Substance Abuse

Who Can Enroll in Florida Drug Rehab Facilities?

Even when you realize you may have a substance abuse problem, getting the help you need may seem like a challenge in itself. It can take a considerable amount of time to face up with the fact that you do suffer from addiction and, even then, you may not know exactly where to turn. While it will take some research into the various facilities in your part of Florida, you can find rehab treatment centers that are ideally suited to provide the help you need.

It’s important to realize that each facility is different, so it can take a while to determine which one is right for you. Unfortunately, some people enroll in the first facility they come across or look for the rehab center that offers the cheapest rates. This can put you at a higher risk of relapse, because these facilities may not have the resources you need to begin a sustainable recovery. So, while anyone can enroll in a Florida drug rehab facility, not every facility is ideal for any addict.

Can Anyone Enroll in Florida Drug Rehab Facilities?

If you’re concerned that your criminal history will keep you from entering a rehab program, you’re not alone. In fact, this is a concern many struggling addicts face, but it’s also a myth. Before seeking treatment, it’s common for addicts to resort to high-risk behavior, such as theft and buying drugs illegally. As a result, a large number of addicts who enter rehab are individuals with criminal records.

Another concern is finding a rehab center with other patients similar to you. In addition to offering a variety of treatment methods and resources, there are also rehab facilities that focus on treating specific types of people. For instance, some specialize in helping female drug addicts, while others focus on helping teens. In facilities that help just one type of person, that outside of that demographic won’t be allowed to enroll. This helps ensure every addict has the best possible chance for a sustained recovery.

Can Teens Voluntarily Enroll in Rehab?

Most of the time, the news media focuses on stories of teens who were admitted into rehab on an involuntary basis. In these cases, the teen’s parents commit the child into a rehab facility, so they can get help with their addiction problem. While it may not be the teen’s choice to participate in a rehab program, they’re still able to benefit from the program and they often go on to live sober and healthy lifestyles.

What about teens who recognize that they have a substance abuse problem on their own? Can they voluntarily enroll in rehab? Since the teenager is a minor, they do still need their parent’s help in enrolling. Their first step should be to discuss their substance abuse problem with their parents and explain that they want help. This can benefit the teen, because the health insurance coverage they have under their parent’s policy may help them finance their treatment needs. Once the teen discusses their need for addiction treatment with their parents, he or she can begin looking for rehab centers best suited to help in his or her situation.

Where Can Women Get Addiction Treatment?

There are drug rehab facilities of all sizes and types in each Florida community. Larger facilities may treat teens, women, and men together, or they may separate recovering addicts based on age and gender. Each facility has a different way of doing things, which is why it’s important to ask questions about the issues that concern you. If you’re a woman with a drug addiction problem and you feel intimidated by the thought of sharing recovery time with male addicts, you should seek out facilities that will keep the male and female clients separate.

There are a number of rehab facilities that are designed to only treat teen girls and women. These are ideal environments because the female addicts can feel more at ease in sharing their thoughts and feelings with others in the recovery program. This is especially helpful in terms of participating in peer-group support meetings. Often, victims of abuse are better able to focus on their recovery when they don’t have to feel fear from men who may also be in recovery. An all-female facility can be the best way for women and teen girls to get the help they need.

If you are ready to begin treatment, call us at 800-737-0933. Our experienced and compassionate counselors are available to talk to you 24 hours a day, 7 days a week. They can answer any questions you may have and help you get into the recovery program best suited to your needs.

What Kind of Licensing Do Private West Palm Beach Rehab Centers Need?

The persistent nature of dependency on drugs means that relapse is often part of the treatment process. The addiction disease continues to become prevalent each passing year, declaring it a global disaster. Fortunately, comprehensive treatment programs address these issues giving hope to addicts.

The rate of success of addiction treatment highly depends on the quality of professionalism and treatment methods at the recovery center. It’s, therefore, essential to choose an addiction treatment center that provides care based on evidence. The growing concern among many people seeking treatment for addiction is the unregulated chaos in the private drug rehab industry. There are plenty of treatment centers that might not offer sound treatment. Licensure and accreditation should help you differentiate between reputable rehab facilities from the unregulated lot. Here’s what you need to know about licensing in the rehab industry.

What is licensure?

All rehab facilities, including their therapists and medical professionals, should be licensed by the state boards. In order to receive licensure to provide rehabilitation services, a facility must adhere to certain guidelines that ensure the validity of treatment methods and the safety of the facility.

Crucial staff members, primarily counselors, therapists, and health specialists at the facility must undergo background screenings. They also must be certified by the board to handle addicts professionally. Asides from holding bachelor’s and master’s degrees in their respective disciplines, they must hold state accreditation in their specialties. Licensed rehab facilities provide their certificates upon request. If a specific facility you are interested in hesitates to present its certifications, that could be a red flag.

What kind of licenses should a rehab center have?

Certificate of need

Some states demand a Certificate of Need to operate a rehab facility. For instance, depending on the bed capacity in the facility, you might want to know if the rehab admits patients legally in accordance with the law. If the recovery center claims to offer some unique features and amenities at the center, ask them to provide the Certificate of Need to ensure that they have the permit to operate whatever special feature is on offer.

Insurance

Insurance is a crucial aspect of running any business. In the case of wrongful administering of medication, accidents, fires, and other accidents who becomes liable? If the facility is fully covered, compensations and rectification of the damages should not be a hurdle. Ensure that your preferred treatment center is insured to protect you from lengthy settlement cases in case of inflicted injuries or damages.

Business license and permits

Business licenses and permits confirm that the treatment center is operating legally. Apart from rehab centers being medical-assisted centers, most are business-oriented. Private rehab centers are particularly operated like businesses. If a rehab facility does not run on a valid business license and permit, its credibility becomes questionable.

Accreditation from rehabilitation control bodies

Certification from these authority boards confirms that the rehab center has fulfilled all base standards required to operate the facility. The organization ensures that all staff members are qualified to provide addiction treatment care. The staff members are also screened to ensure that they have the necessary licenses, certificates, and minimum qualifications. Accreditation from authority also confirms quality assurance. The body will review the quality of services and the utilization of resources at the rehab facility to guarantee the effectiveness of treatment.

An accredited rehab facility guarantees that it follows through state recommended practices that have been approved. This should increase your confidence in the treatment programs offered and improve your chances of a successful recovery.

Every license has an expiration date. Be sure to check if they are up to date. Updated and valid licenses ensure the treatment center is qualified to deliver quality services. You could verify these licenses through physical requests from the facility or through websites that outline licensed and legally operating facilities.

Lack of all these above-stated licenses drags the reputation of a treatment center through the mud. You might want to counter check all these licensure requirements before proceeding for treatment. Are you looking for a well-accredited and fully licensed operating addiction treatment center? Contact us today at 800-737-0933 to receive addiction treatment from qualified specialists at our recovery center. We are here to serve you.

How Long Does it Take to Detox From Suboxone?

How Long Does it Take to Detox From Suboxone?

Suboxone is a medication-assisted therapy used to assist in recovery from heroin and other opioid addictions. It is a combination of two medications: naproxen and buprenorphine. Buprenorphine is a low dose opioid that allows those detoxing from opioids to taper off the drug, rather than doing so abruptly, which can cause a wide range of physical symptoms and ailments, while naproxen binds to the opioid receptors in the brain blocking the high an individual would receive from the low dose of opioids in the buprenorphine.

Suboxone is typically taken for at least 90 days and, if needed, longer. Because Suboxone is an opioid itself, there can be withdrawal symptoms if the medication is stopped abruptly. If you or your loved one has taken the medication, you may be wondering, how long does it take to detox from Suboxone and what withdrawal symptoms to expect. Here is a quick guide.

What Are The Symptoms of Suboxone Withdrawal?

The symptoms of Suboxone withdrawal are very similar to those of heroin and other opioids. These symptoms can vary from person to person but typically include:

  • Difficulty concentrating
  • Headache
  • Fever/Chills
  • Depression
  • Anxiety
  • Muscle and body aches
  • Difficulty concentrating
  • Nausea and/or vomiting
  • Cravings

The severity of withdrawal typically depends on the method used to cease the medication. Abrupt cessation or “quitting cold turkey” is not encouraged as it does not give the body a chance to adjust to not having the medication. To increase the manageability of withdrawal symptoms, tapering is encouraged.

How Long Does It Take to Detox From Suboxone?

While each individual is different, it generally takes about 30 days for physical withdrawal symptoms to be alleviated. Physical withdrawal symptoms are typically at their worst during the first three days of stopping the medication and slowly start to subside after that. During the first week or two, you or your loved one may also experience insomnia or mood swings, but those too will start to dissipate with some time and should not be a problem once you hit week three or four.

It is very important to note that you or your loved one may experience intense cravings after the 30-day mark. It is especially important to remain vigilant and keep in contact with a counselor or other support system during this time due to the fact that the potential for relapse increases during this time.

How Can I or My Loved One Make Detox From Suboxone Easier?

The best thing you or your loved one can do to make detoxing from Suboxone a bit easier, both mentally and physically, is to gradually decrease the intake of the medication. Abruptly stopping Suboxone increases the risk for more severe symptoms throughout the detox. Also, making sure to be in contact with a treatment specialist and/or support group throughout the detox process will also make Suboxone detox more manageable and decrease the chance for relapse.

Detoxing from Suboxone can be difficult. The physical symptoms can wreak havoc on the body and the cravings carry the risk of relapse. Having a good detox plan in place prior to stopping Suboxone increases the likelihood of success for you or your loved one. Do you know someone who would like to quit Suboxone or would you like to quit yourself? We are here to help. Our caring and compassionate counselors are available 24/7. Give us a call at 800-737-0933.

What Are Key Signs that You or a Loved One is Becoming Addicted to Drugs or Alcohol?

Substance abuse often starts through casual use, either as a means of controlling pain or for its own enjoyment. Some people never go beyond casual use, but substance use does become a problem for others. They begin using more and more of the substance just to obtain that same level of relief. In many cases, they need to take a certain amount of the drug or alcohol just to feel normal and to be able to function in their daily lives.

This cycle of addiction doesn’t come without a unique set of symptoms and signs. Depending on the type of substance being used, those signs can vary in severity and frequency. However, there are some indications of addiction that hold true regardless of the type of substance being used. While there will likely be symptoms caused that are specific types of drugs, the symptoms mentioned here can be commonly observed in most people who suffer from addiction.

Substance Abuse Patterns

The signs and symptoms of drug or alcohol addiction may be difficult to identify at first. In fact, your inability to see a substance abuse problem in a loved one can even be one of the signs that there is an addiction problem. People suffering from addiction will often go to great lengths to hide that they are using at all. They may hide liquor or pill bottles and only use at times when they know they will be undisturbed.

Hiding substance abuse becomes more common after someone has observed that the individual might have a problem. Rather than risk another confrontation, they will hide their use of alcohol or drugs altogether. They may even learn to control their withdrawal symptoms enough that they will seem normal most of the time. However, as the addiction becomes stronger, the addict usually becomes withdrawn. He or she may avoid social encounters and may limit the time they spend with family members. This type of isolation is done partly to avoid criticism of their substance use, but also to provide more opportunities to use drugs or alcohol.

Physical Symptoms of Drug and Alcohol Addiction

Addiction causes chemical changes in the brain and, over a longer period of time, the brain relies on the drug or alcohol to maintain that altered state. This is why many addicts fail when they try to quit on their own. The brain and central nervous system rely on the substance to operate normally by this stage in the addiction, so a sudden absence of the drug or alcohol causes intense cravings. The cravings often become so strong that, when the addict does relapse, he or she uses larger and more frequent doses to compensate.

While you may not notice cravings, there are other common symptoms of withdrawal that you can observe. In people suffering from a stronger addiction, these symptoms may be observable even in a short time between doses.

  • Frequent nausea and vomiting
  • Red or watery eyes
  • Insomnia (lack of sleep) or hypersomnia (too much sleep)
  • Fatigue

Behavioral Changes Caused By Drug and Alcohol Addiction

You may also notice behavioral changes, which can be caused by substance abuse or by a desire to continue using. For instance, tardiness to school or work is common among struggling addicts. They may also miss days entirely, either because they overused the substance the night before, or because they’re going through withdrawal as a result of being out of the drug or alcohol. These attendance problems often worsen over time, until they are either suspended from school or fired from their job.

A strong indication that a loved one is suffering from addiction is that their overall appearance has changed. Since they have withdrawn from most social activities, they may no longer care about their appearance. It’s common for an addict to stop bathing, brush their teeth infrequently, and stop conducting other personal hygiene rituals. They may also wear the same clothes for days or weeks at a time. In itself, this may not be the result of drug addiction, but, when coupled with other signs, it could indicate a substance abuse problem.

If you do suspect a loved one may be struggling with addiction, consulting experienced counselors may help you. When you call 800-737-0933, our counselors can provide you with guidance and resources that will help you talk with your loved one about their addiction. This is the first step in getting your loved one the addiction treatment they need to recover and begin a healthier way of life.

Can Long Term Rehabs Help Me if I Have Substance Abuse Issues and PTSD?

Many people who are suffering from the disease of addiction have had some sort of trauma in their life. Trauma can affect you in a variety of ways and cause different issues with your mental health, and in order to cope, you may have turned to drugs or alcohol. As you’ve already learned, the drugs or alcohol only make your problems even worse, but you can recover. Going to a long-term treatment program can help you overcome your addiction as well as your symptoms of PTSD.

PTSD is a serious mental health issue that affects many people, and if it’s resulted in you turning to drugs or alcohol, you’re not alone. A long-term treatment center that specializes in dual diagnosis treatment is going to be able to help you with your PTSD as well as your addiction. Through individual therapy, you’re going to be able to talk through your trauma and begin healing. You’ll also see how beneficial the support of others can be for your recovery, which can help you maintain long-term sobriety.

How PTSD Leads to Addiction

While many people who struggle with PTSD are veterans of war or first responders like police officers, EMTs, and others, you can develop PTSD for other reasons as well. If you’ve been the victim of verbal, physical or emotional abuse, this can be extremely traumatizing as well. Trauma is different for everyone, and some people develop the symptoms of PTSD after a life-threatening accident or the loss of a loved one. If you’re struggling with the symptoms of PTSD, you may experience the following:

  • Severe anxiety
  • Flashbacks
  • Intense fear
  • Insomnia or nightmares
  • Emotional detachment or unwanted thoughts

All of these symptoms as well as more can also lead to symptoms of depression and cause you to isolate. Unfortunately, due to the symptoms, you may have trained your brain to turn to alcohol or drugs as a way to cope with these issues. The problem is that drugs and alcohol only make your PTSD, depression, and anxiety much worse. This is why you need to go to a long-term recovery program in order to learn a better way of living.

Individual Therapy for PTSD

Trauma can happen at any age, and it causes the brain to change in a variety of ways. The limbic system in your brain is constantly trying to keep you safe, and when you experience a traumatic event, your limbic system goes on high alert. The way the brain tries to protect you is by giving you a variety of triggers to try and keep you safe, but this can cause your life to become unmanageable. In order to recover, you’ll need to go through therapy to work through your trauma.

In many cases, your trauma still has such power over you because you’ve never been able to process what’s happened to you. Revisiting your traumatic experience can be scary, but you won’t be doing it alone. When you’re working with a therapist, they’ll be right there with you to process your trauma and help you begin the healing process. As you talk through your trauma, your brain begins to start healing, and your traumatic experience begins to lose its power over you, which is going to help you with your sobriety.

Group Support for Trauma Survivors

If you’re a survivor of trauma and are struggling with an addiction to drugs or alcohol, you’re not alone. When you’re struggling with addiction and trauma, you might feel extremely alone and as if nobody understands, but you’ll see that this isn’t true when you’re in long-term inpatient rehab. You’re going to meet others who have experienced trauma and are also trying to overcome their addiction. The people you meet in treatment will be there to relate to your experience and provide you with the support you need. Some of the relationships you build in treatment are going to last you for years to come after your discharge as you continue to support one another in your recovery.

If you’re ready to overcome your addiction and trauma, we’re a dual diagnosis treatment program located in South Beach, Florida. We proudly serve the people of South Beach as well as many other clients who come in from places like New Jersey, Maryland and other places in the Northeast. We have a team of addiction and trauma specialists who can help you begin on the path of sobriety, so give us a call today at 800-737-0933.

Can a Christian Drug Rehab Help Me Reconnect with God?

If you’re looking for a quality drug rehabilitation center for yourself or a loved one, there are several factors to consider. The principles and tactics that the facility implements to effectively treat patients can help you determine which rehab center is right for you. If you’d prefer to receive drug rehabilitation at a Christian facility, here are a few things you can expect from the process.

Spiritual and Physical Healing

When a person enters rehab, the staff members may have to take special measures to remove all harmful substances from the addict’s body. Removal methods could include pumping the addict’s stomach and/or providing medications in liquid or pill form that will expel drugs or alcohol from the system. During this process, the staff may pray among themselves before each phase of treatment for the skill and insight to properly treat the addict. Employees may also pray with and for the addict during this phase of treatment if the addict is willing to receive prayer. While addiction specialists do need to be trained and educated in their fields of study, specialists who are Christians believe that they won’t be able to be as effective in their jobs without the leading and power of God.

Increasing Self Esteem

Christian rehab centers often focus on increasing the self-esteem of addicts. During counseling and therapy sessions, professionals may emphasize the notion that God wants the best for all humanity. Addicts will also learn how much God cherishes them and wants them to live a free and healthy life. Explaining this to addicts can increase their self-esteem and make them feel more valued. Spiritual lessons, testimonies from former addicts and Christian literature and Bible verses are often used in addiction treatment at Christian facilities to help addicts understand how much God loves them.

Addiction counselors are also trained to assess the factors that lead addicts to use harmful substances. This means that therapy sessions can help addicts determine whether they are using drugs due to family issues or genetic tendency toward addiction. Uncovering these issues can help therapists create effective treatment plans.

Rejuvenating The Body

Christians believe that their bodies are the temple of the Holy Spirit, which is why many Christian teachings advise against the use of drugs and alcohol. At a Christian rehabilitation center, addicts will likely learn how to care for their bodies according to Biblical scriptures. There are several passages in the Bible that mention specific foods and herbs, and science has proven that these foods due to having a positive effect on human health.

Addicts may be assigned a diet plan or guidelines that includes a wealth of fresh fruits and vegetables and healthy proteins that will restore the body and increase physical strength and mental clarity. Regular exercise can also be a viable part of addiction recovery. Working out every day can increase endorphins to boost the mood and reduce the effects of anxiety and depression, which are mental illnesses that can often lead to drug addiction. Meditation, which can include learning more about the Bible and centering one’s thoughts can accelerate recovery for many addicts as well.

Life After Rehab

Most Christian rehab facilities emphasize the notion that drug and alcohol rehabilitation is an ongoing process. Just because an addict completes rehabilitation doesn’t mean that he/she will never be tempted to use alcohol or drugs again. The right Christian rehab program will provide addicts with resources that allow them to connect with their spirituality and renew their confidence in themselves. This may be especially necessary shortly after rehab or during times of extreme stress or sadness. Addicts should be able to get in touch with Christian counselors, clergy members and other former addicts who are leading successful lives so they can receive encouragement or prayer during all phases of recovery. Forming bonds with these people an also reduce the chances that the addict will only use these resources when he/she is in dire straits. Regular communication with addiction counselors and former addicts who have a strong belief in God can help addicts receive the strength they need to maintain sobriety.

We’re here to help you get on the road to recovery. Give us a call today 800-737-0933.

What Are the Pain Medications that Most Often Form Habits?

Chronic pain can be quite distressing. Many people go to the doctor’s office to get help for their ongoing struggle. One of the best ways to combat discomfort is with opioid pain-relieving medications. Unfortunately, these medications are very addictive and can easily be misused. It’s important to know what drugs to use and which ones to avoid should you ever be faced with agonizing pain that won’t go away.

How Do Pain Relievers Becoming Habit-Forming?

While pain can ruin your life, taking a drug that you can become addicted to will do the same. Even if you take a medication as it’s prescribed, you can still quickly develop a habit. When the medications enter the bloodstream, they block pain receptors. Not only does the discomfort subside, but many get a euphoric feeling too. It’s that sensation that people want to experience again and again.

Many are shocked to discover that the misuse of pain medications is the number one form of drug abuse in America. It can happen because a doctor prescribed something too strong, prescribed too much, or prescribed them for too long of a period. Another common factor is that the person had a predisposition to addiction, and they didn’t know the drug would affect them this way.

The Opioid Crisis Intensifies

The number of people addicted to opioids continues to rise. When the doctors stop prescribing, and the supply runs dry, then people turn to the black market to find a compatible solution.

Shockingly, as many as eight out of 12 people that are prescribed an opioid pain reliever will become addicted, and four of those 12 people will use heroin as their drug of choice. Is it any wonder that more than 115 people die each day in this country from drugs? While efforts are in place to reduce the number of opioid prescriptions, the problem has become so out of control that it has little effect.

The Most Addictive Painkillers

As your body adjusts to the medication, you will need more to get the same effects. What was once therapeutic has crossed the lines into an addiction. Many painkillers can become addictive, but here are the top ten:

•OxyContin
•Oxymorphone
•Demerol
•Fentanyl
•Dilaudid
•Hydrocodone
•Percocet
•Codeine
•Morphine
•Methadone

Signs of Addiction

Though these medicines are prescribed for legitimate reasons, they should be used with caution. How do you know if being properly medicated is turning into an addiction, well it can start as simple as not feeling the same benefits from the smaller dose, so you adjust the amount you take to enhance your experience.

If you are taking more than prescribed, then it’s is a significant warning sign. Another thing you may notice is that you feel like you always need to have the drug with you. It becomes a safety net, and you can’t live without it.

You may find yourself calling the doctor’s office asking for more medication because you’ve used more than the allotted amount. Medical centers are very wise to drug-seeking behaviors, and they will stop giving these medications to anyone displaying concerning signs. If you have asked friends or family if they had any opioid prescriptions, or have turned to the black market, then you know the problem is getting out of control.

How long it takes to become addicted to a pain killer? The answer varies depending on the person, the amount their taking, and other genetic factors. However, you can build a tolerance to the drug in as little as eight days. The longer you take the medication and the higher the amount you take can all impact these timelines.

Some folks say they develop an addiction after the first dose, and others can take them for a month or more without issue.

Knowing When To Get Help

If you’ve seen any of these signs, and you use prescription opioids, then you need to get help. You cannot simply stop taking these medications safely. You need the help and support of a medical rehabilitation center that is trained in the detox process from these harsh drugs.

South Florida is the perfect area to get clean. You are surrounded by Mother Nature and the loving care of a staff that knows what you’re going through. Each team member is strategically placed to enhance your visit and help you get better. If you realize that you have an addiction to opioids, and you’re ready to get help, then call today at 800-737-0933. Our support staff is standing by 24/7 waiting for you!

How Long Does a Dose of Suboxone Work?

What is Suboxone?

Buprenorphine/Naloxone, also known as Suboxone, is an opioid medication used for assisting people who have an addiction to opioids. Brand names of Suboxone also include Bunavial, Zubsolv, and Cassipa. Suboxone uses a blend of buprenorphine and naloxone to assist people in drug withdrawal. When combined with treatment and therapy, Suboxone works well to help addicts get off opioids.

How long does a dose of Suboxone work?

Suboxone begins working soon after it dissolves under a person’s tongue or on their cheek. Most people take one dose of Suboxone as a film dissolved on the tongue. One does get taken every day as directed by a person’s physician.

What does Suboxone do to treat people?

Buprenorphine/naloxone works in the brain to get people addicted to opioids off these drugs. Some of the medicines that Suboxone substitutes for include:

• Heroin.
• Fentanyl.
• Hydrocodone.
• Oxycodone.
• Morphine.

Buprenorphine partially works like an opioid because it is a partial opioid antagonist. It works weaker than full antagonists like methadone and heroin. The opioid effects level off even when dosages increase, reducing the risk of side effects, dependency, and misuse. Suboxone lowers the full impact of opioids, so it helps people addicted to opioids abstain from taking an excess of opioid drugs.

Naloxone, another component in Suboxone, blocks opioid effects when it gets dissolved in a person’s mouth. If naloxone gets injected instead of taken orally, the person taking the drug becomes very ill when they experience withdrawal symptoms. This detail discourages individuals from injecting Suboxone. Suboxone works best, along with counseling and other types of rehabilitation support.

What are the symptoms of opioid dependence?

• Some of the signs of opioid addiction might include:
• An inability to stop using opioids even though they cause relationship and health problems.
• Needing to take more opioids to get the same effect.
• Having withdrawal symptoms when you can’t get the opioids.
• Giving up previously enjoyable activities to use the drug.
• Spending a lot of time finding a way to use drugs.

Signs of withdrawal from opioids include:
• Runny nose.
• Sweating.
• Shaking.
• Nausea and vomiting.
• Diarrhea.
• Achy body.
• Irritability.
• Irritability.

What shouldn’t you do when you take Suboxone?

Don’t start taking Suboxone early. Wait to take it until your doctor instructs you to, or you may have withdrawal symptoms. If you’re pregnant or if there’s a chance you’re pregnant, tell your doctor before you start Suboxone therapy. Continue taking Suboxone for the entire time that your doctor instructs. Follow all instructions about reducing Suboxone levels when it becomes time to stop taking the drug. Don’t miss doses, as this action might cause you to relapse. Suddenly stopping Suboxone for any reason might cause unpleasant withdrawal symptoms. Some antibiotics don’t work well with Suboxone, so let your health care provider know that you’re taking this medication. Take this medication following the instructions provided for you. Don’t take any other drugs with Suboxone unless you have your doctor’s permission.
Can I become addicted to Suboxone?
Yes, addiction remains a possibility when taking this drug. As long as you follow medication instructions, you should be gradually weaned from Suboxone over time.

When Suboxone is used as prescribed and under a doctor’s supervision, the medication works well to help people safely get off opioids. You must follow the doctor’s instructions to achieve the desired effects without addiction, however. If you suddenly stop taking Suboxone, you will have withdrawal symptoms. So please consult your doctor before you quit taking Suboxone.

This prescription is a controlled substance (CIII) and is regulated by the government. Some individuals who use street drugs or who abuse prescription drugs might want your drugs. Selling or giving Suboxone to someone else remains against the law. Using Suboxone in ways other than prescribed can cause addiction. Taking this medication via injection increases your chances of addiction.

Taking Suboxone might get you off opioids for good. But for them to work correctly, you have to follow the instructions to get the right benefits. If you find that you can’t get off Suboxone when it comes time to start tapering off the drug, you need to ask for help. We can help you stay off opioids and Suboxone, too. Please contact our office right away at 1-234-456-7890 for more information and a consultation with our specialists.

How Can the Marchman Act Help Me Get Treatment for My Loved One?

Far too many people know how painful it is to watch a loved one struggle with an addiction to drugs or alcohol. For some friends and family members, the pain is very personal because they have suffered collateral damage at the hands of their loved one’s addiction. The problem is it’s difficult for family members to exert any influence over a loved one who is unwilling to admit they are dealing with the cycle of addiction.

Family members can only hope there will come a time when their addicted loved one comes to the realization there’s a problem. At that point, there’s hope the addiction sufferer will finally reach out for help. Short of that happening, the only other recourse family and friends might have is an intervention. Sometimes interventions work and sometimes they don’t. If an intervention fails, loved ones don’t have the option of putting a gun to their addicted loved one’s head to drag them into rehab.

With all that said, there is a law in Florida that empowers family members to force a loved one into rehab if they can establish the loved one’s addiction makes the loved one danger to themselves or to others. The name of that law is the “Marchman Act.” FYI: The Marchman Act is officially listed as the “Hal S. Marchman Alcohol and Other Drug Services Act of 1993”.

At this point, we would like to engage in further discussion about the Marchman Act and how it works.

Using the Marchman Act to Get a Loved One Into Rehab

Before we begin this discussion, it seems prudent to point out something that should be evident. Contrary to some people’s beliefs, using the Matchman to have a loved one involuntarily placed in an addiction treatment facility is not an adversarial action. In many cases, it is being done out of legitimate love and concern for the addicted family member.

Think about it for a moment. An individual is trying to survive life caught up in a substantial addiction to drugs or alcohol. Their life is crumbling before their very eyes. Maybe they are homeless or dealing with financial, health and relationship problems. They won’t seek help because they either don’t want help, don’t believe they have an addiction or have given up hope. Left to their own devices, there’s real potential these kinds of addiction sufferers are headed down the road towards prison, insanity or even death. What kind of a relative or friend would just stand by and let that happen?

The Marchman Act exists for this very reason. It’s not a blanket option for family members to exercise in order to remove an unwanted nuisance from their own lives. Like any other restrictive law on the books, a family member has to show just cause that their addicted loved one poses a real danger to themselves or others. Making that claim has to be adjudicated in a court of law.

Reasons Marchman Act Can Be Exercised

Remember, a family member has to show just cause as to why their loved one should be involuntarily subjected to addiction treatment. The first qualification is the addiction sufferer must show a high level of impairment whether sober or not. If they are impaired, it becomes reasonable to assume they don’t have the capacity for taking proper care of themselves or making good judgments. They have basically lost the ability to control their lives.

The other reason why the courts might exercise the Marchman act is if the family member can show that their loved one has made threats or is a danger to others. Under the influence of a substance, any signs of aggression should be given extra scrutiny.

The Process
If a family member makes the decision to attempt to have the courts invoke the Marchman Act on their loved one, there’s a very specific process the family member must follow. Here are the steps in order:

  • Petition the court with a sworn affidavit
  • A court hearing is held for involuntary assessment
  • The defendant is held for up to five days for medical and mental health evaluation
  • If found impaired, the court will issue order for involuntary treatment of up to 60 days
  • If the defendant refuses, they are held in civil contempt of court

If you have concerns about the welfare of an addicted loved one living in Florida, we would like to offer our addiction treatment services. If you need help with the process, you can contact us at 800-737-0933.

Will an Alcohol Rehab in West Palm Beach Help You Keep Your Job?

Current data shows that Florida has a significant problem when it comes to substance abuse. To help put this into context, the National Institute on Drug abuse (NIDDA) reports that there were over 3,000 overdose deaths in the sunshine state in 2016. It is important to note that the city of West Palm Beach has seen its fair share of drug-related deaths stemming from synthetic opioids, which accounted for nearly 2,000 deaths in 2016. Also worth noting, underage drinking is 4 percent higher than the national average in Palm Beach County. Lastly, more than 4,000 DUI arrests are made in the county every year.

Given these statistics, it is not unreasonable to conclude that alcoholism is just as big a problem in Palm Beach County as drug abuse. While many people have decided to seek help for their addiction to alcohol, some are still reluctant to get the help that they need and have cited fear of losing their job as the primary reason. In this article, we will take a look at the federal laws that are designed to protect not only your privacy but also your job while you work toward overcoming your addiction to alcohol.

WHY YOU SHOULD DISCLOSE YOUR PROBLEM WITH ALCOHOL TO YOUR EMPLOYER

While the fear of losing your job as a result of opening up about your addiction is understandable, not taking steps to conquer your addiction could lead to subpar work performance, which could potentially lead to termination anyway. Once you have made up your mind to seek help for your addiction, most rehab programs will advise you of your rights under the Family and Medical Leave Act (FMLA) and also the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA).

These federal laws are in place to protect your job should you need a leave of absence due to health reasons. And yes, substance abuse qualifies as a serious health condition under FMLA. The Americans with Disabilities Act provides you with some recourse in the event that you’re terminated while seeking help for your addiction. For example, if your termination was based on your decision to seek help for an addiction, you can file a lawsuit against your employer for discrimination under the ADA.

HOW CAN A ALCOHOL REHAB PROGRAM HELP YOU KEEP YOUR JOB?

Most alcohol and drug treatment programs can assist you in gathering any information that you will need relative to your treatment that you can then give to your employer. They may also be able to help with your Return-to-Work Agreement (RTWA) after you have completed your treatment. These agreements outline what employers will be expecting from an employee once he or she returns to work following the completion of an alcohol rehab program. However, this is usually the end of their involvement. Generally speaking, it is a good idea to work with your employer’s human resources department to confirm that they are required to follow FMLA guidelines as smaller companies with fewer than 15 employees are not required to do so. The same also applies to ADA as well.

WHAT YOU SHOULD KNOW BEFORE SEEKING TREATMENT FOR ALCOHOL ABUSE

Assuming your employer is required to follow ADA and FMLA guidelines based on their employee count and other criteria, you will want to familiarize yourself with your company’s policies as they relate to drug and alcohol abuse. For example, if you have an accident at work while under the influence, FMLA and ADA may not apply. In most cases, you will also need to have a letter from a licensed physician stating that your addiction constitutes a serious health condition under FMLA. While this may all seem daunting, taking these steps will ensure you can keep your job while getting the help that you need to overcome your addiction. Furthermore, these procedures are also in place to help employers as well. According to drugabuse.gov, substance abuse costs the U.S. more than $700 billion in lost revenue each year, most of which is attributed to a loss of productivity, healthcare costs, and injuries in the workplace.

WILL YOUR EMPLOYER PROTECT YOUR PRIVACY?

One of the biggest concerns that most people have when it comes to opening up about their addiction is that their struggles will become the subject of gossip in the workplace. Assuming that your employer is required to follow FMLA and ADA guidelines, your privacy will be protected. However, most employers already have policies in place that are designed to protect sensitive employee information. That said, if you’re ready to overcome your addiction to alcohol, consider speaking with one of our friendly and knowledgeable representatives today at 800-737-0933.