Prescription Drugs

Does Suboxone Work – How Does Suboxone Work? What Happens in the Body When You Use Suboxone to Treat Opiate Dependence

It is hard to turn on the news without hearing stories of lives damaged by opiate addiction or ended by overdose. Many people are looking for help with this chronic condition. In recent years, Suboxone has become an important tool in the treatment of narcotic addiction. This article will explore how Suboxone works and what happens in the body when it is used as a treatment for opiate dependence.

What is Suboxone

Suboxone is a prescription treatment for opiate addiction. This medicine is a combination of two compounds, Buprenorphine and Naloxone. It is normally taken daily, either as a pill which dissolves under the tongue or as a dissolving film.

The two substances that are combined in Suboxone play different roles. Buprenorphine, itself a milder opiate, is the main active ingredient. In the brain, it attaches to the same receptors as stronger opiates, reducing cravings for the patient.

Naloxone is a compound that blocks the effects of opiates. Its primary role in Suboxone is to prevent abuse. When taken orally as directed, the drug is effective. If someone tries to take Suboxone by injection, the Naloxone will prevent the opiate from providing a high.

What does Suboxone do to your body

Suboxone acts as a treatment to step down from stronger opiates. The symptoms of withdrawal are one of the major concerns for addicts trying to quit. If someone has become physically dependent on opiates, quitting can be both a painful and anxious time. Strong cravings for another dose become all-consuming. Because Suboxone mimics the action of stronger opiates, cravings are not as strong and withdrawal not as difficult.

Suboxone contains a milder opiate, and some patients report a slight high when first taking the drug. However, because the effects are milder, and the cravings reduced, you can live a much more normal life while undergoing Suboxone treatment. In conjunction with other behavioral therapies, Suboxone can help you establish new, positive habits and get your life back together.

Are there other effects of Suboxone?

The Buprenorphine in Suboxone is a milder opiate. As such, it does have side effects similar to other opioid substances. Some reported side effects of Suboxone are

  • Constipation
  • Headache
  • Muscle ache
  • Insomnia

Another important concern with Suboxone is withdrawal. Suboxone is intended as a long-term treatment, a milder opiate taken intentionally to avoid stronger opiates, such as heroin. However, even though it is milder, there will still be a physical dependence on the drug. If you stop taking Suboxone suddenly, especially early on in the recovery process, you may experience withdrawal symptoms. For this reason, it is important to take Suboxone only under medical supervision. Over time, as the dosage lowers, you will become less dependent on the drug, perhaps one day being free of opiates altogether.

Support on a Challenging Path

Ending an opiate dependence is a difficult journey. It will take time to get clean. It will take time for your brain to reset itself. Recovery will be a great challenge, but you do not need to do it alone. Treatments like Suboxone can be a big help in getting started and continuing on the path. If you are ready to take the first step, call us at 800-737-0933.

Pointers For Staying Sober After Going Through An Opiate Detox Center

An addiction problem has been recognized. The addict has successfully undergone professional opiate detox, which is no easy feat. The drugs are now out of the addict’s system, and the addict and his/her loved ones are left to figure out how to accomplish holistic recovery and continue the prized sobriety. Here are some pointers for staying sober after going through an opiate detox center.

Go From Detox Straight Into A Rehab Program

Addiction programs vary greatly, but most include four broad key elements:

•Intake
•Detox
•Rehabilitation
•Recovery

Intake simply collects information, and it’s the point at which professionals will determine if and how you need to be detoxed. Once you’ve detoxed and your initial withdrawals from the opiates are manageable, it will be up to you, if voluntary, or the entity that’s ordered your placement in a facility, if involuntary, as to whether you continue forward to the rehabilitation phase.

It’s important to understand that physical detox is only the start of recovery. There’s a long road ahead of it still to be traversed. Some choose to try to rehab themselves. However, if available to you, a rehabilitation program can be an invaluable aspect of sobriety.

Rehabilitation treatment should be aimed at holistically addressing all areas of your life, not just your substance addiction. It will explore cognitive behavior therapies. Expect to explore areas such as:

•Mental state
•Personal history for the core of addiction behaviors
•Nutrition
•Physical health
•Family therapy
•Individual therapy
•Group therapy
•Necessary pharmaceutical treatment
•Developing long-term recovery strategies

Remember that there’s not a one-size-fits-all treatment for addiction. There’s a lot of inpatient and outpatient options available. Find a program that’s a good match for your needs and circumstances, and then be ready to commit however much time is deemed necessary to complete the program.

Take Advantage Of Follow Up Programs

Recovery can be short lived if you don’t have adequate support as you transition from the reclusiveness of rehab back to your daily life. Research aftercare and follow up programs to continue the help you need to traverse addiction.

Such programs may include a slow or plotted reintroduction to normal day-to-day life, such as through weekend reprieves at an addiction center or going from the rehab center into a sober living facility. Follow up programs have many other offerings including:

•Drug and alcohol testing
•Nicotine addiction support
•Group, individual, and family therapies
•Help forming new patterns and lifestyle choices
•Stress reduction and coping skills
•Strategies for family members to support their recovering loved ones
•Job and vocational training
•Anger management classes
•Group activities and outings with other dealing with addiction

Find Sober Friends

One of the biggest risks to a recovering addict’s sobriety is returning to socialize with those not sober. There’s tremendous self-inflicted pressure to be who you once were and do what you once did to fit in where you once fit in; there’s also a tremendous amount of peer pressure to be the “old you.” It’s painful, but the lifestyles and behaviors of others that no longer align with the sober you should be cut away. Removing this temptation from your life will make room for relationships that do support and enable you to progress along the path of recovery.

Tips for building new sober support:

•Work on reestablishing trust and honesty within healthy relationships
•Find a new circle of friends
•Join a social activity that excludes addictive substances

Abandon Old Stomping Grounds

It’s the same as with friends. You can’t hangout in the same places sober as you did not sober. Doing so brings forth memories and temptations that do nothing but eat away at your resolve, self-esteem, and goals to move forward.

Evaluate Your Total Environment

From where you live to where you work, carefully examine each facet of how you’re living to determine if it supports or detracts from your sobriety. Maybe you’re a waitress in Palm Beach serving alcohol. Maybe you live in South Florida area heavy with recreational drug users or have a roommate that throws frequent parties.

There will hopefully be a time when the actions of others and your environment plays a lesser role in your sobriety, but these changes are particularly important in the early timeframes of recovery. And, it’s okay if those changes need to be permanent. Prioritize yourself and your sobriety and work to remove anything unsupportive or not conducive.

For many, abandoning friends, lifestyles, hangouts, jobs, and/or homes all add up to questioning who they are as a person – an identity crisis. It will require focusing on the positive, not negative. A new environment gives you vast room to explore new possibilities without every single moment being something that triggers your cravings.

Focus On Mental Health

Stress, depression, anxiety, and other negative emotions can quickly and easily result in relapse. Meditation and a routine exercise program are useful tools for both your mental and physical health. These bathe your brain in feel good endorphins and chemicals and release tension held in muscles. As you see the results of routine exercise and meditation, you’ll also feel more self-confident and be refocused on your personal goals, not the history of your addition. Include a well-balanced diet that supports mental health; if you’re not participating in an after care program, then consult a nutritionist for a diet plan.

Always Be Self-Aware

Relapse most often has a personal trigger behind it. Know thy own self. Understand your vulnerabilities, weaknesses, and triggers. Capture these thoughts immediately verses letting them swirl around unaddressed until they become overwhelming. Talk with a sober friend or family member, counselor, or support group to determine the best way to address the issue.

Addicts often times have an undiagnosed co-occurring mental health issue, whether it be depression or OCD, that affects their long-term sobriety. Mental illness worsens substance abuse. Substance abuse then worsens mental illness. Worsening mental illness then increases substance abuse. It can be a vicious cycle if not addressed. Be honest in your intake and rehabilitation processes so that any mental health issues can be identified and addressed if they exist.

These seven pointers for staying sober after going through an opiate detox center can help you reach your long-term sobriety objective. Are you ready to start or continue on your road to recovery? Call us today 800-737-0933

How Doctors Are Contributing To Increased Admissions In Prescription Drug Rehab Centers

Prescription drugs are given to patients to help them with a medical condition and improve their health. However, when doctors prescribe medications for mental health conditions or pain people tend to abuse these drugs. These types of medications are highly addictive and can cause unpleasant withdrawal symptoms when it comes time to stop.

Drug addiction does not discriminate, and people of all ages abuse prescription medications. They take these pills to feel good, experiment or to be accepted by others. Since physicians are prescribing these medications, patients believe they are safer than street drugs and legal. That is not true because people are overdosing and abusing these drugs every day. Here is some information about how doctors are contributing to increased admissions in prescription drug rehab centers.

What is prescription drug addiction?

When someone takes prescription drugs without following the physician’s instructions, that is called prescription drug abuse. If you have ever taken a higher dosage than prescribed or used your medication for another reason, you are abusing your medication. Crushing, snorting or injecting your medication is also considered prescription drug abuse.

Unfortunately, many doctors give strong pain relievers, tranquilizers and sedatives to people because they suffer from mental or medical conditions. Patients suffering from ADHD, anxiety, sleep disorders and depression need medications to help with their symptoms. But instead of using the drugs as prescribed patients are abusing them.

How to identify prescription drug addiction?

Since drugs stimulate the reward system in the brain, it is easy to become addicted. The introduction to drugs, even when prescribed by a doctor, can change the brains chemistry. This change can release the neurotransmitters in the brain that cause drug addiction.

When drugs are taken, they produce an intense euphoria that teaches the brain to seek them out regardless of the consequences. These are some of the signs of prescription drug addiction:

When drugs are taken they produce an intense euphoria that teaches the brain to seek them out regardless of the consequences. These are some of the signs of prescription drug addiction:

• You keep taking the drug longer than prescribed and make excuses to get it.
• Your tolerance is built up for the drug causing you to need more to get high.
• When you stop taking the medication, you become physically ill.
• You become obsessed with the drug and disregard your friends and family.
• When you take prescription drugs, you drink alcohol and other drugs.

The most common abused prescription drugs

Even though prescription drugs are given to patients by physicians, they one of the leading causes of drug abuse. They are abused more than cocaine, heroin and methamphetamine. More than 46 people die daily from prescription opioid overdoses. Here is a list of the most commonly abused prescription drugs:

Pain relievers

Oxycodone, methadone and hydrocodone are opioid drugs that inhibit the brain’s capacity to process pain. They target the brain stem and affect your body’s ability to control breathing, sleeping and heart rate. These drugs are highly addictive and cause severe withdrawal symptoms when the user stops taking them.

Stimulants

Ritalin, Adderall and Dexedrine affect your attention span, energy and can make you more alert. Physicians prescribe them for people diagnosed with ADHD, narcolepsy and depression. They increase the levels of dopamine in your brain, raise blood pressure and elevate the heart rate. When taken other than prescribed, they can cause seizures and irregular heartbeats.

Tranquilizers and sedatives

Xanax, Valium and Librium are central nervous depressants that are prescribed for anxiety, panic attacks and sleep disorders. This medication is also known as barbiturates and benzodiazepines because they make the user sleepy and reduce anxiety. When abused these pills can cause your heart and breathing rate to slow down and lead to seizures.

Many substances abusers mix their prescription medications with alcohol, which can increase the risk of drug interactions. These interactions can include internal bleeding, heart problems and labored breathing. The elderly are becoming more susceptible to prescription drug abuse as well as young women, adolescents and teens.

Although your physician has prescribed medications to you, does not mean you will become addicted. If you take your medication as prescribed, you should not develop an addiction. When you are taking medication, keep your pills in a safe place. Do not share your pills with anyone, including your friends or family. Many people hide their problem with prescription medications, and if you have pills, they will steal them.

If you do find yourself or someone you know dealing with prescription drug addiction, please call us. Our counselors are available 24 hours a day. Call 800-737-0933

How Drug Detox Centers in South Florida Handle Opiate Withdrawal

You probably already know that feeling you get when you have not used opiates when you typically do. You start feeling like the flu because you start having body aches, vomiting, diarrhea, shakes, etc. Not feeling sick is the reason that you keep using opiates despite the repercussions. You want to be free from your addiction, but having to go through withdrawal scares you. Detox centers in South Florida are trained to make withdrawal as safe and comfortable as possible for you.

Drug detox centers in South Florida Handle Opiate Withdrawal by:

Medication

Detox centers will give you medication to treat your symptoms (e.g. rapid heart rate, hypertension, pain, etc.). In addition, they also understand the importance of having to have your body come down off the drugs slowly; therefore, they may give you opiate replacements (e.g. suboxone) to slowly bring your body back down to a normal internal state.

Monitoring Vitals

The medical staff will be monitoring your vitals constantly. They will make note of every change, regardless of how minor they are. Some withdrawal symptoms can be fatal if not treated. You may even be woken up in the middle of the night to have your vitals checked.

Therapies

In addition to basic medical care, these centers will also use holistic therapies (e.g. healthy diet, chiropractic care, acupressure, bio sound therapy, etc.) to make withdrawal faster and more comfortable.

The Importance of Drug Detox

Addictions to drug and alcohol is physiological almost always physiological. The repeated use of the substance makes your body feel like you need use the substance in order to survive. When you do not use drugs or alcohol, you start feeling sick because your body is not receiving what it thinks it needs. Your body lets you know when it is in trouble. Drug detox is necessary because you cannot go from one extreme to the other. You need to slowly come down off the addictive substance. Withdrawal can be physically and emotionally trying if you do not go through it under proper medical supervision. In some cases, withdrawal symptoms can be deadly. Alcohol withdrawal is the only withdrawal than can definitely kill you; however, that does not mean withdrawal symptoms from other drugs can kill you as well, especially opiates because they are similar to alcohol.

Genesis House is a detox program that is located in Lake Worth, Florida. We are committed to helping you the genesis of your new life. Call us today at 800-737-0933

Reasons To Avoid Opiate Addiction Doctor And Work Towards Complete Detox

People who have undergone substance abuse know that it is really simple for others to advise that they just quit at once. The process of letting go of addictive substances is just that — a process.

Getting started on the process of overcoming addiction can be the toughest part that many find hard to overcome on their own. Withdrawal symptoms of different substances can range in strength and nature. These include:

  • Shaking and tremors
  • Chills/Fever
  • Sleep Pattern Change
  • Pain
  • Sweating
  • Anxiety, depression, and other uncomfortable emotional/mental reactions
  • Appetite fluctuations

To avoid these symptoms and stop taking addictive stubstances, many go to their doctor to prescribe them an opioid medication. The substnces in these medications bind to the same receptors that the abusive substance does. This temporarily fulfills the craving and before one knows it, they are addicted to something else.

Why Choose Detox Over Medication

The alternative to taking addictive opioid medications is going for detox therapy. Detox therapy is the first part of healing and curing addictions. The detox aims to clean out all of the addictive substances and toxins out of your body. These substances in the blood are precisely what causes the withdrawal symptoms.

Detox helps you transition safely from the state of addiction towards therapy so that you can concentrate on the protocol of the therapy instead of fighting with yourself over the cravings.

There is a great comfort in knowing that there is someone who knows what they are doing when you are experiencing a withdrawal crisis. You don’t have to do it on your own. In the cases of alcohol and benzodiazepine addictions, the symptoms can be potentially dangerous, and when under supervision, medication can be administered to help you overcome it safe and sound.

Even if you do not require medical interventions, you can still benefit from a detox. The clearing of the addictive substances from your body will help carry you through in your decision to stop for good. The confidence of making it through something that you didn’t think you could earlier will give you the motivation for further therapy.

Detox and therapy are a healing process that has a goal of curing your life at the root and the things that triggered your addiction in the first place. You can receive help along this healing journey for a new life. Call us today 800-737-0933

Finding a Treatment Center in Florida With In House Detox

If you or someone you love is struggling with an addiction to alcohol or drugs, you may feel overwhelmed by the situation at hand. Addiction doesn’t only hurt the addicted individual, but also affects their friends and family. Living with a substance use disorder is a daily challenge that puts your well being at risk every day. You don’t need to feel alone in your addiction though.

Fortunately, help is attainable. Learn more about treatment centers with in house detox programs and the benefits they offer below to take the first step towards recovery.

What is Detox?

Detoxification, commonly called “detox” for short, refers to the process of eliminating harmful toxins from the body. Detox plays a critical role in the beginning phase of treatment for drug and alcohol addictions. For starters, it can eliminate the body’s physical dependency on a substance. This in turn allows the addicted individual to break free from uncomfortable withdrawal symptoms which may include the following:

  • Vomitting or nausea
  • Hot or cold flashes
  • Involuntary shaking
  • Confusion
  • Mood swings
  • Aggression
  • Excessive sleep or inability to fall asleep

Unfortunately, many people fail to seek out professional help prior to attempting to withdrawal from addictive substances on their own. People who try to detox at home often relapse as a result of undesirable symptoms. The best way to ensure successful release of toxins is to detox in a reputable treatment center with 24 hour support from medical staff and addiction counselors.

Not all treatment centers offer in house detox programs though. Finding one with this included is ideal because it eliminates the transitional phase between a detox facility and rehabilitation center.

During this phase, many people in recovery are still battling with the emotional and mental aspects surrounding addiction. This makes them highly susceptible to relapse despite breaking their dependency to an addictive substance. In house detox enables you or your loved one to immediately begin treatment after releasing the toxic substances from your system safely. In most cases, detox lasts less then two weeks.

In house detox also gives you access to caring addiction professionals who are able to support you every step of the way. Coping techniques and in some cases medication are available to make withdrawal easier.

If you are ready to reclaim your life from addiction once and for all, get in touch with one of our friendly counselors by 800-737-0933 today!

How Florida Addiction Treatment Can Help You Stay Out Of Legal Trouble

If you are living in the cycle of addiction, you are not alone. Addiction affects countless Americans and individuals all across the globe. It can affect your health, emotional and mental well being, and also get you into legal complications.

Help from a reputable treatment center near you is within reach. Learn more about the connection between addiction and legal problems below or reach out to us now to discover the right treatment option for your needs.

How Can Addiction Lead to Problems with the Law?

Addiction is considered a disease in which affected individuals have little to no control over their use of potentially harmful substance such as street drugs, prescription drugs and alcohol. When you are addicted, your body physically depends on a substance to feel comfortable. This occurs over time as a result of repeated use.

If an addicted person does not get an adequate amount of a substance, he or she may experience an array of uncomfortable withdrawal symptoms and ultimately, attempt to obtain more drugs or alcohol to ease the pain. Some of the most common withdrawal symptoms include nausea, difficulty falling asleep or excessive sleeping and bodily aches and pains. Mood complications such as unexplainable aggression or violent outbursts and depression can also be present.

If you use illegal substance such as street drugs, you put yourself at risk for suffering serious legal complications such as jail time, probation and fines. If you drive while under the influence of a substance, you can suffer from similar consequences and get your license suspended or revoked entirely. Addiction can seriously hinder your independence and ability to maintain your daily responsibilities as well. Other potential legal scenarios related to addiction include:

  • Domestic violence
  • Public intoxication
  • Public fighting or outbursts

The only way to eliminate your risk of incurring legal problems caused by addiction is to break free from the disease entirely. However, imagining your life free from drugs or alcohol can be challenging, especially if you are currently using.

Choosing to seek help is the first step towards recovery. With 24/7 support from our professional and caring counselors, you can count on us to help you through every step of the treatment process. Get started today by calling 800-737-0933

Do Any Detox Programs in South Florida Use Alternative Medications Like Buprenorphine?

If you live in southern Florida, and you’re considering entering a drug treatment program for opioid addiction, you’re probably wondering what the detox procedure will be like. You probably already know that opioid withdrawal is painful. It’s only natural to wonder what types of medications are used to ease the opioid withdrawal process. Do any southern Florida rehab facilities use buprenorphine for opioid withdrawal?

The answer is, yes, many of them do. But what is buprenorphine? What benefits does it have?

Buprenorphine is a synthetic opioid. It’s most commonly combined with another medication called naloxone. This combination medication is known by its brand name, Suboxone. Naloxone is actually a drug used to reverse opioid overdoses. It’s widely known as Narcan. It’s included in the Suboxone formulation to discourage intravenous abuse of the buprenorphine. When taken by mouth as directed, the naloxone in Suboxone will have little to no effect. However, if the Suboxone is injected, the naloxone will act to block any euphoric effects from the buprenorphine. Similarly, buprenorphine produces little to no euphoria when taken orally.

How Buprenorphine Works

Buprenorphine eases opioid withdrawal symptoms by occupying certain opioid brain receptors. It has a high receptor affinity. This is a fancy way of saying that buprenorphine will block the euphoric effects of any other opioids which may be taken concurrently. Buprenorphine also has a very long half-life. This means that a single dose can last for a full 24 hours.

Buprenorphine can be used as both a detoxification agent and as a maintenance drug. When given in decreasing doses over a period of time, the drug can greatly ease withdrawal symptoms. Many South Florida rehab facilities use buprenorphine to gradually and comfortably wean their clients off of their opioid drug of choice. It can also be used as a take-home opioid maintenance drug. It must be prescribed by a specially licensed Suboxone physician, but it can be filled at any pharmacy. The patient then takes their daily dose in the privacy of their own home. Although addictive in itself, buprenorphine is certainly better than injecting illicit opioids such as heroin. It allows many former users to live a normal life once again.

If you Need Help with Opiates

Now that you know that buprenorphine therapy is available to you, it’s time to give us a call. A lot of South Florida rehab facilities use buprenorphine as part of their treatment plan for their clients. Let us help you find the right rehab for you. Call us at 800-737-0933 at any time of the day or night. You will find reassurance and guidance. We look forward to your call.

Drug Detox Program For People Who Have Become Addicted To Medications Prescibed By A Doctor

How could something so good turn out to be so bad? That’s a question often posed by prescription medication users who become addicts. Yes, doctor prescribed painkillers to help patient’s get relief from pain. When those medications are misused or abused, the results can become tragic.

Pain medications almost always contain some form of opiate. Opiates are the operative ingredient found in heroin. Heroin is one of the most highly addictive illicit drugs on the planet. Along with a bevy of distressing side effects, opioids also produce some rather dangerous withdrawal symptoms. Anyone addicted to painkillers has to be conscious of these withdrawal symptoms should they choose to stop using. Here’s a sampling of said withdrawal symptoms:

  • Severer muscle and stomach cramps
  • Respiration and pulmonary issues
  • Diarrhea and vomiting
  • Convulsions and tremors
  • Hallucinations

Under no circumstance should someone addicted to painkillers try to stop on their own. It would be prudent for the individual to seek help from a professional, reputable drug rehab facility.

The Detox Process

Prior to getting help for any personal issues that may have led to their addiction, most addicts need time to detox. Detox can be administered in-house at a rehab facility or through a dedicated detox facility. Clinicians will generally prescribe a detox program based on the depth and longevity of the patient’s addiction.

The primary objective of detox is to get patients through the withdrawal process with a minimum of discomfort. This can be a real challenge for patients addicted to painkillers. For the most part, they are placed in a medically monitored detox program. Under the watchful eye of medical professionals, patients are monitored on a constant basis. If a patient starts to show signs of distress, doctors have the ability to prescribe medications that should help the patient move forward.

During the detox process, there are three primary concerns:

  • Patients will have difficulty breathing
  • Patients will exhibit a substantial loss of appetite
  • Patients will have difficulty sleeping

It might take a patient up to a week to clear the most serious withdrawal symptoms, but once the patient gets clear, they should be ready to focus on therapy and counseling.

If you are ready to seek help for your addiction, we are ready to provide that help. You can get started on recovery by calling us at 800-737-0933

How To Solve Your Pain Problems By Going To a Detox Center

Millions of Americans suffer addiction to opiates and other pain medications. The recent uptick in the number of people suffering addiction to these drugs stems from many causes. When individuals experience severe pain from injuries or illnesses, doctors often must prescribe medications that contain highly addictive properties.

For patients who suffer from acute pain that is short lived, these drugs often present no addiction problem. The drug serves its purpose—masking the pain—so that patients can rest and recover. However, when patients are confronted with an injury or illness that causes chronic pain, they often must remain on these medications for months or years. When these medications are taken for that length of time, addiction often results.

Addiction results largely from tolerance. Because the body becomes accustomed to these drugs over time, the pain masking effect becomes weaker. The doctor then must prescribe an increased dosage. This results in the patient developing an even higher dependency on the drug. Patients may also develop cross tolerance, which is a tolerance to all opioid drugs, not just the specific one they have taken.

High levels of dependency result in severe withdrawal symptoms when the patient needs to stop taking the medication. Some common withdrawal symptoms include cravings, restlessness, moodiness, insomnia, goose bumps, diarrhea, rapid heart beat, and high blood pressure. These symptoms often grow severe, making it difficult or impossible for patients to stop taking the drug.

Detox helps solve your pain problem

During medically supervised detox, clients receive treatment for withdrawal symptoms. Generally, withdrawal symptoms last from a few days to several weeks. The withdrawal process depends greatly on the individual’s chemical makeup. It also depends upon the type of drug used, as well as the length and quantity of use.

Detox staff prescribes medication that reduces withdrawal symptoms. This allows patients to recover safely and comfortably. Medically supervised detox also involves treatment and monitoring of underlying medical issues.

Because many people withdrawing from medications like Vicodin or OxyContin are experiencing difficult injuries or illnesses, ongoing treatment of those medical issues is necessary. For detox to be successful, patients must not only recover from the withdrawal symptoms but also feel comfortable that their pain is manageable. This prevents relapse.

Chronic pain results from many injuries and illnesses. Though treatment with pain relieving drugs is often necessary, these medicines often leave patients in a state of drug dependency. If you or you loved one has become addicted to pain medication, our counselors are available 24 hours a day. Call 800-737-0933