Tag Archives: addiction

Can I Still Get Necessary Medication if I Do a Prescription Pill Detox?

The decision to go through detox and rehab isn’t an easy one to make. While you likely know that you need professional help, there are often certain factors that stand in your way. You may be wondering if you have to quit your job to go through rehab or if you’ll have to give up all of your activities. You may be wondering how long you will have to stay or if you can leave the facility and still receive help. Going into detox is a huge step, and you should always look for answers before you commit.

One popular question many users ask is what happens if they go into detox because of prescription medication abuse. Let’s read on to learn more about detox and to answer that question.

What can I expect during the intake process?

If you are considering detox and rehab for your prescription medication abuse, you’ll want to know what the steps are before you sign yourself in. Before your detox starts, you’ll first go through the intake process in the facility you have chosen. You’ll talk to a counselor who will ask you many questions about your prescription pill problem. He or she, along with the rehab’s doctors and nurses, will use these answers to develop your treatment plan. They will want to know how long you have been using prescription drugs, your normal dose, if you have tried to detox before, and if you are taking any pills now.

It is important to be 100% honest with the staff right from the start. This allows them to create the best treatment plan geared towards your individual needs.

What if I need medication to ween myself off of prescription drugs?

Many men and women end up relapsing when they don’t have the necessary medication to cope with withdrawal symptoms. This is a concern for many users, so don’t be afraid to talk to your therapist or doctor about it in the beginning. If you are going through the withdrawal process and are experiencing mild to severe symptoms, the rehab may provide medication that can help. The staff will make sure you are medically supervised during your withdrawals. If you choose to stay in a rehab day and night, you will have round-the-clock care. Medication for your withdrawals may also be provided if you are in an outpatient rehab program.

Certain medications are able to mimic the effects of prescription pills, quickly relieving the withdrawal symptoms and cravings you may experience. Your doctor will give you enough of the medication while you are in detox to keep your withdrawal symptoms at bay and to cut back on the physical cravings you may have for the pills. During the course of your treatment, your doctors may adjust the dosage to fit your needs.

What medications will I be given?

The type of medication you will receive will depend on the doctor, the facility, and your individual needs. You may be given the following:

Antidepressants- Your brain may not produce enough “happy” chemicals on its own. That is one reason you may have turned to prescription pills in the first place. Doctors may prescribe antidepressants to help combat the feelings of depression and anxiety you may feel once you stop taking prescription pills. Two common antidepressants are Prozac and Zoloft.

Benzodiazepines- Often called benzos, these drugs have the ability to reduce irritability and anxiety, two common side effects that happen during withdrawal. Benzos provide a calm, sedating effect that is helpful for addicts dealing with alcohol withdrawal. Your doctor will carefully monitor your use of benzos during detox because they are very addictive.

Clonidine- Clonidine is usually prescribed for alcohol and opiate withdrawals. This medication will help ease certain withdrawal symptoms, such as tremors, sweating, anxiety, cramps, and muscle aches.

Your doctor will carefully monitor you to make sure you do not simply replace one pill with another during detox. They will give you just enough medication to relieve the worst of your withdrawal symptoms during detox. From then on, you’ll learn how to deal with a life without prescription pills through therapy and counseling.

Call to learn more about our services today

Don’t let prescription medication keep a tight hold on you. We can help you get through the worst of the withdrawal symptoms with medically supervised detox services at our clinic. Our caring staff will help you every step of the way! Call us today at 800-737-0933 to hear more about our programs and to decide if we are the right fit for you.

What Are Some Surprising Drug Detox Effects You Might Not Expect?

Drug detox is often one of the most difficult stages in addiction recovery. The effects of drug abuse change the brain and body on a chemical level, which plays into the addiction process. Not surprisingly, you may experience a few drug detox effects that you might not expect.

Since each person’s body interacts with addictive substances in different ways, detox effects can take different forms. Knowing what to expect can go a long way towards helping you get the supports you need to make it past the detox period. Here are a few surprising drug detox effects to watch for along with a brief overview on what causes these effects.

What Causes Drug Detox Effects?

Addictive substances take an ongoing toll on the body on both a physical and psychological level. While the desired effect may be to get high or escape from the events of the day, these substances accomplish this by altering important chemical processes in the brain and body. After a certain point, the brain and body begin to rely on the drug’s effects to function normally.

Here are just a few substances that fall in this category:

  • Alcohol
  • Heroin
  • Crack, cocaine
  • Prescription painkillers
  • Benzodiazepines
  • Prescription stimulants, such as Ritalin and Adderall

Drug detox effects, also known as withdrawal effects, develop out of the chemical imbalance created when drug use stops. More often than not, the severity of withdrawal effects experienced reflects the degree of imbalance left behind by the drug’s effects. Since each person’s physical makeup interacts with addictive substances in different ways, the types of withdrawal effects experienced can vary from person to person in type and intensity.

Here are a handful of effects you might not expect to experience during drug detox:

Confused Thinking

The effects of drug addiction specifically target the brain’s cognitive processes, which include reasoning, learning and memory. As drug use continues, these systems continue to undergo chemical changes that directly impact a person’s priorities and motivations. These changes account for the incessant cravings and ongoing preoccupation with getting and using addictive substances.

Confused thinking results from the chaos that develops within the brain’s chemical system when drug use stops. In effect, the brain develops a psychological dependence on the drug’s effects in the same way the body develops a physical dependence. In the absence of the drug’s effects, it becomes difficult to carry out mental tasks that require concentration, focus and planning.

Severe Depression

Depression and substance abuse tend to go hand-in-hand. Drug abuse often becomes a form of escape from depression. On the flip-side, abusing drugs for any length of time breeds the types of brain chemical processes that cause depression. In turn, the brain’s increasing susceptibility to depression is part of the reason why a person requires increasingly larger doses of the drug over time.

For these reasons, stopping drug use typically brings on feelings of severe depression. The severity of the depression varies depending on how long a person abused drugs and the types of drugs used. In the most severe of cases, suicidal tendencies can run especially high.

Intense Anxiety

While most everyone has experienced some level of anxiety in one form or another, the experience doesn’t typically the point where it interferes with a person’s ability to function throughout the day. As a drug detox effect, anxiety levels can be overwhelming and in the most extreme cases, a person can experience full-blown panic attacks.

Signs of intense anxiety and developing panic attacks include:

  • Restlessness
  • Tremors
  • Rapid breathing
  • Increased heart rate
  • Light-headedness
  • Tightness in the chest

Extreme Moods

Extreme moods are another drug detox effect you might not expect. Changes in mood can be triggered by anything and don’t necessarily have to make sense. Addictive substances force the brain to secrete large amounts of serotonin and dopamine, which promote happiness and a sense of well-being. In effect, neurotransmitter levels are severely depleted when drug use stops.

Extreme moods to watch for include:

  • Violent outbursts
  • Aggressive behavior
  • Feelings of despair

Unfortunately, there are no shortcuts when it comes to addiction recovery. While drug detox can be a difficult experience, it’s very doable when you have the right supports in place. If you have more questions or need information on drug detox programs, call us today at 800-737-0933 to speak with one of our addiction counselors.

Will A Rehab In Florida Admit Me If I’ve Relapsed Before?

Reclaiming your life from drug or alcohol addiction can be a very complex and challenging process. In fact, many people try and fail in recovery multiple times before finally achieving sobriety. This is why relapse is considered a common and ultimately normal part of the recovery process. Although caving to stress, temptation, and cravings can leave you feeling like you’re incapable of getting well, it can actually mean that you’re on the path to getting better and that you just have more to learn and experience throughout treatment than you’d originally expected. Your willingness to rise above relapse and strive for sobriety again is a very positive sign. To ensure your success, you need to look for a rehab in Florida that’s capable of meeting your unique range of needs.

Each time that you try and fail in recovery, you become more knowledgeable of the different triggers and environments that have the ability to best your willpower. You also gain a better understanding of the best treatment types for your circumstances. For instance, if your first effort in recovery took place in a large outpatient program, it may be time to consider your options in long-term, inpatient treatment. With several months away from the relationships, stressors, and triggers of your current life and lifestyle, you’ll have ample time to:

  • Learn new and better coping strategies
  • Identify and address any co-occurring disorders
  • Establish long-term plans for keeping your health and sobriety on the right track

Relapse is also something that you can discuss at length with counselors, peers, and others who are present within the treatment environment. What many patients find is that each relapse is incredibly humbling. It reminds them that seeking ongoing help and support, particularly post-rehab, can be necessary for avoiding past mistakes and for maintaining the right life habits and relationships after formal treatment has ended.

You’ll Be Surrounded By Like-Minded People In Florida Rehab

One of the major benefits of enrolling in a Florida rehab post-relapse is being surrounded by people with similar goals, similar life experiences, and similar histories with relapse. Group therapy is a large part of the drug and alcohol treatment process as it teaches patients proper socialization skills, boundary setting, and strategies for safely and successfully besting cravings. You can share your relapse experiences during group therapy sessions to help others overcome the shame and self-doubt that they’re experiencing. You will also have the opportunity to glean valuable information from the experiences of those around you.

Success In Rehab After Relapse

Countless recovered drug and alcohol users have relapsed before. In fact, many of these individuals have multiple tales of relapse. It can take a while to find out which treatment style is right for you, and which treatment environments will be most conducive to your success. More importantly, for some people, it can also take several tries to fully commit to getting well. Relapsing, however, never means that you’re incapable of succeeding. It is instead an opportunity to learn, further your growth, refine your recovery plan, and build your resolve. Florida rehab centers understand that all of these things can be a normal part of the recovery process.

Inpatient treatment centers strive to provide all of their patients with safe, secure environments. With little to no cell phone use, carefully monitored facilities, and limited access to the outside world, clients have the opportunity to focus completely on getting well. These centers effectively remove drug and alcohol users from unhealthy relationships, circumstances, and other triggers that are impeding their progress. With individual and group therapy, access to treatment for co-morbidity, and many other treatments and support services, Florida rehabs are equipped to provide all that people need for successfully dealing with substance use disorder.

Identifying Needs That May Have Been Overlooked

Some people relapse simply because they aren’t ready for the rigors of recovery. Others relapse because critical needs weren’t met. For instance, if you believe that you are suffering from co-morbidity or a co-occurring disorder, dual diagnosis treatment could be an essential part of your recovery plan. This will address both substance use disorder and any chronic anxiety, chronic depression, or other mental health issues that exist. Dual diagnosis treatments eliminate the need for patients to self-medicate their pain with harmful drugs or alcohol, by treating their discomfort at its actual source.

Your Journey To Good Health Can Start Today

Relapsing shouldn’t prevent you from pursuing happiness, wholeness, and good health. All of the benefits of recovery are still await. You simply need to secure the right support services and help. From intensive, inpatient programs to flexible outpatient plans, there are many different options in Florida rehab available. If you want to find the perfect treatment center for your needs, we can help. Call us today at 800-737-0933.

Why Does Detox From Benzos Make You More Anxious?

Benzodiazepine withdrawal (frequently shortened to benzo withdrawal) is a group of symptoms that emerge when a patient decreases or stops their use of these medications. Whether prescribed or used recreationally, once tolerance has developed and physical and psychological dependence has been established, the patient will most likely experience some of these symptoms, some of which may last longer than others and vary in intensity depending on the patient’s length of use and the amount they have been using. One of the most common symptoms is rebound anxiety, which means that their anxiety feels much worse than it did prior to starting the medication. So, why does detox from benzos make you more anxious?

How do Benzos Work?

Benzos work by “amping up” the patient’s GABA, a brain chemical that blocks certain communication between nerve cells and the brain. Because low GABA levels are linked to anxiety and mood disorders, many people start using benzos for anxiety relief. In fact, about 5% of adults have been prescribed benzos in the last year, usually as a short-term bandaid during a stressful life event (death of a loved one, divorce, or other traumatic occurrences). Benzos are also often prescribed in people with chronic anxiety for short periods (generally a couple of weeks) while the patient undergoes therapy to learn healthy ways to cope with their symptoms.

However, they also produce compelling “feel-good” and sedative effects that are very appealing to many people, particularly those who struggle with anxiety. Additionally, benzos create tolerance very quickly, especially shorter-acting benzos like Xanax, the result of which is the need to take increasingly higher doses to produce these same effects. This combination creates a perfect storm for dependence to develop.

What Happens During Benzo Withdrawal?

Most benzo withdrawal symptoms begin to manifest within 24 hours of the last dose. They can last from a few days to several months, depending on the strength and quantity of the drug and the length of time it has been used. Early withdrawal symptoms, experienced within a few hours of cessation of the drug, include the swift return of anxiety.

As time away from the drug increases, more symptoms appear, including:

  • intense anxiety
  • panic
  • insomnia
  • muscle spasms or tension
  • nausea, vomiting, and other gastric upset
  • mood swings, trouble concentrating, and cloudy thinking

This list is by no means all-inclusive, and every patient is different. However, because of the uncertainty and unpredictability of the number and severity of withdrawal symptoms, it is important to seek treatment when making the decision to stop using benzos.

What is Rebound Anxiety?

During the early stages of benzo withdrawal, the patient can experience any number and combination of the symptoms listed. Even those who have been taking benzos as prescribed can, and often will, suffer from rebound anxiety along with other symptoms.

The “rebound effect” in benzo withdrawal occurs when a medication that had an effect on the symptoms it was being used to treat (whether diagnosed by a physician or as a form of self-soothing or self-medicating) is discontinued. It is characterized by intense waves of anxiety, irritability, panic, insomnia, and other mood disturbances. It can be frightening for patients who have been taking benzos for anxiety, even as exactly prescribed, to be overcome with anxiety and panic. Indeed, rebound anxiety during benzo withdrawal can lead to relapse very quickly. This is why it is important that the patient gets proper treatment and support during withdrawal.

The good news is that help is available, along with support. The need for support and healthy coping skills cannot be stressed enough when it comes to combatting dependence on benzos. As with any other recovery process, the knowledge that they are not alone, that there are people who understand and are willing and able to help, is pivotal to a successful detox and long-term recovery. There are many different treatment options available, and even the most hopeless-seeming cases can and do have successful recoveries. Life after benzos is not only possible, it can be fulfilling and rewarding.

If you’re ready to make a start, you can reach a counselor 24-hours a day by calling 800-737-0933. We’re ready to provide you with the knowledge you need to take the first steps on your path to recovery.

How Can You Recognize the Delirium Tremens Stages Before It’s Too Late?

Delirium tremens is a dangerous symptom of alcohol withdrawal that requires immediate medical attention. It can lead to grand mal seizures and even death. If someone has been drinking continuously for years, their brain and the central nervous system adjusts to the presence of alcohol and becomes physically dependent on alcohol in order to function properly. When someone with severe alcoholism abruptly stops drinking, alcohol leaves the body very quickly, causing their nervous system and brain into a dangerous state. Here’s how to recognize delirium tremens symptoms before it’s too late.

Alcohol withdrawal has a few very distinct stages that you’ll want to be alert to. Most experts break the withdrawal process down into four stages, but there are others who might categorize it into more than four stages. Delirium tremens is a serious condition that about 3-5% of alcoholics will experience if they suddenly stop drinking. It’s not as common as other withdrawal symptoms, but it’s so serious that you should always be alert to its stages and signs.

Stages of Alcohol Withdrawal

Experts who break the withdrawal process into four stages define each stage by time since last drink. The withdrawal stages are:

  • 6-12 hours since last drink
  • 12-24 hours since last drink
  • 24-48 hours since last drink
  • 48-72 hours since last drink

Delirium Tremens is most likely to occur in stage four of the withdrawal process, approximately 48-72 hours after a person takes their final drink. Recognizing the symptoms of delirium tremens is crucial to getting medical help and possibly even saving someone’s life. Never ignore the symptoms of delirium tremens.

Symptoms of Delirium Tremens

When someone goes into delirium tremens, they frequently have a change in mental state that will be immediately noticeable to them. Their behavior may become noticeable to others around them as well, as they will be experiencing anxiety and signs of agitation. Body tremors will be extremely noticeable. Their hands and other limbs may shake uncontrollably, and they may have difficulty focusing on anything and become understandably out of control during this time.

Hallucinations are another hallmark of delirium tremens. When someone is going through alcohol withdrawal and begins to hallucinate, it’s time to seek medical attention immediately, as this is almost always a sign of DTs. Fear is a very common emotion for the alcoholic to experience when these symptoms are present during alcohol withdrawal. They may even scream or cry. Remember, this is a serious medical event and can be life threatening if left untreated. Anyone who is going through alcohol withdrawal who begins to experience these signs of delirium tremens should go to the emergency room or a doctor immediately.

A Sign to Get Help

Alcoholism is a serious medical condition, and withdrawal from alcohol is one of the most dangerous of all drug withdrawals. Because alcohol leaves the body so quickly, it can severely throw the brain and central nervous system out of whack, leaving the person vulnerable to a number of dangerous medical events. Delirium tremens is perhaps the most dangerous symptom of alcohol withdrawal, and it should always be treated with seriousness. If someone experiences DTs, it’s a sign of severe alcoholism. It’s also a sign that it’s time to get help in one of today’s alcohol treatment centers.

Medical detox is the wisest source of treatment for a condition like a delirium tremens. Anyone who is going to withdrawal from alcohol after a long period of use might experience this dangerous symptom of withdrawal, but if someone has already had a bout of DTs, it’s doubly imperative that they go through withdrawal in a medical setting where help is immediately available in the event of delirium tremens. Today’s detox centers are capable of helping you or a loved one cope with this distressing part of alcohol withdrawal. There are many treatment options that will ease the agitation, fear, and other unpleasant symptoms of delirium tremens. The comforting thing to remember is that you no longer have to go through this on your own. A compassionate treatment center staff can help you make it through and begin a full-fledged recovery.

If you’re seeking a treatment center that can treat you for delirium tremens, contact us at 800-737-0933. We’re fully capable of helping you during even the most serious symptoms of alcohol withdrawal, and we can help you during every single stage of recovery after that. You can get help today with a single phone call.

Suboxone for Addiction Recovery

Suboxone is a useful tool that is often implemented to fight addiction. Suboxone is a brand-name drug that is a mixture of buprenorphine (an opioid alternative that is not as addictive as traditional opiates) and naloxone (an opioid-reversal drug that treats symptoms of withdrawal and overdose). Classified as a schedule III (3) drug, Suboxone itself does have the potential for physical and/or psychological dependence, and in rare cases can even be misused and abused. It’s important for potential Suboxone candidates to be aware of this so that they can make an informed decision as to whether or not they feel Suboxone would be an appropriate and effective tool to use during recovery. Suboxone is available in both dissolvable oral films and traditional tablets.

When used in conjunction with traditional addiction therapies, as well as both regular and random drug testing, providers have reported a higher rate of success among their patients. When used in this fashion, Suboxone is considered to be MAT – medication-assisted treatment.

How does Suboxone work?

Suboxone works in two ways. First, the buprenorphine, which is a type of opiate, functions in the brain the same way other opiates do – by binding to opiate receptors and tricking the brain into thinking it is being treated by a traditional opiate. Secondly, the naloxone stays present in the body to prevent both withdrawal from traditional opiates, as well as overdose. Buprenorphine is technically a partial opioid agonist, and in the brain, it works as a step-down from traditional, stronger opiates. In taking the place of other opiates, the buprenorphine in Suboxone both tricks the brain into thinking it is still receiving traditional opiates and protects against withdrawal and overdose thanks to the inclusion of naloxone.

Why Suboxone is effective in aiding addiction recovery.

Suboxone is effective because it replaces traditional opiates, while not being nearly as dangerous nor as addictive as traditional opiates. Federal mandates have made Suboxone both accessible and affordable, and with the film version specifically, a lack of pre-authorization requirements means no hoops to jump through in order to obtain Suboxone. Doctors and psychiatrists alike are licensed to prescribe Suboxone, and addiction clinics are able and willing to set up clients with both therapy and MAT – Suboxone as medication-assisted treatment.

How to use Suboxone: dosage and frequency.

Since Suboxone works in the brain in a similar fashion as regular opiates, users report pain relief, calmness, a lack of both cravings and withdrawal symptoms, and an improved overall sense of well-being. However, it is important to take Suboxone as prescribed and to be aware of how long it lasts in the body, in order to achieve optimal effectiveness.

Once in the body, it can take up to 37 hours for Suboxone to wear off, and a full eight days before blood and urine tests no longer detect traces of the drug. With such a long half-life, users report needing less Suboxone in relation to other opiates. Of course, there are factors that determine how much Suboxone a user will need, and how long the medication will last in their system. These factors include body weight, age, and abuse history. It is for this reason that it is best to undergo a thorough physical prior to being prescribed Suboxone. What is good for the goose is not always good for the gander.

No two addicts — nor their addictions — are alike. And depending on how you respond to Suboxone, as well as changes in your body, health, and lifestyle, you may find that over time you may need to increase or decrease the amount of Suboxone you take in a day, or even in a dose. Some users respond best from one dose in a 24 hour period, while others, particularly users who have digestive mal-absorption issues, may do better with splitting up one dose into two or three smaller doses.

Most importantly, work in conjunction with your therapist and doctor to ensure you are on the proper Suboxone prescription. Take your medication as prescribed, and if you do experience any cravings or withdrawal symptoms, report these right away so that your medical providers can adjust your dosage — and perhaps your therapy regimen — accordingly. Call us today at 800-737-0933.

Will Rehab Programs Help Address Environmental Substance Abuse Triggers?

Triggers come in many shapes and sizes. Some of them will surprise you; a song that comes on the radio you used to shoot up to, or a street sign brings back flashes of the place you used to meet your dealer. There are different types of triggers that can cause relapse, and all of them are covered in a good substance abuse treatment program.

Types of Substance Abuse Triggers

Every trigger can be broken down into different categories: physical, emotional and environmental are the main three. Physical triggers are often intertwined with your environment; sights, smells and sounds that all bring back memories of when you used to drink or do drugs.

Emotional triggers can be influenced by your environment as well; objects, people and familiar places all carry memories that can bring up old feelings you may have once used drugs to cope with.

Your environment may not be somewhere easy to avoid; many people live with others who abuse drugs or drink regularly, whether it’s a partner, their family or roommates. Staying sober means you have to find ways to either avoid these triggers to change your environment altogether.

Many rehabs offer sober housing for people whose previous environment’s aren’t productive to their recovery.

How Rehab Helps You Overcome With Triggers

Coping with substance abuse triggers takes patience and skill; it won’t always be easy, no matter how well you know what to do. Even the best coping strategies can’t always take away the urge to relapse, which is why having an escape plan and accountability partner are important components of recovery.

How you respond to a trigger will vary on any given day; you may face something triggering on a good day and be able to move past it with relative ease. If you’ve been feeling low, though, a minor trigger can push you over the edge.

That’s why the best rehab programs are designed to do more than just teach you how to handle triggers; they’ll help develop emotional intelligence, build resilience, learn how to cope with stress and manage tough situations in healthy ways.

Types of Therapy for Substance Abuse Triggers

Avoidance is a useful strategy, but it isn’t always feasible. Plus, if you only rely on never seeing a trigger as your way of dealing with it, you’re more likely to relapse if you’re ever faced with it. Different types of substance abuse therapies have their own way of helping people learn how to cope with their triggers.

Cognitive behavior therapy, for example, emphasizes recognition and healthy coping skills in addition to avoidance. While you should steer clear of any environmental triggers whenever possible, it’s important to also know how to recognize them and know how to react when they do arise.

Relapse prevention therapy is one of the most effective forms of coping with triggers; you’ll be able to learn about the subtle warning signs of relapse including increased thoughts of using substances, downplaying your feelings about using again and planning ways you could control your use better this time around.

Look for a rehab that offers relapse prevention during treatment as well as continued therapy. Attending support groups, entering outpatient therapy and attending individual counseling sessions can help you avoid succumbing to triggers.

Managing Substance Abuse Triggers

Your sobriety is the most important thing in your life; everything else is depending on it. Does this mean that you can’t bounce back if you relapse? No, but it does mean you should do everything in your power to avoid having to deal with the guilt, shame, embarrassment and hopelessness that comes from using again.

Identifying some of the most common environmental triggers for substance abuse can be a helpful part of planning your life after rehab. Some of these may surprise you.

– Holiday celebrations and birthday parties
– Social gatherings
– Having free time and being alone
– Feeling bored
– Being offered a drink
– Seeing other people drink, smoke or do drugs, even just on TV
– Loneliness

Cravings don’t last forever, no matter how strong they are. If you can find a way to get away from a trigger as soon as possible, it will be easier to deal with the aftermath. Of course, all of this happens day by day, and the foundation is laid during your time in a licensed rehab.

To learn more about recovering from substance abuse, contact us today. Whether you’re looking for outpatient therapy, local support groups or a residential program, we’re always available to help connect you with the best rehabs near you. Contact us any time at 800-737-0933

The Marchman Act Changed substance Abuse Care

The Marchman Act is also known as the Hal S. Marchman Alcohol and Other Drug Services Act of 1993. It is a legal statute in Florida designed to provide emergency intervention for individuals who are abusing alcohol or drugs. This statute is intended to deal with very serious situations. It could be when a chronic substance abuser may be incapable of seeking help, refuses to seek help and might be a danger to themselves or others. The Marchman Act makes it possible for certain individuals, as well as family members, to petition for a court-ordered evaluation to be performed on a chronic substance abuser. This evaluation can happen due to mandated treatment even if the alleged chronic substance abuser refuses it

Substance Abuse Treatment

According to the National Institute on Drug Abuse, there are over 22 million citizens in the United States who may need substance abuse services in a single year. It is estimated that less than 2.6 million individuals were able to get the necessary treatment. According to the Centers for Disease Control (CDC), deaths in the United States attributed to a drug overdose have more than tripled in recent years. The Marchman Act is an involuntary commitment law. It is a tool designed to help chronic substance abusers.

Appropriate Referral

The Marchman Act was created as a way to help those concerned about a loved one who desperately needs help. It can get the assistance needed when a chronic substance abuser refuses treatment. There are certain criteria required for an appropriate referral.

*An individual has inflicted or attempted to inflict harm on themselves or others
*An individual is unable to control or end their use of drugs or alcohol.
*An individual is unable to make rational decisions regarding their substance abuse or treatment.

Marchman Act Process

*Petition – It can be filed by a spouse, relative or guardian. It can also be filed by three concerned individuals who are not related but have seen a person’s out of control drug or alcohol abuse. A law enforcement officer, physician or therapist can file an emergency petition.

*Attorney – An attorney who understands the Marchman Act can help make certain a petition is correctly filed. They can also assist during the entire process.

*Paperwork – This must be filed with the clerk of courts in the county where an individual is abusing drugs or alcohol and is staying or living. Once a person has completed the paperwork, they will be required to swear to its veracity. The petition is then notarized and sent for review by a judge.

*Ex Parte Order – A judge or magistrate will determine if a situation requires immediate action, an Ex Parte order, or if the person who is impaired should be served with a summons that mandates them to attend a hearing. Should it be decided the situation is an emergency, a judge or magistrate can also order law enforcement to get the impaired person and take them to a facility for evaluation.

*Hearing – Should a judge or magistrate determine a situation does not require an Ex Parte order, they may deny the petition or set a hearing date to be held within 10 days. Should a hearing be set, a petitioner is notified by mail. A summons is issued for a respondent. All parties should attend the hearing.

*Legal Counsel – All parties are permitted to have legal counsel for the hearing if they choose. The respondent can provide their own attorney, or they can be provided with a court-appointed attorney.

*Testimony – During the hearing, testimony is presented. A judge or magistrate will determine if a court-ordered evaluation is necessary. The respondent has the burden of proving the individual being accused of substance abuse impairment requires professional evaluation. There are certain facilities able to perform such evaluations. It should take five days to perform, but more time can be requested from a court if necessary.

*After Evaluation – At this time, a facility can choose to discharge an individual, change their status to voluntary or as a court-ordered involuntary admission for treatment services. Treatment can be ordered for up to 60 days. Some counties enable 90 days of treatment with the possibility of renewal every 90 days.

The Matchman Act has been able to help individuals who have been self-destructing with their abuse of drugs or alcohol. Using the power to initiate a petition for an involuntary commitment must only be done as a last resort. When someone believes a person they know or love is in desperate need of help, it should be discussed with a physician or a specialist in the field of addiction. Speaking with an experienced professional should be your first step. We provide counselors who are available to assist you 24 hours a day to help with a chronic substance abuser. Call us today and discuss your situation at 800-737-0933.

How Are Florida Rehabs Making Addiction Healthcare More Accessible to the Poor?

Addictions are equal opportunity diseases. They care not who they attack be it man, woman, child, rich or poor. Any victim that an addiction can claim is perfectly okay with that particular addiction. For this very reason, it’s important than anyone who might fall victim is able to get access to treatment.

The Florida drug and alcohol addiction treatment community is among one of the best addiction communities in the world. The community as a whole is well-deserving of the label “drug addiction rehab capital of the world.” One of the reasons Florida stands above so many of the other addiction communities is because of its willingness and ability to offer services to pretty much anyone who might need them.

Of course, paying for treatment is always going to be an important consideration. Without healthcare insurance, there’s always the possibility the lack of payment resources is going to act as a determent for some individuals to get the care they so desperately need. That’s not a good thing.

If you are poor and still contemplating getting treatment from an addiction treatment facility in Florida, you have to take into consideration how your are going to pay for treatment. Assuming you don’t have healthcare insurance or adequate coverage at the least, we want to explain some of the things Florida rehabs do to make treatment more accessible to people without access to payment resources.

How Are Florida Rehabs Making Addiction Healthcare More Accessible to the Poor?

What’s very clear about the Florida addiction treatment community is the high level of professionalism that exists among so many of the treatment professionals. These are highly trained individuals whose primary motivation for working is being able to save souls and lives. The idea they can’t get access to some people because of money just goes against everything they stand for as professionals. Still, they do realize they work in a profit motivated environment.

To overcome this conflict, it becomes necessary for administrators to figure out how they can help the poor overcome financial barriers. If we are to assume you do not have healthcare insurance nor the financial resources to pay for treatment, we want to let you know how we may still be able to help you.

Support from Charitable Organizations

When the chips are down, it has become normal in America to seek help from charitable organizations. These are the organizations that have processes and the human resources needed to ask giving individuals/corporations for help in the form of donations. It’s these donations, when administered properly, that can save people for horrible suffering.

What we are seeing in Florida is the integration of the charity community with the addiction treatment community. This integration is taking place on two levels. First, many Florida rehabs are connecting with charities to form pools of financial resources that can be used to offset the cost of treating someone without the resources to pay for treatment. This is a big deal, especially to the folks who otherwise might not be able to step up and ask for help.

At the second level, there are a number of charitable organizations that are actually sponsoring and opening their own licensed drug treatment facilities. This is a great approach to the problem because treatment can be directed specifically towards people who have financial issues that might also play a part in the causes of their addictions.

In-House Financing With Reasonable Payment Terms

It’s not unheard of for a top rehab to offer in-house financing plans to help poorer people financially qualify for treatment. This is one of the things some rehabs choose to do with an understanding there’s a risk to offering poor people credit. It’s really about having the heart to give treatment first and worry about getting payment at a later date.

Making Scholarships and Grants Available

There are some government agencies that provide rehabs access to funds that can be used to treat addiction clients. There’s also a number of grateful former clients who have the resources to pay it forward to the less fortunate in the form of legacy grants and scholarship monies. Many of the top Florida rehabs will pool these monies and develop scholarship/grant programs they can use to make treatment affordable for poorer addiction sufferers.

If you are serious about getting treatment, don’t let money deter you. You can contact us at 800-737-0933 and we’ll be glad to help you figure out how you can pay for the treatment you need. If these’s anyway we can offer your financial assistance, we will gladly do so.

Can You Choose Your Therapists at a Drug Rehab Center?

Your therapists will play the biggest role in your treatment. In fact, the relationship between a counselor and their client plays the largest role in the success of any type of psychotherapy. You need a therapist you can trust, as well as one who has experience treating the various nuances and challenges of substance abuse and co-occurring disorders.

Rehab is about choice; your choice to get better, your choice to say no to addiction and your choice to commit to a better life for yourself and your loved ones.

Getting to choose your own therapist is understandably important to you, but connecting with all of the specialists assigned to your treatment is equally worth discussing.

How Therapy Works in Rehab

Some rehabs follow a 12-step program that focuses heavily on group therapy. You’ll spend the majority of your time in these programs with others, working through a methodical process of recovery that includes admitting your powerlessness against addiction, identifying your weaknesses, trusting others or God and building the skills you need to stay sober.

The original 12-step program is rooted in Christianity, and it’s designed to help people overcome substance abuse by putting their faith in God. There are now many secular 12-step programs, but more and more rehabs are beginning to understand the importance of individualized substance abuse treatment.

Individual therapy gives you a safe space to discuss your addiction and mental health one-on-one with a certified counselor; while group therapy is valuable, there are many things you may not be comfortable revealing with others. Your personal counseling sessions will give you therapy that is designed just for you.

Picking Your Therapist

In most cases, you won’t get to interview all of the different substance abuse counselors and choose which one you like best. Counselors and psychologists are assigned to rehab participants based on a variety of factors including specializations, the type of addiction and availability.

For example, you may enter rehab and want to address your eating disorder along with your substance abuse. The rehab may have a counselor who specializes in treating co-occurring eating disorders, which will make it easier for them to understand your problem and come up with effective treatment strategies for you.

If you feel like you do not like your therapist in rehab, you can bring this up to the staff and see if there is another available for you to work with.

What If I Don’t Like My Therapist in Rehab?

It’s okay if you don’t like your therapist. This is the most important thing to establish. Not everyone “clicks,” and that’s why there are so many different staff members involved in rehab. Before you decide what to do next, it’s important to identify why you dislike your therapist.

Ask yourself:

  • What would I like out of therapy that I’m not currently receiving?
  • Do I dislike the therapist’s approach? Do I find them too direct, too gentle, etc.?
  • Am I feeling unheard in therapy?
  • Do I feel like I’m on the same page as my therapist?

Sometimes, people become so uncomfortable with what they’re going through in therapy that they take it out on the counselor. They begin to dislike the person rather than the practice; if you are not ready to discuss something or dislike a certain therapeutic exercise, that’s okay. Let your therapist know; being open about how you feel about everything, including your therapist’s choices, are all welcome and encouraged.

What to Do if You Don’t Like Your Therapist

After identifying the reasons you’re unhappy with your therapy, it’s important to let the counselor know what’s bothering you. Sometimes, the methods a therapist uses may seem pointless, and it’s okay to voice this. If you let your therapist know that you’re feeling stuck, this will help them become better at their job and provide you with a higher quality of treatment.

At the end of the day, you must also realize that therapy isn’t about your therapist. Focus on your goals, and remember that your emotional growth is what truly matters most.

We can help you choose a rehab that feels right for you. It’s natural to feel anxious and even afraid of treatment, but we’ll walk you through different programs so you feel empowered in your search. To get started, contact us at 800-737-0933.