Tag Archives: 28 day rehab

Will 28 Days in Rehab Be Enough?

Everyone has to follow their own path to sobriety, and knowing how long to stay in rehab is an important decision along the journey. Depending on the severity of your addiction, a traditional 28 or 30-day program may not be enough to give you the skills and confidence you need to stay clean and avoid a relapse.

Ultimately, the decision of how long to stay in rehab will rest on you. It’s not about how long someone thinks you should go. It’s about how long you know you need to be there.

What to Expect from 28-Day Rehab Programs?

A 28-day program is the standard recommendation for people who do not have prior experience with addiction treatment. The 28-day program is broken into four blocks, each lasting for a total of seven days – in other words, a month of treatment.

The substance abuse treatment techniques used in 28-day programs focus heavily on psychotherapy and cognitive therapy. Support groups, one-on-one counseling, and skill-building courses will be heavily implemented throughout the duration of treatment.

Each week builds off the last, helping you undo your addiction from the inside out and developing the coping strategies and healthy habits you need to live a successful, sober life.

Do I Need Inpatient or Outpatient Rehab?

Inpatient addiction treatment offers a greater level of control over your own recovery. You get to remove yourself from your current environment, avoiding any triggers and resources that will make it easy to continue using.

Many inpatient programs start at 30 days, but there are many programs that last 60 or even 90 days. Speaking with the staff at rehab and a substance abuse counselor will help you make the best choice for you.

It’s important to understand that no rehab is a cure-all for addiction. You have to be committed to your recovery and willing to extend an olive branch to the staff and counselors trying to help. Someone who is determined to get clean and stay sober will have a better outcome after 28 days of treatment than a half-hearted person who spends 90 days in rehab.

While it’s natural to be fearful treatment won’t work or hesitant to new ideas, you must commit yourself to be fully present during treatment. This is the only way you’ll experience the greatest impact.

What if I Can’t Afford a 30-day Treatment Program?

Although there are many financing options available, some people simply cannot attend residential rehab, but that doesn’t mean they’re out of luck. Outpatient therapy can be an effective addiction treatment too, and Intensive Outpatient Programs (IOPs) can be just as effective as inpatient treatment programs for many people.

How Long Should I Go to Rehab?

You should, first and foremost, get as much help as you can afford and access. Any treatment is better than none. If you can only attend one addiction meeting per week at a local facility, by all means, go. Even if you’re trying to save up for a longer stay at a 28-day facility, you should never forego treatment entirely because you can’t access everything you need right away.

There may be cases where 28-days or even 90 days aren’t enough. In this case, extended programs are available that can last anywhere from six months to a year, and they are designed to help a person fully integrate themselves into a new life with guidance, assistance, and counseling.

Many substance use disorders are tied to mental illness, and the first-time diagnosis in rehab isn’t uncommon. You may require a greater length of treatment if you are tackling addiction alongside a mental health condition such as depression, anxiety, bipolar disorder or schizophrenia.

These guidelines are mere opportunities for people who are looking to get treatment. Rehab comes in many different forms, and there is always a way to get help regardless of your financial status, family obligations and housing arrangements.

Are you ready to take the next step? Call us today at 800-737-0933 and speak to one of our trained representatives. We can help you come up with the perfect treatment plan for you and connect you with the rehab you’ve been waiting for.

Why 28 Days in Rehab Is Not Enough

As you’re investigating options for rehab, you’re probably going to see programs of different lengths. In fact, you may see a number of programs that last for 28 days. The amount of time that you have to spend in rehab really depends upon your individual needs, so it is difficult to say that a specific quantity is unequivocally right or wrong across the board. However, some reasons exist as to why 28 days may not be enough:

  • You must detox
  • You must learn about yourself
  • You must interact with others

A four-week program might not provide you with enough time to detox and to go through a treatment program where you get to know yourself and how to return to the world without abusing drugs and alcohol. Detox is the first step in many rehab programs, and exactly how long this process takes depends upon a number of individual factors.

Also, think about all of the time you have spent trying to get to know yourself. Of course, it is unlikely that you are going to leave a rehab program fully know yourself regardless of how long you are there. However, a major goal is to get you to know yourself better. You particularly want to learn about your triggers and how to avoid them or what techniques will get your mind off of then. Getting this in-depth with self-discovery can be challenging in a four-week span.

Interacting with Others After Treatment

Interacting with your peers and counselors plays an important role in your rehabilitation. In both scenarios, you will generally need to open up about your experiences. You may share information that you were even afraid to admit to yourself in the past. These practices can assist you in knowing when and how to ask for help in the future. Also, your addiction may have led you to a host of negative social connections and habits. By developing bonds with people in the program, you can learn how to trust again. Rebuilding this feeling can certainly take more than 28 days.

When you’re deciding for how long you should enroll in a rehab program, you have to take numerous factors into consideration. Also, you don’t need to make this determination by yourself. Counselors are always available, so you can call 800-737-0933 for guidance. By speaking with someone else, you can get insight into the situation and what you need that you were unable to recognize and determine by yourself.

Why 28 Days of Rehab May Not Be Enough

Treatment for addiction issues is a continually evolving area. 28-day inpatient treatment programs have been the norm in the addiction treatment world. However, research shows that the longer a newly clean and sober person stays in treatment, the better their chances for lasting recovery.

Some substances take longer to detox from than others. There can be periods of time when even after the initial detox period is over that withdrawal symptoms can resurface. In early recovery, it is important that a support system is in place so that the individual does not return to using. If an individual is still in treatment when these symptoms resurface there is a greater chance they will use the resources available to get through it rather than go back out and use.

Even in individuals who will not experience a recurrence of withdrawal symptoms, the brain and body need a chance to fully heal. Dopamine is a chemical found in the brain that is responsible for pleasure. Drug and alcohol users may have a hard time experiencing happiness and joy when they stop using their drug of choice. Most substances deplete the amount of dopamine that is readily available in early recovery and it takes a significant period of time, longer than 28 days, for the level of dopamine to return to normal. When a person stays in treatment during the period of time needed for levels to return, they have a greater chance of continuing in recovery rather than relapsing.

Avoiding Triggers is the Key to Successful Recovery

The main triggers for those in early recovery are being around the people they used with, being in places they used to use, and exposure to the things they used to be around when they were using. If these things can be avoided than recovery can continue with fewer chances for relapse. 28 days in treatment is not long enough to make the changes necessary to eliminate these triggers from their lives.

If you or someone you love is suffering from addiction, consider a treatment program that lasts longer than the typical 28 days. Although many in early recovery are eager to resume their life, understand that a clean and sober life is made much more possible by spending the time necessary in early recovery treatment.

Our counselors are available now to help you begin your journey to recovery. Call us today at 800-737-0933