Tag Archives: addiction treatment

Will Rehab Facilities Accommodate My Special Dietary Requirements?

When battling substance abuse, it isn’t uncommon for many other areas of an individual’s health to become compromised. One of these areas includes their nutrition. Unfortunately, one of the areas that’s often overlooked during recovery from drugs and alcohol is a person’s nutritional effects. These effects can include how a person responds to the withdrawal symptoms that are in direct association with the treatment of addiction. When an individual’s eating habits and dietary requirements aren’t adequately met when they’re recovering from alcoholism or any other kind of substance abuse, this can result in a significant lack of focus and intake of information throughout their therapy and treatment. As a result, they could experience negative outcomes following their treatment.

When undergoing addiction and alcoholism treatment in South Florida, or any other part of Palm Beach County, it’s critical for patients to look for facilities that will incorporate special dietary requirements and nutritional planning into addiction treatment plans. In doing so, it’s possible for individuals to receive the support of scheduled, satisfying, and balanced meals that will improve their treatment outcomes. There are some simple steps involved in the incorporation of this program’s element.

Addiction Recovery and Special Dietary Requirements

It’s critical for everyone to incorporate healthy eating habits into their everyday lives, but even more so for those in addiction recovery. Those who are suffering from addiction, as well as other mental disorders, often have poor nutritional habits. Because these habits can lead to other health problems that are serious later on, it’s vital that a person undergoing substance abuse treatment receive education regarding healthy eating.

When there are circumstances where an individual already knows what their dietary requirements are, it’s critical that they have a meeting with a supervising doctor. Communicating what their needs are regarding these special needs are vital because, if there are allergies or other issues where the patient could become ill, that could hinder the treatment process. Therefore, it’s essential that this communication occurs on day one. We’re going to look at the steps necessary to take for incorporating healthy eating into a recovery treatment plan.

Discuss Nutritional Deficiencies With Supervising Doctor

When individuals are undergoing the intake process, this is where all health and wellness reviews occur. It’s all at this time that the doctor will discuss eating habits and any special dietary requirements. Discussion of the following topics will also happen:

• Potential weight gain from drinking alcohol, taking depressants, or taking sedatives.
• Experiencing weight loss from taking stimulants or due to appetite suppression.
• Deficiencies in vitamins or minerals due to alcohol or drug abuse or poor eating habits.
• The potential for co-occurring eating disorders that may be accompanying the substance abuse.

Develop a Plan with a Nutritionist

Once you’ve communicated your needs with the supervising doctor and they’ve assessed how you’re doing physically, it’ll be time for the nutritionist to step in to help. They’ll examine the notes from the doctor and develop a plan for your specific needs. In addition to taking your specific vitamin and mineral deficiencies into consideration, they’ll also pay close attention to your special dietary requirements.

The nutritionist will also be taking into consideration your level of stress. When the body is in transition during recovery, it’ll be producing additional stress hormones that will result in the depletion of nutrients including:

• Minerals including zinc
• Electrolytes including sodium and potassium
• Vitamins including A, E, C, and B
• Essential fatty acids

When discussing your special dietary needs during the intake process, it’s critical that the supervising doctor know everything about what you need so they can help you through the recovery process. When they have a clear picture from the first day of your treatment of addiction, they can ensure your recovery from drugs and alcohol is as successful as possible with a healthy nutritional plan. We can help, call now 800-737-0933.

Why Can Heroin Relapse Be More Dangerous Than Other Types of Drug Relapse?

Addiction to opioids, in particular, heroin, has reached epic proportions in the United States. In 2017 alone, more than 15,000 deaths from heroin overdose are estimated to have occurred. It is common knowledge that heroin is a dangerous and addictive drug, but many people do not realize that many of these overdose deaths occur during a relapse. In order to understand why heroin relapse is more dangerous than other types of drug relapse, it is important to understand the body’s physical dependence on heroin.

Heroin’s Effect on the Brain

When someone injects or snorts heroin, it travels to the brain and binds to opiate receptors. This causes neurons in the brain to release dopamine. Dopamine is a “feel good” chemical that induces an overall sense of euphoria and well-being. In addition to feelings of euphoria and pain relief, the respiratory system, in particular, the instinct to breathe, is impaired. When too much heroin is taken at once, the person can become unconscious and stop breathing. This is called an overdose.

An overdose of heroin can happen quickly. People around the user may think they simply fell asleep, but when breathing stops, the brain can not get the oxygen it needs to sustain life. If the effects of the heroin are not reversed quickly, permanent brain damage and death can occur.

How Heroin Addiction Occurs

When heroin is used repeatedly over time, the brain builds up a tolerance to the drug. Users then need to use more heroin in order to feel the same effects. Once tolerance occurs, the brain starts to become dependent on heroin in order to function normally. Without the presence of heroin, withdrawal occurs.

Withdrawal from heroin can range from discomfort to agonizing. A person experiencing withdrawal will seek out more heroin in order to stop the negative effects of withdrawal. This is how addiction to heroin occurs.

When a person decides to stop using heroin and enter treatment for their disease they will experience withdrawal. During treatment at a facility, there are support people available to help manage the uncomfortable withdrawal symptoms. Withdrawal symptoms can last from a few days to a few weeks, depending on the length and severity of the addiction.

Why is Heroin Relapse so Dangerous?

As the body becomes accustomed to functioning normally without heroin, its tolerance for the drug also lessens. While a person is in the throes of addiction, they may have needed to use large amounts of heroin in order to function because of high tolerances. When a person is no longer physically addicted to heroin, their tolerance level is lowered. When a person relapses and begins using heroin again, they often overestimate the amount they will need to feel high. This lowered tolerance also increases the risk of overdose and death during relapses.

In order to prevent a relapse from heroin addiction, a long-term treatment program should be used. After withdrawal symptoms cease, therapy and support must be implemented for a greater chance of recovery. Recovery from heroin addiction can be a lifelong struggle for some people and the right treatment program can greatly increase the odds of staying clean and preventing relapse.

Triggers and Warning Signs of Heroin Relapse

It is important to recognize the triggers and warning signs of relapse. Many recovering heroin addicts will need to completely rebuild their life and find new friends and social activities to engage in, which can be a daunting task. Some triggers for heroin relapse include:

  • Feelings of stress, fear, depression, anxiety, guilt and loneliness
  • Seeing drug use on television or movies
  • Spending time with friends or family members associated with heroin use
  • An urge to have more fun during social events
  • Using alcohol or other drugs
  • Big life changes such as a death of a loved one, divorce, or unemployment
  • Boredom

It can also be important for loved ones to recognize the warning signs of relapse so that an increase in therapy or reentry into a treatment program can occur before relapse. Some of these warning signs include:

  • Attitude changes
  • Attending social events with friends associated with past drug use
  • A decline in appearance due to lack of hygiene, sleep, or appetite
  • Dishonestly
  • An increase in irresponsible behavior like skipping therapy, not attending school, or skipping work

If you or someone you love are struggling with heroin addiction or concerned about relapse reach out to us at 800-737-0933. Our counselors are available twenty-four hours a day to answer any questions you may have.

Are Treatments for Drug Addicts and Alcoholics Different?

People are often curious if treatments for drug addicts and alcoholics are different or if they’re the same. The answer isn’t quite as straightforward as you might think. There are ways in which they’re the same and there are ways in which they’re not. Drug addictions are characterized by a person’s obsession with a certain type of drug or group of drugs. Addicts typically will spend a lot of money to get the drug from a dealer and sometimes will steal from others to get the money to access the object of their addiction. Addicts will use a drug for the specific effects they get from it. For example, someone who is a heroin addict is drawn to the feeling of euphoria it gives some people. To get rid of an addiction, the person must pass through a cleansing stage of ridding their system of that drug.

Alcohol addiction is much like drug addiction, except the object of their obsession is, of course, alcohol and not a specific drug. Alcohol provides some of the same effects a drug addict seeks. It offers a person brief relief from the pain they’re experiencing, whether it be physical or mental. It gives them moments of happiness where they feel they lack it in their sober state. With treatment, it’s important that the person goes through a detox, of sorts, to get it out of their system so that counseling and therapy can work their magic to help them get through the addiction.

Treatments for Drug Addicts and Alcoholics

Each type of addiction offers pretty much the same kind of treatment. However, each one will have varying parts based on an individual’s needs. With both types of addiction, you’ll find the following programs:

  • Inpatient Treatment
  • Outpatient Treatment
  • Detox Program

The treatment facility will evaluate your situation and choosing the right treatment for your needs. They will determine what needs you have to beat your addiction, and what services best suit your situation. They will even consider whether you need to work while you go through treatment or if you have a family to support.

Inpatient Treatment for Drug Addicts and Alcoholics

For those with severe addictions, an inpatient program is best. It offers around the clock care to observe your physical and mental health while you go through the detox stage. Medical staff monitors the detox drug use, if needed, to be sure an individual isn’t abusing the treatments.

Inpatient services allow an individual to stay at a residential facility, 24-hours a day for a length of time. During their stay, they will receive counseling and therapy to help them beat their addiction mentally and will have medical services for withdrawal symptoms that ultimately surface during detox

Outpatient Treatment for Drug Addicts and Alcoholics

Outpatient treatment is generally for those who have been through detox and need the long-term care of support services. Sometimes, you may have an intensive outpatient treatment program that enables you to get monitored closely, but still gives you time to go to work and time to spend with your family.

The outpatient part means you go to the center after work, or before, depending on your work schedule. Once you’ve spent your predetermined amount of time there, you go home to sleep in your own bed. Then return on the next scheduled treatment day.

Detox for Drug Addicts and Alcoholics

The treatment used for drug detox and alcohol detox differ due to the differences each one has. Both need intensive monitoring, though, to ensure everything goes well. Once the drug or the alcohol is out of your system, you’re taught coping skills to take with you when you go home and try to live your life free of addiction.

Detox for drugs will also differ with the type of drug that one has an addiction for. Also, it depends on the severity of the addiction as well. Sometimes one will need medication-assistance to get over the addiction and other times, counselors may suggest you do it without medication. Each situation is different in how it’s handled. Counselors determine the best course of action when they evaluate your situation.

So, treatments for drug and alcohol addiction are alike in many ways, but how each type is handled is somewhat different. It’s more about the severity of the addiction and what’s needed to beat it more than it is about the addiction someone suffers from. If you would like more information about drug or alcohol addiction treatments, call us at 800-737-0933.

What Programs Are Available at Heroin Treatment Centers?

Heroin is an opioid drug that is easy to get addicted to. Your brain holds receptors that will react to the chemicals found in these types of drugs, causing you to crave more of it. As easy as it is to get addicted to it, it’s way tougher to beat without the necessary support and medical intervention. That’s why you usually find specialized programs available at Heroin treatment centers. They’re designed to help you kick Heroin out of your system and to learn healthier alternatives to dealing with life’s issues.

There are a few different ways that treatment facilities help you recover from an addiction to a drug like Heroin. Let’s explore what those programs are and how they help you.

Detox Programs at Heroin Treatment Centers

This is the most important step to your recovery. Getting Heroin out of your system and then keeping it out will be necessary. Unfortunately, without professional help, you’ll find trying to get rid of the drug near impossible to do. Once the drug wears off, withdrawal symptoms surface. This can be so debilitating that many people turn to heroin, again, in order to deal with the negative effects. Thus making recovery that much harder to get.

A detox program often will use other medications to help you deal with withdrawals while you wait it out. These, however, will need medical supervision to ensure nothing goes wrong. Some meds a center might use to help in the detox process are:

  • Buprenorphine
  • Naltrexone
  • Methadone

Therapy Programs at Heroin Treatment Centers

While the detox process is powerful with the use of medications, it’s more effective when combined with a facility’s therapy program. A professionally trained counselor can help you understand why your addiction may have happened in the first place. You can explore any issues you may have and learn new coping strategies to use instead of turning to heroin to be your solution.

Some centers offer other types of therapies as well. You could get into an exercise routine that not only gets you physically fit, but it will help promote great mental health too. Also, you could learn some beneficial life skills to use when you go back to your life and have to deal with everyday problems. Adding therapy or counseling sessions to your treatment program increases your chances of becoming addiction-free.

Family Programs at Heroin Treatment Centers

Individual therapy will be necessary to get down to the root of your addiction causes. But, most centers don’t want you to feel isolated and alone in your recovery. You need moral support, not just from the staff or other peers going through the same program as you, but from your family as well. Most centers feel that family involvement is a huge benefit in the rehab process.

You’ll find many facilities offering family programs to help you immerse yourself in therapy right along with them. They become an invaluable support line to cheer you on to recovery. Heroin may have isolated you, but a family treatment program will help sew your relationship back together. This will also help your family members understand where you’re coming from, so they can help you better.

After Care Programs at Heroin Treatment Centers

It’s always great to leave a treatment center feeling addiction-free, but getting over a heroin addiction will take more time than just a few weeks or months. Once you leave, you should still have support, periodically, to keep you off heroin for good. Without it, you could revert to your addiction days and use heroin or maybe another addictive drug. A good facility won’t let you leave without having some kind of aftercare support to keep you going strong.

Typically, you’ll attend group therapy sessions. You may have already started one while you were in the recovery program, but this kind of service is important for your aftercare. You have moral support from others who have been in your shoes and know exactly what it’s like. They can be your best cheer-leading team to inspire you to beat the addiction for good. Sharing your story and learning from others is an important part of your aftercare recovery process.

Since heroin addiction is so hard to get rid of, you should try to use all these treatments when you can. Each part of the program holds important aspects to your recovery and should be used together for maximum benefit. If you have questions or would like to know more about heroin treatments, call us at 800-737-0933.

Two Reasons Why Lake Worth is a Great Place for Treatment

When choosing a treatment facility for drug and alcohol addiction, your priority focus should be on the quality of the facility. However, there is also nothing wrong with selecting a place with nice weather and an engaging community life. Lake Worth is located along the beautiful Atlantic Coast of Florida.

With warm temperatures and bountiful sunshine, it is a great place weather wise. In addition, it is a safe community where you can feel secure during your treatment stay. There are also some excellent treatment facilities. Here are two reasons why choosing a treatment center in Lake Worth, Florida should appeal to you.

An Environment that Cultivates Safety and Security

As you begin your journey towards a life of recovery, you need to feel safe and secure. Lake Worth is pleasant community. Working with a professional staff of therapists will be an important part of your recovery.

However, it is also critical that you feel a secure sense of belonging with the rest of the treatment community. An important aspect of recovering from drug and alcohol addiction is identification.

When you can feel relaxed in your environment, and relaxed around your recovery peers, you are able to make these vital connections. A treatment center in Lake Worth will provide you with such a safe and nurturing environment where you can grow.

A New Life with New Experiences

Establishing a sense of newness in your life can help you during the early stages of recovery. That could be developing an existing appreciation for outside activities, or beginning new experiences.

There are creative techniques to help develop a closer relationship with yourself and your inner feelings. Art, music and nature are three things you can begin to explore as part of your new life of recovery.

Lake Worth offers a bounty of natural beauty, including opportunities to experience the arts. As part of your treatment community experience, you may be able to advance in your recovery to where you will be permitted to indulge yourself in these types of rewarding experiences.

These are two important highlights that Lake Worth as a community will offer you. The treatment center you pick will provide the tools you need for recovery. If you’re looking for a facility that provides a nurturing environment staffed with outstanding therapists who will guide you through a 12-step program, give us a call at 800-737-0933

Our treatment center in sunny Lake Worth has a lot more to offer than simply palm trees and wonderful weather. We’re here to set your feet on solid ground towards a life of beautiful recovery.

Why Going To A Treatment Center Is Better Than Just Going To AA

Over 2 million people seek treatment for addictions through rehabilitation centers each year. Finding the right recovery program can make the difference between gaining and maintaining sobriety or relapsing. While both inpatient and outpatient treatment programs focus on rehabilitation, each kind has unique characteristics and benefits that addicted individuals and their families need to consider.

How Inpatient and Outpatient Rehab Programs Differ

Inpatient rehab centers, also referred to as residential treatment, are in-depth residential recovery programs devised to treat severe addictions. Patients submit to a controlled setting for an extended period of time to conquer their addictions. Patients live at a clinic under 24-hour medical supervision and emotional support. In this environment, every day is meticulously scheduled. Away from distractions and discouragement, residents can focus on healing.

Outpatient rehab programs are part-time, allowing recovering users to continue with their normal daily work and activities. Recovering addicts stay at home. Outpatient treatment centers normally hold meetings early in the morning or evening to accommodate participants’ schedules. Groups such as Alcoholics Anonymous (AA) and Narcotics Anonymous (NA) are often used in conjunction with outpatient treatment. Research indicates that engaging in groups such as AA and NA helps recovering users maintain sobriety.

While an outpatient program does offer invaluable support for recovering alcoholics, it does not provide a means to break away from familiar settings where triggers and temptations lurk. A residential treatment center provides a respite from the routine that enables the misuse of alcohol. The recovering users temporarily have no access to alcohol and are under medical care as they detox. All the while, they receive professional emotional support and cultivate relationships with fellow inpatients.

Overcoming unhealthy habits often requires a reboot — an intensive purging of the old and imparting of the new. An inpatient rehab center is an ideal place to reboot yourself. Outpatient programs can serve as effective maintenance tools. Once you have completed an inpatient program, you can continue treatment with outpatient programs such as AA or NA. You will benefit from the community and accountability which will confirm the insights you gained during residential treatment.

Recovery from addiction is a lifelong journey. Rehab can equip you with the skills you need to become and stay sober. Move in and move on to a better life. Call us at 800-737-0933

How Effective is Substance Abuse Treatment in Florida?

Imagine if you were forced to be confined to a building for one month to several months. You are not permitted outside under any circumstances. Your bedroom during that time is a cold, sterile hospital room. Your daily activities only consist of attending monotone talk therapy and group meetings. The staff treats you like you are a combination of mentally ill and a criminal. You desperately want to be liberated from the chains of your addiction, but you despise your first glimpse of sober life.

This was addiction treatment before the Florida Model

In the 1980’s, Sid Goodman revolutionized substance abuse treatment by innovating the Florida Model. The Florida Model consisted of addiction treatment centers being laid out like a college campus. The clients would live in comfortable, homey living areas and travel to other buildings for their therapies and treatments, allowing them a plethora of outdoor time. The therapy consisted of experiential therapies that were enhanced by the Florida environment in conjunction with the traditional talk therapy and meetings.

Studies have always shown that the Florida Model produced significantly higher success rates than the traditional model. The Florida Model is now used around the world to treat addiction and other mental health disorders.

A Sunny Start to Your Recovery

Since the Florida Model is now used by treatment centers all over the world, people are drawn to Florida for recovery for different reasons.
• The year-round warm climate and proximity to the beach, which creates the ideal healing environment.
• Distancing themselves from the environment where they were active in their addiction.
• The reputable treatment centers.
• The highly-experienced treatment centers and staff.

Substance abuse treatment in Florida is highly effective because they are the experts at their own innovation. Though the Florida Model is a highly effective form of addiction treatment, it must be implemented properly to be effective, and Florida treatment centers have almost 40 years of experience and remain up-to-date on the latest addiction research treatments. In addition to contributing to the ideal healing environment, Florida’s climate enables enjoyable experiential therapies (e.g. animal therapy, nature therapy, adventure therapy, sports therapy, etc.) to be implemented year-round. Receiving experiential therapies will help you open up about your psychological issues, correct your errors in thinking, and learn how to have fun while sober. Distancing yourself from the environment where you were active in your addiction treatment will help you set a solid foundation for new beginnings and avoid relapse triggers early in your recovery.

Genesis House has been treating addiction since 1992. They are a safe, nurturing place to start your sunny start to recovery. Call them today at 800-737-0933

Do Residential Treatment Centers in Florida Offer Better Services Than Outpatient?

The traditional schema of “going to rehab” was going away to an inpatient facility for a period of time. The truth of addiction not being discriminatory is being widely disseminated, compelling all walks of life to seek help. Outpatient addiction treatment is a growing trend throughout the United States. Many high-functioning addicted individuals who have work, educational, and familial obligations are opting for outpatient treatment programs to be able to combat their addiction while being able to fulfill their demanding lifestyle obligations.

Florida has been an addiction recovery hotspot since the 1980’s, when the War on Drugs began and they innovated the world-renowned, proven-effective Florida Model to addiction treatment. Many people turned to Florida because of the benefits of their inpatient treatment centers (e.g. beautiful environment, holistic approach, etc.). Now that outpatient treatment is increasing in popularity, you may be wondering if Florida is jumping on the bandwagon while maintain its reputation.

Why Residential Treatment is Always Best

Residential treatment in Florida is better than outpatient treatment because:

It keeps you away from relapse triggers early in your recovery.

Relapse triggers can be any person, place, or object that is associated with using your addictive substance. Being in residential treatment keeps you away from relapse triggers while you are in your early stages of recovery. You will eventually learn how to cope with relapse triggers, but detoxing and learning the tools to live sober is first priority.

Your full attention is devoted to recovery.

Residential treatment is intended to give you a strong foundation for a life of recovery. The key to living a life of recovery is changing your perspective. When you are being bombarded with recovery tools for most of your waking hours, developing a new perspective will be easier because that is all you will be focusing on. If you are being bombarded with a few hours of recovery and then having to the reality of home, you will lose sight of those tools. You will be moving two steps forward and then two steps back.

You can receive a holistic approach to treatment.

The main benefit of residential treatment is you can receive healing for your body, mind, and spirit. You will be able to go through safe, comfortably withdrawal under the supervision of 24/7 medical staff. You will develop new tools through individual and group therapies. The different experiential therapies will grow your spirit.

It makes it more difficult for you to give up on recovery during rough days.

The road to recovery is full of emotional ups and downs. When you are having a rough day due to an intense therapy session or strong cravings, it is tempting to give up on treatment. If you are in outpatient treatment, you can simply go home, use, and then go back to treatment for your next session or never go to treatment again. If you are in the structured environment of residential treatment, drugs and alcohol will not be at your disposal, decreasing the risk of relapse and/or giving up.

Genesis House is a safe, nurturing environment to heal from addiction in Lake Worth, Florida. Call them today at 800-737-0933

What Is Fentanyl and How Does it Compare To Heroin?

News reports about fentanyl abuse have spiked in recent months, particularly after the drug was implicated in the death of music legend Prince. Many media outlets report that fentanyl is stronger and more deadly than heroin, itself the source of an American epidemic. Both these opioids are highly addictive and extremely powerful.

In contrast to heroin, which is not indicated for medical use, fentanyl is a synthetic opioid designed for use in a surgical setting. The drug can be administered in patch, film, pill, and even lollipop form. Experts estimate it is 1,000 times more potent than morphine. Because of its legitimate medical use, those who become addicted to fentanyl are often those who work in a hospital or who are prescribed the drug and become dependent.

Because fentanyl is so strong, overdoses are more common than with any other type of opioid. This is especially dangerous because of its high tolerance level; users may find they need more of the drug to produce the same high in as little as a week, putting them at risk for a lethal dose. Those dose of fentanyl required to produce an overdose death is estimated at about the 10th of the size of a lethal dose of heroin.

In addition to pure fentanyl, street heroin laced with fentanyl is responsible for many cases of fatal overdose. The two drugs look identical, so there’s no way for a heroin user to determine whether his or her batch includes fentanyl or not. While many states use Narcan to combat the effects of opioid overdose–often saving lives–fentanyl is not as responsive to this antidote as heroin and requires a much higher dosage when it is effective.

 

Identifying Signs of Fentanyl Abuse

If your loved one is abusing fentanyl, heroin, or another type of opioid, you might notice:

  • Confusion, hallucinations, or slurred speech
  • Mood changes or depression
  • Unexplained weight loss
  • Difficulty walking, muscle stiffness, or trouble breathing
  • Itching and scratching
  • Pinpoint pupils
  • Excessive sleepiness

If you or a loved one is struggling with addiction, counselors at the Genesis House are ready to help. Call us anytime at 800-737-0933

Does Vivitrol Really Work for Opioid Dependency?

Vivitrol, a form of naltrexone, is an opiate/opioid antagonist. This means that it works on opioid brain receptors in a manner opposite that of opioids. In other words, when a person takes an opioid medication, the molecules of that medication “fit” into receptor sites in the brain, very similar to the way a key fits into a lock. This causes the opioid effects such as pain relief and euphoria. Opioids can also cause unpleasant effects like nausea, and if enough is taken, can even cause life-threatening suppression of the brain’s breathing center. Opioid antagonists like naltrexone work to reverse these effects and/or prevent them from occurring.

Is Vivitrol Safe? Is it Effective?

Vivitrol is safe as long as you are not allergic to it. It must be used with counseling, and the patient cannot be actively dependent upon opioids when they begin therapy. Vivitrol is given only once a month. It’s a long-acting injection. As long as the patient stays compliant and keeps their injection appointment, Vivitrol is extremely effective. This is because the antagonistic effects of naltrexone in the brain totally prevent any “high” from opioids. Even if the patient weakens and takes them, they will feel nothing because the brain’s opioid receptors are blocked. Only one molecule can occupy a receptor at a time, and naltrexone has a higher affinity, or priority, for the brain’s opioid receptors.

 

Benefits of Vivitrol Therapy:

It’s Not Addictive

Vivitrol works by blocking opioid receptors, not by stimulating them. There is no danger of addiction to Vivitrol.

Helps Patients Break Their Addiction

Recovering addicts can focus on rebuilding their lives, knowing that “giving in to temptation” won’t have the desired effect. They know they can’t get high so they think about other things.

Steady, Automatic Dosing

Because Vivitrol is an extended-release injection, there is no need to take a pill or go to a clinic every day. It provides 24-hour blockage and therefore protection against any opioid-induced “high” for a full month.

Some Possible Disadvantages

Like any other medical therapy, Vivitrol isn’t perfect. For example, if the patient actually needed pain relief, say, due to an accident, because their receptors are blocked, they would not experience the pain relief normally provided by opioids. Also the success of Vivitrol depends upon the patient continuing to show up for their injections on time.

Looking for opiate addiction treatment? Call Genesis House today 800-737-0933