Treatment

When Can Alcohol Withdrawal Effects Be Fatal?

Alcohol addiction is a significant problem in the United States. Statistics recently complied by the National Survey on Drug Use and Health, sometimes abbreviated as NSDUH, found that more than 15 million American age 12 and older were addicted to this substance. Many have tried to beat this dependency. However, alcohol is one of the hardest addictions to conquer.

 The Reasons Alcohol Is So Addictive

Arguably, what makes alcohol so easy to become dependent on is the impact said substance has on the nervous system. When people consume alcoholic beverages, their brains release mood-elevating hormones, such as endorphins and dopamine. That said, in some people, alcohol consumption precipitates the release of even more mood-enhancing chemicals, further stimulating their dependence.

As the habit progresses, the brain releases an increasingly greater concentration of mood chemicals. Eventually, the brain and body develop a greater dependency on the release of these chemicals to function. Ergo, a significantly greater quantity of alcohol are needed to complete that process. In fact, alcohol can alter brain chemistry to the point that pertinent actions like decision making and impulse control can be compromised.

Additionally, the availability of alcohol makes it easier to obtain. To those over 21 years of age, the substance can be purchased legally. Moreover, said the chemical is far less expensive than most other drugs and does not have to purchase in the corner of a dark alley.

 The Alcohol Withdrawal Process

Addiction experts opine that alcohol withdrawal is amongst the most difficult and serious. Withdrawal occurs in stages. The first stage typically begins within eight hours of the dependent’s last drink and might precipitate manifestations like nausea, vomiting, stomach discomfort and shakiness. During the second stage, which sets in roughly one to three days after the subject last consumed alcohol, might consist of cardiovascular symptoms like an increased pulse rate and elevated blood pressure and general manifestations like a decreased body temperature and mental problems like confusion. The last and final stage, commencing anywhere from two to four days after the consumer’s last drink, might comprise symptoms like uncontrollable tremors, hallucinations, raised body temperature and convulsions.

 Alcohol Withdrawal Can Be Fatal

Moderate to severe alcohol withdrawal processes almost always present discernible dangers and, if not properly managed, could prove fatal. There are several circumstances in which alcohol withdrawal could cost the dependent subject their life including:

When The Person Is Severely Dependent

Individuals who have consumed significant quantities of alcohol for prolonged periods stand at an increased risk of experiencing more trying withdrawal processes and potentially fatal complications.

If The Addict Possesses Any Mental Illnesses

Individuals with mental illness might not be able to bear the psychological strain associated with alcohol withdrawal.

When Co-Morbidities Exist

Chronic alcohol usage can precipitate a host of serious physical illnesses. Any of these maladies can weaken a dependent’s body to such a marked extent that they might not be able to tolerate the physical demands of withdrawal.

When The Most Serious Symptoms Manifest

End stage alcohol withdrawal symptoms can result in occurrences like uncontrollable convulsions and delirium tremens, which sends the addict into an ultra hyperactive state where they experience intense confusion and uncontrollable shaking that could quickly proceed to cardiovascular and respiratory collapse if immediate medical attention is not employed. Few people, regardless of how mentally or physically strong they are, can survive this without help.

<strong>Managing Alcohol Withdrawal</strong>

Most cases of alcohol withdrawal should be supervised through a process known as medical detoxification. During said procedure, which can take place inside a healthcare facility like a hospital or inside the confines of an in-patient rehabilitation facility, the addict is gradually weaned off alcohol in a controlled, medically monitored setting. If need be, the patient is administered medications to control burgeoning withdrawal manifestations.

Though both hospital and in-patient detoxification programs often prove effective in eliminating the alcohol from the dependent’s body, in-patient detoxification might yield better results over the long haul. This is because in-patient detox is typically followed by an extended stay inside a treatment facility in which recovering addicts are provided instruction on how to overcome the psychological factors that led to their addiction.

Contacting Us

Individuals who are tired of living an alcohol-dependent life are encouraged to contact us. Though we are located in Palm Beach County, Florida, our team of experienced staff members have helped people from across the United States conquer their alcohol addictions in a safe, comfortable atmosphere. Call us at 800-737-0933.

What’s the Longest Possible Alcohol Detox Time Duration?

Long-term addiction sufferers live with special circumstances due in large part to the extent of their addiction. That’s especially true of people who have been abusing alcohol for years. The fact is there’s almost always a direct correlation between the extent of someone’s alcoholism and the way it negatively impacts their lives.

The impact of long-term alcoholism goes well beyond the way it impacts the alcohol abuser’s every day life. The impact is also felt when said individual makes the decision to stop drinking and seek help for their drinking problem. When they finally take that step, they immediately face the prospect of going through some rather disturbing withdrawal symptoms.

As a point of reference, we thought it would be proper to list out some of the more troubling withdrawal symptoms an alcohol abuser might face after months or years of excessive drinking. The list includes

  • Confusion and inability to handle simple tasks
  • Onset of severe anxiety or depression
  • Profuse sweating
  • Rise in heart rate and blood pressure
  • Delirium Tremens also known as the DTs
  • Hallucinations and difficulty sleeping
  • Nausea and vomiting

Based on this troubling list, both the medical and addiction treatment professions recommend people don’t try to detox off of alcohol without help. The best places to get that help are from a professional dedicated detox facility or a reputable alcohol rehab that provides detox services. In the sections below, the conversation is going to focus on detox treatment and the timing related to the detox process.

The Medically Monitored Detox Program

Upon entering rehab, each client is put through an interview process. The purpose of the interview is to help administrators gather information about each client’s addiction and the circumstances surrounding said addiction. If a client indicates they have been going through a long period of significant alcohol abuse, it’s a good bet they will get placement in a medically monitored detox program.

The primary goal of a medically monitored detox program is to ensure clients are kept safe and comfortable while they detox off alcohol. Should any client start to show signs of pain or discomfort, there will be a physician standing by to prescribe the appropriate relief medications.

This process will continue until the client has cleared their withdrawal symptoms and any residual cravings they have for a drink. For the individuals with moderate drinking problems, the entire detox process will usually take five to seven days. It’s an entirely different story for someone who has being drinking large amounts of alcohol over many months or years.

To better understand what those folks face, the following describes the three stages of detox for someone with a significant alcohol addiction.

Stage 1

The first stage of alcohol withdrawal will start approximately 6 to 8 hours after the alcoholic’s last drink. In the earliest stage, the individual with start to experience a little anxiety, plus some nervousness and sweating. They might also struggle with headaches. These symptoms will be prevalent for the first 24 to 48 hours.

Stage 2

Heading into the second stage (1 to 3 days)of withdrawal, the individual will start to experience issues with blood pressure and their heart rate. Nausea and vomiting will typically occur as the individual struggles with their coordination and ability to handle simple tasks.

It’s at this point that the rehab facility’s treatment staff will start to realize that an individual is going to have a rough go through the entire detox process. This is also the point where a doctor might decide that a client is going to need medication in order to survive the last stage of detox.

Stage 3

If trouble is brewing, this is the stage where the big issues will become apparent. It’s during this stage that the client faces trouble with the DTs and hallucinations that interrupt their ability to get rest. Profuse sweating and high anxiety could also appear at this time. In the worst cases, this final stage of detox could last several weeks up to a full month.

If you are contemplating putting the bottle down and reaching out for help, we ask that you proceed with caution. We would like you to call us at 800-737-0933 and lets us help you with the detox process. During that initial call, we will also take the opportunity to tell you about our facility and addiction treatment services.

What Does A Typical Cocaine Detox Look Like?

Cocaine use and dependency in the United States is a significant concern. Some officials opine the problem is reaching epidemic status. Statistics compiled by the United States government concluded that, in 2016, more than 10,000 lives were claimed as the result of overdoses. Moreover, during that same year, more than one million Americans tried the drug for the first time.

The Reason Users Grow Dependent On Cocaine

Cocaine is extracted from substances contained in the South American jungle-based coco plant and typically synthesized into a white powder users ingest into their bodies through their nose. However, the substance can also be injected into veins in their arms or smoked.

Substance abuse experts caution that cocaine is amongst the most addictive substances in the world because the chemical possesses the capacity to alter brain chemistry. After ingestion, many users report an almost immediate feeling of happiness, calm, alertness and energy-boost. Unfortunately, however, the brain and body quickly grow dependent upon cocaine and persons must ingest greater and greater quantities to produce the pleasant, if not euphoric effects. Several scientific studies conducted examining the addictive quality of various substances found that cocaine was the second most dependency-inducing drug after heroin.

Cocaine’s Impact Upon The Body

Cocaine can exercise a significantly adverse impact upon the body over both the short and long-term. The immediate potentially harmful impacts of cocaine usage include an elevated heartrate, increased blood pressure, restlessness, anger, agitation and insomnia.

However, over the long haul, addicts can experience a plethora of serious health problems, such as cardiovascular problems like heart attacks, strokes, blood vessel damage, headaches, convulsions, severe damage to the respiratory and digestive systems, liver scarring, declining cognitive functions like memory and concentration, frequent nose bleeds and the diminished or complete loss of smell.

Conquering A Cocaine Addiction

The specific therapy a team of healthcare professionals or in-patient treatment center counselors employ to help an addict overcome their addiction will depend upon several factors, including the length and severity of their dependency, personal health measures like their age, weight and general physical condition and the current state of their mental health.

The Detoxification Process

Typically, the first step in any addict’s treatment and ultimate recovery is the detoxification process, which is often abbreviated simply as detox. Most individuals with any moderate to severe addiction to cocaine or any drug cannot simply quit without experiencing significant consequences.

Because the mind and body become addicted to a substance, abrupt cessation of ingestion will invariably precipitate physical and mental manifestations known medically as withdrawals. Usually, these symptoms begin as quickly as a few hours after the last ingestion and might include occurrences like extreme agitation, restlessness, tiredness, sweating, depression and anger. These events intensify as more time passes since the last ingestion.

In many instances, the worst of cocaine withdrawal symptoms last for only a few days. However, the cravings are extremely difficult and, in some cases, impossible for addicts to conquer and frequently precipitate relapse. Intense psychological yearnings for the drug can last for several months after the drug exists the addict’s system.

The Need For Supervised Detox

For this reason, the detox process is typically best handled inside an in-patient drug rehabilitation facility in which the dependent’s withdrawal can be monitored under strict medical supervision. Effective detox performed in a reputable in-patient facility is typically broken down into three separate phases, the medical detoxification, treatment and aftercare.

Medical Detox

In an experienced recovery establishment, the addict is carefully observed during the withdrawal process and given medications to control any untoward manifestations until the drug has departed their body. Cocaine detox is usually not a long process. However, for dependents with discernible physical or mental health issues, the process could prove more challenging and be of longer duration.

Treatment

Once medical detox is completed, the in-patient facility said individual commits themselves to entering often tailors a program geared towards helping the former dependent adapt to sobriety, identify the reasons they became addicts and learn to lead a happy and productive life free of drugs.

Aftercare

Once the treatment program ends, the recovering addict begins their new life. However, many individuals partake in aftercare programs that involve activities like counseling or recovery programs designed towards helping said persons stay on the straight and narrow path.

Contacting Us

Our in-patient facility is located in Southern Florida. That said, our team of experienced medical and drug counseling professionals have helped numerous addicts from throughout the United States overcome cocaine and other substance addictions. Those yearning to end a cycle of dependency are encouraged to contact us 800-737-0933.

Are All Detoxes in Florida Attached to Rehab Centers?

If you have a problem with drugs or alcohol and call Florida home, you are not alone. According to drug-rehab.org, an online resource for drug education and addiction awareness, more than 410,000 Floridians admitted to having a substance use disorder in 2014. It is also worth noting that the number of overdose cases in the state increased by over 5,000 between 2014 and 2016. That said, the substances that are being abused the most in Florida, also known as the sunshine state, include alcohol, cocaine, heroin, and marijuana.

And while prescribed for legitimate reasons, many Floridians are also abusing prescription pain relievers, namely Oxycontin and Hydrocodone. So while the state is best known for its theme parks and exciting nightlife, most will agree that Florida has a serious problem on its hands when it comes to substance abuse. It should be noted, however, that many people have begun to recognize the devastating toll that abusing drugs and alcohol can have on their lives and have sought addiction recovery services from the nearly 14,000 rehab facilities interspersed in and around Florida.

ARE ALL DETOX PROGRAMS IN FLORIDA ATTACHED TO REHAB CENTERS?

Most physicians and addiction experts will agree that overcoming an addiction to certain substances is easier than others. For example, individuals who choose to end their relationship with marijuana are seldom confronted by severe withdrawal symptoms as they go through detox. Sadly, this is not the case for those who are seeking to end their relationship with prescription-based or street-level opioids, such as heroin. The same can also be said for those trying to overcome an addiction to alcohol. In most cases, when an individual stops consuming these particular substances, they will usually find themselves having to deal with an onslaught of severe withdrawal symptoms. And sometimes, these withdrawal symptoms are so severe that many will choose to forgo their pursuit of sobriety and start using again.

Fortunately, many rehab facilities in Florida are aware of the challenges that come with ending one’s relationship with opioids, alcohol, and other hardcore substances. As such, many will offer detox assistance in both their inpatient and outpatient programs. Detox assistance in nearly all Florida rehab facilities includes prescription-based medication to help individuals cope with challenging withdrawal symptoms as well as round-the-clock monitoring by a licensed doctor or nurse. This aspect of addiction recovery will usually take place onsite; however, some facilities may choose to offer them in a separate location. This approach ensures that individuals can get focused treatments that can significantly increase their chances of completing detox successfully. That said, detox assistance can help ease the following withdrawal symptoms associated with substance abuse cessation:

  • Insomnia
  • Anxiety
  • Memory problems
  • Headaches
  • Heart palpitations
  • Profuse sweating
  • Nausea and vomiting
  • Hypertension
  • Muscle aches
  • Tremors

 

The severity of these symptoms, not to mention the type of symptoms an individual will encounter, can vary depending on how long they have been using. It is also worth noting that the specific substance that they were abusing before seeking treatment will also play a role in this regard as well.

HOW LONG WILL THE DETOX PROCESS LAST?

While the goal of any detox program is to help individuals safely and effectively achieve sobriety, the timeframe involved can vary from one person to the next. Whether they are provided onsite or via a separate location, detox programs offered by most Florida-based rehab facilities will last anywhere from 3 to 7 days. In most cases, this is enough time for drugs or alcohol to leave an individual’s system. During this time, the doctors and nurses in these programs will provide individuals with prescription-based medications to help them cope with severe withdrawal symptoms, some of which include

  • Methadone
  • Clonidine
  • Suboxone
  • Naltrexone
  • Antabuse
  • Acamprosate
  • Benzodiazepines
  • Antidepressants

The type of medication that a physician will prescribe to patients is determined based on the symptoms they are experiencing and the substance that their body is attempting to detox. Along with these popular medications, some Florida-based rehab facilities are now offering a relatively new medication called Lofexidine to help ease certain types of withdrawal symptoms. According to a study published by the National Institutes of Health, Lofexidine has been approved by the FDA, also known as the Food and Drug Administration, to help individuals cope with the physical symptoms associated with opioid withdrawal.

BOTTOM LINE

In summary, if you’re struggling with drugs or alcohol and live in Florida, there is no shortage of rehab facilities that you can turn to for help. And most of them, if not all, offer some form of detox assistance to make your journey toward sobriety slightly easier. To learn more about any of the information detailed in this article, consider reaching out to one of our friendly associates today at 800-737-0933.

Is There a Way to Do an Alcoholism Detox Safely at Home?

Alcohol can be a subtle foe. It causes both a mental obsession in the mind of an alcoholic, plus an often insatiable physical craving. Alcoholism is a disease that will try to convince us that there’s nothing wrong with us.

This frightful combination of mental and physical effects makes for potentially dangerous withdrawal symptoms. Here’s a list of four dangerous symptoms of alcohol withdrawal, plus an explanation of why the benefits of supervised detox make it the smart choice.

Symptoms of Alcohol Withdrawal

If there were no inherent dangerous withdrawal symptoms associated with alcoholism, then it probably would be safe to detox at home. However, that is not reality. The truth is that there are a number of dangerous things that can happen during alcohol detox.

When we suddenly try to stop drinking after prolonged or heavy periods of drinking, changes are going to happen in our bodies and brains. The adjustment from drinking to complete abstinence creates often painful side effects. Here are some symptoms of alcohol withdrawal.

  • Insomnia – This is one of the more frequent side effects of alcohol withdrawal. The problem with losing sleep because your mind is craving alcohol isn’t the worst problem. However, lack of good sleep is what triggers dozens of other dangerous mental conditions.
  • Anxiety – Another one of the mental side effects of suddenly stopping your drinking is uncontrollable anxiety. Many alcoholics experience anxiety in normal everyday situations. When you abruptly remove alcohol, the level of anxiety can become emotionally dangerous.
  • Nausea – This is one of the common physical symptoms of alcohol withdrawal. When you get sick after a night of drinking, it may seem like an innocent and necessary evil of having had too much to drink.

However, it is not normal to vomit excessively without some virus or ailment to cause such. What happens during alcohol withdrawal is that your body is already dehydrated from drinking. Vomiting makes the problem even worse. Falling too far down the scale of dehydration can put you at serious medical risk.

  • Shaking – They are known as delirium tremens. When the body suddenly does not have a normal dose of alcohol, it can react violently. Delirium tremens is the uncontrollable shakes that we see happen in cinematic depictions of alcoholism.

The problem is that they happen in real-life as well. Delirium tremens can be so violent that they steal your ability to think rationally. Combined with insomnia and anxiety, hundreds of alcoholics who tried to detox themselves have made attempts to take their own lives.

Recovering alcoholics also tell tales of having horrible hallucinations during the period they were experiencing alcohol withdrawal. The medical bottom line is that when you deprive your body of alcohol after intense use, you are at risk both mentally and physically. Now let’s talk about the benefits of supervised alcohol detox.

Benefits of Supervised Alcohol Detox

The benefits of supervised alcohol detox are simple. They provide you with a medically safe environment surrounded by a professional staff that can help you handle the painful withdrawal phase safely.

  • Supervision – This is one key benefit to admitting yourself to a detox facility. The entire process is under the supervision of trained professionals.
  • Medical Safety – Every alcohol detox will have medical professionals to watch over you. As you experience withdrawal symptoms, they will be on-hand to provide trained medical assistance.
  • Counseling – The road to recovery from alcoholism often begins during the detox period. You will have caring people to talk to about your alcohol problems. There will be a chance for you to chart a course of action after you are out of danger.
  • Program Referral – Along with guided counsel, detox centers are frequently associated with treatment facilities. Even if they are not, there will be an opportunity for you to get a referral to a treatment program that could change your life.

There is nothing that can guarantee that alcohol detox is going to be easy. However, with proper supervision, the dangerous risks associated with alcohol withdrawal can be addressed. Basically, you remove the life-threatening risks from a potential life-threatening situation.

Trying to detox at home is a poor choice. First of all, it’s just not safe. There are too many unknown variables, some of which are potentially life-threatening. Why would you put yourself in such peril?

Detox facilities are staffed with medical professionals to make certain you’re safe. If you even think you have a problem with alcohol, get help today. Most importantly, if you’re trying to stop drinking, don’t try to detox yourself. It is not safe. Contact a detox center to help you at 800-737-0933.

Why Does Detox From Benzos Make You More Anxious?

Benzodiazepine withdrawal (frequently shortened to benzo withdrawal) is a group of symptoms that emerge when a patient decreases or stops their use of these medications. Whether prescribed or used recreationally, once tolerance has developed and physical and psychological dependence has been established, the patient will most likely experience some of these symptoms, some of which may last longer than others and vary in intensity depending on the patient’s length of use and the amount they have been using. One of the most common symptoms is rebound anxiety, which means that their anxiety feels much worse than it did prior to starting the medication. So, why does detox from benzos make you more anxious?

How do Benzos Work?

Benzos work by “amping up” the patient’s GABA, a brain chemical that blocks certain communication between nerve cells and the brain. Because low GABA levels are linked to anxiety and mood disorders, many people start using benzos for anxiety relief. In fact, about 5% of adults have been prescribed benzos in the last year, usually as a short-term bandaid during a stressful life event (death of a loved one, divorce, or other traumatic occurrences). Benzos are also often prescribed in people with chronic anxiety for short periods (generally a couple of weeks) while the patient undergoes therapy to learn healthy ways to cope with their symptoms.

However, they also produce compelling “feel-good” and sedative effects that are very appealing to many people, particularly those who struggle with anxiety. Additionally, benzos create tolerance very quickly, especially shorter-acting benzos like Xanax, the result of which is the need to take increasingly higher doses to produce these same effects. This combination creates a perfect storm for dependence to develop.

What Happens During Benzo Withdrawal?

Most benzo withdrawal symptoms begin to manifest within 24 hours of the last dose. They can last from a few days to several months, depending on the strength and quantity of the drug and the length of time it has been used. Early withdrawal symptoms, experienced within a few hours of cessation of the drug, include the swift return of anxiety.

As time away from the drug increases, more symptoms appear, including:

  • intense anxiety
  • panic
  • insomnia
  • muscle spasms or tension
  • nausea, vomiting, and other gastric upset
  • mood swings, trouble concentrating, and cloudy thinking

This list is by no means all-inclusive, and every patient is different. However, because of the uncertainty and unpredictability of the number and severity of withdrawal symptoms, it is important to seek treatment when making the decision to stop using benzos.

What is Rebound Anxiety?

During the early stages of benzo withdrawal, the patient can experience any number and combination of the symptoms listed. Even those who have been taking benzos as prescribed can, and often will, suffer from rebound anxiety along with other symptoms.

The “rebound effect” in benzo withdrawal occurs when a medication that had an effect on the symptoms it was being used to treat (whether diagnosed by a physician or as a form of self-soothing or self-medicating) is discontinued. It is characterized by intense waves of anxiety, irritability, panic, insomnia, and other mood disturbances. It can be frightening for patients who have been taking benzos for anxiety, even as exactly prescribed, to be overcome with anxiety and panic. Indeed, rebound anxiety during benzo withdrawal can lead to relapse very quickly. This is why it is important that the patient gets proper treatment and support during withdrawal.

The good news is that help is available, along with support. The need for support and healthy coping skills cannot be stressed enough when it comes to combatting dependence on benzos. As with any other recovery process, the knowledge that they are not alone, that there are people who understand and are willing and able to help, is pivotal to a successful detox and long-term recovery. There are many different treatment options available, and even the most hopeless-seeming cases can and do have successful recoveries. Life after benzos is not only possible, it can be fulfilling and rewarding.

If you’re ready to make a start, you can reach a counselor 24-hours a day by calling 800-737-0933. We’re ready to provide you with the knowledge you need to take the first steps on your path to recovery.

What Are Some Ways to Weather the 48 to 72 Hour Period of Alcohol Withdrawal?

Making the decision to check into a rehab center is one you will be grateful for the rest of your life. Whether you are addicted to alcohol or some type of substance, you’ll find the help that you need from reputable rehab personnel who only have your best interests in mind. You’ll be given personalized, one-on-one treatment that will help you get through your addiction while you move on to a better you, one step at a time.

However, you may be worried about what will happen if you go into rehab when you are addicted to alcohol. Alcohol withdrawal can be difficult, if not fatal, if you are not under the care of a professional doctor while you are going through it. Read on to learn some important ways you can weather the 48 to 72 hour period of alcohol withdrawal so that you can go on to learn how to lead a sober and fulfilling life.

Symptoms of Alcohol Withdrawal

First, you will want to understand what symptoms you may experience so that you know what to expect once you stop drinking. If you have been drinking alcohol heavily for even just a few weeks, you could experience physical problems when you decide to stop. This is known as alcohol withdrawal, and the symptoms can easily range from very mild to very serious. The symptoms you experience will depend on the amount of alcohol you have indulged in, for how long, and your level of health.

After six hours of not drinking, you may experience anxiety, nausea, insomnia, vertigo, headaches, vomiting, shaky hands, irritability, anger, sweating, and more. More serious side effects can include mild hallucinations. About 5% of men and women who experience alcohol withdrawal will have delirium tremors, or “DTs”. The DTs are serious symptoms that include very vivid hallucinations and seizures. They can also cause a fever, high blood pressure, intense sweating, confusion, and a racing heart.

Getting Through Alcohol Withdrawal

Alcohol withdrawal may be easier or harder than you think. It takes time and patience to allow the alcohol to completely disappear from your body. However, you can expect the first 24 to 48 hours to be the hardest. Read on for some tips that will help you get through the worst of your alcohol withdrawal symptoms.

Take a cold shower- Taking a cold shower can help clear your mind of your racing thoughts and the urge to drink. It can also help if you are sweating and uncomfortable. Plus, a cold shower has many other health benefits!

Avoid anyone who drinks- You must always stay away from the people or even places that will cause you to want to pick up a drink. Stay far away from anyone who will enable you during this period of withdrawal. You may even want to announce a break from people over social media so that you have a reason to ignore calls and messages from those who do not have your best interests at heart.

Eat healthy- It’s easy to go for junk food when you are in withdrawal because your body will be craving the sugar it used to get from alcohol. Balance out the sugar levels by consuming lots of healthy fruits and vegetables during the first few days of withdrawal while leaving the sugary snacks behind.

Drink plenty of water- Alcohol quickly causes dehydration to occur. During withdrawal you may feel nauseated, so make sure you are drinking plenty of fluids. While water is important, you should also drink fluids that contain plenty of electrolytes, such as sports drinks.

Exercise when you can- We know that you won’t feel like it during withdrawal, but we can assure you that exercise will help. Even a small amount of exercise will release the endorphins in your brain that create the happy and content feelings we are all chasing. You’ll also have a sense of accomplishment when you exercise- a big deal when you are struggling with addiction.

Ride out your cravings- Don’t fool yourself into thinking your cravings will immediately disappear- they won’t. You’ll think about drinking alcohol many times during the withdrawal period. Just remember, the cravings WILL go away. The first 48 hours are the hardest part of alcohol withdrawal, so keep reminding yourself that you are getting through the worst and that it will get better.

We Can Help

Remember, you never have to go through alcohol withdrawal alone. When you are ready to get started on the path to sobriety, let us pave the way. Give us a call at 800-737-0933 to learn more.

What Kinds of Alcohol Detox Programs Are Covered with Health Insurance?

Just a few short years ago, health insurance plans frequently neglected to cover alcohol detox programs. Despite the fact that alcoholism causes a tragic number of chronic health ailments and deaths each year, health insurances seemed all too willing to treat the effects of alcoholism but not very willing to cover services that would prevent those health outcomes from occurring. It is only in the past few years that health insurance providers have stepped up their responsibility and recognized that alcohol detox programs are a life-saving service. Today there are many alcohol detox programs that are covered by health insurance.

You will need to check with your specific health insurance provider to find out what facilities are covered within their network, but you should be pleased to discover that most of today’s detox programs are covered by health insurance. There are many different types of detoxes to choose from. Here are a few of the most commonly covered by insurance.

7-30 Day Medical Detox

The duration of a detox program is usually a week, and these medical detox programs are often provided in hospital settings that use medication to help ease the pain and anxiety of early withdrawal symptoms. Alcohol withdrawal has many dangerous medical complications that can occur, including seizures and delirium tremens. Many alcoholics choose to undergo medical detox, and health insurance is extremely likely to cover a medical detox that lasts between 7 and 30 days.

During a stay in medical detox, you will usually at some point also speak with a counselor who can help to ease the more psychological symptoms of detox. You’ll also have a caseworker who will help to direct you to services that might be more long-term. A medical detox treats alcoholism like any other disease, and you will likely have doctors and nurses to help you through the process.

Holistic Detox Centers

Holistic detox centers treat alcoholism with a “whole body” approach. Since your whole body suffers from alcoholism, then your whole body will benefit from healing. They will work with you to ease the symptoms of withdrawal using more natural methods. You will receive a variety of different treatments that might include:

  • Music therapy
  • Meditation
  • Nutrition guidance
  • Art therapy

Residential Programs

A residential program is more than just a period of detox, but you might be referred to a residential program after you’ve completed detox, so the residential program is an extension of the detox in many ways. These programs are long-term, and they can last for as little as 3 months to even a year or more in time. You’ll have more freedom in a long-term residential program, and you will likely be able to work outside the residential facility, have visitors, and go out and even have a normal life outside of the residential program. Drug testing and procedures to “sign-in” and “sign out” of the facility helps them to maintain a drug and alcohol-free environment.

Not every residential facility is covered by insurance, but there are other programs that often pay for these facilities and make them free for people who have limited income and resources. Even if your insurance doesn’t cover a residential program, please inquire about guidelines for receiving free entry into these programs. You’ll often find that they’re free to low-income clients or clients who meet other guidelines of the facility. As you can see, insurance covers more programs now than ever before, and your best bet is to research a program you are interested in and then contact your insurance or the program and see if insurance covers it. If you’re suffering from alcoholism, the first step is to get into a program. It can literally save your life. Over the past few years, health insurance has realized that alcohol detox programs prevent many of the severe and costly physical ailments that alcohol causes. Today they realize how important it is to pay for detoxes and get help before the consequences of alcoholism are even more costly and deadly, and their revelation about the importance of detox is your good fortune.

If you want to find an alcohol detox that can help you today, please call us now at 800-737-0933. We accept many different types of insurances and strive to work with all of the people who come to us for help on solutions to treatment. We hope you will call us and begin your journey to recovery today.

How Can You Recognize the Delirium Tremens Stages Before It’s Too Late?

Delirium tremens is a dangerous symptom of alcohol withdrawal that requires immediate medical attention. It can lead to grand mal seizures and even death. If someone has been drinking continuously for years, their brain and the central nervous system adjusts to the presence of alcohol and becomes physically dependent on alcohol in order to function properly. When someone with severe alcoholism abruptly stops drinking, alcohol leaves the body very quickly, causing their nervous system and brain into a dangerous state. Here’s how to recognize delirium tremens symptoms before it’s too late.

Alcohol withdrawal has a few very distinct stages that you’ll want to be alert to. Most experts break the withdrawal process down into four stages, but there are others who might categorize it into more than four stages. Delirium tremens is a serious condition that about 3-5% of alcoholics will experience if they suddenly stop drinking. It’s not as common as other withdrawal symptoms, but it’s so serious that you should always be alert to its stages and signs.

Stages of Alcohol Withdrawal

Experts who break the withdrawal process into four stages define each stage by time since last drink. The withdrawal stages are:

  • 6-12 hours since last drink
  • 12-24 hours since last drink
  • 24-48 hours since last drink
  • 48-72 hours since last drink

Delirium Tremens is most likely to occur in stage four of the withdrawal process, approximately 48-72 hours after a person takes their final drink. Recognizing the symptoms of delirium tremens is crucial to getting medical help and possibly even saving someone’s life. Never ignore the symptoms of delirium tremens.

Symptoms of Delirium Tremens

When someone goes into delirium tremens, they frequently have a change in mental state that will be immediately noticeable to them. Their behavior may become noticeable to others around them as well, as they will be experiencing anxiety and signs of agitation. Body tremors will be extremely noticeable. Their hands and other limbs may shake uncontrollably, and they may have difficulty focusing on anything and become understandably out of control during this time.

Hallucinations are another hallmark of delirium tremens. When someone is going through alcohol withdrawal and begins to hallucinate, it’s time to seek medical attention immediately, as this is almost always a sign of DTs. Fear is a very common emotion for the alcoholic to experience when these symptoms are present during alcohol withdrawal. They may even scream or cry. Remember, this is a serious medical event and can be life threatening if left untreated. Anyone who is going through alcohol withdrawal who begins to experience these signs of delirium tremens should go to the emergency room or a doctor immediately.

A Sign to Get Help

Alcoholism is a serious medical condition, and withdrawal from alcohol is one of the most dangerous of all drug withdrawals. Because alcohol leaves the body so quickly, it can severely throw the brain and central nervous system out of whack, leaving the person vulnerable to a number of dangerous medical events. Delirium tremens is perhaps the most dangerous symptom of alcohol withdrawal, and it should always be treated with seriousness. If someone experiences DTs, it’s a sign of severe alcoholism. It’s also a sign that it’s time to get help in one of today’s alcohol treatment centers.

Medical detox is the wisest source of treatment for a condition like a delirium tremens. Anyone who is going to withdrawal from alcohol after a long period of use might experience this dangerous symptom of withdrawal, but if someone has already had a bout of DTs, it’s doubly imperative that they go through withdrawal in a medical setting where help is immediately available in the event of delirium tremens. Today’s detox centers are capable of helping you or a loved one cope with this distressing part of alcohol withdrawal. There are many treatment options that will ease the agitation, fear, and other unpleasant symptoms of delirium tremens. The comforting thing to remember is that you no longer have to go through this on your own. A compassionate treatment center staff can help you make it through and begin a full-fledged recovery.

If you’re seeking a treatment center that can treat you for delirium tremens, contact us at 800-737-0933. We’re fully capable of helping you during even the most serious symptoms of alcohol withdrawal, and we can help you during every single stage of recovery after that. You can get help today with a single phone call.

Outpatient Treatment Versus Inpatient Treatment: What’s Best for My Daughter?

The damaging effects of drugs and alcohol know no bounds, harming young and old alike. What may start out as casual fun can quickly turn into an all-out lifestyle where drugs are involved. For parents, it can be heartbreaking to watch as your child falls prey to the pull of drugs and alcohol. When a drug problem develops, the sooner your child gets the level of support and guidance she needs the better. The choice between outpatient treatment versus inpatient treatment is an important one since it will determine the level of care your daughter receives.

Outpatient and inpatient treatment programs offer two different approaches for helping individuals overcome addiction. Choosing the right program for your daughter will depend on a range of factors, including the severity of her addiction and the effects addiction has had in her life. Read on to see how these programs differ and find out how to determine which treatment approach is best for your daughter.

How Addiction Works

Addictive substances, be it alcohol, heroin or cocaine, all have one thing in common: they’re all able to interact with the brain’s chemical system. This ability to interact means drugs can actually change how the brain’s chemical system works over time. While different types of addictive substances do this in different ways, the overall effect remains the same.

Addictive, mind-altering substances gain easy access to the brain’s system because of their chemical makeup. For instance, opiates contain substances that closely resemble a few of the brain’s neurotransmitter chemicals, including serotonin, dopamine and norepinephrine. When ingested, opiates not only interact with the areas of the brain that produce these chemicals but also stimulate neurotransmitter production.

Before long, the brain becomes unable to produce needed levels of these neurotransmitters without the drug’s effect. At this point, the brain has become physically dependent on the drug to function normally. Over time, physical dependence evolves into a psychological dependence. With psychological dependence, the drug’s effects are the only thing that motivates a person’s motivations, behaviors and thinking. Once psychological dependence takes hold, a full-blown addiction is at work.

The Main Difference Between Outpatient and Inpatient Treatment

The main difference between outpatient and inpatient treatment lies in the level of support each program offers. Level of support has to do with:

  • Level of monitoring and supervision
  • How each program is structured
  • The degree of responsibility the patient has

Inpatient programs operate as live-in treatment facilities. Patients are monitored around the clock. These programs also follow strict schedules where patients are required to attend intensive therapy, 12-step meetings along with other types of treatment interventions. Patients also receive medical care and mental health care.

Outpatient programs do not operate as live-in facilities. Patients live at home, attend school and work while attending scheduled treatment sessions two to five times a week. The treatment interventions used in outpatient programs are mostly the same as those used in inpatient care. The only difference is program participants must be willing to apply what they learn in treatment within their daily lives.

Your Daughter’s Condition Determines Which Program Will Work Best

As a general rule, the longer a drug abuse problem persists the greater the need for intensive treatment care. This is especially the case for the more hardcore drugs like heroin and cocaine or crack. The longer abuse continues the more damage that’s done to the brain’s chemical system. As this damage intensifies, a person’s ability to control drug-using and drug-seeking behaviors diminishes.

In effect, your daughter’s daily behaviors are the best clues as to which program will best meet her treatment needs. The following signs/behaviors indicate a need for inpatient treatment care:

  • Your daughter’s daily hygiene and personal care habits have declined
  • Problems with the law, such as DUIs
  • She’s lost interest in activities that she used to enjoy
  • Her academic performance has declined
  • She skips school on a regular basis
  • Relationships with friends and family have suffered

Outpatient care should only be considered if your daughter’s overall lifestyle is still intact, meaning she still attends school, still spends time with friends and can still meet her daily responsibilities. Ultimately, the more control drugs have over your daughter’s choices and behaviors the greater the need for intensive treatment supports.

If you have more questions or need information on how to get started, call us today at 800-737-0933 to speak with one of our program counselors.