Substance Abuse

How Long Does a Dose of Suboxone Work?

What is Suboxone?

Buprenorphine/Naloxone, also known as Suboxone, is an opioid medication used for assisting people who have an addiction to opioids. Brand names of Suboxone also include Bunavial, Zubsolv, and Cassipa. Suboxone uses a blend of buprenorphine and naloxone to assist people in drug withdrawal. When combined with treatment and therapy, Suboxone works well to help addicts get off opioids.

How long does a dose of Suboxone work?

Suboxone begins working soon after it dissolves under a person’s tongue or on their cheek. Most people take one dose of Suboxone as a film dissolved on the tongue. One does get taken every day as directed by a person’s physician.

What does Suboxone do to treat people?

Buprenorphine/naloxone works in the brain to get people addicted to opioids off these drugs. Some of the medicines that Suboxone substitutes for include: • Heroin. • Fentanyl. • Hydrocodone. • Oxycodone. • Morphine. Buprenorphine partially works like an opioid because it is a partial opioid antagonist. It works weaker than full antagonists like methadone and heroin. The opioid effects level off even when dosages increase, reducing the risk of side effects, dependency, and misuse. Suboxone lowers the full impact of opioids, so it helps people addicted to opioids abstain from taking an excess of opioid drugs. Naloxone, another component in Suboxone, blocks opioid effects when it gets dissolved in a person’s mouth. If naloxone gets injected instead of taken orally, the person taking the drug becomes very ill when they experience withdrawal symptoms. This detail discourages individuals from injecting Suboxone. Suboxone works best, along with counseling and other types of rehabilitation support.

What are the symptoms of opioid dependence?

• Some of the signs of opioid addiction might include: • An inability to stop using opioids even though they cause relationship and health problems. • Needing to take more opioids to get the same effect. • Having withdrawal symptoms when you can’t get the opioids. • Giving up previously enjoyable activities to use the drug. • Spending a lot of time finding a way to use drugs. Signs of withdrawal from opioids include: • Runny nose. • Sweating. • Shaking. • Nausea and vomiting. • Diarrhea. • Achy body. • Irritability. • Irritability.

What shouldn’t you do when you take Suboxone?

Don’t start taking Suboxone early. Wait to take it until your doctor instructs you to, or you may have withdrawal symptoms. If you’re pregnant or if there’s a chance you’re pregnant, tell your doctor before you start Suboxone therapy. Continue taking Suboxone for the entire time that your doctor instructs. Follow all instructions about reducing Suboxone levels when it becomes time to stop taking the drug. Don’t miss doses, as this action might cause you to relapse. Suddenly stopping Suboxone for any reason might cause unpleasant withdrawal symptoms. Some antibiotics don’t work well with Suboxone, so let your health care provider know that you’re taking this medication. Take this medication following the instructions provided for you. Don’t take any other drugs with Suboxone unless you have your doctor’s permission. Can I become addicted to Suboxone? Yes, addiction remains a possibility when taking this drug. As long as you follow medication instructions, you should be gradually weaned from Suboxone over time. When Suboxone is used as prescribed and under a doctor’s supervision, the medication works well to help people safely get off opioids. You must follow the doctor’s instructions to achieve the desired effects without addiction, however. If you suddenly stop taking Suboxone, you will have withdrawal symptoms. So please consult your doctor before you quit taking Suboxone. This prescription is a controlled substance (CIII) and is regulated by the government. Some individuals who use street drugs or who abuse prescription drugs might want your drugs. Selling or giving Suboxone to someone else remains against the law. Using Suboxone in ways other than prescribed can cause addiction. Taking this medication via injection increases your chances of addiction. Taking Suboxone might get you off opioids for good. But for them to work correctly, you have to follow the instructions to get the right benefits. If you find that you can’t get off Suboxone when it comes time to start tapering off the drug, you need to ask for help. We can help you stay off opioids and Suboxone, too. Please contact our office right away at 1-234-456-7890 for more information and a consultation with our specialists.

How Can the Marchman Act Help Me Get Treatment for My Loved One?

Far too many people know how painful it is to watch a loved one struggle with an addiction to drugs or alcohol. For some friends and family members, the pain is very personal because they have suffered collateral damage at the hands of their loved one's addiction. The problem is it's difficult for family members to exert any influence over a loved one who is unwilling to admit they are dealing with the cycle of addiction. Family members can only hope there will come a time when their addicted loved one comes to the realization there's a problem. At that point, there's hope the addiction sufferer will finally reach out for help. Short of that happening, the only other recourse family and friends might have is an intervention. Sometimes interventions work and sometimes they don't. If an intervention fails, loved ones don't have the option of putting a gun to their addicted loved one's head to drag them into rehab. With all that said, there is a law in Florida that empowers family members to force a loved one into rehab if they can establish the loved one's addiction makes the loved one danger to themselves or to others. The name of that law is the "Marchman Act." FYI: The Marchman Act is officially listed as the "Hal S. Marchman Alcohol and Other Drug Services Act of 1993". At this point, we would like to engage in further discussion about the Marchman Act and how it works.

Using the Marchman Act to Get a Loved One Into Rehab

Before we begin this discussion, it seems prudent to point out something that should be evident. Contrary to some people's beliefs, using the Matchman to have a loved one involuntarily placed in an addiction treatment facility is not an adversarial action. In many cases, it is being done out of legitimate love and concern for the addicted family member. Think about it for a moment. An individual is trying to survive life caught up in a substantial addiction to drugs or alcohol. Their life is crumbling before their very eyes. Maybe they are homeless or dealing with financial, health and relationship problems. They won't seek help because they either don't want help, don't believe they have an addiction or have given up hope. Left to their own devices, there's real potential these kinds of addiction sufferers are headed down the road towards prison, insanity or even death. What kind of a relative or friend would just stand by and let that happen? The Marchman Act exists for this very reason. It's not a blanket option for family members to exercise in order to remove an unwanted nuisance from their own lives. Like any other restrictive law on the books, a family member has to show just cause that their addicted loved one poses a real danger to themselves or others. Making that claim has to be adjudicated in a court of law.

Reasons Marchman Act Can Be Exercised

Remember, a family member has to show just cause as to why their loved one should be involuntarily subjected to addiction treatment. The first qualification is the addiction sufferer must show a high level of impairment whether sober or not. If they are impaired, it becomes reasonable to assume they don't have the capacity for taking proper care of themselves or making good judgments. They have basically lost the ability to control their lives. The other reason why the courts might exercise the Marchman act is if the family member can show that their loved one has made threats or is a danger to others. Under the influence of a substance, any signs of aggression should be given extra scrutiny. The Process If a family member makes the decision to attempt to have the courts invoke the Marchman Act on their loved one, there's a very specific process the family member must follow. Here are the steps in order:
  • Petition the court with a sworn affidavit
  • A court hearing is held for involuntary assessment
  • The defendant is held for up to five days for medical and mental health evaluation
  • If found impaired, the court will issue order for involuntary treatment of up to 60 days
  • If the defendant refuses, they are held in civil contempt of court
If you have concerns about the welfare of an addicted loved one living in Florida, we would like to offer our addiction treatment services. If you need help with the process, you can contact us at 800-737-0933.

Will an Alcohol Rehab in West Palm Beach Help You Keep Your Job?

Current data shows that Florida has a significant problem when it comes to substance abuse. To help put this into context, the National Institute on Drug abuse (NIDDA) reports that there were over 3,000 overdose deaths in the sunshine state in 2016. It is important to note that the city of West Palm Beach has seen its fair share of drug-related deaths stemming from synthetic opioids, which accounted for nearly 2,000 deaths in 2016. Also worth noting, underage drinking is 4 percent higher than the national average in Palm Beach County. Lastly, more than 4,000 DUI arrests are made in the county every year. Given these statistics, it is not unreasonable to conclude that alcoholism is just as big a problem in Palm Beach County as drug abuse. While many people have decided to seek help for their addiction to alcohol, some are still reluctant to get the help that they need and have cited fear of losing their job as the primary reason. In this article, we will take a look at the federal laws that are designed to protect not only your privacy but also your job while you work toward overcoming your addiction to alcohol.

WHY YOU SHOULD DISCLOSE YOUR PROBLEM WITH ALCOHOL TO YOUR EMPLOYER

While the fear of losing your job as a result of opening up about your addiction is understandable, not taking steps to conquer your addiction could lead to subpar work performance, which could potentially lead to termination anyway. Once you have made up your mind to seek help for your addiction, most rehab programs will advise you of your rights under the Family and Medical Leave Act (FMLA) and also the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA). These federal laws are in place to protect your job should you need a leave of absence due to health reasons. And yes, substance abuse qualifies as a serious health condition under FMLA. The Americans with Disabilities Act provides you with some recourse in the event that you're terminated while seeking help for your addiction. For example, if your termination was based on your decision to seek help for an addiction, you can file a lawsuit against your employer for discrimination under the ADA.

HOW CAN A ALCOHOL REHAB PROGRAM HELP YOU KEEP YOUR JOB?

Most alcohol and drug treatment programs can assist you in gathering any information that you will need relative to your treatment that you can then give to your employer. They may also be able to help with your Return-to-Work Agreement (RTWA) after you have completed your treatment. These agreements outline what employers will be expecting from an employee once he or she returns to work following the completion of an alcohol rehab program. However, this is usually the end of their involvement. Generally speaking, it is a good idea to work with your employer's human resources department to confirm that they are required to follow FMLA guidelines as smaller companies with fewer than 15 employees are not required to do so. The same also applies to ADA as well.

WHAT YOU SHOULD KNOW BEFORE SEEKING TREATMENT FOR ALCOHOL ABUSE

Assuming your employer is required to follow ADA and FMLA guidelines based on their employee count and other criteria, you will want to familiarize yourself with your company's policies as they relate to drug and alcohol abuse. For example, if you have an accident at work while under the influence, FMLA and ADA may not apply. In most cases, you will also need to have a letter from a licensed physician stating that your addiction constitutes a serious health condition under FMLA. While this may all seem daunting, taking these steps will ensure you can keep your job while getting the help that you need to overcome your addiction. Furthermore, these procedures are also in place to help employers as well. According to drugabuse.gov, substance abuse costs the U.S. more than $700 billion in lost revenue each year, most of which is attributed to a loss of productivity, healthcare costs, and injuries in the workplace.

WILL YOUR EMPLOYER PROTECT YOUR PRIVACY?

One of the biggest concerns that most people have when it comes to opening up about their addiction is that their struggles will become the subject of gossip in the workplace. Assuming that your employer is required to follow FMLA and ADA guidelines, your privacy will be protected. However, most employers already have policies in place that are designed to protect sensitive employee information. That said, if you're ready to overcome your addiction to alcohol, consider speaking with one of our friendly and knowledgeable representatives today at 800-737-0933.

How Strict Are the Rules in Long Term Rehab?

When you are considering entering a rehab center because you recognize that things have begun to spin out of control due to an addiction, you might naturally have a number of questions. For instance, you might wonder how strict the rules are in long term rehab. It should be kept in mind that the goal of attending a long-term rehab is to help you or your loved one get sober and develop the skills necessary to maintain that sobriety even after you leave treatment. For this reason, there are certain rules that you will need to adhere to while you are in treatment. Those rules are designed to help you focus on your treatment and put destructive behaviors behind you so that you will have the best chances possible for sustained recovery. The specific rules you will need to follow will likely vary according to the long-term rehab facility you attend. With that said, there are typically basic rules that clients can be expected to follow in most such facilities. Your ability to follow these rules will make a significant difference in improving your chances of maintaining your recovery.

What Rules Should You Expect in Long-Term Rehab?

If you or someone you care about is ready to enter a long-term rehab center, you should know that most of the rules in rehab facilities are put in place to discourage any type of behavior that might be a detriment to your recovery. First and foremost, you will be expected to refrain from using any type of drug or alcohol while you are in treatment. In the event that you require medication, experienced staff at the facility will provide doses to you. Under no circumstances will you be allowed to retain any type of medication or drug in your possession. This includes over-the-counter medications. Furthermore, you will not be allowed to maintain possession of any type of product that might contain potentially harmful substances, including mouthwash that contains alcohol. There are also restrictions regarding any type of activity that might detract your attention from therapy and recovery. This includes limiting the amount of television you are able to watch. You will also be restricted from using smartphones and other devices that might discourage you from giving your full attention to therapy. While telephones may be available at the rehab facility, your access to the telephones may be restricted and limited to only certain times. During your time in rehab, you should expect to attend: • Therapy sessions • Nutritional counseling • Cognitive behavioral counseling

Rules Regarding Visitors and Relationships in Long-Term Rehab

While you are attending long-term rehab, you should also be aware that you will not be allowed to engage in any relationship of a romantic nature with other clients. Although it is completely understandable that you may form friendships with other clients while you are going through treatment, romantic relationships are discouraged and could even be the basis for being dismissed from treatment. It is crucial that you be able to give your full attention to your treatment and recovery. You may be allowed to receive visitors while you are in treatment, but visitation hours are typically limited. Additionally, you should be aware that you will not be able to come and go from the facility as you please.

Rules Regarding Schedules in Long-Term Rehab

Long-term rehab facilities also typically institute rules regarding the daily schedules of clients. The structure is critically important to the rehabilitation process. For this reason, it is vital that you learn to develop and stick to schedules. In order to assist you with this, the facility will likely have rules in place regarding when you get up in the morning, when you attend therapy when you eat, and even when you go to bed. While such rules might seem to be quite strict, try to keep in mind that they are intended for your benefit. If you have not been accustomed to following a schedule in the past, you might find this phase of treatment challenging, but over time you may also come to find that a schedule is actually quite comforting. If you or someone you care about has been struggling with addiction for a long time and you are ready to finally say goodbye to substance abuse, we are here to help. At our Southwest Florida treatment facility, we help clients in all stages of addiction, including those struggling with long-term addiction. Call us today at 800-737-0933 to learn more about what to expect from rehab.

What Kind of Support Will You Find at a Treatment Center in Florida?

Treatment centers in Florida offer varying levels of support depending on the type of program patients enter. There are a huge number of treatment programs, interventions, and types of therapies that are targeted at treating substance abuse disorders and addiction. The state of Florida has a treatment program to fit all individuals who are seeking help with substance use. Treatment typically begins with detox. After detox, individuals are recommended to move on to either outpatient or inpatient treatment. Afterward, individuals may choose to move into sober living as well as attend support groups. <h2> Types of Treatment Centers and Levels of Support </h2> Long-term residential treatment centers provide support around the clock, 24 hours a day. These types of treatment centers are typically located in non-hospital environments and provide treatment and support for six to 12 months. Treatment in a long-term residential center is usually structured and extremely comprehensive. The services long-term treatment centers provide usually include employment training and other services to support the stabilization of patients after they leave the treatment center. Short-term residential treatment programs also provide around the clock care. Short-term programs typically treat patients and provide support for three to six weeks. The support included in these types of programs includes detox, therapy, and social rehabilitation. After individuals complete treatment in short-term residential programs, they typically attend outpatient therapy and support groups like Narcotics Anonymous or Alcoholics Anonymous. Outpatient treatment programs can vary in the levels of support and treatment they provide. Outpatient treatment programs typically cost much less than inpatient residential treatment programs. Outpatient programs allow their patients to continue to work or go to school and return to their homes at night during treatment. Further, outpatient treatment programs allow patients to remain surrounded by their extended support network of family and friends. Outpatient treatment programs generally provide therapy, drug education programming, and unique treatment plans for each patient. Outpatient programs also provide and mandate that patients attend group counseling and therapy. This allows patients to meet others who are going through similar circumstances and created a network of support. These programs may differ in intensity depending on the type of treatment needed by patients. If you would like more information regarding the types of support you may get in a specific treatment program in Florida, contact us today at 800-737-0933.

Is Suboxone Only Used During Detox?

Suboxone is a medication that is prescribed to treat opioid use disorder. It is a combination of buprenorphine and naloxone. Suboxone is used to decrease the appearance of opioid withdrawal symptoms. It is a long-acting medication and lasts for approximately 24 hours. Suboxone is a film that is placed in the cheek or under the tongue when administered. The side effects of suboxone can include constricted pupils, low blood pressure, lethargy, and respiratory depression. The risk of overdosing on suboxone is drastically lower than overdosing on another opioid like heroin. Suboxone was approved for use in the United States for medical purposes in 2002. The long-term outcomes of suboxone as a treatment for opioid use disorder are better than quitting opioid use overall. Cravings for opioids are decreased when using suboxone, which prevents individuals from seeking out other opioids to use. Suboxone is a first-line treatment for opioid use disorder and has been shown as effective in the treatment and long-term recovery for individuals who were dependent on opioids in the past. Suboxone is typically prescribed during detox and in doctors offices. Individuals are given their prescription and they do not have to be monitored, unlike individuals who must go into a clinic each day to receive their dose of methadone. Individuals who are stable and are not able to visit a clinic each day to receive medication may prescribed suboxone. Further, individuals who have other medical conditions that visit their doctor regularly may be prescribed suboxone. Other individuals who may be prescribed suboxone include those who have jobs that require them to remain alert and are not able to be under a sedating medication like methadone. Suboxone is also recommended to treat individuals who may be affected negatively by methadone use. These populations include individuals who abuse alcohol, the elderly, individuals who take large doses of benzodiazepines, and individuals with a low level of tolerance to opioids. Further, suboxone is prescribed to individuals who are engaging in therapy and counseling in order to treat their opioid use disorder. The use of suboxone in combination with therapy is more successful in treating opioid use disorder than treating it with suboxone alone. If you would like more information regarding suboxone therapy or treatment for opioid use disorder, call us today at 800-737-0933.

How Do I Tell if the Rehab Facilities Near Me Are Any Good?

When you feel as though your entire life is spinning out of control due to substance abuse, it’s imperative that you find a rehab center that can provide the services you need to get your life back on track. Whether you are seeking a rehab facility for yourself or for someone close to you, finding the right treatment program is critical. It’s not uncommon for many people looking for a treatment center to wonder whether a facility near them is any good. This is one of the most important decisions you will make when it comes to addiction recovery, so it is important to know what to look for in a facility. Numerous factors need to be taken into consideration in choosing a substance abuse treatment center. Among those factors include whether the facility in question offers the specific services that the person struggling with addiction needs. Whether or not the treatment facility offers after-care and follow-up services should also be considered. Taking the time to learn as much as you can about a facility can help to guide you in choosing the right program for yourself or your loved one.

Finding Out About the Services Offered by an Addiction Treatment Center

In determining whether or a facility is the right choice, consider whether the program offers a dual diagnosis. Many individuals struggling to overcome addiction also have other clinical conditions, such as anxiety, depression, post-traumatic stress disorder, or eating disorders. It’s also not uncommon for the individual to not even be aware that he or she also has other disorders. For this reason, it’s important to select a facility that offers a dual diagnosis. In a program with a dual diagnosis, incoming clients are provided with an assessment to determine whether they are also struggling with other disorders. Clients who also have other clinical conditions can benefit from receiving treatment not only for their addiction but also for their other conditions. A solid addiction treatment program should also provide a holistic approach to treatment. This means that the program should not just focus on treating the addiction with counseling services but should also provide other forms of treatment that target body, mind, and spirit. Such forms of treatment might include:• Individual and group counseling• Meditation• Nutritional counseling• Stress relief training

Other Factors to Consider When Selecting an Addiction Treatment Program

Additionally, it’s important to consider other factors in determining whether an addiction treatment program is a right choice for your needs. For instance, take some time to research the facility that you are considering and find out whether the program has longevity. Generally, it’s a good idea to steer away from any treatment program that has not been in business for a while. Although some such facilities might be perfectly fine, a facility that hasn’t been in business very long could eventually end up failing if they utilize unlawful or unethical business practices. Overall, treatment centers that have been open longer typically have longevity due to the fact that they provide good service and adhere to ethical standards. Furthermore, you should try to stay away from any treatment center that provides guarantees for success rates. It is simply impossible for a treatment center to provide a guarantee of success for an individual in recovery. Ultimately, it is up to that individual as to whether he or she will continue following the treatment plan after leaving the facility. Ideally, it’s important to look for a program that offers ongoing support group meetings even after clients leave the treatment center.

Do You Need a Treatment Center Near You?

It’s only natural to have a desire to enter a treatment program near you or choose one within a close vicinity for your loved one. One thing to keep in mind is that close proximity does not necessarily mean that a treatment facility is the best choice for your needs or the needs of your loved one. Keep in mind that when you or your loved one enters a treatment program, it will be imperative that he or she be able to fully focus on treatment. Finding the right addiction treatment program may seem as though it is a daunting task, especially given the number of options available. If you are still uncertain as to whether a facility might be the right choice, it’s a good idea to contact the facility directly and obtain as much information as possible, including the various services offered. If you are ready to take that next step, call us today at 800-737-0933 to learn about our addiction treatment center in Southwest Florida.

How Do Medical Professionals Handle Heroin Addiction in Comparison to Other Drug Addictions?

Heroin is one of the most dangerous and addictive street drugs in the world. It is an opiate that will rewrite the brain's perception of pleasure and reward in ways that many other substances do not, so withdrawal from the substance can be far more painful than from other drugs. This is why medical professionals have to handle heroin addiction much more delicately than addiction from other substances.

Detox

The first and perhaps most important step in treating heroin addiction is the detoxification process. This can be harrowing for patients under the most ideal circumstances, and it should never be attempted alone. Many patients need to undergo medical detox, which ensures that they are weaned off of heroin in a controlled environment instead of quitting outright. They may also be provided with medications to help them control their withdrawal symptoms, which is often a crucial part of the rehab process. This usually involves taking suboxone, a medication that can in itself be addictive and should only be taken in a clinical setting.

Counseling

Much of what makes heroin addiction treatment different from other addiction treatment is getting over the physical addiction and managing the harsh withdrawal symptoms, but it is far from the only element of treatment. Once a patient has properly detoxed and is mostly over their physical addiction, they often have to undergo counseling and treatment to address the reasons why they turned to heroin in the first place. This process can take anywhere from a few months to several years depending on the patient's situation. As we said before, heroin alters the brain's perception of pleasure and reward, and any addiction treatment will involve basically rewriting one's thought process. This cognitive therapy and counseling can be just as difficult as overcoming the physical addiction, and it should be taken very seriously. There is no doubt that heroin is one of the most dangerous illicit drugs available today. It is part of the reason why there is such a severe opiate addiction epidemic in the United States, and it continues to claim thousands of lives every year. If you or a loved one is struggling with an addiction to heroin, know that there is hope for you. Contact our treatment center today at 800-737-0933 for more information. Our counselors are available 24 hours a day, and they will gladly help you find the treatment that you need.

How Can People With Chronic Pain Quit Heroin?

You can manage chronic pain and quit heroin while learning how to reduce the risk of substance abuse. Painkillers or its derivatives are adequate for most and as the pain worsens relief demands more frequent doses leading to potential drug dependency. Too often individuals attempt to self-medicate and trigger more serious health conditions. There are effective non-opioid drugs combined with different types of therapeutic and medical procedures for treating chronic pain and addiction. The approach is multi-disciplinary; transitioning from heroin to a non-opioid medication, treatments for pain, and the introductions of precautions to prevent drug relapse.

More Than Just Pain

A vast majority of individual’s suffering with chronic pain are unaware they have a substance abuse problem. Besides the health considerations that will worsen over time substance abuse interferes with the body’s genetic makeup and biological functions. At this point, reversing the effect is difficult without some form of professional assistance. For most, addiction to heroin occurs with long-term use as the chemicals change how our body responds. Did you know?
  • Heroin does not heal or repair the cause of chronic pain.
  • Heroin offers only short-term intervals for relieving chronic pain.
  • Heroin can cause mild to extreme side effects that interfere with day-to-day functions.
Heroin and other painkillers belong to the same class of drugs called opioids. Opioids attach to receptors found on the nerve cells in the brain interfering with the signals that alert the body to pain. For some, it may decrease the level of pain temporarily and prompt a feeling of euphoria.

Non-Opioid Pain Treatments

Heroin isn’t the only chronic pain treatment option. Like heroin, all medications or illegal drugs have potential risk factors. Contributing to these risks are personal health status and family medical disorders.
  • Do you know if other types of substance abuse or psychiatric disorders exist?
The outcome could be affected when one or more of these factors exist. This information helps to select the combinations of medicine and therapy for the individual’s lifestyle and level of pain. Addiction programs incorporate specialized doctors and alternative health teams to help cope with the situation. Depending on the severity of heroin use the withdrawal process can cause:
  • Cold flashes
  • Insomnia
  • Muscle or bone pain
  • Restlessness
Treating chronic pain without heroin involves physical, psychological, and occupational therapies along with a medical supervisor of nonopioid pain treatments or medicine.

Getting Rid of The Pain Without Heroin

Chronic pain is manageable with medications and alternative practices achieving fewer adverse effects on your health. Treatment starts with understanding that both the physical and mental components of one’s health are involved in recovery. Facts of treating pain with heroin:
  • The body builds a tolerance to heroin with long-term use
  • The pain remains.
  • Opioids (heroin) are addictive, dangerous and life-threatening.
Technology and medical advances address the source of the pain collectively with non-opioid medications and therapies. Recovery centers provide a safe and caring environment. Residential programs offer personal and group follow-up care. The goal is to help teach individuals how to live life without addiction through a continuum of care.

Managing Life One Day A Time

The good news, physical dependence on heroin is reversible. By focusing on the cause of addiction and responding to chronic pain, you can learn how to deal with it and quit heroin.
  • It’s not a process that you can maneuver alone.
  • You need the help of trained professionals.
Recovery is a long journey and treatment to the addiction is only the first phase. To quit heroin, you must continue to maintain your physical and mental health one day at a time. See your doctor regularly for the pain to prevent a relapse. More important, if you experience a relapse urge, seek support – it happens from time to time. Dealing with chronic pain is unbearable but blocking out the pain with heroin can only cause more damage to your health. Rather than live with addiction, there’s help available to minimize the effects of withdrawal and teach you how to manage a life with chronic pain instead. Using heroin to quite chronic pain comes with a wide range of potential risks and side effects. Call our office at 800-737-0933 if you find yourself thinking about taking higher doses or more powerful drugs for pain.

Are Florida Drug Rehab Centers Good for People From Out-of-State?

It's very encouraging when someone is finally able to come to grips with the idea they are suffering from an addiction to drugs or alcohol, perhaps both. After that grand admission, the hope is they will also be ready to ask for help beating their addiction. The task of figuring out where to get treatment is not something that should be taken lightly. The quality of one's addiction treatment will eventually affect the ability of the individual to maintain lasting recovery. The first instinct someone will feel is to run out and enlist of services of one of the rehab centers in the local area. While that would certainly be the most convenient option, it might not be the best option. It's vital that the first consideration by the individual's personal welfare, not just in the now, but also into the future. In fact, there are four things each individual should consider during the addiction treatment facility selection process. The four things would be:
  • The possibility outside influences could interfere with the treatment process
  • What type of treatment program would best suit the individual's needs
  • The need for privacy
  • The addiction treatment environment
For the first time addiction treatment patient, the facility treatment selection process can be very intimidating. Hopefully, the following information will serve to help people make the best choice, which many experts would say is a Florida rehab center.

Are Florida Rehabs Good for Non-Residents?

Prior to discussing the viability of Florida rehabs for residents of other states, it's important to note Florida, especially South Florida, is known by experts as the "rehab capital of the world." There are plenty of reasons why experts feel this way. Chief among those reasons is a tremendous concentration of quality addiction treatment resources in this one area. As for the viability of setting aside convenience in order to get treatment from a Florida rehab center, there have to be concrete benefits that would motivate someone to make this choice. After all, the addiction sufferer will be asked to take themselves away from their home and lives for a prescribed period of time. As for the potential benefits, there are many. For purposes of this discussion, the focus will be put on the four selection considerations listed above.

Removing Harmful Influences

Home is where the people, places and things that created the addiction live. It's where the prospective patient's drug dealers and drug-using friends run the streets. It's where family and friend enablers live. It's a place that could be filled with hard feelings and bad memories. A successful addiction treatment process demands the patient be able to truly focus on the process. They need to be open and honest with their counselors to assure problems get solutions. Any possibility of interference from bad people or memories could well be avoided by relocating for treatment in a Florida facility.

Getting Quality Treatment

It should make sense that Florida's reputation as a top rehab destination was built on the backs of the best counselors and clinicians in the industry. These are the folks who have the talent to innovate new and better treatment modalities. As part of the addiction treatment facility selection process, everyone should be willing to do what's necessary to get access to the best treatment professionals and modalities possible.

Privacy

Dealing with addiction and getting treatment are very personal endeavors. If someone is trying to get treatment within the local community, there's an increased chance their issues will get unwanted attention. In most cases, a Florida rehab will be far enough away from home to provide a thick veil of privacy.

Treatment Environment

Anyone would be hard-pressed to find another state that has better year-round weather than Florida. Many of the state's top rehab centers sit among great ocean and lake communities. The ability for these rehab centers to offer access to exciting outdoor activities along with luxury treatment facility amenities only serves to create a great environment where the patient will hopefully feel comfortable. A relaxed patient is apt to be a responsive and motivated patient. We encourage you to be open to the idea of relocating for treatment. If cost and convenience are your top considerations, so be it. However, you'll find you can get the best care possible in Florida, particularly from our facility. For more information about relocating for addiction treatment, you can call one of our representatives at 800-737-0933.