Substance Abuse

How Do I Tell if the Rehab Facilities Near Me Are Any Good?

When you feel as though your entire life is spinning out of control due to substance abuse, it’s imperative that you find a rehab center that can provide the services you need to get your life back on track. Whether you are seeking a rehab facility for yourself or for someone close to you, finding the right treatment program is critical. It’s not uncommon for many people looking for a treatment center to wonder whether a facility near them is any good. This is one of the most important decisions you will make when it comes to addiction recovery, so it is important to know what to look for in a facility.

Numerous factors need to be taken into consideration in choosing a substance abuse treatment center. Among those factors include whether the facility in question offers the specific services that the person struggling with addiction needs. Whether or not the treatment facility offers after-care and follow-up services should also be considered. Taking the time to learn as much as you can about a facility can help to guide you in choosing the right program for yourself or your loved one.

Finding Out About the Services Offered by an Addiction Treatment Center

In determining whether or a facility is the right choice, consider whether the program offers a dual diagnosis. Many individuals struggling to overcome addiction also have other clinical conditions, such as anxiety, depression, post-traumatic stress disorder, or eating disorders. It’s also not uncommon for the individual to not even be aware that he or she also has other disorders. For this reason, it’s important to select a facility that offers a dual diagnosis. In a program with a dual diagnosis, incoming clients are provided with an assessment to determine whether they are also struggling with other disorders. Clients who also have other clinical conditions can benefit from receiving treatment not only for their addiction but also for their other conditions.

A solid addiction treatment program should also provide a holistic approach to treatment. This means that the program should not just focus on treating the addiction with counseling services but should also provide other forms of treatment that target body, mind, and spirit. Such forms of treatment might include:• Individual and group counseling• Meditation• Nutritional counseling• Stress relief training

Other Factors to Consider When Selecting an Addiction Treatment Program

Additionally, it’s important to consider other factors in determining whether an addiction treatment program is a right choice for your needs. For instance, take some time to research the facility that you are considering and find out whether the program has longevity. Generally, it’s a good idea to steer away from any treatment program that has not been in business for a while. Although some such facilities might be perfectly fine, a facility that hasn’t been in business very long could eventually end up failing if they utilize unlawful or unethical business practices. Overall, treatment centers that have been open longer typically have longevity due to the fact that they provide good service and adhere to ethical standards.

Furthermore, you should try to stay away from any treatment center that provides guarantees for success rates. It is simply impossible for a treatment center to provide a guarantee of success for an individual in recovery. Ultimately, it is up to that individual as to whether he or she will continue following the treatment plan after leaving the facility. Ideally, it’s important to look for a program that offers ongoing support group meetings even after clients leave the treatment center.

Do You Need a Treatment Center Near You?

It’s only natural to have a desire to enter a treatment program near you or choose one within a close vicinity for your loved one. One thing to keep in mind is that close proximity does not necessarily mean that a treatment facility is the best choice for your needs or the needs of your loved one. Keep in mind that when you or your loved one enters a treatment program, it will be imperative that he or she be able to fully focus on treatment.

Finding the right addiction treatment program may seem as though it is a daunting task, especially given the number of options available. If you are still uncertain as to whether a facility might be the right choice, it’s a good idea to contact the facility directly and obtain as much information as possible, including the various services offered.

If you are ready to take that next step, call us today at 800-737-0933
to learn about our addiction treatment center in Southwest Florida.

How Do Medical Professionals Handle Heroin Addiction in Comparison to Other Drug Addictions?

Heroin is one of the most dangerous and addictive street drugs in the world. It is an opiate that will rewrite the brain's perception of pleasure and reward in ways that many other substances do not, so withdrawal from the substance can be far more painful than from other drugs. This is why medical professionals have to handle heroin addiction much more delicately than addiction from other substances.

Detox

The first and perhaps most important step in treating heroin addiction is the detoxification process. This can be harrowing for patients under the most ideal circumstances, and it should never be attempted alone. Many patients need to undergo medical detox, which ensures that they are weaned off of heroin in a controlled environment instead of quitting outright. They may also be provided with medications to help them control their withdrawal symptoms, which is often a crucial part of the rehab process. This usually involves taking suboxone, a medication that can in itself be addictive and should only be taken in a clinical setting.

Counseling

Much of what makes heroin addiction treatment different from other addiction treatment is getting over the physical addiction and managing the harsh withdrawal symptoms, but it is far from the only element of treatment. Once a patient has properly detoxed and is mostly over their physical addiction, they often have to undergo counseling and treatment to address the reasons why they turned to heroin in the first place. This process can take anywhere from a few months to several years depending on the patient's situation. As we said before, heroin alters the brain's perception of pleasure and reward, and any addiction treatment will involve basically rewriting one's thought process. This cognitive therapy and counseling can be just as difficult as overcoming the physical addiction, and it should be taken very seriously.

There is no doubt that heroin is one of the most dangerous illicit drugs available today. It is part of the reason why there is such a severe opiate addiction epidemic in the United States, and it continues to claim thousands of lives every year. If you or a loved one is struggling with an addiction to heroin, know that there is hope for you. Contact our treatment center today at 800-737-0933 for more information. Our counselors are available 24 hours a day, and they will gladly help you find the treatment that you need.

How Can People With Chronic Pain Quit Heroin?

You can manage chronic pain and quit heroin while learning how to reduce the risk of substance abuse. Painkillers or its derivatives are adequate for most and as the pain worsens relief demands more frequent doses leading to potential drug dependency.

Too often individuals attempt to self-medicate and trigger more serious health conditions. There are effective non-opioid drugs combined with different types of therapeutic and medical procedures for treating chronic pain and addiction.

The approach is multi-disciplinary; transitioning from heroin to a non-opioid medication, treatments for pain, and the introductions of precautions to prevent drug relapse.

More Than Just Pain

A vast majority of individual’s suffering with chronic pain are unaware they have a substance abuse problem. Besides the health considerations that will worsen over time substance abuse interferes with the body’s genetic makeup and biological functions. At this point, reversing the effect is difficult without some form of professional assistance.

For most, addiction to heroin occurs with long-term use as the chemicals change how our body responds. Did you know?

  • Heroin does not heal or repair the cause of chronic pain.
  • Heroin offers only short-term intervals for relieving chronic pain.
  • Heroin can cause mild to extreme side effects that interfere with day-to-day functions.

Heroin and other painkillers belong to the same class of drugs called opioids. Opioids attach to receptors found on the nerve cells in the brain interfering with the signals that alert the body to pain. For some, it may decrease the level of pain temporarily and prompt a feeling of euphoria.

Non-Opioid Pain Treatments

Heroin isn’t the only chronic pain treatment option. Like heroin, all medications or illegal drugs have potential risk factors. Contributing to these risks are personal health status and family medical disorders.

  • Do you know if other types of substance abuse or psychiatric disorders exist?

The outcome could be affected when one or more of these factors exist. This information helps to select the combinations of medicine and therapy for the individual’s lifestyle and level of pain.

Addiction programs incorporate specialized doctors and alternative health teams to help cope with the situation. Depending on the severity of heroin use the withdrawal process can cause:

  • Cold flashes
  • Insomnia
  • Muscle or bone pain
  • Restlessness

Treating chronic pain without heroin involves physical, psychological, and occupational therapies along with a medical supervisor of nonopioid pain treatments or medicine.

Getting Rid of The Pain Without Heroin

Chronic pain is manageable with medications and alternative practices achieving fewer adverse effects on your health. Treatment starts with understanding that both the physical and mental components of one’s health are involved in recovery.

Facts of treating pain with heroin:

  • The body builds a tolerance to heroin with long-term use
  • The pain remains.
  • Opioids (heroin) are addictive, dangerous and life-threatening.

Technology and medical advances address the source of the pain collectively with non-opioid medications and therapies. Recovery centers provide a safe and caring environment.

Residential programs offer personal and group follow-up care. The goal is to help teach individuals how to live life without addiction through a continuum of care.

Managing Life One Day A Time

The good news, physical dependence on heroin is reversible. By focusing on the cause of addiction and responding to chronic pain, you can learn how to deal with it and quit heroin.

  • It’s not a process that you can maneuver alone.
  • You need the help of trained professionals.

Recovery is a long journey and treatment to the addiction is only the first phase. To quit heroin, you must continue to maintain your physical and mental health one day at a time. See your doctor regularly for the pain to prevent a relapse. More important, if you experience a relapse urge, seek support – it happens from time to time.

Dealing with chronic pain is unbearable but blocking out the pain with heroin can only cause more damage to your health. Rather than live with addiction, there’s help available to minimize the effects of withdrawal and teach you how to manage a life with chronic pain instead.

Using heroin to quite chronic pain comes with a wide range of potential risks and side effects. Call our office at 800-737-0933 if you find yourself thinking about taking higher doses or more powerful drugs for pain.

Are Florida Drug Rehab Centers Good for People From Out-of-State?

It's very encouraging when someone is finally able to come to grips with the idea they are suffering from an addiction to drugs or alcohol, perhaps both. After that grand admission, the hope is they will also be ready to ask for help beating their addiction.

The task of figuring out where to get treatment is not something that should be taken lightly. The quality of one's addiction treatment will eventually affect the ability of the individual to maintain lasting recovery.

The first instinct someone will feel is to run out and enlist of services of one of the rehab centers in the local area. While that would certainly be the most convenient option, it might not be the best option. It's vital that the first consideration by the individual's personal welfare, not just in the now, but also into the future.

In fact, there are four things each individual should consider during the addiction treatment facility selection process. The four things would be:

  • The possibility outside influences could interfere with the treatment process
  • What type of treatment program would best suit the individual's needs
  • The need for privacy
  • The addiction treatment environment

For the first time addiction treatment patient, the facility treatment selection process can be very intimidating. Hopefully, the following information will serve to help people make the best choice, which many experts would say is a Florida rehab center.

Are Florida Rehabs Good for Non-Residents?

Prior to discussing the viability of Florida rehabs for residents of other states, it's important to note Florida, especially South Florida, is known by experts as the "rehab capital of the world." There are plenty of reasons why experts feel this way. Chief among those reasons is a tremendous concentration of quality addiction treatment resources in this one area.

As for the viability of setting aside convenience in order to get treatment from a Florida rehab center, there have to be concrete benefits that would motivate someone to make this choice. After all, the addiction sufferer will be asked to take themselves away from their home and lives for a prescribed period of time.

As for the potential benefits, there are many. For purposes of this discussion, the focus will be put on the four selection considerations listed above.

Removing Harmful Influences

Home is where the people, places and things that created the addiction live. It's where the prospective patient's drug dealers and drug-using friends run the streets. It's where family and friend enablers live. It's a place that could be filled with hard feelings and bad memories.

A successful addiction treatment process demands the patient be able to truly focus on the process. They need to be open and honest with their counselors to assure problems get solutions. Any possibility of interference from bad people or memories could well be avoided by relocating for treatment in a Florida facility.

Getting Quality Treatment

It should make sense that Florida's reputation as a top rehab destination was built on the backs of the best counselors and clinicians in the industry. These are the folks who have the talent to innovate new and better treatment modalities. As part of the addiction treatment facility selection process, everyone should be willing to do what's necessary to get access to the best treatment professionals and modalities possible.

Privacy

Dealing with addiction and getting treatment are very personal endeavors. If someone is trying to get treatment within the local community, there's an increased chance their issues will get unwanted attention. In most cases, a Florida rehab will be far enough away from home to provide a thick veil of privacy.

Treatment Environment

Anyone would be hard-pressed to find another state that has better year-round weather than Florida. Many of the state's top rehab centers sit among great ocean and lake communities. The ability for these rehab centers to offer access to exciting outdoor activities along with luxury treatment facility amenities only serves to create a great environment where the patient will hopefully feel comfortable. A relaxed patient is apt to be a responsive and motivated patient.

We encourage you to be open to the idea of relocating for treatment. If cost and convenience are your top considerations, so be it. However, you'll find you can get the best care possible in Florida, particularly from our facility. For more information about relocating for addiction treatment, you can call one of our representatives at 800-737-0933.

What Types of Insurance Will a Rehab in South Florida Take?

South Florida is one of the premier addiction treatment destinations in the world. With a tremendous concentration of top rehab centers being manned by some of the most talented addiction treatment professionals in the world, the region has been aptly named "the rehab capital of the world."

For the people who live in the area or those who are willing to travel for treatment, there are a number of great benefits to getting treatment at an elite South Florida facility. That list of benefits includes:

  • Getting access to luxury facilities located in beautiful South Florida environments
  • Rehabs located in beach and lake communities offer great amenities
  • Access to the latest and greatest addiction treatment modalities
  • For travelers, the opportunity to remove oneself from home and the potential of outside interference during treatment
  • Privacy and/or anonymity during treatment

One of the other great benefits of seeking treatment from a South Florida rehab is the region's top facilities offer variety. They offer a large menu of treatment options and they tend to accept many forms of payment to cover the costs of said treatments. Cash, savings, credit cards, facility financing, and scholarships are all commons forms of payment. However, healthcare insurance is by far the most popular and logical option. The following sections will discuss the types of insurance rehabs will typically accept and the types of treatments those insurance plans are required to cover.

Types of Insurance Florida Rehabs Will Accept

As a whole, the addiction treatment community understands the importance of accepting insurance as a payment option. There are elite luxury facilities that choose to not deal with insurance providers because it's patient base usually has the means to pay for treatment out-of-pocket.

The rest of the treatment community is generally on board with accepting insurance payments and working with insurance companies. They don't typically concern themselves with whether a policy is a PPO or HMO. That's for the patient to deal with. Instead, the addiction treatment community wants to keep its focus on helping patients take maximum advantage of the coverage a patient's policy offers.

To that end, the patient and treatment facility administrators will typically work closely to determine exactly which treatment services the patent's policy will cover and to what extent. Anything the policy doesn't cover will ultimately become the patient's responsibility.

An interesting aspect of the 2009 Affordable Care Act is it dictates the minimum treatment options each insurance carrier must cover. It doesn't necessarily dictate the extent of the coverage. As a point of reference, here's a basic list of what insurance carriers must cover. We will follow with a brief discussion of each area. The list includes:

  • Detox, including detox related medications
  • Outpatient treatment
  • Inpatient treatment for up to 90 days
  • Aftercare and relapse counseling

Detox, Including Detox Related Medications

Before a patient is going to have the maximum capacity to get through therapy, they need time to clear their substance cravings and get past any possible withdrawal issues that might occur because the patient stopped using their drug of choice. A good detox program provides a safe environment for this process. If medications, including tapering medications, are needed to help the process, insurance companies must cover those costs.

Outpatient Treatment

Healthcare insurance carriers are big proponents of outpatient care. Clearly, it's because outpatient care costs are significantly less than inpatient care. Based on this reality, it's quite common for insurance companies to cover 100% of the costs related to outpatient care.

Inpatient Treatment

Because of the high costs associated with inpatient care, most insurance companies will limit coverage to basic treatment options with a cap on the amount of money and time they will cover. Typically, the patient will be good to go for up to 90 days before coverage is restrained.

Aftercare and Relapse Counseling

Given the propensity for relapses, most insurance companies with an offer to cover the costs associated with outpatient counseling. Aftercare programs exist to make sure existing patients have the resources they will need to avoid relapses after treatment. For the insurance carrier, it's less expensive to cover aftercare counseling than it would be to cover another stint in rehab after a relapse.

If you are sick and tired of being tied to your addiction, it's time to get help. You can start the recovery process by calling our facility at 800-737-0933. Be sure to ask about our services.

Why Should You Consider a Florida Alcohol Rehab Center?

Alcoholism is a serious disease. If you are struggling with an addiction to alcohol, the sooner you get help, the better. Many people try to beat the addiction on their own. In most cases, this isn't effective. Most addicts need professional help to fight their addiction so that they can start living a happy and healthy life. Rehab facilities provide a variety of services that you cannot get if you are trying to get clean on your own.

First, trying to detox from alcohol on your own can be dangerous. If you have been a heavy drinker for years, you will need to detox while under the care of a physician. Also, rehab facilities provide one-on-one counseling. This is important so that you can get to the root of your addiction. Many addicts start drinking do so to try to mask or self-medicate a deeper issue. Unless you get to the root of what caused your addiction in the first place, there is a high risk of relapse. Rehab facilities also offer family counseling.

When you have completed your time in rehab, you are going to need a strong support system. If your addiction has put a strain on your relationships with your friends and family members, counseling is essential in improving your relationships. Also, rehab facilities offer group counseling. This is also a necessary part of the recovery process. Finally, a facility will help set up an aftercare program to keep you from relapsing. Each of these services are essential if you are going to successfully beat your addiction.

If you are ready to take the necessary steps to start fighting your addiction, you should consider a Florida alcohol rehab center. There are a few great reasons why Florida is a great place to get the help that you need.

Florida Is Famous For Being Relaxing

Trying to beat an addiction can be very difficult. During this time, you are going to feel a great deal of anxiety. To help fight this anxiety, you are going to need to find a way to relax. Fortunately, Florida is known for its relaxed, laid-back attitude. The temperature in Florida is comfortable all year long. The comfortable temperature creates a relaxing atmosphere which is essential in healing. Also, there are plenty of beaches in Florida. Taking a long walk on the beach or sitting and watching the waves are great for thinking and personal reflection.

Plenty Of Facilities To Choose From

When it comes to rehab facilities, Florida has plenty of them. There are enough facilities where you can choose the best one that meets your budgetary needs. You can also choose on based on your addiction, your need for detox and any other types of care that you think will need to successfully get clean and sober. Overall, there is a treatment facility for everyone.

A Supportive Recovery Community

Considering that there are so many rehab facilities in Florida, there is a large recovery community. If you choose to remain in Florida after you leave treatment, there are plenty of aftercare facilities to choose from. If you are going to move to a sober living house, you won't have trouble finding one that has space. There are also plenty of meetings and groups available. There are so many aftercare services available in Florida that you can start a whole new life surrounded by other sober individuals. Since community and relationships play a huge role in avoiding a relapse, Florida is the place to be.

Opportunities For the Future

When you have finished your time in a recovery facility, you will be able to start your life over. If you choose to stay in Florida, you shouldn't have much trouble finding a job. Tourism in Florida is huge, and there are plenty of fun places that are always looking for employees with all types of skill sets. Since Florida has a large recovery community, you won't need to worry about there being a stigma placed on the fact that you are a former addict. You will be judged by who you are today and not who you were in the past.

Making the decision to check yourself into a rehab facility is the first step. It is essential in fighting your addiction and avoiding relapse. The next choice that you need to make is where you are going to get the help that you need. While there are rehab facilities all over the country, facilities in Florida are the best. Between the atmosphere, the services available, and the recovery community available to you, Florida rehab facilities have more benefits than other facilities around the country. Call one of our counselors today at 800-737-0933.

Going to Drug Rehab with Your Spouse

Getting help for your addiction might be easier if both you and your spouse attend drug rehab together. One of the hardest parts of going into rehab is leaving your family. If you both decide to go, you'll be in this together and have many opportunities to spend time with each other.

Going into drug rehab can make your relationship stronger. Drugs and alcohol have probably damaged your marriage. It may be hard to know which of your problems are drug-related and which ones are related to your relationship. Recovery gives you a chance to improve your lives and improve your marriage.

Can Married Couples Go to Drug Rehab Together?

Not all facilities take couples into treatment, but many of them do. You can even find treatment centers that cater exclusively to couples. At these centers, you'll find a therapy that focuses on treating the addiction within the marriage.

Some inpatient facilities allow married couples to share a room. Others do not, but allow the spouses to spend time together. If it's important that you share a room, let the treatment center you're considering know that.

Married couples can also attend luxury treatment centers together if you have the financial capability or the insurance coverage to pay for it.

If you're going to outpatient treatment rather than inpatient drug rehab, you will either continue living at home or move to a sober living home.

Will You See Your Spouse Often If You Both Go to Couples Drug Rehab?

You and your spouse will have many opportunities to spend time together if you're both at the same drug rehab center.

  • In some facilities, you'll share a room together.
  • As a couple, you will participate in marriage counseling in addition to addiction treatment.
  • You can spend time together at mealtimes.
  • You'll enjoy social and recreational activities together.
  • You may be in the same support group or 12-step meetings.

Is Going to Drug Rehab Together a Good Idea for Married Couples?

Couples who share an addiction have a high rate of relapse. This is why some couples separate if one of them is determined to stay sober. If you want to save your marriage while you achieve sobriety, going into it together can be an excellent idea.

  • You won't have to separate from an important source of love and support in your life.
  • You can go through recovery without the fear that you'll be living with an active addict when you get home. Living with someone who's still using almost guarantees that you will relapse. It could also cause your marriage to fall apart.
  • Staying sober requires long-term changes to your way of living. If you are both working toward that goal, you can help each other when the going gets rough.
  • Going through drug rehab together will help you bond as a couple.

What Kind of Treatment Will We Receive as a Couple?

  • You will both go to medical detox separately. Each of you will be able to withdraw under medical supervision, with no withdrawal symptoms.
  • You will each receive an individualized treatment plan that focuses on your specific needs and challenges.
  • You'll have individual counseling in addition to couples counseling.
  • You'll receive couple-specific training on living a sober life after treatment.
  • Each of you will have your own primary counselor.
  • You might attend 12-step meetings together, but some addiction experts believe it's better to attend them separately. There are recovery support groups for couples that you may want to look into when you finish treatment.

What Happens After We Complete Drug Rehab?

If you are both committed to staying sober, you can find resources both individually and as a couple. There are a few sober living homes that permit married couples to move in. You might want to live there for a short time as a transition into regular life.

The couples drug rehab you attend can recommend follow-up solutions for you. Relapse rates among addicted couples are high, so it's especially important to establish your aftercare plans.

Succeed in Sobriety Together

By attending couples drug rehab, you can help each other get through the challenges of recovery. By making a commitment to sobriety and to your marriage, you can strengthen your bond and preserve your family. Get started now by calling our counselors anytime at 800-737-0933.

Should Suboxone Be Taken Forever or Just During Detox?

Given its effectiveness, Suboxone is one of the most commonly prescribed medications for those looking to overcome an opiate addiction. It's easy to understand why in light of the medication's capacity to ease withdrawal symptoms while also producing a less intense "high." Suboxone is comprised of two separate medications, Naloxone and Buprenorphine, which offer unique benefits when it comes to helping individuals break free of their addiction. As such, it is not surprising to find that many people want to continue using the Suboxone long-term. In this article, we will take a look at the consequences of long-term use and why it should be avoided.

WHAT IS SUBOXONE?

Although we touched in this briefly in the preface of the article, contains Naloxone, which is highly effective in easing the excruciating pain symptoms associated with opioid withdrawal. The medication can also be used to reverse an opioid overdose. Basically, the drug acts as an antagonist by binding to opioid receptors and blocking the transmission of opioids to the brain. Also, it prevents agonist, the chemical compound that elicits a physiological response when combined with brain receptors.

Now that we have a general understanding of the role of Naloxone, let's focus our attention on Buprenorphine. Unlike naloxone, buprenorphine works by attaching to opioid receptors and stimulating them, which makes it possible to soothe withdrawal symptoms without eliciting the same feelings of euphoria and sedation typical of other opioids.

WHAT ARE THE EFFECTS OF LONG-TERM SUBOXONE USE?

In short, long-term Suboxone usage increases the likelihood of addiction; in fact, according to a report published by SAMHSA (Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration), the misuse of Suboxone resulted in 3,000 emergency room visits in 2005 and exceeded 30,000 in 2010. Although the inclusion of Naloxone as a deterrent to abuse is effective, some individuals have found ways of bypassing this safeguard.

That said, some people have been known to vacillate between Suboxone and their primary drug of choice. Needless to say, such actions can quickly result in relapse. So why are so many people interested in long-term use even after they have undergone detox? Most likely it is for the high that is derived from the medication and to resolve any residual symptoms they may be experiencing, physical or psychological.

HOW TO TAKE SUBOXONE PROPERLY

Suboxone can be taken in a variety of ways; however, patients who undergo treatment are usually prescribed sublingual tablets, which can be dissolved under the tongue before being absorbed by the body. In addition, the medication is also available as a sublingual film; in this case, the film is placed against the interior cheek wall where it will dissolve before being absorbed by the body. That said, both variations work by releasing small doses of Suboxone over a 10-minute time frame.

Although the medication can be administered in a variety of ways, the pill form of Suboxone is a preferred choice when it comes to short-term treatment. As far as dosage is concerned, most patients will be started on a very low dose of Suboxone, usually 6 to 8 mg. This low dose allows physicians to gauge the effectiveness of the medication as well as patient tolerance. That aside, if patients abuse or abruptly stop taking Suboxone, they are usually presented with the following symptoms:

  • Muscle aches
  • Diarrhea
  • Vomiting
  • Insomnia
  • Agitation
  • Anxiety

Obviously, this is not an entire list of symptoms; however, it is a list of the ones commonly reported by current and former patients.

CONCLUSION

In summation, opioid addiction is one of the most challenging addictions for anyone to overcome. After all, the substances are highly addictive, easily accessible, and provides a feeling of euphoria that some find insatiable. While Suboxone can be helpful during the detox, long-term use should be avoided in light of the possibility of abuse, addiction, and relapse.

A more plausible alternative would be to combine short-term Suboxone use with counseling, which can include learning to cope with stress and avoiding triggers that can lead to relapse, for example. Also, it worth noting that many find the support of friends and family invaluable while they are their journey towards breaking their addiction. Call one of our counselors today at 800-737-0933.

Can You Get Drug Treatment in Florida if You Have Relapsed in the Past?

If you've been through treatment for your drug addiction and managed to stay sober for a short time before relapsing, you might think that you failed at recovery. The truth is that relapse is part of the recovery process. If you're willing to make another effort, you can go back to a drug rehabilitation center in Florida for more treatment. You can return to a rehabilitation center that you went to in the past, or you can find a new one.

Relapse rates are high for both alcoholics and drug addicts. That's why treatment centers emphasize the use of good aftercare once you've completed rehab. You might find that even with ongoing support, your addiction came back and claimed you again. That doesn't mean you have to let your addiction win. Deciding to go back for more help is not an admission of failure. It's a sign that you refuse to give up on your recovery.

Will Florida Drug Rehabilitation Centers Still Treat You If You've Relapsed in the Past?

Any drug rehabilitation will welcome you, no matter how many times you have relapsed. You'll find that you start to feel more hopeful as soon as you tell the counselors that you relapsed but you're not giving up. They are there to help, They understand that relapses are common among drug addicts.

Going back to a drug rehabilitation center is the best way to deal with a relapse.

  • You get away from the drugs and other drug users and go back to a safe space.
  • If you feel ashamed or guilty about your relapse, the addictions counselors at a rehab center can help you. Many of them are also addicts in recovery who have experience dealing with relapses.
  • You'll get more support to help you stay on track.
  • Going back to rehab is an acknowledgment that you need help. It shows that you understand the ups and downs of recovery and are still committed to your own success.
  • You won't be judged or criticized. Addiction treatment centers have seen it all before. You'll be praised for making the choice to keep yourself safe.

Going back to a Florida drug rehab center is a courageous step. You're admitting that you need more help and you're not ashamed to ask for it. You're showing that your life matters to you. Some addicts have to return to treatment several times. They're not failures. They're people who refuse to give up on themselves.

Recovery is a Bumpy Road

Addiction experts are fond of noting that recovery is a journey. You might think that it's more of a bumpy road. You get yourself clean, sober and happy and you live that way for a while. One day, it all changes in a flash and you're back using again. What happened?

You hit a bump in the road. It's a bump that every addict has stumbled over. You may have spent many years abusing drugs. You spent a long time living as a full-fledged addict. It would be nice to think that you could shake all that off in just a few months, and for some people that work, but for many people, it isn't that simple.

Why Are Relapse Rates So High?

Addiction is a powerful force. It involves physical, physiological and emotional dependence. If it were easy to get sober, there would be no drug addicts or alcoholics. Who would willingly choose to live life as an addict?

Drug treatment can get you sober and healthy for the first time in many years. Once you get clean and get out of treatment, you're surrounded by triggers. You start experiencing the stress of daily life and you start to miss the way drugs could take you away from all that. That makes it easy to have a slip that turns into a full-blown relapse.

Correct a Relapse by Getting Back into a Florida Drug Rehabilitation Center

A relapse is not the end of the road. It's just a wrong turn. You can get back on track and give yourself a better chance at recovery. You can go back to a drug rehab center in Florida whenever you need to, whether you were treated for your addiction 10 years ago or 10 days ago. If you're ready to continue your journey, call our counselors at 800-737-0933.

Does Suboxone Work – How Does Suboxone Work? What Happens in the Body When You Use Suboxone to Treat Opiate Dependence

It is hard to turn on the news without hearing stories of lives damaged by opiate addiction or ended by overdose. Many people are looking for help with this chronic condition. In recent years, Suboxone has become an important tool in the treatment of narcotic addiction. This article will explore how Suboxone works and what happens in the body when it is used as a treatment for opiate dependence.

What is Suboxone

Suboxone is a prescription treatment for opiate addiction. This medicine is a combination of two compounds, Buprenorphine and Naloxone. It is normally taken daily, either as a pill which dissolves under the tongue or as a dissolving film.

The two substances that are combined in Suboxone play different roles. Buprenorphine, itself a milder opiate, is the main active ingredient. In the brain, it attaches to the same receptors as stronger opiates, reducing cravings for the patient.

Naloxone is a compound that blocks the effects of opiates. Its primary role in Suboxone is to prevent abuse. When taken orally as directed, the drug is effective. If someone tries to take Suboxone by injection, the Naloxone will prevent the opiate from providing a high.

What does Suboxone do to your body

Suboxone acts as a treatment to step down from stronger opiates. The symptoms of withdrawal are one of the major concerns for addicts trying to quit. If someone has become physically dependent on opiates, quitting can be both a painful and anxious time. Strong cravings for another dose become all-consuming. Because Suboxone mimics the action of stronger opiates, cravings are not as strong and withdrawal not as difficult.

Suboxone contains a milder opiate, and some patients report a slight high when first taking the drug. However, because the effects are milder, and the cravings reduced, you can live a much more normal life while undergoing Suboxone treatment. In conjunction with other behavioral therapies, Suboxone can help you establish new, positive habits and get your life back together.

Are there other effects of Suboxone?

The Buprenorphine in Suboxone is a milder opiate. As such, it does have side effects similar to other opioid substances. Some reported side effects of Suboxone are

  • Constipation
  • Headache
  • Muscle ache
  • Insomnia

Another important concern with Suboxone is withdrawal. Suboxone is intended as a long-term treatment, a milder opiate taken intentionally to avoid stronger opiates, such as heroin. However, even though it is milder, there will still be a physical dependence on the drug. If you stop taking Suboxone suddenly, especially early on in the recovery process, you may experience withdrawal symptoms. For this reason, it is important to take Suboxone only under medical supervision. Over time, as the dosage lowers, you will become less dependent on the drug, perhaps one day being free of opiates altogether.

Support on a Challenging Path

Ending an opiate dependence is a difficult journey. It will take time to get clean. It will take time for your brain to reset itself. Recovery will be a great challenge, but you do not need to do it alone. Treatments like Suboxone can be a big help in getting started and continuing on the path. If you are ready to take the first step, call us at 800-737-0933.