Heroin

What Life Skills Can You Learn in Heroin Rehab?

Have you ever wondered why some people have no issue getting through addiction treatment and staying sober for the rest of their lives while others live a life with chronic relapses and distress? Both groups cease to amaze us in the addiction treatment community. As for the way, there are actually several potential explanations.

For a lot of people who constantly relapse, it's sometimes never getting to the bottom of the root cause of their addiction that cause the problems. Other people just have difficulty sticking with a program. On the other side of the coin, it's possible they entered rehab with a moderate addiction or perhaps, they have tremendous support from family and friends, both things making them strong enough to survive.

If it was possible to identify one particular reason for the variance, it would likely have something to do with the coping and life skills someone is able to develop during treatment. For the remaining portion of this document, we are going to discuss the importance of life skill and which life skills seem to make the biggest difference.

What Life Skills Can You Learn in Heroin Rehab?

Before we discuss specific life skills, a little bit of information about what we mean about life skills and its importance seems in order. Life skills are the tools people use to manage their everyday lives. In a normal person, there are the skills that come into play to cover every aspect of an individual's life.

Most people live regulars lives. When stress and frustration come calling, they are able to use the life skills they learned as kids and teenagers to deal with what's in front of them. It doesn't mean they don't struggle and have problems, it just means their problems never seem to get bad enough to lead them into danger.

The folks who end up caught in the cycle of addiction don't always have the right coping and life skills. When unable to properly manage their lives, they become vulnerable to outside influences like drugs and alcohol. The big attraction of substance abuse is it gives the user a way out. It gives them a way to medicate away the pain, stress, and frustration of everyday life. What little bit they had of life skills before they started using dissipates into nothing, leaving them to be like a lake without water in it.

In addiction therapy, the focus is put on isolating the real issues. Once the real issues can be identified, the client, working with a counselor, can begin to develop better life skills. Let's discuss some specific life skills which might prove effective.

Managing Finances

Money issues create a lot of financial problems and stress in our lives. They are also the easiest issues to rectify with the proper training. In rehab, counselors teach their clients how to create a budget and live within the confines of that budget. Organized finances is always a good way to prevent money issues.

Learning to Communicate

Addiction sufferers tend to break away from family and friends in an attempt to isolate themselves. Somewhere along the line they completely lose whatever ability they had to communicate in the first place. Being able to communicate feelings and emotions to friends and relatives while in recovery is absolutely necessary. The addiction sufferer needs the ability to speak up when they are bothered and perhaps on the verge of a relapse. Communication skills are a very important part of recovery.

Leadership Skills

Success in life is an important part of keeping us all happy and satisfied with our lives. Addiction sufferers typically have a breakdown in the ways they interact with people. They tend to withdraw or simply go with the flow. By motivating and teaching them to be leaders of their own lives and perhaps in their careers, that sense of control will often inspire them to keep things moving in a positive direction.

Living Healthy Lives

When people look good on the outside and feel good physically on the inside, it diminishes their desire to punish themselves with drugs or alcohol. In treatment, there's always some focus put on nutrition and getting proper exercise. The routine of exercising and eating well creates certain stability within a person's life.

If your addiction is causing you hardship, you need help. We would be happy to help you with everything from detox to learning better coping and life skills. For more information about our services, we want you to call one of our representatives at 800-737-0933.

How Can People With Chronic Pain Quit Heroin?

You can manage chronic pain and quit heroin while learning how to reduce the risk of substance abuse. Painkillers or its derivatives are adequate for most and as the pain worsens relief demands more frequent doses leading to potential drug dependency.

Too often individuals attempt to self-medicate and trigger more serious health conditions. There are effective non-opioid drugs combined with different types of therapeutic and medical procedures for treating chronic pain and addiction.

The approach is multi-disciplinary; transitioning from heroin to a non-opioid medication, treatments for pain, and the introductions of precautions to prevent drug relapse.

More Than Just Pain

A vast majority of individual’s suffering with chronic pain are unaware they have a substance abuse problem. Besides the health considerations that will worsen over time substance abuse interferes with the body’s genetic makeup and biological functions. At this point, reversing the effect is difficult without some form of professional assistance.

For most, addiction to heroin occurs with long-term use as the chemicals change how our body responds. Did you know?

  • Heroin does not heal or repair the cause of chronic pain.
  • Heroin offers only short-term intervals for relieving chronic pain.
  • Heroin can cause mild to extreme side effects that interfere with day-to-day functions.

Heroin and other painkillers belong to the same class of drugs called opioids. Opioids attach to receptors found on the nerve cells in the brain interfering with the signals that alert the body to pain. For some, it may decrease the level of pain temporarily and prompt a feeling of euphoria.

Non-Opioid Pain Treatments

Heroin isn’t the only chronic pain treatment option. Like heroin, all medications or illegal drugs have potential risk factors. Contributing to these risks are personal health status and family medical disorders.

  • Do you know if other types of substance abuse or psychiatric disorders exist?

The outcome could be affected when one or more of these factors exist. This information helps to select the combinations of medicine and therapy for the individual’s lifestyle and level of pain.

Addiction programs incorporate specialized doctors and alternative health teams to help cope with the situation. Depending on the severity of heroin use the withdrawal process can cause:

  • Cold flashes
  • Insomnia
  • Muscle or bone pain
  • Restlessness

Treating chronic pain without heroin involves physical, psychological, and occupational therapies along with a medical supervisor of nonopioid pain treatments or medicine.

Getting Rid of The Pain Without Heroin

Chronic pain is manageable with medications and alternative practices achieving fewer adverse effects on your health. Treatment starts with understanding that both the physical and mental components of one’s health are involved in recovery.

Facts of treating pain with heroin:

  • The body builds a tolerance to heroin with long-term use
  • The pain remains.
  • Opioids (heroin) are addictive, dangerous and life-threatening.

Technology and medical advances address the source of the pain collectively with non-opioid medications and therapies. Recovery centers provide a safe and caring environment.

Residential programs offer personal and group follow-up care. The goal is to help teach individuals how to live life without addiction through a continuum of care.

Managing Life One Day A Time

The good news, physical dependence on heroin is reversible. By focusing on the cause of addiction and responding to chronic pain, you can learn how to deal with it and quit heroin.

  • It’s not a process that you can maneuver alone.
  • You need the help of trained professionals.

Recovery is a long journey and treatment to the addiction is only the first phase. To quit heroin, you must continue to maintain your physical and mental health one day at a time. See your doctor regularly for the pain to prevent a relapse. More important, if you experience a relapse urge, seek support – it happens from time to time.

Dealing with chronic pain is unbearable but blocking out the pain with heroin can only cause more damage to your health. Rather than live with addiction, there’s help available to minimize the effects of withdrawal and teach you how to manage a life with chronic pain instead.

Using heroin to quite chronic pain comes with a wide range of potential risks and side effects. Call our office at 800-737-0933 if you find yourself thinking about taking higher doses or more powerful drugs for pain.

Is It Possible to Get Off Heroin Without Medical Intervention?

Some drugs you can stop taking cold turkey. While you will experience some withdrawal symptoms, there won’t be deadly consequences. Heroin is not one of these drugs. Heroin is becoming the drug of choice, and its usage is up over 250 percent in the pasts few years. The first goal is to break the psychological dependence then the need for the substance. The problem is this drug gives an immediate impact that affects not only the mind but the neurological system. Caution must be taken.

Side Effects from Withdrawing

Is it possible to get off heroin without help from a medical team? Yes, you can pull yourself off heroin, but it’s not recommended. You must understand what this substance does to the brain to understand how to end your drug use successfully. With each use, the brain is rewired, and the perceptions of pleasure and rewards are altered. Due to its impact on the mind and body, it’s imperative to be weaned off slowly or given another medication to help with the transition. If you stop this drug without tapering, you will experience some of the following:

•Nervousness
•Muscle Cramps
•Temperature
•Queasiness and Vomiting
•Cravings for The Drug
•Suicidal Ideation
•Dehydration
•Extensive Sweating
•Seizures
•Death

The Difference in Using A Medical Team

The process of coming off any drug is both delicate and complicated. For severe drug addictions, inpatient therapy is recommended. Having a team of people surrounding you can ensure that you are safe and medically stable. One of the best ways physicians and rehabilitation centers can accomplish this is by using the drug Suboxone. There is a lot of controversy regarding the use of this medication, but it does help many people conquer heroin.

Using Suboxone To Combat Heroin

The controversy with suboxone is that it’s two medications in one, which has opioid properties. One of the medications, buprenorphine, stimulates the brain like heroin. However, it only stimulates half the brain. Unlike the popular drug, it doesn’t cause euphoria or the severe dependence issues. What it does is reduces the withdrawal symptoms. The other medication, naloxone, helps to block the effects caused by the drugs. It can block the receptors and raise the threshold. No wonder this medication is used by so many to help people get off serious drugs.

Prescription medications like suboxone can help people get their life back and reduce the damage caused by opiates. Some say that this is the drug that can combat the heroin addiction issues faced in this country. The goal is to use it for a short period, and eventually, you can wean off this drug also. Because this medication also has a risk of addiction, it should be administered in an inpatient setting to ensure that the doses can be altered.

Why Going It Alone Is Not Advisable?

While inpatient treatment is recommended for opiates, there are also short-term programs that are not as extensive for those who need outpatient services. Outpatient services allow people who have only had their addiction for a short time get help without interrupting their job or family life. However, this is not recommended for someone who has a severe habit, has been addicted for many years, or is wanting to do a medically assisted detox.

During a typical outpatient program, you receive your testing, counseling, and go through all the steps before going home at the end of the day. Whether on an inpatient or outpatient basis, there is a big responsibility when you undertake such a journey. It’s going to be difficult, it will take everything you have, and it will challenge you and your entire family. However, it will all be worth it in the end.

Getting and staying sober is a journey. You take things day-by-day, and you won't ever arrive at a location. You get better; you slip up, you start all over again. Each time you learn more about conquering and living life to its fullest. You learn the harm the drugs are doing to you, and you vow to yourself that you will never go back again.

Are you tired of living your life wondering where your next high will come from? Do you want to restore your relationships with your family and friends? Do you want to have a job and a normal life once again? We can help you get through this challenging time. Our trained professionals are waiting to help at 800-737-0933. Call anytime day or night.

What Are the Benefits of Traveling to Florida for Heroin Treatment?

By the time a heroin addict realizes their life is falling apart, they typically feel a sense of desperation. They begin to understand that things are getting progressively worse. The lucky ones summon their courage and admit they have a problem and ask for help.

With time ticking, their attention turns to finding that help. At first, the heroin addict might seek advice from the Internet. That's a road to nowhere aside from a listing of reputable addiction treatment centers. All the self-help solutions offered online are a waste of time because they don't create a real recovery. Instead, they advise on how to stop using without delving into the causes of heroin addiction. That leave most people vulnerable to chronic relapses because they haven't truly dealt with their addiction issues.

Time and again, rehab stands as the only viable solution for real heroin addiction. When looking for rehab, the first inclination is to find a local treatment center. That certainly appeals to the sense of convenience. Unfortunately, the most convenient option isn't always the best option. Remember, the quality of treatment will generally determine the quality of a person's recovery.

There are a lot of addiction treatment industry experts who support the notion relocating for treatment is a good idea. Taking things one step further, many experts will go so far as to suggest that looking at Florida as the best treatment destination is a solid idea. Why? Throughout the industry, Florida has a reputation for being home to some of the finest heroin addiction treatment centers in the world. With this in mind, anyone wanting the best treatment possible should give rehabs in Florida much consideration.

Benefits of Traveling to Florida for Heron Addiction Treatment

It's fine if convenience has to be a top consideration. However, the addict is likely to discover many of the local treatment centers don't offer a lot of treatment options. Furthermore, it's quite possible the local facilities will have limited resources. That's exactly why keeping an open mind about traveling for heroin addiction treatment is necessary.

No one in their right mind would suggest someone leave their home area for treatment unless there were plenty of advantages. Indeed, there are several significant reasons for going to Florida could be the best option possible. Some of these benefits include:

  • Getting access to a wider range of specialized services
  • Getting out of harm's way
  • Getting treatment in a comfortable environment
  • Privacy

Let's look more closely at these benefits.

Getting Access to Specialized Services

Many of Florida's top rehabs have earned its reputation by innovating new treatment methods. They focus on this because the cookie-cutter approach to treatment just isn't effective enough. Any addict who truly wants a lasting recovery will understand the value of a counselor having access to modern and innovative treatment modalities that have a record of success.

Getting Out of Harm's Way

Home might be a lot of things, but it's also the place where a person's addiction was born. The home and neighborhood are filled with the addict's fellow users, drug dealers, and even enablers. It's also the place where the addict's triggers and personal problems are most evident. The simple act of removing oneself from that environment for treatment assures there will be a minimum of interference from outside sources and the typical temptations. That means more focus can be placed on therapy.

Getting Treatment in a Comfortable Environment

Given Florid's warm year-round weather and proximity to the ocean and beautiful lake areas, the state has great appeal for someone who wants to get away from bad weather and isolated small towns. Because of what Florida has to offer, many of the top addiction treatment centers offer fun amenities to help make rehab a little more enjoyable.

Privacy

The opportunity to maintain privacy is a huge benefit. A person's reputation can be hurt by the knowledge they have an addiction. Even when seeking treatment, people can become subject to the talk and rumors that fly around. When maintaining a decent reputation matters, the privacy provided by out-of-the-area-treatment has great value.

If you really want the best addiction treatment possible, we strongly encourage you to think outside the box and consider a top rehab in Florida among your options. If you would like more information, we would like you to contact one of our representatives at 800-737-0933 at your earliest convenience. Begin your recovery today.

Do Heroin Rehab Facilities Help Treat Other Opiate Addictions, Too?

In 2018, the United States government behind President Donald Trump finally stepped forward and proclaimed the country was in the middle of a opiate addiction crisis. The first opiate drug that usually comes to mind is heroin. Indeed, the nation is facing a crisis because of heroin abuse.

It's like a flashback to the 1970s and 1980s when both cocaine and heroin became the favorite illicit drugs among the nations's growing drug culture. The cocaine was picking people up and the heroin was putting them down. The government knew back then how devastating heroin could be to the American culture, yet did very little to stem the tide of heroin abuse.

Fast-forward to today and very little has changed. Actually things have gotten worse. People are now abusing other opiate-based drugs such as prescription painkillers and the ever-dangerous fentanyl. All of these substances create the same kind of euphoria. They also create the same kinds of side effects, including:

  • Shallow breathing and other breathing issues
  • Nausea, vomiting and diarrhea
  • Confusion and memory lapses
  • Damage to the pulmonary system - heart issues
  • Liver disease
  • High potential for overdose
  • Addiction - the ultimate side effect

In the case of fentanyl, the side effects can be as much as 10x more dangerous than the side effects from heroin. The problems related to opiates are escalating. That's why we see more and more addiction treatment centers offering drug-specific heroin addiction treatment programs. The beauty of having such a program is the same treatment protocol can then be easily extended to other opiates.

Do Heroin Rehabs Treat Other Opiate Addictions?

The short answer is yes. As mentioned above the same threaten protocol will work for any opiate type addiction because all opiate addictions affect the addict in the same way. The only real difference between the aforementioned drugs, aside from heroin and fentanyl being illicit drugs, is the strength of each drug. Prescription drugs are designed for everyday use. The lower potency of these pills will require the user to abuse these substances over a longer period of time before addiction occurs. With heroin, an addiction is possible with a few weeks of abuse. Fentanyl is so highly addictive that people have become addicted in days.

The way most rehabs approach treating addiction to each of these substances is the same, though the intensity of treatment might scale upwards for people addicted to heroin or fentanyl. The treatment of addiction to any opiate follows a simple formula:

  • Step 1 - Detox
  • Step 2 - Therapy and counseling
  • Step 3 - Recovery and relapse prevention

Here's a closer look at these three steps.

Step 1 - Detox

Opiates are all highly addictive substances when used improperly. Because of the potential for some rather severe withdrawal symptoms, a medically monitored detox program is usually mandated for anyone entering rehab with opiate addiction. The simple fact is many addicts need help getting past withdrawal symptoms like sleeping issues, tremors and convulsions, severe pain from cramping and hallucinations. If medical professionals are standing by to offer comfort and medicine when things get really uncomfortable, the patient stands a much better chance of getting past their cravings and withdrawal safely.

Step 2 - Therapy and Counseling

When detox has been completed, the patient should be able to participate in therapy and counseling at a high level. They need to approach this aspect of treatment with the utmost openness and honesty. This will make it easier to identify and address the personal issues that gave birth to the addiction and gave it a reason to keep going. By identifying specific issues and the triggers that prompt drug use, the patient will get the opportunity to develop better-coping skills, which will be needed as the first line of defense against relapses.

Step 3 - Recovery and Relapse Prevention

After rehab, recovery has begun. Staying clean requires a life-long commitment to following a set of rules in order to stay away from triggers and temptations. For people who need additional help with relapse prevention, resources like sober living, outpatient counseling and 12-Step meetings are available to help them fight the good fight.

If you are addicted to any type of opiate and want help, you are just one call away from salvation. For more information about our opiate addiction treatment programs, you can call us at 800-737-0933.

What Types of Medication Will an FL Heroin Rehab Center Prescribe to Help With Detox?

Addiction is filled with irony and contradiction. For instance, doctors prescribe medications to help patients with things like seizures, depression, sleep disorders, and pain. When taken properly, this medication can produce wonderful results, giving the patient a much better quality of life.

The irony and contradiction come because these very same medications can be very harmful if misused and abused. The line between good and bad results is indeed very thin. For a moment, let's consider pain medications like morphine or Oxycontin. The proper doses of this medication can relieve a patient's chronic pain. That's a good thing for anyone who doesn't have any other alternatives. However, these medications are opiates and opiates are highly addictive. Addiction to these medications can produce side effects like:

  • Loss of motor function throughout the body
  • Memory loss and mental lapses
  • Breathing and blood pressure problems
  • Sleeping issues like insomnia
  • Nausea and vomiting

Even the decision to stop using these drugs after an addiction has been created can cause significant withdrawal symptoms like tremors, hallucinations, convulsions, depression, suicidal thoughts and anxiety.

The reason for this discussion is because certain medications are used in the addiction treatment process. That is ironic and definitely a contradiction. The information below will address the types of medications used during the detox process and how those drugs help as well as what risks they create.

Types of Medication an FL Heroin Rehab Center Can Prescribe to Help With Detox?

When people enter rehab with a significant addiction, their minds and bodies have an extremely high level of dependence on the drug(s) of choice. Before a patient is going to be able to focus on the rigors of therapy and counseling, they need time to wean themselves off all substances. During that process, the aforementioned withdrawal symptoms come into play. The purpose of a detox program is to get patients past their cravings and withdrawal symptoms as safely as possible.

If at all possible, it's a good thing if the patient can detox as naturally as possible. Maybe good nutritional and exercise programs are all they will need to eliminate their issues. With that said, that's a best-case scenario that's usually only applicable to people with a moderate addiction. Otherwise, a medically monitored detox program is needed.

In a medically monitored detox program, patients go through detox under the watchful eye of medical professionals. If severe discomfort becomes apparent, the doctors have the ability to prescribe certain medications to help with issues like pain or sleeping issues. In the case of people with a "severe" addiction, tapering medications may be used to help the patient slowly and safely wean off drugs. Some of the common medications used in a Florida detox program include:

  • Disulfiram and naltrexone for alcohol addiction
  • Methadone or Suboxone for opiate addiction
  • Buprenorphine for opiate addiction
  • Ritalin for cocaine and meth addictions

Let's look closer at the benefits of these drugs in the detox and addiction treatment process.

Disulfiram and Naltrexone for Alcohol Addiction

These medications are often used to decrease the cravings a patient has while going through the detox process. The effects of these drugs replace the effects of alcohol, creating less desire for booze. These drugs have proven very effective in relapse prevention.

Methadone or Suboxone for Opiate Addiction

Both of these medications are used for severe addictions to heroin and painkillers. They are tapering medications that offer the body lower doses of the active ingredients found in opiates. They are intended for long-term detox programs with diminishing doses over several weeks. They are also addictive.

Buprenorphine for Opiate Addiction

Another tapering drug for heroin addiction. The difference is this drug doesn't contain opiates as an active ingredient. Instead, it's considered a partial opioid agonist, which activates the same opioid receptors but produces a much safer response.

Ritalin for Cocaine and Meth Addictions

Ritalin is a stimulant drug prescribed to treat ADHD. Doctors and scientists have found that while the drug acts to stimulate the same receptors in the brain, the intake process is much slower, which results in a lower propensity for addiction. It's good for long-term use.

If you would like more information about the medications we might use during your addiction treatment, you need to call us immediately. You can reach one of our professional staff members at 800-737-0933.

What Resources Can Help You Detox From Heroin in Florida?

If you're seeking treatment for heroin addiction, the first thing you'll need to do is detox. Detoxing usually takes about a week, but it can be a painful process. Withdrawal symptoms are often severe and, in some cases, even dangerous. Fortunately, there are a number of resources available to help. What resources can help you detox from heroin in Florida?

Florida is a state that's been hit hard by the opioid crisis throughout the United States. It's common for prescription and illicit opioids to be used illegally all over the state. Successful drug rehab is an urgent need. Drug rehabs tend to deal with the mental aspect of addiction, but you need to overcome the physical withdrawal first. This is where a detox center comes in. Some detox centers are part of a larger rehabilitation facility, while others offer detox services alone.

Detox Centers

Detox centers are, as the name implies, places where you go to safely detox from drugs and alcohol. It's important to go to one of these centers to have a medically supervised detox from heroin. Only with medical supervision can you receive the care you need to safely weather the withdrawal process. Your medical team can provide resources that help ease the pain of symptoms.

Heroin withdrawal doesn't look the same for every person. A number of factors will affect the progression. The way someone abused heroin, how long they've abused it, and the dosage they took will all affect your dependency. The more dependent you are, the more severe the withdrawal symptoms will typically be. If you've previously withdrawn from opioids or have a history of mental illness, your withdrawal might be more intense.

Withdrawal Symptoms

For many heroin users, the withdrawal process feels a lot like the flu. Mild symptoms set in first, followed by more moderate and severe symptoms as the withdrawal progresses.

Mild symptoms might include:

  • Cramping of the abdomen
  • Sweats and chills
  • Nausea
  • Runny nose
  • Aches in the muscles and bones

Moderate symptoms include:

  • Diarrhea and vomiting
  • Issues with concentration
  • Restlessness
  • Tremors and goose bumps
  • Fatigue
  • Agitation

Severe symptoms include:

  • Depression and anxiety
  • Insomnia
  • Cravings for the drug
  • Hypertension
  • Unusually rapid heart rate
  • Spasms in the muscles
  • Issues with respiration

Even severe symptoms aren't usually life-threatening, but some medical symptoms come with potential complications that can be life-threatening. For this reason, you should never quit heroin cold turkey without having mental health and medical professionals supporting you.

Managing Withdrawal Symptoms with Medication

When you go through the withdrawal process at a detox center, you may be prescribed medication to help with the symptoms. Your doctor may replace the heroin with an opioid that works for longer periods of time. You may also be prescribed antidepressants, anticonvulsants, and anti-nausea medication to help with specific withdrawal symptoms.

The FDA has approved the use of a drug called Suboxone to help with cravings during withdrawal. It can also be used to help with continuing cravings throughout the treatment process. This means it's considered a "maintenance" medication. Suboxone is used to prevent relapses by suppressing drug cravings.

With that said, there have been cases in the past where Suboxone was used recreationally. Some heroin users use Suboxone to ease their withdrawal symptoms between heroin doses. This use of Suboxone is very dangerous and can lead a person to develop an addiction.

Another commonly-used drug is methadone. This long-acting opioid can be substituted for shorter-acting heroin. In the majority of cases, methadone will be active in the user's bloodstream for a whole day. Methadone helps minimize withdrawal symptoms by activating a person's opioid receptors.

Methadone is a federally regulated drug. When prescribed, it's typically provided in pill form once per day. From there, the methadone doses can gradually taper down.

One other medication that might be prescribed is Naltrexone. This opioid antagonist blocks the brain's opioid receptors, so you don't get high even if you use opioids. This drug is often used to maintain heroin abstinence on a long-term basis.

It's important to be honest with your medical team about your history of drug use. If you don't give all the information, they won't be able to help you effectively.

If you're ready to get help for your addiction, talk to one of our trained counselors at 800-737-0933.

What Resources Can You Use to Help Heroin Addicts?

It seems 10 lifetimes that America has been dealing with a heroin abuse epidemic. The drug became popular and a problem in the 1960's and remains a menace today. One would think the country would have perfected ways to treat heroin addicts, but the reality is it hasn't. So what exactly can you do to help a heroin addict?

What we know is there really is only one viable method of treatment for heroin addiction. Folks often try conventional counseling with a therapist, but it hardly makes a dent. The Internet is full of home remedies and self-help methods of treatment and again, it hardly makes a dent. What these option have in common is they fail to address both the addiction and the causes of the addiction.

That really leaves the addict with one choice, getting treatment from a reputable drug and alcohol treatment facility. For your part, you can be a good friend or loved one. You can look out for them in anticipation of a crisis that almost always comes. When that crisis does come, it will be time for you to tap into the resources at your disposal.

What Resources You Have to Help a Heroin Addict

While it may not be your responsibility, you still have an obligation to look after your loved ones. If someone you care about is addicted to heroin, it's going to be tough watching them struggle and simply do nothing. Unfortunately, doing nothing equates to enabling, and that's the last thing you want to do. With that in mind, here's a few resources you can use to help your loved one get the help they need.

Educate Yourself

Unless you understand the nuances of heroin addiction, you'll find there's much for you to learn. The Internet is filled with information about heroin addiction. It might be worthwhile to contact your own physician and ask them to help educate you. Of course, a reputable drug addiction treatment center is going to be willing to sit down with you and offer up information.

Intervention

Armed with some knowledge about heroin addiction, you might want to consider putting on an intervention. This would give you a great opportunity to get other people involved in the process. Remember, the goal of an intervention is to motivate the heroin addict to seek help. Here's a few dos and don'ts to consider when running an intervention.

  • Be prepared and rehearse what is going to be discussed
  • Try to keep things positive by having each person mention how much they care
  • Don't make accusations
  • Don't let the subject of the intervention take over the proceedings
  • Discuss possible treatment options and offer to be supportive

You can anticipate your loved one being a bit overwhelmed. They might need a little time to let the intervention process sink in. You should give them that time. By not pressing and keeping things positive, there's an excellent chance they will agree to get help. If not, don't panic. You can stay diligent and hopefully they will come around.

Help With the Treatment Facility Selection Process

When your loved one is ready to accept they have an illness and get help, it would be an excellent idea for you to be prepared to offer assistance with the rehab selection process. The first thing you can help with is finding out how much of the treatment process you loved one's healthcare insurance provider is willing to cover. For any shortage, you could help locate other financial resources.

From there, you can help your loved one find the right treatment facility. There has been a dramatic transformation in the addiction treatment industry over the last few years. They place much more emphasis on providing custom treatment programs that fit a patient's needs and circumstances. With this in mind, you might want to discuss your loved one's situation with multiple treatment facilities. Eventually, you will find one that has exactly what you and your loved one are needing.

While your loved on is in treatment, you could actually start the process of locating aftercare resources. This might include a sober living home, 12-Step meetings and counseling resources.

We hope the information we have provided above will help you save your loved one. When your loved one is ready to admit defeat and ask for help, we encourage you to pick up the phone and call one of our professional counselors at 800-737-0933.

Why Can Heroin Relapse Be More Dangerous Than Other Types of Drug Relapse?

Addiction to opioids, in particular, heroin, has reached epic proportions in the United States. In 2017 alone, more than 15,000 deaths from heroin overdose are estimated to have occurred. It is common knowledge that heroin is a dangerous and addictive drug, but many people do not realize that many of these overdose deaths occur during a relapse. In order to understand why heroin relapse is more dangerous than other types of drug relapse, it is important to understand the body’s physical dependence on heroin.

Heroin’s Effect on the Brain

When someone injects or snorts heroin, it travels to the brain and binds to opiate receptors. This causes neurons in the brain to release dopamine. Dopamine is a “feel good” chemical that induces an overall sense of euphoria and well-being. In addition to feelings of euphoria and pain relief, the respiratory system, in particular, the instinct to breathe, is impaired. When too much heroin is taken at once, the person can become unconscious and stop breathing. This is called an overdose.

An overdose of heroin can happen quickly. People around the user may think they simply fell asleep, but when breathing stops, the brain can not get the oxygen it needs to sustain life. If the effects of the heroin are not reversed quickly, permanent brain damage and death can occur.

How Heroin Addiction Occurs

When heroin is used repeatedly over time, the brain builds up a tolerance to the drug. Users then need to use more heroin in order to feel the same effects. Once tolerance occurs, the brain starts to become dependent on heroin in order to function normally. Without the presence of heroin, withdrawal occurs.

Withdrawal from heroin can range from discomfort to agonizing. A person experiencing withdrawal will seek out more heroin in order to stop the negative effects of withdrawal. This is how addiction to heroin occurs.

When a person decides to stop using heroin and enter treatment for their disease they will experience withdrawal. During treatment at a facility, there are support people available to help manage the uncomfortable withdrawal symptoms. Withdrawal symptoms can last from a few days to a few weeks, depending on the length and severity of the addiction.

Why is Heroin Relapse so Dangerous?

As the body becomes accustomed to functioning normally without heroin, its tolerance for the drug also lessens. While a person is in the throes of addiction, they may have needed to use large amounts of heroin in order to function because of high tolerances. When a person is no longer physically addicted to heroin, their tolerance level is lowered. When a person relapses and begins using heroin again, they often overestimate the amount they will need to feel high. This lowered tolerance also increases the risk of overdose and death during relapses.

In order to prevent a relapse from heroin addiction, a long-term treatment program should be used. After withdrawal symptoms cease, therapy and support must be implemented for a greater chance of recovery. Recovery from heroin addiction can be a lifelong struggle for some people and the right treatment program can greatly increase the odds of staying clean and preventing relapse.

Triggers and Warning Signs of Heroin Relapse

It is important to recognize the triggers and warning signs of relapse. Many recovering heroin addicts will need to completely rebuild their life and find new friends and social activities to engage in, which can be a daunting task. Some triggers for heroin relapse include:

  • Feelings of stress, fear, depression, anxiety, guilt and loneliness
  • Seeing drug use on television or movies
  • Spending time with friends or family members associated with heroin use
  • An urge to have more fun during social events
  • Using alcohol or other drugs
  • Big life changes such as a death of a loved one, divorce, or unemployment
  • Boredom

It can also be important for loved ones to recognize the warning signs of relapse so that an increase in therapy or reentry into a treatment program can occur before relapse. Some of these warning signs include:

  • Attitude changes
  • Attending social events with friends associated with past drug use
  • A decline in appearance due to lack of hygiene, sleep, or appetite
  • Dishonestly
  • An increase in irresponsible behavior like skipping therapy, not attending school, or skipping work

If you or someone you love are struggling with heroin addiction or concerned about relapse reach out to us at 800-737-0933. Our counselors are available twenty-four hours a day to answer any questions you may have.

What Programs Are Available at Heroin Treatment Centers?

Heroin is an opioid drug that is easy to get addicted to. Your brain holds receptors that will react to the chemicals found in these types of drugs, causing you to crave more of it. As easy as it is to get addicted to it, it’s way tougher to beat without the necessary support and medical intervention. That’s why you usually find specialized programs available at Heroin treatment centers. They’re designed to help you kick Heroin out of your system and to learn healthier alternatives to dealing with life’s issues.

There are a few different ways that treatment facilities help you recover from an addiction to a drug like Heroin. Let’s explore what those programs are and how they help you.

Detox Programs at Heroin Treatment Centers

This is the most important step to your recovery. Getting Heroin out of your system and then keeping it out will be necessary. Unfortunately, without professional help, you’ll find trying to get rid of the drug near impossible to do. Once the drug wears off, withdrawal symptoms surface. This can be so debilitating that many people turn to heroin, again, in order to deal with the negative effects. Thus making recovery that much harder to get.

A detox program often will use other medications to help you deal with withdrawals while you wait it out. These, however, will need medical supervision to ensure nothing goes wrong. Some meds a center might use to help in the detox process are:

  • Buprenorphine
  • Naltrexone
  • Methadone

Therapy Programs at Heroin Treatment Centers

While the detox process is powerful with the use of medications, it’s more effective when combined with a facility’s therapy program. A professionally trained counselor can help you understand why your addiction may have happened in the first place. You can explore any issues you may have and learn new coping strategies to use instead of turning to heroin to be your solution.

Some centers offer other types of therapies as well. You could get into an exercise routine that not only gets you physically fit, but it will help promote great mental health too. Also, you could learn some beneficial life skills to use when you go back to your life and have to deal with everyday problems. Adding therapy or counseling sessions to your treatment program increases your chances of becoming addiction-free.

Family Programs at Heroin Treatment Centers

Individual therapy will be necessary to get down to the root of your addiction causes. But, most centers don’t want you to feel isolated and alone in your recovery. You need moral support, not just from the staff or other peers going through the same program as you, but from your family as well. Most centers feel that family involvement is a huge benefit in the rehab process.

You’ll find many facilities offering family programs to help you immerse yourself in therapy right along with them. They become an invaluable support line to cheer you on to recovery. Heroin may have isolated you, but a family treatment program will help sew your relationship back together. This will also help your family members understand where you’re coming from, so they can help you better.

After Care Programs at Heroin Treatment Centers

It’s always great to leave a treatment center feeling addiction-free, but getting over a heroin addiction will take more time than just a few weeks or months. Once you leave, you should still have support, periodically, to keep you off heroin for good. Without it, you could revert to your addiction days and use heroin or maybe another addictive drug. A good facility won’t let you leave without having some kind of aftercare support to keep you going strong.

Typically, you’ll attend group therapy sessions. You may have already started one while you were in the recovery program, but this kind of service is important for your aftercare. You have moral support from others who have been in your shoes and know exactly what it’s like. They can be your best cheer-leading team to inspire you to beat the addiction for good. Sharing your story and learning from others is an important part of your aftercare recovery process.

Since heroin addiction is so hard to get rid of, you should try to use all these treatments when you can. Each part of the program holds important aspects to your recovery and should be used together for maximum benefit. If you have questions or would like to know more about heroin treatments, call us at 800-737-0933.