict to ask questions that might drive them to see the light.

Family/Friend Intervention

Intervention is a delicate process. It requires all participants be educated and well-prepared to do their part in a well-organized family/friend meeting. Without making threats and accusations, each participant should discuss how the person's addiction affects them personally, how they feel about the individual and what outcome they would like to see from the intervention. There's power in numbers and if everyone does their part, the addict could come to the realization people care and maybe they should as well.

We understand your concern about the welfare of your loved one. If we can help with the treatment process or provide information about how to convince your loved one to seek help, you can call us at 800-737-0933.

Will a Free Detox Center Provide the Same Care As One You Pay For?

Substance abuse and addiction can be a painful process for individuals and families. Entering a treatment center or rehabilitation facility can be expensive. Sometimes most of the costs are left up to the individual. For those who need treatment, free detox centers are available.

There are several types of detox centers in which you can get access to free or low-cost detox treatment. If you have insurance, detox centers may be fully or partially covered. State-funded detox centers can provide discounts or offer free services to individuals with no income and no insurance.

Faith-based detox centers are geared towards individuals who want to focus on their faith as part of their treatment plan. But, not all of them are free. It's important to do your research before entering a free detox center. Learn more about detox centers and the different types that could fit your needs.

What Are Free Detox Centers?

Free detox centers are treatment centers for drug or substance abusers. It gives them access to medical treatment to overcome their withdrawal and addiction problems. However, they may not receive the same amount of care or treatment they would at a rehab facility. Not all detox centers provide facilities, counseling, and ongoing support. These short-term clinics just provide patients with the care they need to start their recovery. They can also provide them with additional resources to get started on the road to recovery and where to find additional help and guidance.

Who Can Use Free Detox Centers?

Free detox centers are helpful for the homeless, low-income individuals, or those who don't have insurance. Dealing with addiction and substance abuse can be difficult for many individuals and their families. Sometimes it's hard to afford the type of care you need. Those who can't pay for rehabilitation or treatment choose to go to a detox center instead.

Using Insurance to Pay for Detox Center

Since 2014, the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act requires all health insurance plans, including Medicaid, to provide coverage for substance abuse treatment. As of 2018, this law is still intact. Depending on your insurance plan, you may have to pay for some of your treatment. Many insurance plans may provide addiction and substance abuse services before your deductible is met, making it easier to enter a detox center.

Using a State-Funded Detox Center

Some states provided funding for substance abuse and addiction treatment. They even accept patients who have no insurance or have little to no income. These programs come with long waiting lists. You also have to meet certain criteria before you're eligible for free services. You must prove some or all of the following information before you enter a free detox center:

  • Official residency within your state-funded
  • Proof of income (or no income) or no insurance
  • Proof of your addiction and need for assistance

Once you meet some or all of the requirements, various treatment options are available. Find out the different detox programs provided to you by contacting your state mental health or substance abuse agency.

Trying a Faith-Based Detox Program

There are several faith-based programs that have free detox centers. Be aware that not all of them provide medically supervised detox programs. Also, they require individuals to undergo detox before accessing the other services their programs provide.

Faith-based programs integrate faith into their treatment programs. This is a great option for individuals who are focused on their faith. Contact your leaders of faith to help you determine which faith-based detox programs are available in your area. Not all faith-based detox centers are free. Ask about costs before entering treatment.

Addiction can affect every aspect of an individual's life. It can damage your relationships with your loved ones, your friends, and your family members. It can cause health problems and mental health issues.

Worrying about the costs of treatment causes additional stress when you're trying to recover from substance abuse. There are resources available for pregnant women, veterans, young people, and those living in poverty. However, if you have an income or insurance, free detox may not be available. Don't give up hope just yet, though. There are resources available to individuals to help pay for your detox program, such as payment plans, scholarship programs, and insurance coverage.

Ready to get started on the road to recovery? Contact our trained counselors today. We can help you find the right treatment plan you need and determine the costs. Our counselors are available 24 hours a day. Call us today for more information at 800-737-0933.

Will a Christian Detox Help Me Get Back On Track With Sobriety and My Faith at the Same Time?

Alcohol addictions can happen to anyone, even those who are strong in their christian faith. For Christians, finding your way to sobriety will require more than just standard treatment practices. Getting over the addiction is one thing, but repairing your faith in the higher power in your life, will be necessary to prevent the addiction from coming back. This has many people wondering if a Christian Detox Center can help get them back on track with sobriety and their faith at the same time.

The answer is yes, but not all Christian detox centers are alike. Medications counseling, therapy, and group sessions are all important factors for overcoming your addiction initially. When it comes to keeping alcohol from gaining control of your life again, a strong faith in the Lord is the prescription of choice for your spiritual needs. Finding a treatment center that caters to the mental and medical side of therapy is great, but choosing one that adds spiritual health to the mix would be better. There are some important qualities you should look out for when choosing the program for you or your loved one.

Scripture Study is Important for Getting Back on Track With Sobriety and Your Faith

Strengthening your Christian faith is key to achieving sobriety. A house built on a strong foundation can withstand some harsh weather thrown at it. The same is true for Christians. Building a foundation of faith from scriptures will help you withstand the toughest trials life throws at you, especially the ones that made you turn to the addiction in the first place.

To construct a strong foundation of faith, a careful study of scriptures should take place. It will help you see what God has to say about the situation and what you need to do to overcome it. Christian detox centers don’t always use scripture study in their programs though. Without scriptures to combat temptation, you risk falling to the same alcoholic addiction repeatedly. Be sure that your program has a healthy dose of biblical studies included in their treatment plans.

Prayer is Necessary to Achieve Sobriety and Strengthen Your Faith

Another important element of a successful detox program is the use of prayer. Biblical study helps strengthen your faith and prayer helps boost your relationship to God. Fighting off temptation for alcohol will require the help of your higher power and the best way to reach him is through prayer sessions.

A good Christian treatment plan will include a prayer for individual devotion and for group sessions. They can teach you to pray and will encourage consistent prayer time so your relationship with God doesn’t suffer.

Worship Services May Be Conducted Weekly to Maintain Your Christian Faith and Encourage Sobriety

For Christians who sign up for in-house detox, worship services may be a part of every Sunday. It’s not a part of the program, but it could be offered weekly to help you maintain your faith and build a strong relationship with your Lord. Sobriety isn’t easy to achieve for anyone whether you are a christian or not. Attending services consistently will help you avoid having the alcoholic addiction come back.

Christians, who’ve been through a program like this, say having that outlet to continue their worship helped them stay positive and gave them hope of recovery. It also helped them become more comfortable with their recovery program. While there are a few centers built on certain denominations, like Lutheran, most will offer a more general service that anyone can take part in.

What’s Offered Beyond Detox for Sobriety and Your Faith

As with any other type of center, there are programs you can use when the detox process is over and you have to put the newly found techniques to use on the outside. Each center is different, but most will offer some basics to help you stay sober when you leave the in house treatment program. Many faith-based plans will offer you:

  • Continued therapy integrating christian values
  • Training for employment if needed
  • Resources for childcare
  • Social services

You can find much more than that in some treatment centers. What programs they add to your plan will depend on your current needs or living situations. So, be sure to check out what each one has before making your final choice. If you have any more questions about faith-based detox or you would like to get started in signing up for one right now, call us at 800-737-0933. We’ll be glad to answer any of your questions or walk you through the sign-up process.

How Going To Rehab Now Can Help You Avoid Long Term Effects of Opiate Addiction

Research continues to show us the science behind highly-addictive drugs like opiates. This research has allowed us to better understand the relationship between addiction and the human brain. Addiction is a disease of the brain, working both chronically and progressively. It is caused by an alteration of brain functioning, which can be due to a variety of factors, such as genetics, chemical imbalance, or injury and trauma. When this alteration in functioning occurs, a person often engages in impulsive, compulsive, and destructive behaviors. When opiates get involved, it is particularly dangerous and more difficult to kick the habit. Opiate addiction is one the most challenging to overcome, and the United States is currently experiencing an epidemic of opiate abuse.

What are Opiates?

Opiates are a particularly dangerous breed of drug due to the fact that they molecularly mimic the natural painkillers produced in the brain. Opium is derived from the poppy plant and can then be modified into many different forms, from patches and pills to powder and injectable fluid. Many opiates are legal, as they are used in medicine to treat pain. Morphine is one such example, as are many prescription painkillers.

Prescription painkillers work by bonding with the opiate receptors present in the brain, triggering pain-relieving effects within the nervous system. In small doses and when used only as necessary, they are not bad for the body. However, when opiates are taken in high doses, a different, euphoric effect is produced. The brain is triggered to release large amounts of neurochemicals, like dopamine and serotonin, flooding the brain and body with a pleasure response. When individuals take high doses for prolonged periods of time, the body becomes chemically reliant on the substance and people become dependent on the effect. The sensation caused by this flooding of neurochemicals is much more more intense than the effect produced by small doses of painkillers, which are meant to relieve pain but not overwhelm the senses. The intensity is so strong that the brain is tricked into believing that these outside substances are superior to the naturally-occurring painkillers, which in turn reinforces the drug-seeking behavior and, eventually, addiction.

Long-Term Effects of Opiate Addiction

Long-term abuse of opiates has profoundly negative effects on both the body and the brain. They fundamentally alter the internal structure and functioning of neurons and other components of the brain and change a person's ability to cope with stress and pain. Extended opiate use inhibits the body's ability to tolerate pain and discomfort, reducing its ability to fight pain naturally. This explains why many people, who begin by taking prescription painkillers after an illness or surgery, become dependent upon the pills and need them more and more. When a person stops taking the medicine after the body has become dependent on it, they can experience pain more intensely. Furthermore, when someone is given a normal dose after becoming accustomed to higher doses, the medicine can fail to be effective, as there are not enough chemicals to attach to all of the brain's available receptors In addition to causing a sick person to feel pain again, the lack of available neurochemicals can play a nasty role in mood and emotional function, causing the person to feel sad, hopeless, and powerless without the higher levels of opiates.

Unfortunately, these negative effects are long-lasting and can remain even after a person has begun the process of recovery. The psychological effects in particular can last for many years after addiction treatment, and each day is another battle in the struggle. This reason, in particular, is why it is best to seek medically-assisted treatment when deciding to try to get clean and begin recovery.

How Going to Rehab Can Help

Choosing to enter rehabilitation is the first step in the long process of recovery. At an opiate addiction treatment facility, individuals are given medical attention and assistance with detox and withdrawal and throughout recovery. The psychological components of opiate addiction are addressed through individual counseling and group therapy sessions. These are necessary elements for treating this disease. Just like a person suffering from a chronic illness needs support, so, too, do people struggling with opiate addiction. With the proper methodology and social and medical support systems, the cycle of opiate addiction can be broken, and the goal of achieving long-lasting recovery can be seen as attainable.

Don't let your life be destroyed by opiate dependence. Our counselors are ready and waiting to help you help yourself now. Call us today at 800-737-0933 to start your journey to recovery.

Why Opiate Addiction Treatment Requires A Medical Detox

The United States is in the grip of an opioids epidemic, with estimated 2.6 million Americans dealing with some form of opioid addiction. What makes opioid addiction particularly frightening is the prevalence of overdoses leading to more than 40,000 deaths per year. If you or someone you love is addicted to an opioid, it’s imperative that you get them treatment as soon as possible. In doing so, it’s important to know that proper opioid addiction treatment requires a medical detox as part of the process.

While it’s possible to stop taking opioids ‘cold turkey’, the process is intensely uncomfortable both from a physical and mental standpoint. When you combine that with the fact that opioid addictions are among the most powerful addictions out of any narcotic or addictive substance, the odds of recovering from an opioid addiction without a robust and supportive regimen including medical detox are low. Defeating an opioid addiction is one of the more difficult feats a person will undergo, and treating it with a medical detox is the most effective way known to get clear of opioids for good.

Why Opioid Addiction Requires Medical Detox

An opioid refers either to the street drug heroin or any of a number of pharmaceutical medications like OxyContin, Fentanyl, Percocet, Vicodin, Morphine, Codeine or several others. These drugs operate in a similar way in all cases, though their strength, release cycle and a few other attributes may be different. The bottom line I that the drug attaches to the opioid receptors in the brain cells, producing feelings of euphoria and blocking out the feeling of pain.

The body becomes dependent on regular infusions of the opioid of choice, and in the absence of any medical intervention will begin to manifest a number of negative physical, mental and emotional symptoms as withdrawal occurs.

Symptoms of Untreated Opioid Withdrawal

Depending on whether the opioid of abuse is a short-acting or a longer-acting one, symptoms of withdrawal will generally begin to manifest themselves anywhere from between 12 hours to 30 hours of the last dose. It should be stressed that the symptoms of opioid addiction aren’t generally life-threatening, in contrast with withdrawal from certain other substances like alcohol. However, they tend to be extremely unpleasant, and medical detox treatment can go a long way toward smoothing the transition off opioids into something the person can bear.

Symptoms of opioid addiction withdrawal include both physical and mental/emotional symptoms, and are as follows:

PHYSICAL SYMPTOMS OF WITHDRAWAL

  • Alternating Chills and Sweats
  • Feelings of Nausea
  • Vomiting
  • Muscle Aches
  • Diarrhea
  • Excessive Tearing of the Eyes
  • Runny Nose
  • Difficulty Sleeping
  • Restlessness

MENTAL/EMOTIONAL SYMPTOMS OF WITHDRAWAL

  • Depression
  • Anxiety
  • Agitation
  • Irritability

Opioid withdrawal symptoms will usually begin to abate by around the week mark after the last dose, though certain opioids have longer half-lives and remain within the body for longer periods of time.

Ways to Medicate Opioid Addiction Treatment

A number of medical techniques exist to mitigate or ease the effects of opioid withdrawal. The first one, in certain cases, would be to taper the dosage of the specific opioid the person is taking. This is a more viable treatment option of certain opioids, and a far less viable one for something like heroin. The alternative would be to use another medication to substitute for the opioid of abuse. The most commonly used medication for this is Methadone, which is a long-acting opioid used especially to treat heroin addiction. It’s worth noting that Methadone being an opioid itself means that some risk of abuse and overdose remains.

Other medical options include Suboxone and Subutex, two more opioid-substitutes which are regarded as even less overdose-prone than methadone. Any of these options will cut down on the physical symptoms of opioid withdrawal, and therapy and treatment can lead to the prescription of mood stabilizers to deal with some of the mental and emotional symptoms as well. A combination of medications can smooth the transition from extreme physical and mental dependency and dramatically reduce cravings.

There’s no shame or stigma in needing help to beat an opioid addiction, and a medical detox to treat opioid addiction is critical to producing a successful outcome. If you or someone you care about is suffering from an opioid addiction, don’t wait. We can help - call now 800-737-0933