Tag Archives: 28 day program

How Can You Make the Most of 28 Days in Rehab

When you commit to entering a treatment program for drug abuse or alcoholism, you’re taking a critical first step towards recovery. The goal is to use the time you spend in a treatment facility to build a foundation for a clean and sober life.

Treatment programs vary in length, but the 28-day model is still very popular. No matter how long you remain in residential treatment, you need to take advantage of the experience. Here are some suggestions for how you can make the most of 28-days in rehab.

Learn to Listen

There is an old adage spoken by those in recovery that involves listening. Those who have been a part of various recovery communities may make reference to taking the cotton out of your ears and putting it in your mouth.

This is a somewhat overzealous way of insisting that anyone new in recovery needs to open their ears before they open their mouth. It doesn’t mean to clam up and avoid talking. What this does reference is learning how to be a good listener.

During your 28 days in rehab, try to avoid crafting witty replies while you should be absorbing what you’re hearing. One way to make the most out of these four weeks in treatment is to learn to listen because when you listen, you’ll learn.

Listen to Learn

The inherent benefit of improving your listening skills is developing the ability to learn from what you hear. There are various ways you can absorb information you will hear during your 28-day rehab program.

Take advantage of counseling sessions, group therapy opportunities, or outside meetings to practice absorbing what you hear. Once you’ve learned how to listen, you will be able to listen to learn.

Not everything will prove helpful, but at least you won’t miss important things that you identify within your own recovery. Never shut your mind to a suggestion or idea that might be helpful in your recovery.

When you listen to learn, not to formulate an opinion, you’ll be amazed at how much you absorb. Recovery is a lifelong learning process. So, one way to get the most out of your 28-day rehab is by listening to learn.

Be Honest

No one in a treatment environment should ever judge another person. There aren’t right or wrong answers to the questions you will answer about yourself during various parts of your program.

The only thing that is vital is that you are honest. Without honesty, there can be little hope that you will hear things that will resonate with you. When you become totally honest, your mind will open to suggestions.

You will begin to identify with others who share your feelings. Only by being honest can you receive helpful suggestions on what paths might help you stay clean and sober. Dishonesty is one way to expose you to the perils of relapse.

The old adage that honesty is the best policy is an interesting concept for most life situations. In your recovery, it is essential. Being totally open and honest may be hard at first, but if you commit to being honest, you will soon find it becomes a natural part of your personality.

Be Open-Minded

A key requirement to learning and changing is being able to accept new ideas. If you go into any type of treatment environment with a closed mind, you’ll reduce your chances of success dramatically.

Having an open mind doesn’t mean compromising your principles. It simply means you are going to strive to avoid forming an opinion based on old ideas. Old habits die hard.

The key to changing bad habits is to be open to the whole idea that a change is necessary. The goal of your 28-day treatment program isn’t to perform some kind of miracle. Sometimes the whole idea of being clean and sober for 28-days is a miracle all by itself.

But, if you work towards a better sense of open-mindedness, you will have developed a useful tool for you sustained recovery. If you can focus on being open-minded during your 28-day rehab, you’ll be amazed at what might happen.

When you open your ears and learn how to listen to learn, you’ll receive help from places you may have never envisioned. Your openness and honesty will attract you to like-minded people, people who will share with you their own experience, strength, and hope.

These are some key suggestions to remember that can help you get the most out of your 28-day rehab experience. If you have yet to make the decision to seek treatment for a drug or alcohol problem, call and speak to someone today at 800-737-0933.

Will 28 Days in Rehab Be Enough?

Everyone has to follow their own path to sobriety, and knowing how long to stay in rehab is an important decision along the journey. Depending on the severity of your addiction, a traditional 28 or 30-day program may not be enough to give you the skills and confidence you need to stay clean and avoid a relapse.

Ultimately, the decision of how long to stay in rehab will rest on you. It’s not about how long someone thinks you should go. It’s about how long you know you need to be there.

What to Expect from 28-Day Rehab Programs?

A 28-day program is the standard recommendation for people who do not have prior experience with addiction treatment. The 28-day program is broken into four blocks, each lasting for a total of seven days – in other words, a month of treatment.

The substance abuse treatment techniques used in 28-day programs focus heavily on psychotherapy and cognitive therapy. Support groups, one-on-one counseling, and skill-building courses will be heavily implemented throughout the duration of treatment.

Each week builds off the last, helping you undo your addiction from the inside out and developing the coping strategies and healthy habits you need to live a successful, sober life.

Do I Need Inpatient or Outpatient Rehab?

Inpatient addiction treatment offers a greater level of control over your own recovery. You get to remove yourself from your current environment, avoiding any triggers and resources that will make it easy to continue using.

Many inpatient programs start at 30 days, but there are many programs that last 60 or even 90 days. Speaking with the staff at rehab and a substance abuse counselor will help you make the best choice for you.

It’s important to understand that no rehab is a cure-all for addiction. You have to be committed to your recovery and willing to extend an olive branch to the staff and counselors trying to help. Someone who is determined to get clean and stay sober will have a better outcome after 28 days of treatment than a half-hearted person who spends 90 days in rehab.

While it’s natural to be fearful treatment won’t work or hesitant to new ideas, you must commit yourself to be fully present during treatment. This is the only way you’ll experience the greatest impact.

What if I Can’t Afford a 30-day Treatment Program?

Although there are many financing options available, some people simply cannot attend residential rehab, but that doesn’t mean they’re out of luck. Outpatient therapy can be an effective addiction treatment too, and Intensive Outpatient Programs (IOPs) can be just as effective as inpatient treatment programs for many people.

How Long Should I Go to Rehab?

You should, first and foremost, get as much help as you can afford and access. Any treatment is better than none. If you can only attend one addiction meeting per week at a local facility, by all means, go. Even if you’re trying to save up for a longer stay at a 28-day facility, you should never forego treatment entirely because you can’t access everything you need right away.

There may be cases where 28-days or even 90 days aren’t enough. In this case, extended programs are available that can last anywhere from six months to a year, and they are designed to help a person fully integrate themselves into a new life with guidance, assistance, and counseling.

Many substance use disorders are tied to mental illness, and the first-time diagnosis in rehab isn’t uncommon. You may require a greater length of treatment if you are tackling addiction alongside a mental health condition such as depression, anxiety, bipolar disorder or schizophrenia.

These guidelines are mere opportunities for people who are looking to get treatment. Rehab comes in many different forms, and there is always a way to get help regardless of your financial status, family obligations and housing arrangements.

Are you ready to take the next step? Call us today at 800-737-0933 and speak to one of our trained representatives. We can help you come up with the perfect treatment plan for you and connect you with the rehab you’ve been waiting for.

How Do I Get Sober if I Can’t Do 28 Days In Rehab?

Hitting rock bottom is defined by the feeling of wanting to be free from your addiction than wanting to continue using to numb your pain. You most likely heard of many people getting into recovery after doing 28 or more days in rehab. While you want to be free from your addiction, you may not want to do 28 days in rehab or cannot do 28 days in rehab due to work, school, family, or financial reasons.

There are other options available to get sober if you cannot do 28 days in rehab:

Outpatient Rehab

Outpatient rehab allows you to receive the guidance and support of rehab without having to be confined to a facility. When attending outpatient rehab, you can still go to work, school, home, etc. Partial-hospitalization consists of six-hour sessions that meet five days a week. Intensive-outpatients consists of three-hour sessions that meet two to five days a week. Outpatient rehab consists of one-hour sessions that meet once or twice a week. Intensive-outpatient is the best option if you work or attend school full-time and are at the beginning of your recovery.

Detox

The physical aspect of addiction must always be addressed. In order to safely, and comfortably go through withdrawal. Detox programs can be found in inpatient rehab facilities, hospitals, clinics, or as stand-alone facilities. You would stay at the detox facility for as long as you are going through withdrawal, which may last two to fourteen days.

Support Meetings

Regardless if you take the past of inpatient rehab, outpatient rehab, or just detox, support meetings are a must to help you get sober because you will be able to connect with people who can empathize with you. Twelve-step meetings are not your only option; there are many 12-step-alternatives that you can choose from.

Getting Sober in the Outside World

While doing 28 or more days in inpatient rehab has many benefits, one of the major downfalls is getting sober in a confined environment that does not resemble the outside world. The outside world presents many challenges that can endanger recovery. However, the key to recovery is learning to cope without having to turn to drugs, alcohol, or any other addictive behavior. Outpatient rehab or detox with support meetings is beneficial because it helps you learn how to stay maintain recovery unconditionally.

Genesis House is a rehab and detox facility in Lake Worth, Florida. If you are interested, call us today at 800-737-0933