Opioids

Can I Go to Outpatient Opiate Detox Without Missing Work?

Are you considering entering into detox? Are you ready to give up a life of using drugs and alcohol to take the journey towards health and happiness? If this sounds like an amazing idea, then it is time to check out your local opiate detox clinic. Don’t wait any longer to get clean and sober when you have the option to work towards a better life!

Now that you have made the decision to attend rehab it is time to find the one that is best for you. You may have been thinking about attending a rehab that provides round-the-clock care for weeks or months at a time. Unfortunately, this option may not be the best one for your situation. You may be worried about whether you can attend an outpatient opiate detox without missing any time from work. If so, read on to learn more.

Substance Abuse and Job Performance

Employers have plenty of cause for concern when it comes to substance abuse in the workplace. Employees who are under the influence of drugs, alcohol, or both are a danger to themselves and others. They are generally less productive, miss more work, and can cause hazardous situations for themselves and others. They are more likely to cause an accident in the workplace and often perform very poorly when they are at work. Substance-addicted employees often take longer breaks and are often found sleeping on the job, especially if they are addicted to opiates or heroin.

If you are struggling to hold down a job because of your substance abuse, then it is even more important to get into an outpatient opiate detox as soon as possible. However, you won’t want to miss work to do so. Luckily, there are many other rehab options that will allow you to work around your schedule while still providing you with the best services possible.

Outpatient or Inpatient- What Should I Choose?

Inpatient rehab allows patients to stay at the center day and night. Many inpatient services last for weeks or months. They offer comprehensive services that will help any level of addict get off of drugs and alcohol. Unfortunately, inpatient rehab will require you to put your entire life on hold to attend. You’ll have to give up your job, school, and all other responsibilities to check into the clinic all day and all night.

Outpatient rehab is the best option for you if you need to keep your job but also want to utilize rehab services. Outpatient rehab may also be known as a partial hospitalization program. These programs allow you to go through the entire process of detox and therapy without having to give up your job.

Is Outpatient Right for Me?

You’re probably wondering whether an outpatient rehab is right for your situation. These programs are probably your best choice if you:

• Can’t miss any work
• Have obligations you can’t ignore
• Cannot afford a longer rehab stay
• Do not want to commit to rehab full-time
• Are looking to keep to your daily schedule as much as possible

Outpatient rehab centers are the best option when you need to work around your schedule at work. Some facilities offer Monday through Friday sessions that last up to eight hours. If you work nights, then this may be the best option for you. If you work during the day, then evening facilities will work better for your situation. Rehabs also offer weekend care that you can utilize while still keeping your job, as long as you don’t usually work weekends.

What to Expect

Even though you are working around your work schedule the rehab that you choose will still expect you to put in the time and effort. You’ll be expected to attend as many therapy sessions as possible during your time there. This will include individual counseling, dual diagnosis therapy, group therapy, and possibly family sessions. You’ll be asked to make it on time and to stay for the entire session.

You can also expect detox services through outpatient care. If you are worried that you won’t be given the same treatment, don’t fret. All outpatient rehab clinics will provide you with qualified, reputable doctors and nurses who will help you through the detox process. You can still expect medically-supervised detox services, even through outpatient clinics.

Call Today to Find Out More

What are you waiting for? Call us at 800-737-0933 to learn how we can help you get off opiates. We have trained, professional staff who will help you every step of the way. Call or stop by to find out more.

What’s the Typical Percocet Withdrawal Length Before Physical Symptoms Subside?

The length and physical symptoms of withdrawal from Percocet are influenced by many factors. These influences can be environmental, physical, and psychological. Understanding the properties of Percocet, along with its intended use, will help in gaining an understanding of the withdrawal process and with the highly addictive potential of using this pain medication.

Percocet is a prescription pain medication in the opioid family; it is a combination of oxycodone and acetaminophen, both powerful pain medications that complement each other. This opioid is recommended for use by patients affected with moderate to severe pain; because of its physical dependence and addictive qualities, it should only be used for short amounts of time.

Percocet Withdrawal

Percocet withdrawal includes several uncomfortable symptoms. These symptoms present themselves in three stages after discontinuing the use of Percocet; these stages include the early withdrawal stage, the peak withdrawal stage, and the late withdrawal stage. The amount and severity of symptoms depend on the severity of physical dependence and/or addiction to the medication. Seeking medical advice, and finding specialists to help with this process, is strongly suggested.

Stage 1 of Withdrawal

In this stage of early withdrawal, symptoms start to appear at about 24 to 30 hours after the last dose of Percocet. The severity of symptoms during this stage continues to get worse over the next couple of days. These symptoms include:

• Body Aches
• Sweats
• Insomnia
• Loss of Appetite
• Racing Heart
• Increased Blood Pressure
• Fever

Stage 2 of Withdrawal

This is the peak stage of withdrawal; this is when withdrawal symptoms are at their worse and this stage starts about 72 hours after the last dose of Percocet was ingested. Symptoms accompanying this stage of withdrawal can remain relentless for up to 5 days, some have reported up to 10 days, and can include the following symptoms:

• Diarrhea
• Stomach Cramps
• Nausea and Vomiting
• Goosebumps
• Chills
• Depression
• Intense Drug Cravings

Stage 3 of Withdrawal

This stage of late withdrawal is when physical symptoms and intense psychological symptoms start to decrease. During this time, it is important to have a lot of support because this is a critical time for starting the journey of abstaining from the use of Percocet. It is also a time to discover other ways to manage the causes for becoming dependent on this opioid medication including both physical and psychological disorders.

Percocet Addiction

Pain medications like Percocet, and other drugs in the opioid family, have proven to be highly addictive. After becoming physically dependent on Percocet, the withdrawal process can be almost impossible to endure without seeking medical advice and having the support of specialists. Continuing the use of Percocet after the recommended time, or manner it was prescribed, can trigger addiction, lead to the use of other illegal opioids, and overdose resulting in death.

Opioids react with transmitters in the brain that activate the reward system. These transmitters are known as endorphins and can decrease the feeling of pain while giving a boost to feelings of well-being and pleasure within the body. After a while, these pleasurable feelings become something you can’t live without and constantly seek. The amount of the drug it takes to reach these feelings increase as the structure of the brain changes and requires more opioids to engage this feeling.

Warning Signs of Addiction

The warning signs of addiction to Percocet and other opioids include physical signs of withdrawal along with behavioral deviations. These changes can include:

• Different friends and groups of friends
• Avoiding friends and family; spending time alone
• Losing interest in regular activities
• Not caring about personal hygiene
• Change in eating habits
• Excessively energetic
• Irritable
• Quick changes in mood
• Abnormal sleeping pattern
• Missing appointments and financial hardships
• Getting in trouble with the law
• Erratic daily schedule

Conclusion

The withdrawal process from any opioid, including Percocet, can be extremely complicated. Seeking the advice, support, and help, of specialists, will make the withdrawal process more tolerable and successful; it will also assist with the decisions on how to handle problems associated with addiction and what proper supports should be put into place. Now is the time to ask for help from people who understand and care, please call 800-737-0933, we are standing by for your call.

Is A Florida Rapid Detox A Good Choice If Normal Detox Is Too Hard?

Detoxification and withdrawal are always the very first steps in addiction recovery. Unfortunately, they are also the most challenging. Whether going “cold turkey”, taking part in a medication-assisted program, or trying to gradually wean yourself off of drugs on your own, you may find yourself struggling to make it through this initial phase. Fortunately, a Florida rapid detox center can be an excellent alternative to normal detox, especially for those who have tried traditional detoxification methods before, and with little success.

Florida detox is designed to expedite an incredibly uncomfortable process that typically last several weeks. With this cutting-edge detoxification method, it’s possible to circumvent the physical and emotional challenges of withdrawal almost entirely. When choosing rapid detox programs, patients are placed under anesthesia for a period of approximately four to six hours. During this time, opioid antagonist drugs are used to totally eliminate prescription painkillers or heroin from their systems. Once awakened, people will find that all drugs and drug residues have been effectively flushed from their bodies so that no withdrawal symptoms remain. If the fear of withdrawal-related pain has been preventing you from seeking the help you need, this manner of detoxification can provide a swift and virtually painless alternative.

What You Need To Know About Rapid Detox

Although rapid detox can be a better and more comfortable way to start the recovery process, it should not be seen as a shortcut to total wellness. This process merely eliminates harmful drugs from patients’ systems and prepares them for the next leg of their journeys in addiction treatment. The many psychological and emotional effects of drug abuse must still be addressed. More importantly, patients will still need to learn more about the underlying causes of their substance use disorder, discover healthy coping strategies, and establish sustainable plans for keeping their lives on track.

It is also important to note that this procedure is performed entirely under IV sedation. As such, there are several risks associated with rapid detox that are not common with normal detoxification methods. Full-service rapid detox clinics, however, are staffed around the clock by seasoned teams of highly trained medical professionals. Not only can these individuals help mitigate the risks associated with rapid detox, but they can also assist patients in becoming mentally and physically ready for all that lies ahead. With this support, many people show far better tolerance for detoxification challenges, and go on to experience impressive levels of overall treatment success.

Opioid Treatment And The Use Of Maintenance Drugs

To fully understand the potential benefits of rapid detox, Florida locals must consider the alternatives. MAT or medication-assisted treatment is designed to minimize withdrawal symptoms with maintenance drugs such as suboxone or methadone. Unfortunately, these maintenance drugs can lead to new forms of addiction and drug dependence. For patients who are looking to totally free themselves from the damaging effects of substance abuse, this particular route isn’t always appealing. In a sense, it can leave patients trading one opioid problem for another. Moreover, as MAT patients progress in their recoveries, many find that the doses of their maintenance medications increase, rather than decline. This is due in large part to the body’s innate ability to increase its tolerance with prolonged exposure. It is also the result of insufficient knowledge of the best methods for controlling and managing the effects of these maintenance drugs. Rapid detox can help patients bypass the need for suboxone or methadone altogether. For those struggling with opiate addiction, there are a number of medications that can be used to control ongoing physical cravings that might otherwise derail their recoveries. While these products are unlikely to cause addiction, they cannot be used until patients are entirely opioid-free. With rapid detox, those who are committed to recovery can access these non-addictive support products within just a matter of hours.

Rapid Detox Can Set The Stage For Total Freedom

Many people are inspired to start recovery by a desire for personal freedom. Having your life controlled by a virtually unceasing craving for drugs can be devastating. With medication-assisted opioid treatment, there is often the risk of becoming dependent upon the very maintenance drugs that are meant to make you better. Conversely, Florida’s rapid detox will give you near-instant access to support products that will eliminate your cravings and that aren’t known to be addictive. With these services, you can sidestep the initial and most challenging stages of drug treatment. If you’re ready to free yourself from the binds of opiate addiction, we’re here to help. Call us now at 800-737-0933.

How Lethal Is a Methadone and Xanax Combination?

It might surprise some people to find out that prescription medications are often used to treat people with addictions to drugs. If that sounds counterproductive or dangerous, you shouldn’t be too concerned given that the prescription drugs will be administered by a medical professional who works for the rehab center.

If you are wondering what kinds of prescription medication is being prescribed, there are some very important medications that doctors will prescribe to help clients go through detox. While some of these medications are intended to help clients deal with pain and sleeping issues, there are other medications that are used to help them safely wean clients off very dangerous illicit substances like heroin and fentanyl. One such medication is called methadone. Methadone is an opiate that’s used to help opioid addiction sufferers taper away from other opiates.

In rehab, clients might also have to continue taking medications they need to help them deal with psychological or mental disorders. A good example of such a medication would be a drug like Xanax. Xanax is a benzodiazepine used mainly for the treatment of anxiety.

Moving forward, the discussion is going to center on both methadone and Xanax and the dangers of using these two medications at the same. This discussion is relative because of the likelihood it could occur in rehab and does occur sometimes on the streets.

How Lethal Is a Methadone and Xanax Combination?

Before starting this discussion, it’s important to note that at no time should someone take multiple drugs without first consulting with a doctor. There are significant risks associated with combining substances without a clear understanding of how the substances are going to interact with one another. The combination of methadone and Xanax is a clear example of how dangerous combing substances can be.

To be very clear, no one should combine methadone and Xanax without a prescription from a doctor. Furthermore, it’s vitally important that the client strictly follow the doctor’s prescription as written. The following information will clarify why that’s so important.

The first area of concern in regards to the combination of these two substances is the effect the combination will have on the individual’s respiratory system. You see, both methadone and Xanax have properties than tend to suppress a person’s respiratory system. If someone were to take both medications at the same time, it would have the effect of doubling up on those the properties that suppress respiration. Even the slightest error in dosage could lead the client to have great difficulty breathing. Effectively, it could lead to the individual dying of an opioid overdose.

Both methadone and Xanax acts as sedatives. That would make sense given methadone is an opioid and Xanax is used to treat anxiety disorders. Again, taking both substances at the same time would have the effect of doubling up on the sedation. While that unto itself is not terribly dangerous, the sedative effect combined with any interruption in breathing could be lethal.

Alternative Solution

In an addiction treatment setting, doctors would be leery about allowing clients to keep taking Xanax while using methadone to wean off opiates. Does that leave the client exposed to issues with their anxiety disorder? Yes, it probably does. However, there are other medications the rehab facility’s doctor could prescribe as an alternative to Xanax. It could be a medication that significantly cuts down the risk of harm when combined with methadone. The solution would be temporary given the likelihood the client could resume taking Xanax once they have completed their methadone treatment program.

Dealing with poly-substance Abuse

Both methadone and Xanax are high on the list of medications that get abused. They are both also high on the list of substances that have addictive properties. When someone enters rehab with an addiction to multiple substances, they are said to be victims of poly-substance abuse. Rehabs have programs to deal with such addictions, but the process is obviously complicated by the fact doctors and therapists have more issues they have to consider during treatment.

As stated above, you would be taking a terrible risk if you decided to start abusing Xanax and any type of opiate substance at the same time. If you find yourself addicted to either or both of these types of substances, you need to contact us as soon as possible about coming in for treatment. You can reach us 24/7 by dialing 800-737-0933. Given the risks you are facing with addiction, now is the time to call.

How Can I Manage Pain Symptoms During a Hydrocodone Detox?

If you’re ready to end your relationship with hydrocodone, there are a few things that you should know. Similar to other drugs, the withdrawal symptoms that come with going through detox can be severe and, in some cases, may even lead to relapse. Some of the withdrawal symptoms commonly associated with abrupt hydrocodone cessation include nausea, vomiting, diarrhea, fatigue, anxiety, and depression. And these symptoms can last between 5 and 7 days on average. While all of these symptoms are unpleasant, most will agree that the pain associated with coming off of the powerful narcotic is by far the worse. Fortunately, many rehab facilities provide substance abuse treatments that can help ease pain and many other symptoms that make achieving sobriety difficult.

WHAT TO EXPECT WHILE DETOXING FROM HYDROCODONE

Now that we have a basic understanding of the withdrawal symptoms that one is likely to face as they work toward ending their relationship with hydrocodone, let’s take a closer look at the withdrawal timeline. According to a study published by Medical News Today, an online resource for medical news aimed at both physicians and the general public, hydrocodone withdrawal symptoms often present themselves within 6 to 12 hours following an individual’s last dose. And all of these symptoms, including pain, can vary in intensity depending on how long an individual has been using and how much of the drug they were consuming before starting their detox journey.

MANAGING PAIN WHILE DETOXING FROM HYDROCODONE

When it comes to helping individuals cope with pain symptoms associated with coming off of hydrocodone, many rehab facilities will offer medication-assisted detox, which includes the use of various prescription-based medications that have been approved by the FDA (Food and Drug Administration). Along with helping to soothe pain, many of these same medications are effective in easing many of the other symptoms that can make getting through detox challenging, such as nausea, vomiting, and diarrhea, for example. That said, some of the prescription-based medications used by most rehab facilities include

Buprenorphine – This FDA-approved medication is classified as a partial opioid agonist, which means that it blocks opioid receptors in the brain that are responsible for triggering the euphoric high that comes with abusing hydrocodone and many other opioids. It is also worth noting that buprenorphine is a long-acting partial opioid agonist that carries a low risk for abuse. Along with pain, this prescription-based medication also provides relief from several other symptoms, including anxiety, sweating, and vomiting.

Clonidine – Commonly prescribed to treat high blood pressure and ADHD (attention deficit hyperactivity disorder), clonidine is yet another FDA-approved medication that is used to treat severe withdrawal symptoms. Studies show that clonidine helps block chemicals in the brain that would otherwise lead to sympathetic nervous system activity, a condition that triggers muscle pain, anxiety, sweating, and vomiting while individuals are going through detox.

Methadone – Similar to buprenorphine, methadone is a long-acting partial opioid agonist that works by blocking opioid receptors in the brain, which, in turn, eases pain and other symptoms associated with coming off of hydrocodone. It is important to note that methadone is highly addictive. Therefore it must be taken as prescribed to avoid the risk of substituting one drug problem for another one.

NON-PRESCRIPTION PAIN MANAGEMENT TREATMENTS

Ideally, individuals who are trying to overcome an addiction to hydrocodone should seek the help of a licensed rehab facility, preferably one that offers medication-assisted detox. However, for those who are trying to quit using on their own, there are over-the-counter medications that you can take to ease severe withdrawal symptoms, including

Tylenol – For those who are struggling with minor aches and pains while going through detox, Tylenol can provide some much-needed relief. However, much like prescription-based medication, it must be taken responsibly. Therefore, you will want to follow the instructions on the packaging for safe and effective dosing.

Loperamide – Also known as Imodium, loperamide is an over-the-counter medication that can help combat diarrhea. Studies show that loperamide works by reducing movement in the gut, which can reduce bowel movements while bulking up loose stool.

Electrolytes – While detoxing from hydrocodone, it is not uncommon to experience vomiting and diarrhea, both of which can result in a loss of fluids and dehydration. The best way to combat both of these problems is by consuming sports drinks, such as Gatorade, that contain electrolytes. Staying hydrated can also help ease pain symptoms as well.

BOTTOM LINE

All in all, there are many ways to cope with pain and other symptoms associated with overcoming hydrocodone addiction. To learn more about the prescription and at-home treatments detailed in this article, consider speaking with one of our friendly addiction specialists today at 800-737-0933.

Can Opiate Detox Facilities Help Manage Withdrawal Through Medication?

When abused, opiate drugs exert a hold on the mind and body that lingers for much longer than you might expect. The longer you abuse opiates the harder it is to stop taking these drugs. For these reasons, opiate detox facilities use medication treatment for withdrawal to help patients make it through the detox stage of recovery. Keep reading to see how opiates work on the brain’s chemical processes and how medication treatment for withdrawal can help you take back your life from addiction.

Opiate Effects on the Brain

Not too many types of drugs can interfere with the brain’s chemical makeup like opiates do. Opiate-based drugs, such as Vicodin, hydrocodone, codeine and heroin have a chemical composition that closely resembles that of certain neurotransmitter chemicals in the brain. Dopamine, norepinephrine and serotonin neurotransmitters all share chemical compounds that are similar to opiates. These similarities enable opiate-based drugs to change the brain’s chemical makeup over time.

As opiates change the brain’s chemical system, the brain becomes increasingly dependent on opiates to function normally. As this takes place, the brain cells that interact with opiates become less sensitive to opiate effects over time. This means, larger doses of the drug are needed to keep the brain running as it should.

After a certain point, long-term abuse of opiates or taking large doses on a regular basis will disrupt the brain’s ability to regulate the body’s systems. Once this happens, a severe physical dependence on the drug has developed. The systems most affected by opiate dependence include:

  • The limbic system, which regulates emotions
  • Cognitive-based systems, which regulate thinking and behavior
  • Sleep cycles
  • The reward system, which regulates learning and motivation

Opiate Detox Withdrawal Effects

Opiate detox facilities focus on easing the withdrawal effects that occur when opiate use stops. Withdrawal effects reflect the state of disarray the body is in due to the chemical imbalances caused by opiate abuse. When opiate abuse stops, the brain can’t yet produce the number of neurotransmitters needed to keep the body’s systems running normally. As a result, the following withdrawal effects occur:

  • Severe depression
  • Nausea and vomiting
  • Fever and profuse sweating
  • Anxiety
  • Tremors
  • Mental fog

Opiate detox facilities use medication treatment for withdrawal to help the brain’s chemical system adjust to detox. In the absence of some form of medication support, withdrawal effects can quickly overwhelm your efforts to stop using. When this happens, the risk of relapse runs especially high.

Treating Opiate Withdrawal With Medication

While many may believe overcoming addiction is a matter of willpower, opiate addiction is a chronic physical condition, much like heart disease and diabetes. Long-term opiate abuse leaves behind long-term damage in the brain. Medications used to treat opiate withdrawal support the brain’s chemical processes so that it can function normally. The severity of your abuse problem will determine how you’ll need to keep taking medication.

Medications Used to Treat Opiate Withdrawal

Medication-based treatments for opiate withdrawal use specially formulated, opiate-derived drugs that interact with the same brain neurotransmitter processes as opiates. These medications produce controlled effects that don’t set off the abuse-addiction cycle like heroin and prescription painkillers do. In turn, these controlled effects work to wean the brain and body off addictive opiates.

Two medications -methadone and Suboxone- are commonly used in the treatment of opiate withdrawal. When ingested on a daily basis, these medications relieve the effects of withdrawal and also help reduce drug cravings. Methadone and Suboxone differ in how they accomplish these ends.

Methadone is a full opiate agonist, meaning it helps the brain produce needed levels of neurotransmitter chemicals. As a controlled substance, opiate detox facilities must distribute methadone on a daily basis. In this way, overdose risks can be prevented.

Suboxone contains two medications: buprenorphine and naloxone. Buprenorphine is a partial opioid agonist. It has a built-in ceiling effect that greatly lowers the risk for overdose. This mechanism also prevents patients from getting high on the drug.

Naloxone, the second ingredient, acts as an opioid antidote. As an opioid antidote, naloxone acts as a safety precaution by triggering severe withdrawal in cases where patients try to dissolve and inject Suboxone. Unlike methadone, Suboxone can be prescribed by a doctor so there’s no need for daily visits to a clinic facility.

If you’re considering medication treatments for opiate withdrawal or have more questions about how it all works, our addiction counselors can help. Call us today at 800-737-0933 and find out how to get started.

What Are the Main Differences Between Different Opioid Drugs?

Opioids are a powerful class of drugs that are primarily used to provide pain relief. There are many different types of opioids including medications like morphine, fentanyl and even street drugs like heroin. Opioids are classed as being either natural, semisynthetic or fully synthetic depending on the process and substances with which they are manufactured. All opioids are highly addictive substances and abusing opioids or even taking opioids in a prescribed manner can easily result in chemical dependence and opioid addiction.

How Do Opioids Work?

Opioids are most commonly taken orally or by injection although sprays, dermal patches and other forms of administration may also be used. Once an opioid has entered the body, it acts upon receptors within the central nervous system in order to reduce sensations of pain and discomfort. Opioids can vary considerably in terms of potency depending on the dose and type of drug being used. In addition to relieving pain, opioids can also produce a powerful euphoric sensation which often leads to increased instances of abuse and addiction.

Natural Opioids

While some opioids are made from partially are fully synthetic chemicals, drugs like opium, morphine and codeine are made naturally from the opium poppy. Despite the substances and process used to manufacture them, natural opioids can be just as dangerous and addictive as their synthetic counterparts, especially when abused or taken in an unsafe manner. Morphine is one of the most widely-used medications for pain management and is often prescribed to patients following a traumatic injury as well as during and after a surgical procedure. Even when prescribed by a doctor, morphine and other natural opioids can be highly habit forming and those who abuse the drug run a much higher risk of developing an addiction or suffering an opioid overdose.

Semisynthetic Opioids

This type of opioid is made using chemical compounds that are derived from the naturally-occurring compounds found within the poppy plan. While many semisynthetic opioids were created in an attempt to reduce the addictive properties of natural opioids, such efforts were not always successful. Common examples of semisynthetic drugs include hydrocodone, oxycodone, benzylmorphine as well as the street drug heroin.

Synthetic Opioids

Drugs like methadone, fentanyl, and dextropropoxyphene are wholly synthetic and were manufactured using man-made compounds. Drugs like fentanyl are used in the treatment of extreme pain as they are far more potent than natural opioids like morphine and require a much smaller dose in order to be effective. Other drugs like methadone are less potent and are frequently used to provide relief from the symptoms of withdrawal for those who attempting to overcome an addiction to heroin, morphine or other more powerful opioids.

Opioid Addiction

The high potency and habit-forming nature of opioids makes them a highly-addictive substance. Opioid addiction is a very common problem, one that often begins when patients are provided with a prescription for pain-management medication by a physician. Those who are taking opioids following a surgery, accident or other type of injury may notice that the effects of their medication may begin to decrease the longer they take it. Attempting to self medicate by upping the dosage in order to produce the same level of relief that patients have become accustomed to can easily lead to an addiction.

Signs of an Opioid Addiction

There are many signs that may indicate someone is developing or suffering from an opioid addiction. Common indications of a problem often include:

  • Mood swings
  • Loss of interest in work, school or personal activities
  • Pinpoint pupils are dark marks along the arms
  • Going through prescriptions too quickly
  • Fatuige and increased sleepiness

Being able to recognize the signs of chemical dependency and addiction can be crucial to recovery. Opioid addicts who fail to seek help are far more likely to suffer from the long-term health effects of opioids which often include overdose and death.

Treatment and Recovery

Attempting to overcome an opioid addiction without professional help can be far more difficult. Even acute withdrawal symptoms may be dangerous without proper medical supervision. There are numerous treatment options, including both inpatient and outpatient care. Even long-term counseling and emotional support groups can be powerful tools for those who are struggling to overcome an addiction.

If you are someone close to you is suffering from a problem with opioids, seeking help can make a life-saving difference. Call us today at 800-737-0933 to learn more about treatment options and other resources.

How Can You Avoid Relapsing During Long Term Drug Rehab?

Many people who are assessed during short-term rehab will express fear of relapse if they are released from their programs. After all, relapse is a very real threat in the recovery community, and patients themselves often realize this and ask for further treatment. Long-term residential programs provide a community-like atmosphere that gives recovering individuals many paths toward relapse prevention. It’s one of the reasons that patients enter long term drug rehab in the first place. They realize the many programs long term treatment professionals set up solely to deal with the daunting prospect of relapse. How can you avoid relapsing during long term drug rehab? The answer is a long one.

Treatment centers have safety measures put in place specifically to help individuals deal with triggers to relapse. The long term drug rehabs themselves are often the best way to avert relapse in the early days. They do drug screens, provide a drug-free environment to live in and help each client gradually re-enter the community. Group meetings provide peer support. Some are 12 step meetings, but there are other meetings in long term facilities that help clients deal with life on life’s terms.

Individual and Group Sessions

Long term rehab centers structure their programs around the solid principles of addiction counseling and science. They have trained counseling staff on hand that knows how to discuss the triggers that often cause relapse in recovering clients. When you’re in inpatient rehab, you have access to counselors or caring staff 24 hours a day. If there is a true emergency, they can also deal with that.

Group sessions are another excellent way to get support from a counselor who is leading the group, plus peers who might be encouraged to share their own stories during group sessions. You’ll also find group meetings to provide peer support. Some are 12 step meetings, but there are other meetings in long term facilities that help clients deal with life on life’s terms.

Dual Diagnosis Services

Good long term residential centers have dual diagnosis services that help clients with mental illness receive their medications and counseling for those specific issues as well. The result is a well-rounded treatment program that addresses issues that commonly lead to relapse. Those with a co-existing mental illness often face pressure to relapse simply from the symptoms of that particular illness.

Counseling, group meetings, medication management, and peer support all form a solid backbone for recovery in a long term drug rehab. Dual diagnosis will be among the most important services to look for when seeking out treatment. Without support for a mental illness, relapse is likely, and these centers know this and provide the services.

Triggers for Relapse

Among the many things, you’ll learn inside a long term drug rehab is how to cope with the triggers of relapse. Triggers include anything that might stir up feelings that make you want to lose. In the early days, triggers will come often and strongly, but as you learn to live life without drugs or alcohol, you become more resistant to these triggers. Many things that might trigger a relapse include:

  • Negative emotions (stress, depression, fear, and other negative emotions)
  • Seeing a person that reminds you of addiction (AKA a former using partner)
  • Seeing an object that reminds you of using (for example a spoon or a can)
  • Positive emotions at times can make you want to “celebrate”

If it seems like you’re surrounded by a world that reminds you of drugs or alcohol in the beginning, you’re not alone. Triggers will be strong in early recovery, and that’s one of the reasons it’s so important to find a long term treatment program that is helpful to you in the early going. You can learn to cope with those triggers by using tools learned in counseling, such as meditation or deep breathing exercises. Seeking out help from a peer in recovery can also help, as they’re also experiencing these intense emotions. As you go through life drug-free in an inpatient drug rehab, you begin to replace those negative triggers with things that don’t remind you of using at all. Over time, it becomes easier to cope with, and you learn to appreciate life for what it is, without drugs.

If you want to prevent relapse by entering a long term drug rehab, our counselors are available 24 hours a day. Call 800-737-0933 to get started.

If Getting High on Suboxone During Treatment Is Too Tempting, What Other Medication Options Are There?

According to a study published by the National Institute on Drug Abuse, more than 37 million individuals worldwide abuse prescription opioids. For those who may not be as familiar with them, opioids are Schedule II medications that work by binding to receptors in the brain to help block pain and promote a sense of wellbeing. And for this reason, they are among the most commonly prescribed medications for those struggling with chronic diseases that have a pain component, such as HIV, AIDS, fibromyalgia, and certain cancers.

However, in addition to blocking pain and promoting a sense of wellbeing, these same medications can trigger a euphoric high that causes many people to abuse and ultimately become addicted to them. It is important to note that many individuals also abuse street-level opioids, such as heroin, to cope with pain or to derive a euphoric high as well. Fortunately, more and more people have come to appreciate the toll that abusing these substances can have on their lives and have decided to seek help. However, many are woefully unprepared for the withdrawal symptoms associated with coming off of these drugs.

COMMON OPIOID WITHDRAWAL SYMPTOMS

Depending on how long an individual has been using, opioid withdrawal symptoms can range from mild to intense. For those coming off of short-acting opioids, such as morphine, hydromorphone, oxycodone, or heroin, for example, withdrawal symptoms can start in as little as 6 to 12 hours once they have stopped using. In contrast, those coming off of long-acting opioids, like oxycodone controlled release, Morphine ER, or Duragesic, can expect withdrawal symptoms to start within 30 hours. That said, mild withdrawal symptoms can include the following:

  • Watery eyes
  • Muscle pain
  • Insomnia
  • Anxiety
  • Agitation
  • Runny nose
  • Profuse sweating
  • An irregular heartbeat
  • Fever
  • High blood pressure

Intense withdrawal symptoms associated with opioid cessation can include the following:

  • Nausea
  • Vomiting
  • Stomach cramps
  • Depression
  • Severe drug cravings

HOW ARE OPIOID WITHDRAWAL SYMPTOMS TREATED DURING REHAB?

Most rehab facilities in America will offer medically-assisted detox to help patients cope with the onslaught of severe withdrawal symptoms. Along with round-the-clock monitoring, medically-assisted detox also includes the use of Suboxone, Methadone, and Naltrexone, which have been approved by the FDA (Food and Drug Administration), to help ease withdrawal symptoms. While these medications are effective, they are also highly addictive. For this reason, the FDA recently approved lofexidine, a new medication that many hope will soon become widely available in rehab facilities across America.

WHAT YOU SHOULD KNOW ABOUT LOFEXIDINE

Approved by the FDA in May 2018, lofexidine, also known as Lucemyra, is a medication that was originally used to treat hypertension and anxiety. However, because of how it interacts with the nervous system, it can also provide many of the same benefits as Suboxone, Methadone, Naltrexone, and Clonidine in terms of offering pain relief and soothing feelings of anxiety. Of these 4 medications, lofexidine has a lot more in common with Clonidine, which is frequently paired with Naltrexone to help prevent relapse. However, unlike Clonidine, it does not cause a drop in blood pressure.

WHAT MAKES LOFEXIDINE A BETTER CHOICE FOR TREATING OPIOID WITHDRAWAL SYMPTOMS?

The primary reason that lofexidine is a better choice for treating withdrawal symptoms associated with opioid cessation is that it is a non-opioid medication. Therefore, it doesn’t pose the same risk of addiction as other commonly prescribed drugs, which in addition to Suboxone, Methadone, Naltrexone, and Clonidine, include benzodiazepines, a class of medication commonly prescribed to treat the psychological symptoms associated with coming off of opioids. In short, lofexidine is an alpha-2 adrenergic receptor agonist that works by reducing norepinephrine signaling in the brain, which disrupts the transmission of pain signals and promotes feelings of euphoria that can help combat depression and anxiety. It is important to note that because it is a non-opioid, lofexidine does not provide the same kind of relief from withdrawal symptoms as its opioid counterparts. Nonetheless, it is proving to be an excellent choice for individuals who would rather not get high while going through detox.

BOTTOM LINE

If you’re ready to end your relationship with opioids but have concerns about severe withdrawal symptoms while going through detox, lofexidine can help make the process that much easier. Furthermore, lofexidine is significantly safer than many of the medications that are commonly prescribed to combat severe withdrawal symptoms. To learn more about lofexidine or to find a rehab facility in your area, consider speaking with one of our addiction experts today at 800-737-0933.

Where Can I Find Reliable Rehab Reviews?

Before going into inpatient rehab, it’s important to have an idea of the kind of environment that exists in that rehab. Is the staff compassionate? Is the staff qualified and easy to talk to? Are there security measures taken at the rehab to make sure that everyone is safe and sound from threats both outside and within? Finding these answers is easier in today’s world than ever before thanks to the abundance of rehab reviews.

Any old rehab reviews won’t do, though. You need to make sure that the rehab being reviewed has no connection to the source reviewing it. You might want reviews from former clients, but you wouldn’t want reviews by a publication that the rehab paid to review it. Spotting reliable reviews are dependent on your knowledge of what they look like.

Online Sources

There are many terrific places that review rehabs and give you detailed information about the facility. They’ll sound unbiased and very specific (as much as confidentiality will allow). These publications can be trusted and will usually be something you’ve heard of just word of mouth. They’ll also look professional and be run by people who update the site often.

Search engines often have reviews as well, and this is where you can read about the rehab center from happy customers. They’ll often tell you about how the facility helped them and why they’d recommend it to a friend. In many cases, they can rate the rehab facility so that you have an idea of the overall quality of it (a four-star rating will be higher than a three-star rating, for example). This denotes quality in the rehab facility. Search engines are often a reliable source for finding out more about the rehab you’re considering.

Offline Sources

Word of mouth reviews is often the most helpful. If you know friends or family who has been an actual client at a rehab treatment center, then you might have an idea of whether the person telling you about it is reliable or not. If they wouldn’t steer you wrong on things like that, it’s likely they’re a reliable source of information about that treatment center. Magazines tend to be more of a national source of information, so if you are willing to travel to go to rehab, reading reliable reviews in a magazine might be a helpful venture.

Paper publications like magazines and newspaper often have reviews about rehab centers. Many magazines rank rehabs annually and give you quality information about the kind of treatment program they offer. Newspapers will sometimes take a local facility they’ve investigated and give potential clients more information. They may even have awards for local rehabs and let you know which ones are award-worthy. Newspapers are a time-tested media format that has helped people learn more about the world around them for years. They continue to serve the public with excellent reliable rehab reviews sometimes.

How Reviews Help

Before traveling to a place, it’s wise to know more about it. Certain rehabs cater to certain kinds of clients, while others will serve all. For example, you can find rehabs that have a spiritual approach to rehab, while others help clients who have a strong Christian faith and want to find a Christian rehab. Reading reviews can help you know if you will fit into the environment the rehab fosters. If you’re spiritual, you’ll want to find a rehab that has a natural, spiritual approach to recovery. If you have strong Christian faith, reviews can help you recognize when rehab is a Christian one.

Reading reviews can also curb some of the anxiety that might become with checking yourself into a rehab center. Many people are understandably nervous about the process and don’t want to be in the dark about it. By reading reviews, you increase your knowledge of the rehab center, learn a little from former clients, and begin to feel more at ease with the possibility of becoming a client of a certain facility. Thanks to reliable reviews, you can also cross out and avoid those rehabs that don’t have a less than stellar reputation with reviewers and/or clients. Sometimes ruling out rehab centers can make it easier to find the one that’s right for you. Reviews accomplish all of these many important things.

If you’re ready to learn more about spotting reliable rehab reviews or ready to get started on the treatment of your own, please call us today at 800-737-0933.