Detox

Where Can I Find Reliable Rehab Reviews?

Before going into inpatient rehab, it’s important to have an idea of the kind of environment that exists in that rehab. Is the staff compassionate? Is the staff qualified and easy to talk to? Are there security measures taken at the rehab to make sure that everyone is safe and sound from threats both outside and within? Finding these answers is easier in today’s world than ever before thanks to the abundance of rehab reviews.

Any old rehab reviews won’t do, though. You need to make sure that the rehab being reviewed has no connection to the source reviewing it. You might want reviews from former clients, but you wouldn’t want reviews by a publication that the rehab paid to review it. Spotting reliable reviews are dependent on your knowledge of what they look like.

Online Sources

There are many terrific places that review rehabs and give you detailed information about the facility. They’ll sound unbiased and very specific (as much as confidentiality will allow). These publications can be trusted and will usually be something you’ve heard of just word of mouth. They’ll also look professional and be run by people who update the site often.

Search engines often have reviews as well, and this is where you can read about the rehab center from happy customers. They’ll often tell you about how the facility helped them and why they’d recommend it to a friend. In many cases, they can rate the rehab facility so that you have an idea of the overall quality of it (a four-star rating will be higher than a three-star rating, for example). This denotes quality in the rehab facility. Search engines are often a reliable source for finding out more about the rehab you’re considering.

Offline Sources

Word of mouth reviews is often the most helpful. If you know friends or family who has been an actual client at a rehab treatment center, then you might have an idea of whether the person telling you about it is reliable or not. If they wouldn’t steer you wrong on things like that, it’s likely they’re a reliable source of information about that treatment center. Magazines tend to be more of a national source of information, so if you are willing to travel to go to rehab, reading reliable reviews in a magazine might be a helpful venture.

Paper publications like magazines and newspaper often have reviews about rehab centers. Many magazines rank rehabs annually and give you quality information about the kind of treatment program they offer. Newspapers will sometimes take a local facility they’ve investigated and give potential clients more information. They may even have awards for local rehabs and let you know which ones are award-worthy. Newspapers are a time-tested media format that has helped people learn more about the world around them for years. They continue to serve the public with excellent reliable rehab reviews sometimes.

How Reviews Help

Before traveling to a place, it’s wise to know more about it. Certain rehabs cater to certain kinds of clients, while others will serve all. For example, you can find rehabs that have a spiritual approach to rehab, while others help clients who have a strong Christian faith and want to find a Christian rehab. Reading reviews can help you know if you will fit into the environment the rehab fosters. If you’re spiritual, you’ll want to find a rehab that has a natural, spiritual approach to recovery. If you have strong Christian faith, reviews can help you recognize when rehab is a Christian one.

Reading reviews can also curb some of the anxiety that might become with checking yourself into a rehab center. Many people are understandably nervous about the process and don’t want to be in the dark about it. By reading reviews, you increase your knowledge of the rehab center, learn a little from former clients, and begin to feel more at ease with the possibility of becoming a client of a certain facility. Thanks to reliable reviews, you can also cross out and avoid those rehabs that don’t have a less than stellar reputation with reviewers and/or clients. Sometimes ruling out rehab centers can make it easier to find the one that’s right for you. Reviews accomplish all of these many important things.

If you’re ready to learn more about spotting reliable rehab reviews or ready to get started on the treatment of your own, please call us today at 800-737-0933.

Can Long Term Rehabs Help Me if I Have Substance Abuse Issues and PTSD?

Many people who are suffering from the disease of addiction have had some sort of trauma in their life. Trauma can affect you in a variety of ways and cause different issues with your mental health, and in order to cope, you may have turned to drugs or alcohol. As you’ve already learned, the drugs or alcohol only make your problems even worse, but you can recover. Going to a long-term treatment program can help you overcome your addiction as well as your symptoms of PTSD.

PTSD is a serious mental health issue that affects many people, and if it’s resulted in you turning to drugs or alcohol, you’re not alone. A long-term treatment center that specializes in dual diagnosis treatment is going to be able to help you with your PTSD as well as your addiction. Through individual therapy, you’re going to be able to talk through your trauma and begin healing. You’ll also see how beneficial the support of others can be for your recovery, which can help you maintain long-term sobriety.

How PTSD Leads to Addiction

While many people who struggle with PTSD are veterans of war or first responders like police officers, EMTs, and others, you can develop PTSD for other reasons as well. If you’ve been the victim of verbal, physical or emotional abuse, this can be extremely traumatizing as well. Trauma is different for everyone, and some people develop the symptoms of PTSD after a life-threatening accident or the loss of a loved one. If you’re struggling with the symptoms of PTSD, you may experience the following:

  • Severe anxiety
  • Flashbacks
  • Intense fear
  • Insomnia or nightmares
  • Emotional detachment or unwanted thoughts

All of these symptoms as well as more can also lead to symptoms of depression and cause you to isolate. Unfortunately, due to the symptoms, you may have trained your brain to turn to alcohol or drugs as a way to cope with these issues. The problem is that drugs and alcohol only make your PTSD, depression, and anxiety much worse. This is why you need to go to a long-term recovery program in order to learn a better way of living.

Individual Therapy for PTSD

Trauma can happen at any age, and it causes the brain to change in a variety of ways. The limbic system in your brain is constantly trying to keep you safe, and when you experience a traumatic event, your limbic system goes on high alert. The way the brain tries to protect you is by giving you a variety of triggers to try and keep you safe, but this can cause your life to become unmanageable. In order to recover, you’ll need to go through therapy to work through your trauma.

In many cases, your trauma still has such power over you because you’ve never been able to process what’s happened to you. Revisiting your traumatic experience can be scary, but you won’t be doing it alone. When you’re working with a therapist, they’ll be right there with you to process your trauma and help you begin the healing process. As you talk through your trauma, your brain begins to start healing, and your traumatic experience begins to lose its power over you, which is going to help you with your sobriety.

Group Support for Trauma Survivors

If you’re a survivor of trauma and are struggling with an addiction to drugs or alcohol, you’re not alone. When you’re struggling with addiction and trauma, you might feel extremely alone and as if nobody understands, but you’ll see that this isn’t true when you’re in long-term inpatient rehab. You’re going to meet others who have experienced trauma and are also trying to overcome their addiction. The people you meet in treatment will be there to relate to your experience and provide you with the support you need. Some of the relationships you build in treatment are going to last you for years to come after your discharge as you continue to support one another in your recovery.

If you’re ready to overcome your addiction and trauma, we’re a dual diagnosis treatment program located in South Beach, Florida. We proudly serve the people of South Beach as well as many other clients who come in from places like New Jersey, Maryland and other places in the Northeast. We have a team of addiction and trauma specialists who can help you begin on the path of sobriety, so give us a call today at 800-737-0933.

Is Detoxing from Drugs and Alcohol Always Painful?

The fact that you’re beginning to consider rehabilitation for drug or alcohol addiction is a commendable situation. Taking this step means that you’ll be on your way to a brighter life. However, as you’re navigating the process, you likely have an array of concerns and questions, and some of those inquiries may very well pertain to whether or not detoxing from drugs and alcohol is always painful.

Detox and Pain

As you may know, the detox stage is an important part of recovery from an addiction to drugs or alcohol. Without going through this stage, your recovery efforts are likely to suffer, which is an important element to consider. Even though you may experience some pain during the detox process, understand that fighting through it is so important. To have a true answer to your question about pain and detox, you have to understand a few important elements:

  • understanding detox and pain
  • individual factors
  • trained professionals
  • necessary component
  • accomplishment
  • companionship and understanding

Understanding Detox and Pain

You may wonder why the pain would even play a role in detox at all. Keep in mind that your body has become addicted to a certain substance. Without that substance, you may start to go through withdrawal. Withdrawal can have a variety of effects on your body, and levels of pain could come into fruition. What you should recognize though is that the pain may or may not be severe. Also, rehabilitation centers typically offer medically supervised detox. During this stage, you are under the care of medical professionals who can attend to your needs and foster a safe and healthy detox process.

Individual Factors

Whether or not detox will hurt, and the extent to which this process will cause pain is going to depend upon individual factors as well. If you have been using a hard drug for a long time, then the pain may very well be worse than it would be in other cases. For example, if you have recently started having problems with alcohol, the detox process may cause minimal physical pain to your body if it causes any at all. You should also take your individual threshold for pain into account. Some people simply do not feel pain as badly as others do.

Trained Professionals

Choosing the right rehabilitation center can also help you to better manage the pain that may come along with detox. In other words, you should look for a center that has staff members who are open and honest with you about what to expect during the process. Furthermore, the professionals should also speak with you about methods to reduce the pain and encourage you to continue through detox as it is a vital component of the process.

Necessary Component

The answer is clearly that detox does not always cause pain. However, it can. Knowing that pain can play a role in this early step might scare you away from pursuing a treatment program. In the long run, opting for detox is a less painful and jarring option than remaining addicted to drugs or alcohol. What you can do is remind yourself that going through detox isn’t optional when you want to heal from your addiction. Understanding that detox is a necessary part of the process can help you to feel a sense of empowerment.

Accomplishment

You can also think about detox in a positive light. Instead of focusing on the pain, shift your attention to the fact that after you go through detox, you have completed one part of the process. You still have a number of stages to go through, but you should feel accomplished in getting through detox. In fact, the accomplishment that you feel after your detox can provide motivation and encouragement for you as you continue on your journey to recovery.

Companionship and Understanding

Knowing that you aren’t alone can also act as a source of inspiration. Other people are going through detox as well. Even though you may not see them right now, they are there. You are all on your way toward an incredible journey that will allow you to have a new life. Also, once you are finished with this stage of the program, you can join with others who understand.

As you can see, your detox stage might be painful, and it might not be. Fortunately, you can call 800-737-0933 to discuss a specific plan of treatment with trusted professionals.

Are There Pain Medications That Aren’t Habit Forming?

America is in the midst of an epidemic of pain medication abuse. The problem is the addictive nature of prescription opioids: a recent report from the “Trust for America’s Health” found double- and triple-digit increases in synthetic opioid deaths from 2016–2017 of both males and females, from all ethnicities, and in every region of the nation.

Pain is frustrating and debilitating, and it can take over your life without warning. Unfortunately, opioid-based pain medications can be addictive, which can cause an entirely new set of problems.

It isn’t always simple to manage pain without habit-forming medications, or it wouldn’t be the problem it is … but there are alternatives. It’s best to be forearmed with the knowledge to protect yourself and your loved ones.

Not all Pain Medications are Habit-forming

According to government statistics, more than 47,000 Americans died from opioid overdose in 2017, a figure which includes prescription opioids, heroin, and the synthetic drug, fentanyl. Any medication requires caution, but the abuse factor makes opioids one of the riskiest.

The good news is that there are safe, effective medications which aren’t habit forming—and more are in development. Also, for many types of pain, it’s been shown that opioids are not more effective than non-opioid medications.

NSAIDs

The most common non-opioid (non-narcotic) pain relievers are nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs). These are effective against mild-to-moderate pain from many different conditions, including headaches, fever, inflammation, arthritis, sprains, cramps, muscle soreness, and toothaches. NSAIDs are often available over-the-counter.

Out of the nearly two dozen NSAIDs available by prescription, three are available over-the-counter in the US and most countries:

• Aspirin (Bayer, Bufferin, generics) – the most common NSAID is a synthetic derivative of salicylic acid, a natural compound found in foods. Salicylic have been used for healing and pain relief since ancient times.

• Naproxen (Aleve, generics) – Treats pain, fever, and swelling. Naproxen is similar to ibuprofen and begins working in just 30 minutes.

• Ibuprofen (Advil, Motrin, generics) – This medicine is effective for pain and fever, and can help with swelling—but its effects wear off quickly and must be readministered every 4-6 hours. The increased risk is associated with long-term use of over three months.

Acetaminophen

This is the world’s most popular pain medication, otherwise known as Tylenol. It relieves pain by blocking the production of prostaglandins in your system that can cause inflammation and fever. If correctly managed, this is a front-line pain treatment.

Acetaminophen is available over-the-counter and is generally well tolerated—though its effectiveness varies according to the pain condition and the individual’s system. Though considered safe, long-term use at higher dosages does carry some risk, and serious drug interactions are possible.

Tricyclic Antidepressants

Antidepressants have proven helpful with nerve-associated pain such as with fibromyalgia and diabetic neuropathy. Tricyclics are the most common antidepressant used for pain treatment, even though their action isn’t fully understood. Effects come on slowly over the period of a few weeks, not hours, and they’re not habit-forming.

Other Non-Habit-forming Medications

Other non-addictive pain-relieving medications are targeted to certain conditions or applications. These require a prescription and medical oversight in the US and most countries.

SNRIs

Non-addictive antidepressants known as serotonin-norepinephrine reuptake inhibitors (SNRIs) are typically quite effective against diabetic neuropathy pain. There are several SNRIs currently on the market.

• Duloxetine (Cymbalta)
• Venlafaxine XR (Effexor XR)
• Desvenlafaxine (Pristiq)
• Milnacipran (Savella)
• Levomilnacipran (Fetzima).

Antiseizure meds

Certain anticonvulsant medications seem to relieve pain by affecting calcium and GABA levels in your bloodstream. These manage pain from damaged nerves without risk of addiction.

Two medications, gabapentin, and pregabalin are especially effective in treating shingles-related neuralgia, diabetic neuropathy, and pain from spinal cord injuries. Newer medications have fewer side effects than older medications of this class.

Topical Applications

Pain medicine can be applied to the skin instead of being ingested, so there isn’t a risk of addiction.

One common example is the lidocaine patch that is commonly used to treat shingles-related pain. Another is capsaicin ointment, from the active ingredient of chili peppers, which is effective against joint and diabetic nerve pain.

Summary

It’s not always evident from the media’s reports about opioid pain-killer addiction, but there’s good news, too. A number of safe and effective non-addictive pain medications are available, and there are promising medicines on the horizon.

If you have more questions or concerns, we can help: call us now 123-456-7890.

How Long Does a Dose of Suboxone Work?

What is Suboxone?

Buprenorphine/Naloxone, also known as Suboxone, is an opioid medication used for assisting people who have an addiction to opioids. Brand names of Suboxone also include Bunavial, Zubsolv, and Cassipa. Suboxone uses a blend of buprenorphine and naloxone to assist people in drug withdrawal. When combined with treatment and therapy, Suboxone works well to help addicts get off opioids.

How long does a dose of Suboxone work?

Suboxone begins working soon after it dissolves under a person’s tongue or on their cheek. Most people take one dose of Suboxone as a film dissolved on the tongue. One does get taken every day as directed by a person’s physician.

What does Suboxone do to treat people?

Buprenorphine/naloxone works in the brain to get people addicted to opioids off these drugs. Some of the medicines that Suboxone substitutes for include:

• Heroin.
• Fentanyl.
• Hydrocodone.
• Oxycodone.
• Morphine.

Buprenorphine partially works like an opioid because it is a partial opioid antagonist. It works weaker than full antagonists like methadone and heroin. The opioid effects level off even when dosages increase, reducing the risk of side effects, dependency, and misuse. Suboxone lowers the full impact of opioids, so it helps people addicted to opioids abstain from taking an excess of opioid drugs.

Naloxone, another component in Suboxone, blocks opioid effects when it gets dissolved in a person’s mouth. If naloxone gets injected instead of taken orally, the person taking the drug becomes very ill when they experience withdrawal symptoms. This detail discourages individuals from injecting Suboxone. Suboxone works best, along with counseling and other types of rehabilitation support.

What are the symptoms of opioid dependence?

• Some of the signs of opioid addiction might include:
• An inability to stop using opioids even though they cause relationship and health problems.
• Needing to take more opioids to get the same effect.
• Having withdrawal symptoms when you can’t get the opioids.
• Giving up previously enjoyable activities to use the drug.
• Spending a lot of time finding a way to use drugs.

Signs of withdrawal from opioids include:
• Runny nose.
• Sweating.
• Shaking.
• Nausea and vomiting.
• Diarrhea.
• Achy body.
• Irritability.
• Irritability.

What shouldn’t you do when you take Suboxone?

Don’t start taking Suboxone early. Wait to take it until your doctor instructs you to, or you may have withdrawal symptoms. If you’re pregnant or if there’s a chance you’re pregnant, tell your doctor before you start Suboxone therapy. Continue taking Suboxone for the entire time that your doctor instructs. Follow all instructions about reducing Suboxone levels when it becomes time to stop taking the drug. Don’t miss doses, as this action might cause you to relapse. Suddenly stopping Suboxone for any reason might cause unpleasant withdrawal symptoms. Some antibiotics don’t work well with Suboxone, so let your health care provider know that you’re taking this medication. Take this medication following the instructions provided for you. Don’t take any other drugs with Suboxone unless you have your doctor’s permission.
Can I become addicted to Suboxone?
Yes, addiction remains a possibility when taking this drug. As long as you follow medication instructions, you should be gradually weaned from Suboxone over time.

When Suboxone is used as prescribed and under a doctor’s supervision, the medication works well to help people safely get off opioids. You must follow the doctor’s instructions to achieve the desired effects without addiction, however. If you suddenly stop taking Suboxone, you will have withdrawal symptoms. So please consult your doctor before you quit taking Suboxone.

This prescription is a controlled substance (CIII) and is regulated by the government. Some individuals who use street drugs or who abuse prescription drugs might want your drugs. Selling or giving Suboxone to someone else remains against the law. Using Suboxone in ways other than prescribed can cause addiction. Taking this medication via injection increases your chances of addiction.

Taking Suboxone might get you off opioids for good. But for them to work correctly, you have to follow the instructions to get the right benefits. If you find that you can’t get off Suboxone when it comes time to start tapering off the drug, you need to ask for help. We can help you stay off opioids and Suboxone, too. Please contact our office right away at 1-234-456-7890 for more information and a consultation with our specialists.

What are the Signs of Hydrocodone Addiction?

What are the Signs of Hydrocodone Addiction?

Hydrocodone is a commonly prescribed opioid medication used to treat pain which has a high potential of abuse. The use of opioids, which include prescription medications such as hydrocodone and illicit drugs such as heroin, has skyrocketed in recent decades, resulting in a widespread epidemic of abuse in the United States. It is estimated that there are currently 2 million people struggling with opioid addiction and that roughly 47,450 die every year from an opioid overdose. The crisis has been covered widely in the news, putting citizens on high alert regarding potential addiction in themselves and their loved ones. Understanding the signs of a hydrocodone addiction can be a vital step to starting down a path towards recovery. Here a few things to know regarding hydrocodone addiction.

What is Hydrocodone?

As previously mentioned, hydrocodone is a prescription opioid medication used to treat pain. It is semi-synthetic, meaning it is created in a lab rather than occurring naturally like other opioids such as morphine and codeine. Hydrocodone is generally combined with other medications, such as cough syrup to aid in reducing certain symptoms in addition to minimizing pain. It works by binding to certain receptors in the brain and altering the way the body reacts to pain. Hydrocodone can be prescribed in various forms including syrups, tablet, and capsules which are either extended release or short-acting. Outside of providing pain relief, hydrocodone can induce feelings of euphoria, making it a prime medication for abuse and addiction.

What are the Signs of Hydrocodone Addiction?

In the beginning, hydrocodone use may create symptoms of slowed heart rate, anxiety, headache and difficulty breathing. Under normal use, these symptoms are quite regular and will tend to dissipate with time. However, hydrocodone addiction occurs when an individual begins to take the medication outside of the way it was intended to be used. Your loved one may tell you that they have begun taking “just a little bit more” than the doctor has prescribed because their pain is not being absolved with the prescribed dose. This is an indication that the body has built up a tolerance to the medication and is no longer producing endorphins or aiding in pain relief without the presence of the drug and is one of the first signs that an individual is dependent on hydrocodone. Other signs of hydrocodone abuse include:

  • Seizures: Seizures can occur if an individual has used hydrocodone heavily or for an extended period of time and attempts to quit without medical assistance.
  • Depression: Your loved one may withdraw from social activities or things they once loved, especially when they are prevented from using hydrocodone. They may also begin to ignore their appearance and hygiene.
  • Confusion: A person with a hydrocodone addiction may have difficulty holding conversations or thinking logically.
  • Blurred vision: Individuals may find themselves knocking things over or running into objects due to poor vision.
  • Paranoia: Your loved one may begin to feel persecuted or illogically afraid of people and things they were once comfortable with.

It is also important to understand that individuals who have regularly used hydrocodone over a long period of time or who have become accustomed to using large doses generally experience withdrawal symptoms. This occurs when there is a significant reduction in the amount of hydrocodone used, resulting in uncomfortable and sometimes severe physical and mental symptoms including, difficulty breathing, muscle weakness, difficulty breathing, clammy skin, and severe anxiety and depression.

What Should I do if My Loved One Is Addicted to Hydrocodone?

The best thing you can do for a loved one addicted to hydrocodone is to encourage them to get help. While many may believe that they can quit on their own or “cold turkey”, this method is not encouraged. Withdrawal symptoms can be quite severe for those with an even moderate addiction and enduring withdrawal without the help of a knowledgable professional can increase their risk for relapse. Thankfully there are people out there that can provide skilled and compassionate care throughout all stages of recovery. Your loved one does not have to quit on their own and there are options available to increase their chances of success. Ready to get started? Our counselors are available 24 hours a day. Give us a call at 123-456-7890.

What Are the Most Important Things to Know About Drug Detoxing?

What are some of the most significant facts to know about going through drug detox? You already know you’ve got a lot of work ahead of you. But what can you expect to happen during the detox process?

How long will drug detox take?

The amount of time it takes to drug detox depends totally on the drugs you’ve been using and the length of time you used them. In general, however, drug detox takes somewhere from seven days to two weeks. Some drugs take longer. Getting off drugs remains a challenge for everyone who does it. Staying off drugs for the long term also includes a lot of hard work. Ask your medical professional for more information on detoxing from a specific drug or alcohol.

How does drug detox feel?

You need professional and emotional support to get through the drug or alcohol detox process. This support helps keep people withdrawing from drugs to stay clean and sober and to prevent a relapse.

When detoxing, many individuals become nauseated and vomit. You need help keeping hydrated, and anti-nausea medications assist in relieving vomiting. Exercise and hydration both work well to combat some of the physical and emotional symptoms of withdrawal that you might feel. Anti-diarrhea medications also assist people with stomach upset due to withdrawal. Some medicines work well to less severe withdrawal symptoms if you stop taking heroin or opiates. Suboxone is a legal medication that works as a replacement for these two drugs. Once the opioids leave your system, you can gradually reduce the amount of the substitute medication you take.

Many recovering addicts experience sleep problems and hypersensitivities during withdrawal from substances such as benzodiazepines. Detoxing at a medically staffed detox center allows you to have medical help with severe withdrawal symptoms so that you won’t experience as much discomfort. Also, addicts sometimes start taking drugs to self-medicate mental health issues such as depression or bipolar disorder. If you become depressed or experience emotional problems during withdrawal, a health care provider can prescribe you drugs to ease these problems, too.

Should I drug detox at home?

No, you shouldn’t drug detox at home, especially by yourself. If it were easy to detox using will power, you would have been clean and sober by now. But, drug and alcohol withdrawal is serious business. Tempting as it might appear, drug detox needs to be left to the experts. Some people who go through drug detox become violently ill. People sometimes die during the process of detoxing. You require a trained staff to help you get off your drugs of choice and reliable folks to keep you safe while you go through withdrawal.

Most people become very ill while they detox. You might also have seizures, hallucinations, and experience a wide variety of distressing side effects from not using your drug of choice. When you detox in a medical facility, you don’t only gain a better chance at completing the detox process, but you might also qualify for medications to reduce your uncomfortable drug withdrawal symptoms. Other severe physical and mental problems that might occur during detox include:

• Delirium tremens.
• Grand mal seizures.
• Intense cravings for the missing drug or alcohol. These fierce cravings might bring about an overdose.
• Extreme nausea and vomiting, leading to dehydration and malnutrition.
• Low blood pressure.]
• Kidney failure.
• A chance of choking on your vomit.
• Coma.
• Death.

Can I successfully drug detox? Or am I hooked for life?

You can successfully detox from drugs and alcohol. If you quit taking your medication of choice or stop drinking, your body can begin to heal itself. Once your body releases all of the addictive toxins from it, you do need to find out why you started to use in the first place. To accomplish this task, you need to go to a reputable rehab program. Most rehabs offer individual and group therapy, training, and education about why you might have started using. Medical help remains available to keep you off your previous drug or alcohol addiction. You might receive family therapy and get to participate in a sober living program. Sober living enables you to live in a home-like setting and gradually work your way back into interacting with the world outside your treatment placement. Please make the call and contact us for more detox information and a new start in life without drugs and addiction.

Are You Allowed to Leave Long Term Treatment Programs for a Night?

If you are thinking about a rehab program for yourself or someone close to you, there is a lot that comes to mind. The majority of the people wonder: what a rehab program involves? How long the treatment period takes? What are the regulations of the addiction treatment center? Well, you need to know that a rehab program varies from one person to the next depending on the severity of drug and alcohol abuse. There is inpatient treatment and outpatient treatment. The former mostly applies to individuals that are severely affected, and it entails long term treatment programs to attain sobriety.

How does a rehab program take?

Normally, a rehab program lasts between 30 and 90 days. Short treatment programs take about 30 days, while, long-term treatment programs can take between 60 and 90 days. There are programs that provide you with a standardized program that requires you to stay in the facility for a short period. And there are rehab programs that give you an individualized approach to establish your level of addiction, plus your mental and physical state to determine how long you should stay in the facility.

How does a rehab program work?

Whether you’re under outpatient or inpatient treatment, there is a series of steps that a rehab center follows to ensure that you achieve full recovery after the program. Individuals also need to understand that addiction is not something that people wish upon themselves. It is a disease. Therefore, you should not shy to check yourself or a loved one into a rehab facility.

Here’s how the program works.

I. Assessment

When you check into a rehab facility, the first step is assessment. Here, a dual diagnosis has to be conducted to establish if you have any underlying mental issue. During the assessment, a specialist will also ask a couple of questions to determine the drug or alcohol you’re addicted to, plus the duration.

II. Detox

Detox is a critical phase because it’s where substance or alcohol user stops using. During this stage is when relapsing occurs, and that’s why specialized care is recommended during detoxification. It is also during this phase that withdrawal symptoms occur, and they are the major cause of relapsing. Some of the symptoms include:

  • Agitation
  • Excess sweating at night
  • Shakiness
  • Vomiting
  • Nausea
  • Irritability

III. Rehabilitation

The next step is rehabilitation. The step involves both physical and emotional help, and there are stipulated rules that you have to follow. A client attends a couple of counseling sessions, which helps him or her to regain self-esteem. During this phase, you get to see the positivity of a sober life and the negativity of addiction.

You will also receive group therapy sessions and recovery meetings. At this stage, you are given time to partake in other activities such as exercising, taking trips to the beach, watching movies, and family members can also visit.

Incentives

After you have undergone the rehabilitation process, a rehab facility can offer you privileges once you show that you have advanced through the program positively. However, before any incentive, you have to have remained sober and followed through the treatment program goals.

The rewards come after a significant amount of time during the process, whereby you’re let to go for unsupervised trips or even given weekend passes. Such privileges serve as a motivation for you to continue pursuing sobriety, plus you also act as an ideal example to other clients within the rehab program.

IV. Aftercare

The last step involved in a rehab program is aftercare. It is a critical step because addiction is a chronic disease that has no definite cure. This step helps you to manage your addiction throughout your life. You can get help from self-help groups within your community. Alumni groups also come in handy in helping you avoid drug and alcohol abuse. During this stage, you learn how to interact with the community around you when sober.

Conclusion

Addiction is a chronic disease that affects a good number of people. It is not voluntary, and that is why you should be confident to seek help from a rehab facility if you or a family member is struggling with addiction. Sticking to your treatment plan and maintaining sobriety can see you get privileges from the rehab center, which prompts you to pursue sobriety.

Are you struggling with addiction? Would you like to pursue sober living? Well, contact us today at 800-737-0933 to get the help you need.

Is Suboxone Only Used During Detox?

Suboxone is a medication that is prescribed to treat opioid use disorder. It is a combination of buprenorphine and naloxone. Suboxone is used to decrease the appearance of opioid withdrawal symptoms. It is a long-acting medication and lasts for approximately 24 hours. Suboxone is a film that is placed in the cheek or under the tongue when administered. The side effects of suboxone can include constricted pupils, low blood pressure, lethargy, and respiratory depression. The risk of overdosing on suboxone is drastically lower than overdosing on another opioid like heroin. Suboxone was approved for use in the United States for medical purposes in 2002.

The long-term outcomes of suboxone as a treatment for opioid use disorder are better than quitting opioid use overall. Cravings for opioids are decreased when using suboxone, which prevents individuals from seeking out other opioids to use. Suboxone is a first-line treatment for opioid use disorder and has been shown as effective in the treatment and long-term recovery for individuals who were dependent on opioids in the past. Suboxone is typically prescribed during detox and in doctors offices. Individuals are given their prescription and they do not have to be monitored, unlike individuals who must go into a clinic each day to receive their dose of methadone.

Individuals who are stable and are not able to visit a clinic each day to receive medication may prescribed suboxone. Further, individuals who have other medical conditions that visit their doctor regularly may be prescribed suboxone. Other individuals who may be prescribed suboxone include those who have jobs that require them to remain alert and are not able to be under a sedating medication like methadone. Suboxone is also recommended to treat individuals who may be affected negatively by methadone use. These populations include individuals who abuse alcohol, the elderly, individuals who take large doses of benzodiazepines, and individuals with a low level of tolerance to opioids. Further, suboxone is prescribed to individuals who are engaging in therapy and counseling in order to treat their opioid use disorder. The use of suboxone in combination with therapy is more successful in treating opioid use disorder than treating it with suboxone alone.

If you would like more information regarding suboxone therapy or treatment for opioid use disorder, call us today at 800-737-0933.

Why Is Outpatient Treatment After Rehab So Important?

When people think of drug and alcohol rehab, what usually comes to mind is an inpatient program in which a patient stays in a facility for a month. They spend that time detoxing, treating their withdrawal symptoms, and attending therapy sessions address the roots of their addictions. That’s all very important, but addiction treatment doesn’t end there.

As anyone who has ever struggled with drugs and alcohol can tell you, addiction is a lifelong struggle. A patient might be over their physical addiction, but there are always underlying factors that led to substance abuse in the first place such as depression, anxiety, an abusive home life, or chronic pain. These issues often don’t go away just because someone is physically clean; they can persist throughout life and lead to a relapse. This is why outpatient treatment is so important.

Rehab is the First Step

In many ways, undergoing detox and inpatient rehab is only the first step in overcoming an addiction. It may be a very important first step, but it is a first step nevertheless. What it does is allow patients to become physically healthy and overcome the need to constantly use drugs and alcohol to be free of pain and withdrawal. When that happens, the real healing can begin in the form of ongoing therapy that can last for years.

The Benefit of Outpatient Treatment

\In its simplest form, outpatient treatment keeps patients accountable so they don’t relapse and start using drugs and alcohol again, but it’s often more than that. We’ve already talked about how outpatient therapy allows patients to address the underlying psychological issues that may have drove them to drugs in the first place, but it can also provide a strong support system if they engage in group therapy. That support system is crucial since it surrounds patients with people who understand what they are going through and provides them with positive influences to replace the peers who may have encouraged risky behavior. The most important thing to remember is that the initial inpatient rehab is only a small part of addiction recovery, yet it’s something that most people fail to realize. The treatment that comes after is just as important, if not more so. It’s the reason why most good treatment programs include inpatient and outpatient treatment programs instead of just the standard detox that most people imagine.

If you or a loved one is struggling with an addiction to drugs or alcohol, always remember that there is hope for you. It will be a long and difficult road to recovery, but it is one that will be worth it in the end. For more information about the programs that may be available to you, contact us today at 800-737-0933. We will be more than happy to answer your questions and provide the help you need.