A Few Quick Tips to Help You Find the Right Drug Detox Program in South Florida

Deciding to enter a drug detox program takes courage. Many people make the mistake of remaining in denial about their or their loved ones substance abuse for too long. This results in lost time and damage to dreams, relationships, and health. Choosing to proactively address substance abuse puts you or your loved one on the road to recovery.

Finding the right drug detox program can never be taken lightly. Drug detox works best when clients stay throughout the entire program. The chances of clients choosing to complete detox and rehab are greatly enhanced when they choose the right type of program. Here are a few tips to help:

Religious or Traditional Based

This is a purely personal decision. Both approaches work for the right clients. The key is considering what you or your loved one’s needs really are.

Medically Supervised Detox

When clients must endure severe and dangerous withdrawal effects, medically supervised detox becomes a necessity. The illness experienced by many people addicted to opioids or heroin can be so severe that they cannot withdraw safely outside of a medical setting. Severe alcohol withdrawal can cause extreme spikes in blood pressure, hallucinations, convulsions, and unconsciousness.

Many people that wish to quit drugs or alcohol find it impossible because of these extreme symptoms. For that reason, an inpatient, medically supervised detox provides the answer. Patients are prescribed medications that manage these withdrawal symptoms. They also receive medical treatment for any co-occurring medical conditions, some of which are aggravated by the withdrawal process. Clients also benefit from being away from environments where they used drugs or alcohol.

Withdrawal takes from one to several weeks, depending on the type of drug withdrawal and the length and quantity of use. Though sometimes uncomfortable, the withdrawal process is natural and necessary. During this time, the body adjusts to the drug’s absence.

Detox Plus Rehab

Some centers provide detox while others provide detox plus rehab. The process of completing both detox and rehab usually takes between 30 and 90 days. If the client has the ability to attend both detox and rehab, he or she has the greatest chance of success.

Rehab provides therapy aimed at helping clients live a drug and alcohol free life after they leave the drug treatment center. Counseling, cognitive therapy, and group therapy help clients build the skills and support they need to remain sober. Rehab drastically reduces relapse rates.

Finding the right detox treatment program gives you or your loved one the best chances for a positive experience. The most important thing is taking the first step. Our counselors are available 24 hours a day. Call 800-737-0933

Is a Drug Treatment Center in Florida Right For You?

Drug and alcohol addiction are complex and difficult to overcome. The process of breaking addiction requires first withdrawing from the substance, then addressing the underlying causes of the addiction. The withdrawal phase takes from one to several weeks, depending on the type, length, and severity of the addiction. The rehabilitation phase, where the underlying issues of addiction are treated, takes from several weeks to several months.

Though this may seem like a long period of time, most people who enter drug and alcohol rehab programs find the time passes quickly. When they leave the treatment center, they feel fresh, healthy, and empowered. With their desire for the substance under control, they often turn to other activities that make them feel well and productive. As more time passes, their desire for drugs and alcohol continually diminishes. Many times, they completely lose all desire for drugs and alcohol as other aspects of life become their focus.

Is it time to enter a drug treatment center?

If addiction has set in, the answer must be yes. The powerful street drugs of today are manufactured with a never before seen potency. Heroin has become an epidemic because of this. It is often cut with dangerous additives like fentanyl.

These drugs are too powerful for the human body to tolerate in any quantity for even a short period of time. Once addiction has set in, the withdrawal symptoms force people to continue using the drug. Breaking the addiction requires medically supervised detox.

What is medically supervised detox?

During this process, clients usually remain at the drug treatment center on an inpatient basis. This not only keeps clients away from environments where drugs are readily available, it also allows staff to monitor the client’s health and provide medication that reduce withdrawal effects.

Many rehab clients face dangerous drug withdrawal effects. It is crucial to provide medication for their health and safety. For example, severe alcohol withdrawal can lead to delirium tremens, which causes convulsions, extreme panic, and hallucinations. Many street drugs have similar and sometimes more extreme withdrawal symptoms.

Medications reduce these symptoms to safe and tolerable levels. Once detox is complete, the client is ready to move to rehabilitation, where counseling and support help them better understand how to avoid relapse. Success is often achieved through combinations of therapies, such as counseling and group therapy.

Addiction to hard drugs and alcohol can destroy a person’s dreams and leave them in a state of ill-health. For those suffering addiction, reaching out for help provides a path to permanent sobriety. Our counselors are available 24 hours a day. Call 800-737-0933

Why 28 Days of Rehab May Not Be Enough

Treatment for addiction issues is a continually evolving area. 28-day inpatient treatment programs have been the norm in the addiction treatment world. However, research shows that the longer a newly clean and sober person stays in treatment, the better their chances for lasting recovery.

Some substances take longer to detox from than others. There can be periods of time when even after the initial detox period is over that withdrawal symptoms can resurface. In early recovery, it is important that a support system is in place so that the individual does not return to using. If an individual is still in treatment when these symptoms resurface there is a greater chance they will use the resources available to get through it rather than go back out and use.

Even in individuals who will not experience a recurrence of withdrawal symptoms, the brain and body need a chance to fully heal. Dopamine is a chemical found in the brain that is responsible for pleasure. Drug and alcohol users may have a hard time experiencing happiness and joy when they stop using their drug of choice. Most substances deplete the amount of dopamine that is readily available in early recovery and it takes a significant period of time, longer than 28 days, for the level of dopamine to return to normal. When a person stays in treatment during the period of time needed for levels to return, they have a greater chance of continuing in recovery rather than relapsing.

Avoiding Triggers is the Key to Successful Recovery

The main triggers for those in early recovery are being around the people they used with, being in places they used to use, and exposure to the things they used to be around when they were using. If these things can be avoided than recovery can continue with fewer chances for relapse. 28 days in treatment is not long enough to make the changes necessary to eliminate these triggers from their lives.

If you or someone you love is suffering from addiction, consider a treatment program that lasts longer than the typical 28 days. Although many in early recovery are eager to resume their life, understand that a clean and sober life is made much more possible by spending the time necessary in early recovery treatment.

Our counselors are available now to help you begin your journey to recovery. Call us today at 800-737-0933

Reasons Why You Should Try Going To a Drug Treatment Center in Florida

Drug treatment centers are often ideal solutions for those who have faced long-term addictions to prescription medications as well as illegal street drugs. Opting to enter a drug treatment center in Florida has a variety of benefits that are essential when maintaining a clean life on your journey to sobriety. Knowing just a few of the reasons why a drug treatment center is an optimal solution to an addiction is a way for you to find a location that offers rehabilitation programs that are truly right for you.

There are both inpatient and outpatient drug rehabilitation centers available throughout the state of Florida, fitting individuals based on their needs. Inpatient rehab and drug treatment centers require you to remain on the premises of the treatment center itself throughout the entirety of the duration of your program. Outpatient services, however, do not require you to stay in a sober center which may lead to relapsing depending on the support system you have in place while abstaining from the use of any drugs or illegal substances.

Benefits of a Drug Treatment Center in Florida

Drug treatment centers offer a number of benefits and help to keep individuals on track when seeking long-term sobriety. One of the biggest perks of a drug treatment center is the ability to find joy in hobbies and activities while sober again. Drug treatment centers provide a zero-tolerance atmosphere to keep individuals from feeling tempted or swayed by the presence of any alcohol, tobacco, or other substances.

A treatment center also often provides both individual counseling or therapy in addition to group therapy sessions. Talking with other individuals in group settings is a way to feel less judgment, shame, or guilt that is commonly associated with drug addictions. When you have the ability to express yourself and lean on others for support it is much easier to stick to your goals of remaining sober and abstaining from the use of alcohol altogether.

Seeking out a drug treatment center in Florida is ideal whether you have recently developed an addiction to drugs or if you have been battling addiction throughout most of your life. A drug treatment center is one of the most optimal solutions for anyone seeking healthy and positive changes for their future. Are you looking to get help with a drug or alcohol problem? Contact us today. Our counselors are available 24 hours a day. Call 800-737-0933

How a Marchman Act Really Works

When a loved one is addicted to alcohol or opiates, it is almost always more than family or friends can manage on their own. In the State of Florida, the Marchman Act is a statute that can help you get emergency care for someone battling addiction. The state court system can provide for either a voluntary or involuntary assessment and stabilization of a person abusing drugs or alcohol, as well as provide treatment for it. Many people have heard of the Marchman Act, but are not completely sure how to use it. Here’s how the Marchman Act really works.

Getting Help With a Marchman Act

To get help from the Florida court system someone has to file a petition with the county clerk of courts to have the substance abuser evaluated. The least expensive option for the filing is to get the required packet at the Clerk of Court’s office and do it yourself. Keep in mind though, that any mistakes or missing details in the petition can cost you precious time. So, if you choose to do the petition yourself take the time to do it right.

The next option seems obvious but may not be. When dealing with the courts, you hire a lawyer to represent you. Remember though, that a lawyer can help you prepare for the filing and represent you at the hearing, but usually is not involved in treatment for the patient.

The third option when implementing the Marchman Act is to hire an intervention counselor who specializes in the entire process. An intervention counselor can file a petition, as well as guide you through setting up a treatment plan to ensure that your loved one receives the care that is needed.

So how does the Marchman Act really work? After the petition is filed, there will be a hearing within ten days. The petitioner receives notice of the hearing by mail and the patient is served notice by the sheriff. From there the court can order for involuntary assessment at a treatment center for up to five days to evaluate and stabilize the patient. A second petition may be filed once the initial written assessment is reviewed by the court to order involuntary treatment for up to 60 days. For the family and patient battling addiction to drugs or alcohol, the Marchman Act can be a lifesaver.

Need help?  Call us today 800-737-0933

How Much Will Insurance Cover For Heroin Detox?

Heroin addiction is a devastating disease that afflicts many people today including teenagers and adults. One of the questions that we are asked frequently at our center is whether or not insurance will cover a heroin detox. We hear from many people who are interested in getting clean and staying with us for a heroin detox, but they worry about coming up with the money.

Insurance companies often have provisions that include heroin addiction. These coverages typically involve treatment at a reputable facility that has a detoxification process and a recovery process. One of the reasons insurance companies cover heroin detox programs is because of the devastating health effects of heroin use. Heroin use causes both mental and physical problems with the latter including liver and kidney diseases.


How Do I Find Out if My Insurance Company Covers Heroin Detox Programs?

The best way to find out if your insurance company covers heroin detox programs is to speak directly with an agent. Sometimes speaking to an agent over the phone can be difficult and we recommend speaking with an agent in person if possible to review the coverage for your particular plan. Once you find out which programs are covered by your insurance provider and the type of coverage you can expect to receive, you can contact the rehab center to set up additional payment plans for any fees not covered by your insurance company.

What affects the type of coverage you will receive for heroin detox programs?

  • State You Live In
  • Your Insurance Provider
  • Your Insurance Plan
  • Program Type: Inpatient Vs. Outpatient

When reviewing health insurance guidelines for heroin detox coverage, you will also want to ask your provider about inpatient vs. outpatient therapy. Most heroin detox centers start with inpatient heroin detox therapy to ensure that patients are following all steps of treatment including therapy sessions and abstaining from the drug. Most patients benefit from starting with inpatient detox programs before moving to outpatient detox programs because of the undivided one-on-one attention. The outpatient therapy detox programs are best for patients who have better control over their addiction and are simply looking for additional support.

Ready to take action and beat your addiction today? Contact 800-737-0933 to get started. We know that reaching out isn’t easy, but it is the first step towards a life of freedom. You deserve to experience everything that life has to offer and we want to help you reach your potential living a heroin-free life.

Does Naltrexone Actually Help Curb Addiction Cravings?

When fighting diseases of addiction it is necessary to use every tool available in order to prevent relapses from occurring. Traditional methods of recovery like individual counseling and group therapy will always be necessary in order to teach individuals how to live a life free of drugs and alcohol. In addition to these traditional methods, there are medications available to help curb cravings and enable recovery.

Can Naltrexone Help Me?

Naltrexone is a once-daily medication that is used to curb opiate and alcohol cravings and prevent relapse. It is an opioid antagonist which means it binds to opiate receptors in the. This blocks opiate-based drugs like heroin or oxycontin from producing its euphoric effects when taken. In alcohol addicts, it has been used to counteract cravings for alcohol and can also block its effects if alcohol is ingested. It is thought that naltrexone inhibits the release of endorphins when alcohol is consumed.

Individuals in a recovery program who take naltrexone have an increased chance of long-term recovery. Opiate addicts know that if they take naltrexone, even if they leave the facility to take drugs, they will not get the high they were used to. This can prevent relapse in patients and lead them to stay in treatment longer. The longer a person remains in an inpatient treatment facility the greater their odds of being successful. The naltrexone gives the patient time to learn about their addiction, what types of stressors and triggers they should avoid, and what kinds of coping strategies they can use in order to remain in recovery.

Naltrexone is effective but it does have drawbacks. Individuals taking naltrexone will not be able to feel the effects of opiate-based pain medication which can be problematic in the event of an accident or traumatic injury. However, the effect of naltrexone gradually wears off within a twenty-four hour period.

Opiate addicts who take naltrexone and then decide to stop may have increased sensitivity for a period of time to opiates. If the person relapses, this can lead to a much lower tolerance to opiates and cause a fatal overdose. However, this is the case when tolerance is lowered among recovering addicts who have not taken naltrexone as well.

Other opiate addiction recovery medications like methadone and suboxone, are replacements for illicit opiates like heroin. However, these replacement medications are opiates themselves and users can develop an addiction to them as well. Naltrexone is not an opiate and is nonaddictive. It can be stopped at any time without worrying about the effects of withdrawal.

Naltrexone will never replace the need for other therapies, but it is an effective weapon in treating addictions. If you or someone you know could benefit from taking naltrexone, call our counselors today to ask about its benefits. Call today 800-737-0933

Why Outpatient Detox Should Be Coupled With Ongoing Treatment

Drug and alcohol addiction is a serious disease. It affects nearly every aspect of your life including your job, your relationships with family and friends, and your health. In order for you to resume a normal life free from drugs and alcohol, the treatment must be taken as seriously as the disease. Recovery is a process that not only includes removing drugs and alcohol from your body but also learning how to cope with life without using them.

Detoxing from drugs and alcohol is the first step towards a sober life. During outpatient detox, you may go through some uncomfortable withdrawal symptoms. This initial detox may seem like the hardest part to go through, but recovery needs to include ongoing treatment in order to prevent relapse and be successful.

When you are addicted to drugs or alcohol, they become your first priority. Everything else in your life gets pushed to the side in order to satisfy the addiction. Now that you are determined to end your addiction, you need to learn how to live life again without being under the influence.

Types of Ongoing Treatment

You may have been experiencing underlying mental health issues and chose to self-medicate with drugs and alcohol. Unfortunately, now that the drugs and alcohol are gone, the mental health issue you were experiencing before will most likely return. One on one counseling can help you manage any mental health issues that may be present during your recovery treatment. Counseling can help you learn effective coping strategies to deal with life stressors and triggers that may give you cravings for your drug of choice. Therapy can help you define goals you would like to set for yourself both during and after your treatment.

Group therapy is helpful for patients starting out in recovery. Attending group therapy sessions gives you an opportunity to share your own experiences, what is working for you in recovery and what you need to work on. It is also helpful to hear about other recovering addicts’ similar experiences and what challenges they may be facing.

Twelve-step support groups like alcoholics anonymous and narcotics anonymous have proven to be incredibly helpful for recovering addicts. Like group therapy, this is a way to hear about others’ experiences and what they have learned from them. It is a good way to learn how others cope with cravings or how they manage their daily lives without drugs or alcohol.

The initial detox period needs to be incorporated with ongoing treatment in order to be successful. A serious illness like addiction needs to be treated seriously so that you can live a healthy, sober life. Our counselors are available twenty-four hours a day to help you begin your new sober life. Call today 800-737-0933

What Happens During Heroin Detox?

Heroin is one of the most addictive drugs, and the detox period can be tough. However, once you’re through the detox stage, you’ll be on the road to recovery. Although detox is slightly different for everyone, it can be helpful to have a general idea of what happens.

The severity of the withdrawal symptoms will vary depending on how dependent the brain is on the substance. Common withdrawal symptoms include:

  • Muscle pain
  • Insomnia
  • Sweating
  • Nausea and vomting

Heroin greatly increases dopamine levels in the brain. After prolonged or repeated use, the brain becomes unable to produce sufficient amounts of dopamine on its own and has to readjust to functioning without the drug. Therefore, many people also experience psychological withdrawal symptoms, like anxiety, agitation, and paranoia.

Timeline of Heroin Detox

Heroin withdrawal symptoms usually start between six and 12 hours of the last dose. The symptoms usually peak around the second day. By the third or fourth day, the symptoms typically subside a little, but the discomfort isn’t completely gone. It’s important to eat properly during this time to help your immune system. Many people experience shivers and abdominal cramping during the third, fourth, and fifth days.

Withdrawal symptoms often end after about seven days. For those who were severely addicted, the symptoms may last for 10 days, but they rarely last for longer. However, some symptoms, like trouble sleeping and loss of appetite, may persist for a few more days.

Although the acute withdrawal stage typically ends in under 10 days, the entire detox process can last for several months because the brain changes caused by heroin take a long time to reverse. This is known as PAWS, or post-acute withdrawal symptoms.

If you begin a supervised detox program, the process will typically begin with an intake and evaluation, which will let your healthcare providers determine an appropriate treatment plan. You’ll probably have a physical exam and be asked questions about mental health symptoms. Then, your medical professionals will come up with a plan for your immediate detox and long-term treatment.

Even though the effects of detox and withdrawal are rarely fatal, it’s very important to go through detox under medical supervision. This reduces the risk of relapse and provides medical care in case there are complications. If you or a loved one is struggling with a heroin addiction, call us at 800-737-0933 for the care you need.

How Bad is The Heroin Epidemic?

Opioids are the the most prevalent cause of drug overdose in the US, and overdose rates continue to increase. From the year 1999 to the year 2008, heroin overdose rates increased by 400%, and rates have quadrupled again since 2010. Heroin overdose rates increased by over 20% from 2014 to 2015 alone. We are in the midst of a crisis, and opioids are to blame

Many heroin addictions begin with prescription opioids. In fact, three out of four new users report abusing pills first. For years, doctors prescribed them more freely. In more recent years research on their addictive properties and overdose rates has caused doctors to reduce, and sometimes cut off, prescriptions. Addicts can buy opioid pills, but they are very expensive. Heroin is less expensive and much stronger, so addicts sometimes turn to it out of desperation.

It is estimated that around 70,000 people report using heroin each year, but the number is likely much higher. Many addicts do not seek treatment on their own and would not answer questions about heroin use honestly. Demographically, the average heroin user is white, male, low-income, has abused prescription drugs in the past, and between the ages of 18 and 25.

Do you suspect that someone you care about is abusing heroine? Learn the signs.

Signs of heroin use include:

  • tiny pupils
  • appearance of sleepiness
  • flushed skin
  • paraphernalia, such as burnt spoons, baggies of a white substance or syringes
  • runny nose
  • track marks, or always covering arms
  • lack of self care, such as eating and grooming
  • nausea or vomiting
  • scratching

Health risks of heroin use include damage to the lungs, heart and kidneys, as well as severe impairment of the ability to think.

Because the potency of heroin varies and addicts often use more to achieve a stronger effect, overdose rates are very high. Often times, the difference between the amount needed for the desired effect and the amount that could cause a fatal overdose is very small. Because of this, all heroin users are at risk of overdose.

Do you or someone you care about need help overcoming addiction? We at Genesis House are here for you. You can reach us, 24 hours a day, at 800-737-0933