Tag Archives: addiction recovery

Suboxone for Addiction Recovery

Suboxone is a useful tool that is often implemented to fight addiction. Suboxone is a brand-name drug that is a mixture of buprenorphine (an opioid alternative that is not as addictive as traditional opiates) and naloxone (an opioid-reversal drug that treats symptoms of withdrawal and overdose). Classified as a schedule III (3) drug, Suboxone itself does have the potential for physical and/or psychological dependence, and in rare cases can even be misused and abused. It’s important for potential Suboxone candidates to be aware of this so that they can make an informed decision as to whether or not they feel Suboxone would be an appropriate and effective tool to use during recovery. Suboxone is available in both dissolvable oral films and traditional tablets.

When used in conjunction with traditional addiction therapies, as well as both regular and random drug testing, providers have reported a higher rate of success among their patients. When used in this fashion, Suboxone is considered to be MAT – medication-assisted treatment.

How does Suboxone work?

Suboxone works in two ways. First, the buprenorphine, which is a type of opiate, functions in the brain the same way other opiates do – by binding to opiate receptors and tricking the brain into thinking it is being treated by a traditional opiate. Secondly, the naloxone stays present in the body to prevent both withdrawal from traditional opiates, as well as overdose. Buprenorphine is technically a partial opioid agonist, and in the brain, it works as a step-down from traditional, stronger opiates. In taking the place of other opiates, the buprenorphine in Suboxone both tricks the brain into thinking it is still receiving traditional opiates and protects against withdrawal and overdose thanks to the inclusion of naloxone.

Why Suboxone is effective in aiding addiction recovery.

Suboxone is effective because it replaces traditional opiates, while not being nearly as dangerous nor as addictive as traditional opiates. Federal mandates have made Suboxone both accessible and affordable, and with the film version specifically, a lack of pre-authorization requirements means no hoops to jump through in order to obtain Suboxone. Doctors and psychiatrists alike are licensed to prescribe Suboxone, and addiction clinics are able and willing to set up clients with both therapy and MAT – Suboxone as medication-assisted treatment.

How to use Suboxone: dosage and frequency.

Since Suboxone works in the brain in a similar fashion as regular opiates, users report pain relief, calmness, a lack of both cravings and withdrawal symptoms, and an improved overall sense of well-being. However, it is important to take Suboxone as prescribed and to be aware of how long it lasts in the body, in order to achieve optimal effectiveness.

Once in the body, it can take up to 37 hours for Suboxone to wear off, and a full eight days before blood and urine tests no longer detect traces of the drug. With such a long half-life, users report needing less Suboxone in relation to other opiates. Of course, there are factors that determine how much Suboxone a user will need, and how long the medication will last in their system. These factors include body weight, age, and abuse history. It is for this reason that it is best to undergo a thorough physical prior to being prescribed Suboxone. What is good for the goose is not always good for the gander.

No two addicts — nor their addictions — are alike. And depending on how you respond to Suboxone, as well as changes in your body, health, and lifestyle, you may find that over time you may need to increase or decrease the amount of Suboxone you take in a day, or even in a dose. Some users respond best from one dose in a 24 hour period, while others, particularly users who have digestive mal-absorption issues, may do better with splitting up one dose into two or three smaller doses.

Most importantly, work in conjunction with your therapist and doctor to ensure you are on the proper Suboxone prescription. Take your medication as prescribed, and if you do experience any cravings or withdrawal symptoms, report these right away so that your medical providers can adjust your dosage — and perhaps your therapy regimen — accordingly. Call us today at 800-737-0933.

Will Christian Recovery Centers Help Me Mend My Relationship with God?

God has many different meanings. For Christians, God means the Father God, the Son Jesus, and the Holy Spirit. For Muslims, God means Allah. For some people, God means the Universe or Divine Energy. For others, God is simply the good orderly direction that they receive from their recovery programs. All concepts are accepted and viewed as equally valid in recovery programs. God or a Higher Power has a presence in many recovery programs because the 12-Steps include it and many people find help leaning on God or a Higher Power.

Whether not a Christian Recovery Center will help you mend your relationship with the God of Your Understanding is contingent on a variety of factors:

• The God of Your Understanding
First and foremost, the God of your understanding must be the Christian Concept of the Higher Power. I have a belief system that that concept of the Higher Power, a Christian Recovery Center will not help you mend your relationship with the God of Your Understanding. You should look into a rehab that is specific to your faith or a secular rehab that has a diverse range of individuals.

• Your Past Experience with Christianity
If you were raised Christian and saw that as a good upbringing or had past experiences with Christianity or Christians that were positive, a Christian Recovery center may be beneficial for your recovery because it is adding the specific Higher Power of Your Understanding to your recovery program. If you were raised Christian and saw that as an oppressive upbringing or had a bad experience with Christianity or Christians that were not positive, a Christian recovery center may hinder you more than help you.

• Your Views on Christianity
The label of “Christian” is extremely broad. There are many different sects of Christianity (e.g. Catholic, Evangelical, Presbyterian, Episcopalian, etc.). At the same time, not all Christians have the same beliefs about certain issues (e.g. acceptable clothing, makeup, sexuality, magical practices, cursing, etc.). If you believe in most of the rules of traditional Christianity, a conservative Christian rehab will be right for you. If you are more of a liberal Christian, a more liberal Christian rehab that only covers universal truths in Christianity will definitely be better for you. Inquire with the rehab about their beliefs and values before committing to it

What Really is Spirituality?

Spirituality has many definitions and is often used interchangeably with religion. The word “spirituality” actually stems from Latin and Greek words that mean “to have an awakening to yourself.” Spirituality does not really have anything to do with your religion, the rules, and rituals that you follow, sacred objects that you own, or where you do or do not go to church.

Spirituality is actually an experience of having strong self-esteem and feeling free to express who you truly are.

Spirituality and religion are often used interchangeably because religion was originally supposed to help people spiritually. However, human imperfection and differences make religion not a perfect system and not work for everyone. For some people, religion is a part of their spiritual journey. For example, if you are Catholic, the quiet environment of the Catholic Church can help you reflect on your life, the rituals help you feel closer to the God of Your Understanding, and the rules coincide with your personal moral beliefs. For other people, other religions or belief systems may speak to their personal spirit.

God as You Understand God: Many Paths to Spirituality

Many people come into recovery and are scared to hear the word “God.” In the 12-Steps, God is meant to be the God of Your Understanding, as it is italicized in Steps Three and Eleven. The God of Recovery is not supposed to be a punishing God; the God of Recovery is supposed to be a loving, benevolent God. If you were raised with or have experience with a concept of God that did not sit well with you, rest assured that God is not the God of Recovery or has to be the God of Your Understanding.

The God of Your Understanding can stem from the religion you were raised with, the religion that you subscribe to now, your personal belief system, an object (e.g. gemstone, book, sacred object, etc.), something within you (e.g. your conscience), or your recovery program itself. In recovery, you will meet people with all different concepts of the Higher Power. All are seen as equally valid, so do not feel pressured to have a certain concept or push a certain concept on others. There are many paths to the Higher Power, spirituality, and recovery.
There are many faith-based recovery centers and secular recovery centers ready to help you recover and find personal spirituality. Contact one today at 800-737-0933.

Is Christian Alcohol Rehab Better than Secular Rehab?

Belief in a Higher Power has been a part of addiction recovery since Alcoholics’ Anonymous was founded in 1935. In modern times, rehab centers for addiction have emerged. Certain types of rehabs exist to cater to specific populations. One of those certain types of rehabs is Christian rehabs. If you are considering a Christian alcohol rehab, you may be questioning if a Christian alcohol rehab is better than a secular alcohol rehab. The simple answer is it depends on each person and his or her personal belief system.

There are no general differences in quality between Christian and secular rehabs. Both types of rehabs must meet the same standards by law and most likely offer the same types of therapies. The only difference is a Christian rehab will be providing tools for recovery that are based in the Christian perspective. If you are a strong practicing Christian or the Christian ideology simply sits well with you, a Christian alcohol rehab may certainly benefit you because it will be centered around the Higher Power of Your Understanding. However, if you are an agnostic, atheist, or non-practicing Christian, a Christian rehab might not be the best fit. Which type of rehab is better for you will vary upon what you are comfortable with. While many of the principals taught in a Christian rehab are universal and apply to different faiths and levels of religiosity, the Christian concepts may be hard to ignore for those who do not possess that worldview.

The Elements of a Christian Alcohol Rehab

If you have decided that a Christian rehab is better for you than a secular rehab, here is what you can expect:

• Medical Detox and Evidence-Based Therapy
A myth about Christian or faith-based rehabs is that they only use religion and no scientific-based treatments. For most Christian rehabs, that myth is not true. Most of them use medical detox and evidence based psychological therapies in conjunction with Christian principals. For example, staff may pray over you during the detox process or your counselor will talk about turning childhood traumas over to Jesus during cognitive-behavioral therapy.
• Religious Services
Christian rehabs may host religious services one to several times a week in the rehab center or provide transportation to a local church. Whether or not attending some or all of these services is mandatory depends on the rehab center.
• Biblical Principals
Since the Bible is the basis for Christian principals, it will often be quoted and read in group sessions. Your counselor may also use it during individual sessions.
• Christian-Based Policies
Christian rehabs may have certain policies that are aligned with Christian beliefs (e.g. certain clothing, literature, or makeup being prohibited; mandatory attendance of religious services, or affection between opposite sexes being prohibited). The policies will vary upon Christian rehab. Some may have more traditional rules while others will have less rules and only use universal Christian principles in treatment.
• The 12 Steps in a Christian Perspective
In a regular 12-Step Meeting, each member is allowed to have the Higher Power of His or Her Own Understanding. However, in a Christian rehab, the Higher Power being discussed will be strictly focused on God, Jesus, and the Holy Spirit.

How Belief in a Higher Power Aids in Recovery

Even if a Christian rehab is not for you or you do not have any religion at all, belief in a Higher Power of Your Understanding is beneficial for recovery. Recovery is a difficult process that is full of uncertainty. Having faith in a Higher Power (e.g. God, Jesus, the Universe, nature, Allah, the recovery program itself, etc.) can help put some of your fears about the future to rest. A saying that many people have in recovery is “Ask for help every day, and do not worry about who you are asking.” Instead of thinking of a Higher Power as someone who is taking control over your life or sitting on a throne judging you, think of your Higher Power as a best friend to walk with you and provide loving guidance on your journey through sending you the right people, places, things, and events at the right time. Belief in a Higher Power can also help you put your past in perspective to help you heal from traumas.

Twelve-Step Programs are spiritual, not religious programs, which means they are about having an awakening to your own personal spirit. Their focus is not on worshiping a particular Higher Power or making you adhere to a certain religious doctrine. Because they are a spiritual program, they are designed to help you find the Higher Power of Your Understanding. When you take a look within yourself, you will be able to find your personal Higher Power and build a bridge to that Higher Power as you see fit. For some people, religion may play a major role in their spiritual journey while others may do better without it.

Both Christian and secular rehabs exist in the South Florida region. Contact us at 800-737-0933 today.

How Can the Marchman Act Help Me Get Treatment for My Loved One?

Far too many people know how painful it is to watch a loved one struggle with an addiction to drugs or alcohol. For some friends and family members, the pain is very personal because they have suffered collateral damage at the hands of their loved one’s addiction. The problem is it’s difficult for family members to exert any influence over a loved one who is unwilling to admit they are dealing with the cycle of addiction.

Family members can only hope there will come a time when their addicted loved one comes to the realization there’s a problem. At that point, there’s hope the addiction sufferer will finally reach out for help. Short of that happening, the only other recourse family and friends might have is an intervention. Sometimes interventions work and sometimes they don’t. If an intervention fails, loved ones don’t have the option of putting a gun to their addicted loved one’s head to drag them into rehab.

With all that said, there is a law in Florida that empowers family members to force a loved one into rehab if they can establish the loved one’s addiction makes the loved one danger to themselves or to others. The name of that law is the “Marchman Act.” FYI: The Marchman Act is officially listed as the “Hal S. Marchman Alcohol and Other Drug Services Act of 1993”.

At this point, we would like to engage in further discussion about the Marchman Act and how it works.

Using the Marchman Act to Get a Loved One Into Rehab

Before we begin this discussion, it seems prudent to point out something that should be evident. Contrary to some people’s beliefs, using the Matchman to have a loved one involuntarily placed in an addiction treatment facility is not an adversarial action. In many cases, it is being done out of legitimate love and concern for the addicted family member.

Think about it for a moment. An individual is trying to survive life caught up in a substantial addiction to drugs or alcohol. Their life is crumbling before their very eyes. Maybe they are homeless or dealing with financial, health and relationship problems. They won’t seek help because they either don’t want help, don’t believe they have an addiction or have given up hope. Left to their own devices, there’s real potential these kinds of addiction sufferers are headed down the road towards prison, insanity or even death. What kind of a relative or friend would just stand by and let that happen?

The Marchman Act exists for this very reason. It’s not a blanket option for family members to exercise in order to remove an unwanted nuisance from their own lives. Like any other restrictive law on the books, a family member has to show just cause that their addicted loved one poses a real danger to themselves or others. Making that claim has to be adjudicated in a court of law.

Reasons Marchman Act Can Be Exercised

Remember, a family member has to show just cause as to why their loved one should be involuntarily subjected to addiction treatment. The first qualification is the addiction sufferer must show a high level of impairment whether sober or not. If they are impaired, it becomes reasonable to assume they don’t have the capacity for taking proper care of themselves or making good judgments. They have basically lost the ability to control their lives.

The other reason why the courts might exercise the Marchman act is if the family member can show that their loved one has made threats or is a danger to others. Under the influence of a substance, any signs of aggression should be given extra scrutiny.

The Process
If a family member makes the decision to attempt to have the courts invoke the Marchman Act on their loved one, there’s a very specific process the family member must follow. Here are the steps in order:

  • Petition the court with a sworn affidavit
  • A court hearing is held for involuntary assessment
  • The defendant is held for up to five days for medical and mental health evaluation
  • If found impaired, the court will issue order for involuntary treatment of up to 60 days
  • If the defendant refuses, they are held in civil contempt of court

If you have concerns about the welfare of an addicted loved one living in Florida, we would like to offer our addiction treatment services. If you need help with the process, you can contact us at 800-737-0933.

Why Is It a Good Idea to Do Your Drug Rehab Program in Florida?

After weeks/months/years of drug abuse, the notion you might be ready to stop using and get help is encouraging. It takes a lot of strength and courage for someone to admit they have an addiction. It takes even more courage to ask for help.

It’s true that the very first step towards recovery is admitting one has no control over their addiction. It opens the door to everything that needs to happen before the addict is able to start living life without the need to self-medicate. The fact someone would take this important step mandates that the individual find the right place to get treatment.

It’s understandable that the first instinct will be to consider a rehab in the local area. For a lot of people and in some circumstances, that’s probably the right decision. However, there are potential issues one might encounter by settling on getting treatment so close to home. If someone where to take the approach they are only going to get one shot at recovery, they might want to put more effort into finding the right place for their addiction treatment.

In all cases, it’s important for the addict to look for the best possible solution. If money is a big issue, staying close to home might be the only viable choice. Putting money aside, there’s real value derived from keeping an open mind about the possibility of temporarily relocating for treatment.

If someone really wanted the best care possible regardless of cost or inconvenience, Florida is a wonderful destination for addiction treatment. The fact is the state of Florida has a worldwide reputation as the “rehab capital of the world.” It earned this reputation because of the concentration of top rehabs and addiction treatment specialists operating throughout the state. The following information details the reasons why a rehab in Florida might be the best choice.

Why Addiction Treatment in Florida is a Good Idea

If you are going to invest the time, effort and money to temporarily relocate to get treatment for your addiction, you should do so for the right reasons. This is your best shot at creating a recovery that will stand the test of time. The success rate of most Florida rehabs should be reason enough to make this a viable solution. However, that’s just one of several reason why a Florida rehab makes sense. Some of the other reasons include:

  • Removing possible interference from outside sources
  • Obtaining a high level of specialized care
  • Getting access to luxury amenities for comfort

Here’s a closer look at these reasons and why they make a Florida rehab stand out above the other options,

Removing Possible Interference From Outside Sources

It’s important to recognize that your home area is where your addiction started and thrived. This is where you became part of the drug culture. It’s here that your drug dealers, enablers and fellow drug users all come together in a central location. This is the place and these are the people that can interfere with your treatment and recovery. Florida is a great place to go to get away from these triggers and temptations so you can truly focus on your treatment process.

Obtaining a High Level of Specialized Treatment

One of the great benefits of going to Florida is getting access to the industry’s best counselors and clinicians. These people are innovators in their field. They know how to assess a person’s addiction circumstances and develop a modern treatment program that addresses each patient’s specific needs. It’s a much higher level of care than that which you would likely get from your local rehab.

Getting Access to Luxury Amenities for Comfort

When patients can get treatment in an environment that feels homey, they are usually better able to relax and focus on the task at hand. Because of the great year-round weather conditions and facility locations around beaches, lakes and entertainment areas, many of Florida’s top rehabs can offer really nice recreational amenities that break up the intensity of therapy. Having access to recreational activities allows patients to build new relationships and form interests in new activities.

You owe it to yourself to get the best care you can. If you are willing to remove yourself from harm’s way and get treatment a safe distance from home, Florida stands as the top destination to get the best care possible. For more information, we encourage you to call us at 800-737-0933 about our addiction treatment services.

How Do You Convinced a Loved One to Visit Rehab Facilities When They Don’t Believe They Have a Problem?

It’s understandably difficult to watch a loved one fighting with addiction. While they deal with the endless pursuit of their drug of choice, family and friends sit by and contemplate how to react. Some loved ones will respond with sympathy, putting themselves in position to become enablers. That’s not a good situation.

There’s usually another group of loved ones who decide to distance themselves from the addict. They might do so out of embarrassment or disappointment. They might also do so after being victimized by the addict’s actions. No one likes to become collateral damage to someone else’s personal problems. One can only hope these loved ones can somehow get past their anger.

Then there’s the group of loved one’s that occupy the middle ground. These are the people who understand what’s going on and want to help without becoming enablers. Where the other relationships may be strained, this is the group that could have the desire and ability to truly help.

We all have to remember that most addicts aren’t interested in putting down the glass of whiskey or the syringe full of heroin. They’re more likely to believe they don’t have a problem. They believe they are in total control of their lives and have the ability to stop at anytime without repercussions. We call this denial.

If you have a loved one who is clearly caught in the cycle of addiction but believes otherwise, convincing them to get help could be difficult. Still, you may be their only chance for recovery and should do all you can to get them into treatment. If you are wondering how? Perhaps, the following information might be useful.

How to Get a Loved One to Seek Treatment for Addiction

If your loved one is in denial or simply reluctant to seek help, you need to approach them with some level of caution. The fact you might still have open lines of communication with them is vital. Also, you might want to enlist the help of any other loved ones who still have good standing with the addict. There is power in numbers.

From least to most invasive suggestions for convincing your loved one to seek help, try these methods, after which we will go into more detail:

  • Have a personal one-on-one conversation about the issues you see. Talk to them not at them
  • Discuss possible ramifications if they continue down the path of substance abuse
  • Create an opportunity for them to speak with an addiction treatment specialist or former addict with good recovery time
  • Family/Friend intervention

Personal One-on-One Conversation

Sometimes, the personal touch can move mountains. You should try to find a time and private place where you can sit down and speak frankly about how you view their addiction issues. There’s always a chance you showing concern could make them realize something might actually be wrong. Above all, you’ll want to make sure you avoid lecturing or demanding action. Talk to them, not at them.

Discuss Possible Ramifications

There’s a real possibility your loved one can’t see the logical conclusions to their substance abuse. After educating yourself, you might want to educate them about the health and personal issues they face if they don’t deal with their addiction issues. You can also use this opportunity to set behavioral boundaries to let them know there are circumstances that could cause issues with you and other loved ones. It’s kind of a one-on-one intervention.

Seek Professional Support

If you are unsure how to approach this subject with your loved one, you might want to enlist help from people who have been there and done that. A private meeting with an addiction treatment specialist or recovering addict might provide an opportunity for the addict to ask questions that might drive them to see the light.

Family/Friend Intervention

Intervention is a delicate process. It requires all participants be educated and well-prepared to do their part in a well-organized family/friend meeting. Without making threats and accusations, each participant should discuss how the person’s addiction affects them personally, how they feel about the individual and what outcome they would like to see from the intervention. There’s power in numbers and if everyone does their part, the addict could come to the realization people care and maybe they should as well.

We understand your concern about the welfare of your loved one. If we can help with the treatment process or provide information about how to convince your loved one to seek help, you can call us at 800-737-0933.

How Is Counseling Going To Help Me With My Drug Addiction?

Trying to recover from addiction by yourself is like climbing a slippery pole with no foothold. You can slip at any moment and crash down to the bottom, making it even harder to start climbing back.

The reason why it is almost impossible to recover from addiction by yourself is because addiction is a chronic brain disease: your brain has been changed where judgment, decision making and behavior control have been lost. You no longer have the ability to make and carry out decisions about your life. But the good news is that the brain can heal when you give up drugs and move toward health.

If you admit that you are a drug addict, you’ve already taken the first step toward recovery. This means that you are considering, or have entered, an addiction recovery program. An important part of the program is individual counseling. What does this involve, and how does it help you?

Individual Counseling for Drug Addiction Recovery

Individual counseling helps you to look at and understand what led you to drugs in the first place, and what got you hooked on it. Talking to someone who listens and wants to understand and sort through your tangled feelings can help you to face your addiction honestly. You can then slowly find the motivation and strength to climb out of the addiction.

The individual counseling sessions will probably occur once weekly for about 50 minutes.
This may involve:

• working through the obstacles to recovery, within yourself or in your relationships and interactions with others,
• dealing with cravings and withdrawal symptoms and developing coping skills, and
• setting goals for the immediate and long term future.

The counselor will help you develop a recovery program and will act as an anchor in keeping you engaged in that recovery program.

Addiction Recovery Program

The recovery program will include first, detox and possible medication to control the craving. This is followed by individual counseling to set up your recovery program. Finally, group counseling places you together with other recovering addicts to share feelings and experiences and to provide support and motivation.

Professionals who have worked with and helped addicts regain their lives are attuned to the pain and risks involved. You will feel their love and support when you place yourself in their care. So jump out of the addiction and dive into their recovery program and welcoming arms.