Treatment

Can Florida Rehabs Help You Get Your Life Back on Track After Getting Clean?

There is a rampant addiction crisis in the US, with millions of families and individuals feeing the impact each day. Overcoming an addiction to opioids, alcohol, or even illicit drugs is never easy, even with loving friends and family to provide support. When you are considering a rehab center or facility in Florida, you may be curious about the aftercare that is provided and the type of assistance you will receive once you have completed your program in its entirety. Understanding the types of rehabilitation programs that Florida offers along with aftercare options is a way to find a solution that is best to help get your life back on track.

Types of Florida Rehabilitation Programs

In Florida, there are multiple rehabilitation programs available to assist those who struggle with a range of addictions. Inpatient rehab facilities, as well as outpatient programs, are the most prevalent types of rehabilitation solutions available in the State of Florida. Comparing both inpatient and outpatient programs is highly advisable when choosing a center or treatment facility that is optimal for you.

Inpatient Rehabilitation Centers

Inpatient rehabilitation centers require individuals in need of care and assistance to live within the center or facility itself. Those seeking inpatient care must live within the center or facility throughout the entirety of the duration of the addiction program. With an inpatient facility, you will have the opportunity to work together with both medical professionals as well as addiction specialists as they help you learn how to get your life back on track. Some of the advantages of an inpatient rehab facility include:
  • Medically Monitored Detoxing: If you are in need of a medically monitored detox, an inpatient rehab center is ideal. Medically monitored detox ensures your health and safety with proper medical guidance and observation.
  • Counseling and Therapy: Inpatient programs provide both individual and group therapy sessions which are extremely helpful for those who are seeking an outlet to share struggles and obstacles in a safe and judgment-free environment.
  • Zero-Tolerance Environment: Inpatient facilities provide a zero-tolerance environment. A zero-tolerance environment prohibits individuals from using or possessing any form of alcohol, tobacco, or drugs. Prescription medications may be provided by staff if necessary during treatment, depending on your needs.
  • Routines: Addictions can cause individuals to lose track of time while maintaining a healthy and regular routine. With an inpatient rehabilitation facility, relearn how to create and stick to a routine that is beneficial both mentally and physically. With a routine in place it is much easier to avoid temptations or finding yourself in tough situations that may cause you to relapse.
  • Activities: Relearn how to find joy in simple hobbies and activities that you once loved or cherished. Spend time socializing with others, learning a new skill, or using physical exercise as a way to keep you on the right track as you work towards a new life of sobriety.

Outpatient Rehabilitation Programs

Outpatient rehabilitation programs are also available in the State of Florida. With an outpatient program, you have the ability to continue living at home while attending work without being required to live within a facility or center. Outpatient programs often extend to therapy, counseling, and with intensive outpatient programs, monitored detoxing. Outpatient programs are ideal for those who have a strong support system or for those who have only a slight addiction with the ability to steer clear from outside temptations.

Aftercare and Support

Getting continuous treatment and aftercare is vital for those struggling with addiction, even if you have completed a 30, 60, or 90-day inpatient rehabilitation program. Aftercare solutions help individuals to reintegrate back into a normal routine with work and local resources. Additionally, aftercare solutions are also available for those who are seeking local group therapy sessions, individual counseling, and even sponsorship meetings. Before choosing an inpatient or outpatient program that is best for your needs, it is important to inquire about the type of aftercare you will receive once your program has been completed. With the right support system and proper aftercare services, feel comfortable and confident moving forward in your life as you get it back on track. Are you ready to take the next step to get your life back on track? We can help. Our counselors are available 24 hours a day. Call us at 123-456-7890 to learn more about our Florida rehabilitation programs and to discover which treatment options are right for you today.

How Long Does a Dose of Suboxone Work?

What is Suboxone?

Buprenorphine/Naloxone, also known as Suboxone, is an opioid medication used for assisting people who have an addiction to opioids. Brand names of Suboxone also include Bunavial, Zubsolv, and Cassipa. Suboxone uses a blend of buprenorphine and naloxone to assist people in drug withdrawal. When combined with treatment and therapy, Suboxone works well to help addicts get off opioids.

How long does a dose of Suboxone work?

Suboxone begins working soon after it dissolves under a person’s tongue or on their cheek. Most people take one dose of Suboxone as a film dissolved on the tongue. One does get taken every day as directed by a person’s physician.

What does Suboxone do to treat people?

Buprenorphine/naloxone works in the brain to get people addicted to opioids off these drugs. Some of the medicines that Suboxone substitutes for include: • Heroin. • Fentanyl. • Hydrocodone. • Oxycodone. • Morphine. Buprenorphine partially works like an opioid because it is a partial opioid antagonist. It works weaker than full antagonists like methadone and heroin. The opioid effects level off even when dosages increase, reducing the risk of side effects, dependency, and misuse. Suboxone lowers the full impact of opioids, so it helps people addicted to opioids abstain from taking an excess of opioid drugs. Naloxone, another component in Suboxone, blocks opioid effects when it gets dissolved in a person’s mouth. If naloxone gets injected instead of taken orally, the person taking the drug becomes very ill when they experience withdrawal symptoms. This detail discourages individuals from injecting Suboxone. Suboxone works best, along with counseling and other types of rehabilitation support.

What are the symptoms of opioid dependence?

• Some of the signs of opioid addiction might include: • An inability to stop using opioids even though they cause relationship and health problems. • Needing to take more opioids to get the same effect. • Having withdrawal symptoms when you can’t get the opioids. • Giving up previously enjoyable activities to use the drug. • Spending a lot of time finding a way to use drugs. Signs of withdrawal from opioids include: • Runny nose. • Sweating. • Shaking. • Nausea and vomiting. • Diarrhea. • Achy body. • Irritability. • Irritability.

What shouldn’t you do when you take Suboxone?

Don’t start taking Suboxone early. Wait to take it until your doctor instructs you to, or you may have withdrawal symptoms. If you’re pregnant or if there’s a chance you’re pregnant, tell your doctor before you start Suboxone therapy. Continue taking Suboxone for the entire time that your doctor instructs. Follow all instructions about reducing Suboxone levels when it becomes time to stop taking the drug. Don’t miss doses, as this action might cause you to relapse. Suddenly stopping Suboxone for any reason might cause unpleasant withdrawal symptoms. Some antibiotics don’t work well with Suboxone, so let your health care provider know that you’re taking this medication. Take this medication following the instructions provided for you. Don’t take any other drugs with Suboxone unless you have your doctor’s permission. Can I become addicted to Suboxone? Yes, addiction remains a possibility when taking this drug. As long as you follow medication instructions, you should be gradually weaned from Suboxone over time. When Suboxone is used as prescribed and under a doctor’s supervision, the medication works well to help people safely get off opioids. You must follow the doctor’s instructions to achieve the desired effects without addiction, however. If you suddenly stop taking Suboxone, you will have withdrawal symptoms. So please consult your doctor before you quit taking Suboxone. This prescription is a controlled substance (CIII) and is regulated by the government. Some individuals who use street drugs or who abuse prescription drugs might want your drugs. Selling or giving Suboxone to someone else remains against the law. Using Suboxone in ways other than prescribed can cause addiction. Taking this medication via injection increases your chances of addiction. Taking Suboxone might get you off opioids for good. But for them to work correctly, you have to follow the instructions to get the right benefits. If you find that you can’t get off Suboxone when it comes time to start tapering off the drug, you need to ask for help. We can help you stay off opioids and Suboxone, too. Please contact our office right away at 1-234-456-7890 for more information and a consultation with our specialists.

How Long Does It Take to Get Admitted to Inpatient Drug Rehab?

It's very encouraging that you are seeking information about getting treatment for your addiction. Should you decide to go forward and do so, you'll have a bit of a fight on your hands. Fortunately, this is the "good" fight and something you don't have to do on your own. The first step towards recovery is yours to make. You have to come to terms with the reality you have an addiction. It's not a knock on your strength or character. Addiction is a disease. As such, it's not going to go away without treatment, which brings us to the second step towards recovery. You have to reach out for help. You can forget all the internet self-help solutions people are offering. They are seldom effective in the least. What you need is to enlist the services of a professional addiction treatment facility like ours. One question you might be wanting to ask is, "How long does it take to get admitted into an inpatient program?" Addiction is a very serious issue that addiction treatment facilities take very serious. As such, it's necessary for rehab facilities to streamline the process in order to efficiently get people in the door and ready for treatment. To answer your question, the admission process takes as little as an hour. In most cases, the facility's intake clinician will do an interview to determine the extent and nature of the prospective client's addiction. From there, financial considerations will be discussed to make sure the necessary payment resources are in place to begin treatment. Assuming everything goes well, there's no reason why the prospective client won't become an actual client within an hour. Of course, available bed space could become an issue. After admission, the facility's clinicians will execute the addiction treatment plan. From here, we want to discuss the entire addiction treatment process.

The Treatment Process After Admission

The modern-day drug rehab facility uses a wider range of treatment options than rehabs of yesteryear. Innovation has put a lot more treatment options in the toolboxes of treatment professionals all over the country. While treatment options are evolving, the actual process remains intact. For the most part, the addiction treatment process includes three steps as follows:
  • Detox Programs
  • Therapy and Counseling
  • Aftercare programs
For your benefit, we want to look at these steps in greater detail.

Detox Programs

When a client enters rehab within hours of their last drink or hit, they will have taken their last dose. Within 8-16 hours, they'll start to feel the effects of withdrawal. When the client's addiction is significant, the withdrawal symptoms can be quite dangerous. Clinicians will typically prescribe a medically-monitored detox program when they feel a client's health will be at risk as withdrawal takes hold. While the facility's medical staff is monitoring the client's withdrawal progress, they are hoping the client will be able to detox with a minimum of intervention. However, they are also ready to prescribe relief medication should pain or discomfort become apparent. When the detox process is complete, the client should be focused enough to handle therapy.

Therapy and Counseling

A majority of the time in treatment is spent in therapy. The client will be working closely with their therapist(s) on a mission of self-discovery. A counselor usually decides to deliver intensive counseling on an individual basis while also using group therapy as a way to get clients to interact with one another. Throughout therapy, the goal is very clear: find the driving force behind the client's addiction. When successful, it becomes easier to find solutions in the form of strong coping skills. The success of therapy is measured by the client's ability to create a strong recovery.

Aftercare Programs

The end of therapy is the beginning of recovery. In the coming months, the client is likely to encounter temptation and their triggers. The problem with that is a lot of recovering addiction sufferers are not yet ready to completely stand on their own. For that reason, rehab facilities offer aftercare programs to help keep former clients stay sober. The most prominent aftercare options include access to 12-Step meetings, additional outpatient counseling and sober or transitional living. There really is little cause for concern about the rehab admission process. As long as bed space and financial resources are available, you should be admitted within an hour or two. The important thing is to get help. If you are ready, you can reach us at 123-456-7890.

How Can the Marchman Act Help Me Get Treatment for My Loved One?

Far too many people know how painful it is to watch a loved one struggle with an addiction to drugs or alcohol. For some friends and family members, the pain is very personal because they have suffered collateral damage at the hands of their loved one's addiction. The problem is it's difficult for family members to exert any influence over a loved one who is unwilling to admit they are dealing with the cycle of addiction. Family members can only hope there will come a time when their addicted loved one comes to the realization there's a problem. At that point, there's hope the addiction sufferer will finally reach out for help. Short of that happening, the only other recourse family and friends might have is an intervention. Sometimes interventions work and sometimes they don't. If an intervention fails, loved ones don't have the option of putting a gun to their addicted loved one's head to drag them into rehab. With all that said, there is a law in Florida that empowers family members to force a loved one into rehab if they can establish the loved one's addiction makes the loved one danger to themselves or to others. The name of that law is the "Marchman Act." FYI: The Marchman Act is officially listed as the "Hal S. Marchman Alcohol and Other Drug Services Act of 1993". At this point, we would like to engage in further discussion about the Marchman Act and how it works.

Using the Marchman Act to Get a Loved One Into Rehab

Before we begin this discussion, it seems prudent to point out something that should be evident. Contrary to some people's beliefs, using the Matchman to have a loved one involuntarily placed in an addiction treatment facility is not an adversarial action. In many cases, it is being done out of legitimate love and concern for the addicted family member. Think about it for a moment. An individual is trying to survive life caught up in a substantial addiction to drugs or alcohol. Their life is crumbling before their very eyes. Maybe they are homeless or dealing with financial, health and relationship problems. They won't seek help because they either don't want help, don't believe they have an addiction or have given up hope. Left to their own devices, there's real potential these kinds of addiction sufferers are headed down the road towards prison, insanity or even death. What kind of a relative or friend would just stand by and let that happen? The Marchman Act exists for this very reason. It's not a blanket option for family members to exercise in order to remove an unwanted nuisance from their own lives. Like any other restrictive law on the books, a family member has to show just cause that their addicted loved one poses a real danger to themselves or others. Making that claim has to be adjudicated in a court of law.

Reasons Marchman Act Can Be Exercised

Remember, a family member has to show just cause as to why their loved one should be involuntarily subjected to addiction treatment. The first qualification is the addiction sufferer must show a high level of impairment whether sober or not. If they are impaired, it becomes reasonable to assume they don't have the capacity for taking proper care of themselves or making good judgments. They have basically lost the ability to control their lives. The other reason why the courts might exercise the Marchman act is if the family member can show that their loved one has made threats or is a danger to others. Under the influence of a substance, any signs of aggression should be given extra scrutiny. The Process If a family member makes the decision to attempt to have the courts invoke the Marchman Act on their loved one, there's a very specific process the family member must follow. Here are the steps in order:
  • Petition the court with a sworn affidavit
  • A court hearing is held for involuntary assessment
  • The defendant is held for up to five days for medical and mental health evaluation
  • If found impaired, the court will issue order for involuntary treatment of up to 60 days
  • If the defendant refuses, they are held in civil contempt of court
If you have concerns about the welfare of an addicted loved one living in Florida, we would like to offer our addiction treatment services. If you need help with the process, you can contact us at 800-737-0933.

What Are the Similarities and Differences Between Different Opioid Drugs?

Opioid is the general term for a narcotic derived, ultimately, from the opium poppy. Opiates are natural opioids. Some of these drugs are prescribed to control pain while others, such as heroin, are illegal. All of them are similar in that they lock into receptors in the central nervous system, which is made up of the brain and the spinal cord. Opioids can be problematic because along with pain relief many of them cause an intense euphoria when they are taken. This can lead to dependence and addiction. People can overdose on opioids, though the symptoms can be reversed by taking an opioid antagonist called naloxone. Naloxone also locks into opioid receptors, but it doesn’t produce the euphoria associated with opioids such as heroin. Here are some opioids:

Heroin

Heroin or diamorphine is a synthetic opioid made from morphine, which is an opiate. Though it was created as a pain reliever by the same people who developed aspirin, heroin is now illegal. When it is pure, it is a white powder, though as a street drug it is rarely used in its pure form. It is snorted, smoked or injected. A type of heroin called black tar resembles asphalt and gets its color from the impurities that remain after it’s been processed. The drug can easily pass through the blood-brain barrier, a physiological system that usually protects the brain from toxins. Once there, the body converts heroin into morphine, which then binds to mu-opioid receptors. The person feels a rush that can be very intense and may be accompanied by nausea and vomiting. After the rush, the person grows drowsy and “nods off.” Other initial effects of heroin are: • Reduced mental function • Slowed heart rate • Slowed breathing • Constipation These symptoms appear because heroin, like all opioids, is a central nervous system depressant. A person who takes too much heroin can die if their breathing and heart rate are drastically slowed down by the drug.

Fentanyl

Unlike heroin, fentanyl is legal but strictly controlled. Like other opioids, it is prescribed for pain. It is also 80 to 100 times stronger than morphine. An analog of fentanyl, carfentanil, is 100 times stronger than fentanyl. Both are used to ease the pain of end-stage cancer. Like heroin, dependency can develop with fentanyl, especially if the person takes it for a long time. Unlike heroin, it is not injected or snorted, but comes in the form of a tablet placed under the tongue, a film placed on the skin, a lozenge meant to dissolve slowly between the patient's gum and cheek or a lollipop. A patient who is taking fentanyl must be monitored by and work closely with their doctor. A person who is on fentanyl should not drink grapefruit juice or eat grapefruit. This is true if the patient is using any type of opioid, because grapefruit has a chemical that stops the body from metabolizing opioids. This intensifies the effect of the drug and can lead to sudden death even if the fruit or the juice is taken hours after the person has taken their opioid drug.

Methadone

Methadone is also a legal opioid, but it is different from the others in that it is used to wean a patient from their dependency on another opioid. It can only be prescribed through an opioid treatment program, or OTP that is certified by the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration. Methadone is also used to treat pain, including the pain of withdrawal from other opioids such as heroin. It is taken once a day as a pill, a liquid or a wafer under a doctor’s supervision and at a dosage that is tailored to the needs of the patient. Many patients need to go to a clinic to take their dose of methadone if they are using it to quit another opioid. When they are seen to be reliable and stable, they can take the drug home with them. Like other opioids, a person can become addicted to methadone, so it is crucial that they take it exactly as their doctor prescribed. This is especially true of patients who can take the drug home with them. There are many other types of opioids, including hydromorphone, hydrocodone, oxymorphone and codeine. They are powerful, pain-killing drugs that have made the lives of many patients bearable, but the risk of abusing and even dying from these drugs is considerable if they are misused. If you feel you have a problem with opioids, don’t hesitate to call us today. Our counselors are available 24 hours a day, seven days a week. Call us at 123-456-7890.

What Are the Most Important Things to Know About Drug Detoxing?

What are some of the most significant facts to know about going through drug detox? You already know you've got a lot of work ahead of you. But what can you expect to happen during the detox process?

How long will drug detox take?

The amount of time it takes to drug detox depends totally on the drugs you've been using and the length of time you used them. In general, however, drug detox takes somewhere from seven days to two weeks. Some drugs take longer. Getting off drugs remains a challenge for everyone who does it. Staying off drugs for the long term also includes a lot of hard work. Ask your medical professional for more information on detoxing from a specific drug or alcohol.

How does drug detox feel?

You need professional and emotional support to get through the drug or alcohol detox process. This support helps keep people withdrawing from drugs to stay clean and sober and to prevent a relapse. When detoxing, many individuals become nauseated and vomit. You need help keeping hydrated, and anti-nausea medications assist in relieving vomiting. Exercise and hydration both work well to combat some of the physical and emotional symptoms of withdrawal that you might feel. Anti-diarrhea medications also assist people with stomach upset due to withdrawal. Some medicines work well to less severe withdrawal symptoms if you stop taking heroin or opiates. Suboxone is a legal medication that works as a replacement for these two drugs. Once the opioids leave your system, you can gradually reduce the amount of the substitute medication you take. Many recovering addicts experience sleep problems and hypersensitivities during withdrawal from substances such as benzodiazepines. Detoxing at a medically staffed detox center allows you to have medical help with severe withdrawal symptoms so that you won't experience as much discomfort. Also, addicts sometimes start taking drugs to self-medicate mental health issues such as depression or bipolar disorder. If you become depressed or experience emotional problems during withdrawal, a health care provider can prescribe you drugs to ease these problems, too.

Should I drug detox at home?

No, you shouldn't drug detox at home, especially by yourself. If it were easy to detox using will power, you would have been clean and sober by now. But, drug and alcohol withdrawal is serious business. Tempting as it might appear, drug detox needs to be left to the experts. Some people who go through drug detox become violently ill. People sometimes die during the process of detoxing. You require a trained staff to help you get off your drugs of choice and reliable folks to keep you safe while you go through withdrawal. Most people become very ill while they detox. You might also have seizures, hallucinations, and experience a wide variety of distressing side effects from not using your drug of choice. When you detox in a medical facility, you don't only gain a better chance at completing the detox process, but you might also qualify for medications to reduce your uncomfortable drug withdrawal symptoms. Other severe physical and mental problems that might occur during detox include: • Delirium tremens. • Grand mal seizures. • Intense cravings for the missing drug or alcohol. These fierce cravings might bring about an overdose. • Extreme nausea and vomiting, leading to dehydration and malnutrition. • Low blood pressure.] • Kidney failure. • A chance of choking on your vomit. • Coma. • Death.

Can I successfully drug detox? Or am I hooked for life?

You can successfully detox from drugs and alcohol. If you quit taking your medication of choice or stop drinking, your body can begin to heal itself. Once your body releases all of the addictive toxins from it, you do need to find out why you started to use in the first place. To accomplish this task, you need to go to a reputable rehab program. Most rehabs offer individual and group therapy, training, and education about why you might have started using. Medical help remains available to keep you off your previous drug or alcohol addiction. You might receive family therapy and get to participate in a sober living program. Sober living enables you to live in a home-like setting and gradually work your way back into interacting with the world outside your treatment placement. Please make the call and contact us for more detox information and a new start in life without drugs and addiction.

Are You Allowed to Leave Long Term Treatment Programs for a Night?

If you are thinking about a rehab program for yourself or someone close to you, there is a lot that comes to mind. The majority of the people wonder: what a rehab program involves? How long the treatment period takes? What are the regulations of the addiction treatment center? Well, you need to know that a rehab program varies from one person to the next depending on the severity of drug and alcohol abuse. There is inpatient treatment and outpatient treatment. The former mostly applies to individuals that are severely affected, and it entails long term treatment programs to attain sobriety.

How does a rehab program take?

Normally, a rehab program lasts between 30 and 90 days. Short treatment programs take about 30 days, while, long-term treatment programs can take between 60 and 90 days. There are programs that provide you with a standardized program that requires you to stay in the facility for a short period. And there are rehab programs that give you an individualized approach to establish your level of addiction, plus your mental and physical state to determine how long you should stay in the facility.

How does a rehab program work?

Whether you're under outpatient or inpatient treatment, there is a series of steps that a rehab center follows to ensure that you achieve full recovery after the program. Individuals also need to understand that addiction is not something that people wish upon themselves. It is a disease. Therefore, you should not shy to check yourself or a loved one into a rehab facility. Here's how the program works.

I. Assessment

When you check into a rehab facility, the first step is assessment. Here, a dual diagnosis has to be conducted to establish if you have any underlying mental issue. During the assessment, a specialist will also ask a couple of questions to determine the drug or alcohol you're addicted to, plus the duration.

II. Detox

Detox is a critical phase because it's where substance or alcohol user stops using. During this stage is when relapsing occurs, and that's why specialized care is recommended during detoxification. It is also during this phase that withdrawal symptoms occur, and they are the major cause of relapsing. Some of the symptoms include:
  • Agitation
  • Excess sweating at night
  • Shakiness
  • Vomiting
  • Nausea
  • Irritability

III. Rehabilitation

The next step is rehabilitation. The step involves both physical and emotional help, and there are stipulated rules that you have to follow. A client attends a couple of counseling sessions, which helps him or her to regain self-esteem. During this phase, you get to see the positivity of a sober life and the negativity of addiction. You will also receive group therapy sessions and recovery meetings. At this stage, you are given time to partake in other activities such as exercising, taking trips to the beach, watching movies, and family members can also visit.

Incentives

After you have undergone the rehabilitation process, a rehab facility can offer you privileges once you show that you have advanced through the program positively. However, before any incentive, you have to have remained sober and followed through the treatment program goals. The rewards come after a significant amount of time during the process, whereby you're let to go for unsupervised trips or even given weekend passes. Such privileges serve as a motivation for you to continue pursuing sobriety, plus you also act as an ideal example to other clients within the rehab program.

IV. Aftercare

The last step involved in a rehab program is aftercare. It is a critical step because addiction is a chronic disease that has no definite cure. This step helps you to manage your addiction throughout your life. You can get help from self-help groups within your community. Alumni groups also come in handy in helping you avoid drug and alcohol abuse. During this stage, you learn how to interact with the community around you when sober.

Conclusion

Addiction is a chronic disease that affects a good number of people. It is not voluntary, and that is why you should be confident to seek help from a rehab facility if you or a family member is struggling with addiction. Sticking to your treatment plan and maintaining sobriety can see you get privileges from the rehab center, which prompts you to pursue sobriety. Are you struggling with addiction? Would you like to pursue sober living? Well, contact us today at 800-737-0933 to get the help you need.

What Can You Bring to Residential Drug Rehab Facility

Now that you've decided to go to rehab, you don't need to stress out about what to pack and what to leave behind. This is because we got that covered for you. Our aim is to ensure the safety of our esteemed clients, their loved ones, and our staff. As a result, all our rehabilitation centers have a checklist of what you can bring to residential drug and another one of the prohibited items. This checklist is created following strict policies set for the purpose of ensuring the efficiency of rehab services while also helping the clients work towards their goal. Upon admission, our staff will check your bag against these lists and catalog the things you come with to ensure you take with you all your belongings when leaving. Before we tell you what you can bring, however, how about starting with what is prohibited:
  • Electronics- Although there is internet access in rehabs, it is best to keep you from distractions like smartphones, laptops, or tablets and any device that could record videos or play games. If you must bring your alarm clock, it should not have a music player. The idea is to invite a therapeutic atmosphere to improve the efficiency and effectiveness of rehab strategies.
  • Revealing clothes- Avoid packing clothes that can be described as sexy or simply anything revealing. Your mind should be on ensuring you successfully recover from drug addiction and not getting into relationships or indulging in sexual activities.
  • Valuable- When going to rehab, only bring jewelry that you must wear like a wedding ring or watch. You, however, could consult the rehab institution you're joining to determine whether they have safe boxes for the valuables that you can't leave behind.
  • Questionable items- Alcohol, cigarettes, perfumes, sex-related books, aerosol cans, knives, guns, non-prescription drugs, and outside foods should also not be brought to residential drug recovery centers.

Things you can bring to rehab

Different rehab facilities have varying rules that dictate what you can bring while participating in residential drug recovery programs. Some of the facilities are obviously stricter than others. Nonetheless, it is recommended that you come with the names, contacts, and addresses of the family, friend, or professional experts involved in your recovery process. You should also provide information on 12 step sponsors who will help you continue a healthy lifestyle during and after rehab. If you have any prescription drugs, you should bring them in their original package and ensure the product label is still on. If the medication is in syrup form, the package should be sealed and brand new. Since you will find vending machines in rehab institutions, you might need some money in small bills. This should also come in handy when making store runs during your stay. Bring with you your credit or debit card, checkbook, or other financial tools that you'll use to pay for your medication while in rehab. You can also bring a notebook, a journal, stamps & envelops, and pictures of any loved one in the wallet or room.

Clothes you can bring

As a rehab facility, we are quite strict on the dress code of our patients. For instance, you will need to stay away from revealing or somewhat sexy clothes. You could opt for layering options depending on the weather like t-shirts, jackets, sweaters, pajamas, or cardigans. To avoid over-packing since the space available for you in the rehab facility may be limited, get some comfortable shoes, pants, socks, bathrobe, belt, slippers, undergarments, and something dressy for when you have special events like family night. Since you will engage in certain outdoor activities, consider bringing some sneakers or tennis shoes along. Some workout clothes would also come in handy in case you have to go to the gym or take part in sporting activities. Since there might be a pool in the institution, you could also bring a one-piece swimsuit for ladies and a trunk for men.

Personal Effects

Although your comfort during treatment in a rehab center is paramount, we are recovery professionals who specialize in creating a facility that best meets your needs. As such, if you must pack some toiletries, personal hygiene or beauty products, they must be alcohol-free and there shouldn't be any aerosols. Consider checking with the rehab institution you're going to about the items they allow and the quantity. The personal products should be enough for a whole month and they can include deodorant, toothbrush & toothpaste, hair care products (shampoo, conditioner, and a pump hair spray, a comb/brush, shaving cream), a lotion, sunscreen, and limited makeup. So, are you ready to begin your recovery process with us? If you are, get in touch with us at 800-737-0933. Our services are available 24/7/365.

Will 28 Days in Rehab Be Enough?

Everyone has to follow their own path to sobriety, and knowing how long to stay in rehab is an important decision along the journey. Depending on the severity of your addiction, a traditional 28 or 30-day program may not be enough to give you the skills and confidence you need to stay clean and avoid a relapse. Ultimately, the decision of how long to stay in rehab will rest on you. It's not about how long someone thinks you should go. It's about how long you know you need to be there.

What to Expect from 28-Day Rehab Programs?

A 28-day program is the standard recommendation for people who do not have prior experience with addiction treatment. The 28-day program is broken into four blocks, each lasting for a total of seven days - in other words, a month of treatment. The substance abuse treatment techniques used in 28-day programs focus heavily on psychotherapy and cognitive therapy. Support groups, one-on-one counseling, and skill-building courses will be heavily implemented throughout the duration of treatment. Each week builds off the last, helping you undo your addiction from the inside out and developing the coping strategies and healthy habits you need to live a successful, sober life.

Do I Need Inpatient or Outpatient Rehab?

Inpatient addiction treatment offers a greater level of control over your own recovery. You get to remove yourself from your current environment, avoiding any triggers and resources that will make it easy to continue using. Many inpatient programs start at 30 days, but there are many programs that last 60 or even 90 days. Speaking with the staff at rehab and a substance abuse counselor will help you make the best choice for you. It's important to understand that no rehab is a cure-all for addiction. You have to be committed to your recovery and willing to extend an olive branch to the staff and counselors trying to help. Someone who is determined to get clean and stay sober will have a better outcome after 28 days of treatment than a half-hearted person who spends 90 days in rehab. While it's natural to be fearful treatment won't work or hesitant to new ideas, you must commit yourself to be fully present during treatment. This is the only way you'll experience the greatest impact.

What if I Can't Afford a 30-day Treatment Program?

Although there are many financing options available, some people simply cannot attend residential rehab, but that doesn't mean they're out of luck. Outpatient therapy can be an effective addiction treatment too, and Intensive Outpatient Programs (IOPs) can be just as effective as inpatient treatment programs for many people.

How Long Should I Go to Rehab?

You should, first and foremost, get as much help as you can afford and access. Any treatment is better than none. If you can only attend one addiction meeting per week at a local facility, by all means, go. Even if you're trying to save up for a longer stay at a 28-day facility, you should never forego treatment entirely because you can't access everything you need right away. There may be cases where 28-days or even 90 days aren't enough. In this case, extended programs are available that can last anywhere from six months to a year, and they are designed to help a person fully integrate themselves into a new life with guidance, assistance, and counseling. Many substance use disorders are tied to mental illness, and the first-time diagnosis in rehab isn't uncommon. You may require a greater length of treatment if you are tackling addiction alongside a mental health condition such as depression, anxiety, bipolar disorder or schizophrenia. These guidelines are mere opportunities for people who are looking to get treatment. Rehab comes in many different forms, and there is always a way to get help regardless of your financial status, family obligations and housing arrangements. Are you ready to take the next step? Call us today at 800-737-0933 and speak to one of our trained representatives. We can help you come up with the perfect treatment plan for you and connect you with the rehab you've been waiting for.

How Can a Christian Track Help in Recovery?

If you or a family member is affected by addiction or substance use disorders, searching for a reputable, effective recovery program that will provide lasting results is a key step towards recovery and healing. A Christian track can help in the recovery process. When considering the recovery options available to you, choosing a Christian track provides additional benefits over the standard programs. You or your loved one will receive counseling and support based on well-researched, evidence-based treatment techniques while also applying biblical principles that can provide lasting change. What can a Christian track to recovery provide?

A Compassionate Community

Many people may find choosing a faith-based recovery program reassuring. In a Christian recovery track, you will be surrounded by a compassionate community of people who are attentive to not only your physical and emotional needs but also your spiritual needs. Christ reached out with love and compassion to the broken and the hurting. When the clinicians and staff of a recovery program are acting out of His example of mercy and grace, they can offer a level of support that is not easily found in other programs. You will feel the kind of love and acceptance that can only be found in Christ.

Support on the Spiritual Journey

Recovery is not just a physical and emotional process. It is a spiritual process as well. A Christian recovery track can provide the support you need on your spiritual journey. This support is available in areas such as:
  • Prayer. While you are struggling with an addiction, prayer can be difficult. Your clinicians will be able to encourage you in your prayer life, and they will be ready to pray for you when you need it.
  • Biblical Advice. God’s Word provides deep insights that guide our daily lives. Our clinicians can help you unpack and understand how biblical principles can help you on your journey to recovery.
  • Spiritual Perspective. Many of the issues we face have a spiritual aspect to them. A Christian recovery track can help you interpret the spiritual aspect of addiction and healing, guiding you in the application of spiritual solutions.

Hope and Forgiveness

God can provide lasting healing to individuals and families. Two of the chief messages of the Bible are hope and forgiveness. Both of these ideas can be hard to grasp if you are struggling with substance abuse. A Christian track to recovery can help you see that Christ offers hope. A Christian clinician can show you that you have the tools, ability, and support you need to find healing. They can also guide you in finding forgiveness — both God’s forgiveness and self-forgiveness. You do not have to stay stuck in addiction and substance abuse. Our counselors are available 24 hours a day. Give us a call now at 800-737-0933.