Tag Archives: addiction

Who Is At Risk of Abusing Opioid Medications?

America finds itself caught in an opioid addiction epidemic. Prescription painkillers, heroin and the ever-dangerous fentanyl are dominating the headlines for all the wrong reasons. If you are suffering from an addiction to any kind of opioid, you're facing some very serious long-term repercussions if you don't get help. We hope you realize that, which is why you are looking for information. With your need for information in mind, we want to encourage you to get help now. To help motivate you, we want to tell you about the treatment process. Hopefully, this will put your mind at ease and let you know what to expect. Much of our focus is going to be placed on the detox process and the use of detox medications. When you locate the right treatment facility based on your needs, you'll likely go through an intake interview. The facility's clinician is simply gathering information about your addiction profile. From this profile, they should be able to determine the proper course of treatment.

Tapering Detox Programs - The Risk of Abuse

While therapy and aftercare are important aspects of treatment, it's all predicated on the addiction sufferer successfully getting past withdrawal and their cravings. It would be a mistake to underestimate the importance of a detox program, especially for someone with an addiction to opioids. Remember, the withdrawal symptoms associated with opioid addiction can be quite dangerous. We are talking about symptoms such as:
  • Respiratory and circulatory issues
  • Severe muscle spasms in the stomach and extremity regions
  • Psychological issues such as anxiety and depression
  • Nausea, vomiting and diarrhea
  • Sleeping issues
The point of a detox program is to help clients get through these withdrawal symptoms with a minimum of discomfort. If the client does encounter discomfort, the detox facility's medical staff has the option to prescribe certain medications for relief. That brings us to a very serious discussion. There are times when a client enters rehab with a very significant addiction to an opioid substance. If the addiction is deep-rooted enough, a standard detox program might not suffice as far as keeping the client safe. That's when a tapering program becomes the best solution. In a tapering program, a doctor will prescribe medications like Suboxone or Methadone to help ease the client away from their addiction. The process could take weeks instead of months, but it's necessary for the welfare of the client. Unfortunately, tapering medications are derivatives of the substances being treated. That makes them addictive. That raises an important question: "Who Is At Risk of Abusing Opioid Medications?" The short answer is anyone who misuses the prescribed medications. Given the fact these drugs are addictive unto themselves, they must be taken as the doctor prescribes. The doctor's job is to monitor the client's progress to assure everything is going as the doctor planned. If the client takes larger doses or takes a tapering drug more often than prescribed, it's substance abuse. As you can imagine, substituting one addiction for another is not good. The client is obligated to follow the doctor's instructions or risk further problems. After going through a detox program, the client should be ready for the rest of the treatment process.

Addiction Therapy

Therapy is the meat and potatoes of addiction treatment. This is the opportunity for the client to identify the personal issues that are driving their desire to hide behind a harmful substance. To get to that point, the client has to be willing to speak openly and honestly with the therapist. With the therapist's direction, the real issues should become apparent. After identifying the issues at hand, the client has the opportunity to develop very specific coping skills they can use to combat their problems. With the right coping skills, relapses can be avoided.

Aftercare Programs

After the client has completed treatment, they have to leave rehab and begin living life on life's terms. The good news is they don't have to do that alone. The rehab facility should be able to offer them access to aftercare programs the client can use as support resources. The best support resources include outpatient counseling, sober living options and 12-Step meetings. If you have an addiction to opioids, you have to be cautious. Your overall well-being is at risk. We would like to recommend you let us help you arrest your addiction and reclaim your life. If you are ready to start treatment, please call us at 123-456-7890.

How Does Hydrocodone Dependence Work?

Not all addictions begin because of intentional behavior. There is a time when people are using legitimate medications, make a few judgment errors, and end up with a full-blown addiction to the drug in question. Yes, there's an opioid addiction epidemic in the United States. It was created from a mixed bag of causes with one of the primary culprits being prescription painkillers. Among that group of substances is a painkiller that goes by the generic name hydrocodone. For anyone out there reading this information, the drug's brand name is Vicodin. Clearly, that's a well-known name among people in the medical community and on the streets. When used as directed by a physician, hydrocodone is very good at doing what it is intended to do. It provides relief from severe pain issues. Unfortunately and not surprisingly, it's highly addictive. If someone sticks to their prescription, they shouldn't have any problems. However, making the decision to increase doses or frequency without a doctor's guidance is like playing with fire. Opioids are notorious for creating dependence, which is only a small step away from a full-blown addiction. In the section below, we want to discuss how dependence works. That includes how it begins and how quickly it can turn into an addiction.

About Hydrocodone Dependence

Before the discussion begins, there's a very important distinction between dependence and addiction that needs to be clarified. Dependence occurs when the body and mind have a strong craving for a substance. It becomes an addiction when the body goes through withdrawal symptoms when it's denied the substance it craves. Simply put, the possibility of withdrawal symptoms is the fine line between dependence and addiction. The truth about hydrocodone dependence is it usually starts innocently enough. A person has pain issues, their doctor prescribes Vicodin, and the patient starts taking the drug as the doctor prescribed. The problem is people usually enter this "contract" with unreasonable expectations. The reality is the pain relief is never quite as fulfilling as the individual expected it to be. Their solution? They start taking the drug in higher doses or more frequently. As the amount of drugs builds up in their system, the body begins to develop an expectation that the drugs will always be there. What the body wants and needs is relayed to the brain, and the brain tells its owner, hey, we need more Vicodin. That's the essence of dependence.

The Signs of Hydrocodone Addiction

As dependence progresses and the individual acts to fulfill their cravings, addiction stands in the wings waiting. FYI: Here's a few signs of hydrocodone addiction:
  • Withdrawal from personal relationships
  • Unkempt personal hygiene
  • Obsession with pursuing drugs or money for drugs
  • Escalating need to take larger doses more often
  • Destructive and criminal behavior
  • Inability to handle personal responsibilities

Treating Hydrocodone Addiction

If an addiction to hydrocodone does form, the addiction sufferer only has one viable option for recovery: They have to submit themselves to an addiction treatment program with a reputable addiction treatment center like ours. With an addiction to an opioid substance, the incoming client should expect to have to spend time in a detox program. The withdrawal symptoms associated with an addiction to said substances are quite dangerous. It just makes more sense to participate in a medically-monitored detox program where medical staffers are monitoring client progress and making sure they are safe during the detox process. After successfully clearing withdrawal and any residual cravings for their drug of choice, the client should be ready for counseling. During counseling, they will get the opportunity to work with a counselor on their issues. During the process, they will hopefully learn a lot about their addiction. That should include the driving forces behind it. At the end of the day, the goal of counseling is to identify the root causes of addiction and subsequently provide the client with the life and coping skills they will need to get around temptation and their personal triggers. That stands as the key to making sure there are no relapses in the future. We can sympathize with the bad things you are experiencing from your addiction to hydrocodone (Vicodin). With that said, we can help you get past your addiction on the way to leading a better life. If you would like more information about our services and facility, you can contact one of our administrators at 800-737-0933.

How Can the Marchman Act Help Me Get Treatment for My Loved One?

Far too many people know how painful it is to watch a loved one struggle with an addiction to drugs or alcohol. For some friends and family members, the pain is very personal because they have suffered collateral damage at the hands of their loved one's addiction. The problem is it's difficult for family members to exert any influence over a loved one who is unwilling to admit they are dealing with the cycle of addiction. Family members can only hope there will come a time when their addicted loved one comes to the realization there's a problem. At that point, there's hope the addiction sufferer will finally reach out for help. Short of that happening, the only other recourse family and friends might have is an intervention. Sometimes interventions work and sometimes they don't. If an intervention fails, loved ones don't have the option of putting a gun to their addicted loved one's head to drag them into rehab. With all that said, there is a law in Florida that empowers family members to force a loved one into rehab if they can establish the loved one's addiction makes the loved one danger to themselves or to others. The name of that law is the "Marchman Act." FYI: The Marchman Act is officially listed as the "Hal S. Marchman Alcohol and Other Drug Services Act of 1993". At this point, we would like to engage in further discussion about the Marchman Act and how it works.

Using the Marchman Act to Get a Loved One Into Rehab

Before we begin this discussion, it seems prudent to point out something that should be evident. Contrary to some people's beliefs, using the Matchman to have a loved one involuntarily placed in an addiction treatment facility is not an adversarial action. In many cases, it is being done out of legitimate love and concern for the addicted family member. Think about it for a moment. An individual is trying to survive life caught up in a substantial addiction to drugs or alcohol. Their life is crumbling before their very eyes. Maybe they are homeless or dealing with financial, health and relationship problems. They won't seek help because they either don't want help, don't believe they have an addiction or have given up hope. Left to their own devices, there's real potential these kinds of addiction sufferers are headed down the road towards prison, insanity or even death. What kind of a relative or friend would just stand by and let that happen? The Marchman Act exists for this very reason. It's not a blanket option for family members to exercise in order to remove an unwanted nuisance from their own lives. Like any other restrictive law on the books, a family member has to show just cause that their addicted loved one poses a real danger to themselves or others. Making that claim has to be adjudicated in a court of law.

Reasons Marchman Act Can Be Exercised

Remember, a family member has to show just cause as to why their loved one should be involuntarily subjected to addiction treatment. The first qualification is the addiction sufferer must show a high level of impairment whether sober or not. If they are impaired, it becomes reasonable to assume they don't have the capacity for taking proper care of themselves or making good judgments. They have basically lost the ability to control their lives. The other reason why the courts might exercise the Marchman act is if the family member can show that their loved one has made threats or is a danger to others. Under the influence of a substance, any signs of aggression should be given extra scrutiny. The Process If a family member makes the decision to attempt to have the courts invoke the Marchman Act on their loved one, there's a very specific process the family member must follow. Here are the steps in order:
  • Petition the court with a sworn affidavit
  • A court hearing is held for involuntary assessment
  • The defendant is held for up to five days for medical and mental health evaluation
  • If found impaired, the court will issue order for involuntary treatment of up to 60 days
  • If the defendant refuses, they are held in civil contempt of court
If you have concerns about the welfare of an addicted loved one living in Florida, we would like to offer our addiction treatment services. If you need help with the process, you can contact us at 800-737-0933.

What Are the Most Important Things to Know About Drug Detoxing?

What are some of the most significant facts to know about going through drug detox? You already know you've got a lot of work ahead of you. But what can you expect to happen during the detox process?

How long will drug detox take?

The amount of time it takes to drug detox depends totally on the drugs you've been using and the length of time you used them. In general, however, drug detox takes somewhere from seven days to two weeks. Some drugs take longer. Getting off drugs remains a challenge for everyone who does it. Staying off drugs for the long term also includes a lot of hard work. Ask your medical professional for more information on detoxing from a specific drug or alcohol.

How does drug detox feel?

You need professional and emotional support to get through the drug or alcohol detox process. This support helps keep people withdrawing from drugs to stay clean and sober and to prevent a relapse. When detoxing, many individuals become nauseated and vomit. You need help keeping hydrated, and anti-nausea medications assist in relieving vomiting. Exercise and hydration both work well to combat some of the physical and emotional symptoms of withdrawal that you might feel. Anti-diarrhea medications also assist people with stomach upset due to withdrawal. Some medicines work well to less severe withdrawal symptoms if you stop taking heroin or opiates. Suboxone is a legal medication that works as a replacement for these two drugs. Once the opioids leave your system, you can gradually reduce the amount of the substitute medication you take. Many recovering addicts experience sleep problems and hypersensitivities during withdrawal from substances such as benzodiazepines. Detoxing at a medically staffed detox center allows you to have medical help with severe withdrawal symptoms so that you won't experience as much discomfort. Also, addicts sometimes start taking drugs to self-medicate mental health issues such as depression or bipolar disorder. If you become depressed or experience emotional problems during withdrawal, a health care provider can prescribe you drugs to ease these problems, too.

Should I drug detox at home?

No, you shouldn't drug detox at home, especially by yourself. If it were easy to detox using will power, you would have been clean and sober by now. But, drug and alcohol withdrawal is serious business. Tempting as it might appear, drug detox needs to be left to the experts. Some people who go through drug detox become violently ill. People sometimes die during the process of detoxing. You require a trained staff to help you get off your drugs of choice and reliable folks to keep you safe while you go through withdrawal. Most people become very ill while they detox. You might also have seizures, hallucinations, and experience a wide variety of distressing side effects from not using your drug of choice. When you detox in a medical facility, you don't only gain a better chance at completing the detox process, but you might also qualify for medications to reduce your uncomfortable drug withdrawal symptoms. Other severe physical and mental problems that might occur during detox include: • Delirium tremens. • Grand mal seizures. • Intense cravings for the missing drug or alcohol. These fierce cravings might bring about an overdose. • Extreme nausea and vomiting, leading to dehydration and malnutrition. • Low blood pressure.] • Kidney failure. • A chance of choking on your vomit. • Coma. • Death.

Can I successfully drug detox? Or am I hooked for life?

You can successfully detox from drugs and alcohol. If you quit taking your medication of choice or stop drinking, your body can begin to heal itself. Once your body releases all of the addictive toxins from it, you do need to find out why you started to use in the first place. To accomplish this task, you need to go to a reputable rehab program. Most rehabs offer individual and group therapy, training, and education about why you might have started using. Medical help remains available to keep you off your previous drug or alcohol addiction. You might receive family therapy and get to participate in a sober living program. Sober living enables you to live in a home-like setting and gradually work your way back into interacting with the world outside your treatment placement. Please make the call and contact us for more detox information and a new start in life without drugs and addiction.

Will an Alcohol Rehab in West Palm Beach Help You Keep Your Job?

Current data shows that Florida has a significant problem when it comes to substance abuse. To help put this into context, the National Institute on Drug abuse (NIDDA) reports that there were over 3,000 overdose deaths in the sunshine state in 2016. It is important to note that the city of West Palm Beach has seen its fair share of drug-related deaths stemming from synthetic opioids, which accounted for nearly 2,000 deaths in 2016. Also worth noting, underage drinking is 4 percent higher than the national average in Palm Beach County. Lastly, more than 4,000 DUI arrests are made in the county every year. Given these statistics, it is not unreasonable to conclude that alcoholism is just as big a problem in Palm Beach County as drug abuse. While many people have decided to seek help for their addiction to alcohol, some are still reluctant to get the help that they need and have cited fear of losing their job as the primary reason. In this article, we will take a look at the federal laws that are designed to protect not only your privacy but also your job while you work toward overcoming your addiction to alcohol.

WHY YOU SHOULD DISCLOSE YOUR PROBLEM WITH ALCOHOL TO YOUR EMPLOYER

While the fear of losing your job as a result of opening up about your addiction is understandable, not taking steps to conquer your addiction could lead to subpar work performance, which could potentially lead to termination anyway. Once you have made up your mind to seek help for your addiction, most rehab programs will advise you of your rights under the Family and Medical Leave Act (FMLA) and also the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA). These federal laws are in place to protect your job should you need a leave of absence due to health reasons. And yes, substance abuse qualifies as a serious health condition under FMLA. The Americans with Disabilities Act provides you with some recourse in the event that you're terminated while seeking help for your addiction. For example, if your termination was based on your decision to seek help for an addiction, you can file a lawsuit against your employer for discrimination under the ADA.

HOW CAN A ALCOHOL REHAB PROGRAM HELP YOU KEEP YOUR JOB?

Most alcohol and drug treatment programs can assist you in gathering any information that you will need relative to your treatment that you can then give to your employer. They may also be able to help with your Return-to-Work Agreement (RTWA) after you have completed your treatment. These agreements outline what employers will be expecting from an employee once he or she returns to work following the completion of an alcohol rehab program. However, this is usually the end of their involvement. Generally speaking, it is a good idea to work with your employer's human resources department to confirm that they are required to follow FMLA guidelines as smaller companies with fewer than 15 employees are not required to do so. The same also applies to ADA as well.

WHAT YOU SHOULD KNOW BEFORE SEEKING TREATMENT FOR ALCOHOL ABUSE

Assuming your employer is required to follow ADA and FMLA guidelines based on their employee count and other criteria, you will want to familiarize yourself with your company's policies as they relate to drug and alcohol abuse. For example, if you have an accident at work while under the influence, FMLA and ADA may not apply. In most cases, you will also need to have a letter from a licensed physician stating that your addiction constitutes a serious health condition under FMLA. While this may all seem daunting, taking these steps will ensure you can keep your job while getting the help that you need to overcome your addiction. Furthermore, these procedures are also in place to help employers as well. According to drugabuse.gov, substance abuse costs the U.S. more than $700 billion in lost revenue each year, most of which is attributed to a loss of productivity, healthcare costs, and injuries in the workplace.

WILL YOUR EMPLOYER PROTECT YOUR PRIVACY?

One of the biggest concerns that most people have when it comes to opening up about their addiction is that their struggles will become the subject of gossip in the workplace. Assuming that your employer is required to follow FMLA and ADA guidelines, your privacy will be protected. However, most employers already have policies in place that are designed to protect sensitive employee information. That said, if you're ready to overcome your addiction to alcohol, consider speaking with one of our friendly and knowledgeable representatives today at 800-737-0933.

How Strict Are the Rules in Long Term Rehab?

When you are considering entering a rehab center because you recognize that things have begun to spin out of control due to an addiction, you might naturally have a number of questions. For instance, you might wonder how strict the rules are in long term rehab. It should be kept in mind that the goal of attending a long-term rehab is to help you or your loved one get sober and develop the skills necessary to maintain that sobriety even after you leave treatment. For this reason, there are certain rules that you will need to adhere to while you are in treatment. Those rules are designed to help you focus on your treatment and put destructive behaviors behind you so that you will have the best chances possible for sustained recovery. The specific rules you will need to follow will likely vary according to the long-term rehab facility you attend. With that said, there are typically basic rules that clients can be expected to follow in most such facilities. Your ability to follow these rules will make a significant difference in improving your chances of maintaining your recovery.

What Rules Should You Expect in Long-Term Rehab?

If you or someone you care about is ready to enter a long-term rehab center, you should know that most of the rules in rehab facilities are put in place to discourage any type of behavior that might be a detriment to your recovery. First and foremost, you will be expected to refrain from using any type of drug or alcohol while you are in treatment. In the event that you require medication, experienced staff at the facility will provide doses to you. Under no circumstances will you be allowed to retain any type of medication or drug in your possession. This includes over-the-counter medications. Furthermore, you will not be allowed to maintain possession of any type of product that might contain potentially harmful substances, including mouthwash that contains alcohol. There are also restrictions regarding any type of activity that might detract your attention from therapy and recovery. This includes limiting the amount of television you are able to watch. You will also be restricted from using smartphones and other devices that might discourage you from giving your full attention to therapy. While telephones may be available at the rehab facility, your access to the telephones may be restricted and limited to only certain times. During your time in rehab, you should expect to attend: • Therapy sessions • Nutritional counseling • Cognitive behavioral counseling

Rules Regarding Visitors and Relationships in Long-Term Rehab

While you are attending long-term rehab, you should also be aware that you will not be allowed to engage in any relationship of a romantic nature with other clients. Although it is completely understandable that you may form friendships with other clients while you are going through treatment, romantic relationships are discouraged and could even be the basis for being dismissed from treatment. It is crucial that you be able to give your full attention to your treatment and recovery. You may be allowed to receive visitors while you are in treatment, but visitation hours are typically limited. Additionally, you should be aware that you will not be able to come and go from the facility as you please.

Rules Regarding Schedules in Long-Term Rehab

Long-term rehab facilities also typically institute rules regarding the daily schedules of clients. The structure is critically important to the rehabilitation process. For this reason, it is vital that you learn to develop and stick to schedules. In order to assist you with this, the facility will likely have rules in place regarding when you get up in the morning, when you attend therapy when you eat, and even when you go to bed. While such rules might seem to be quite strict, try to keep in mind that they are intended for your benefit. If you have not been accustomed to following a schedule in the past, you might find this phase of treatment challenging, but over time you may also come to find that a schedule is actually quite comforting. If you or someone you care about has been struggling with addiction for a long time and you are ready to finally say goodbye to substance abuse, we are here to help. At our Southwest Florida treatment facility, we help clients in all stages of addiction, including those struggling with long-term addiction. Call us today at 800-737-0933 to learn more about what to expect from rehab.

Is Suboxone Only Used During Detox?

Suboxone is a medication that is prescribed to treat opioid use disorder. It is a combination of buprenorphine and naloxone. Suboxone is used to decrease the appearance of opioid withdrawal symptoms. It is a long-acting medication and lasts for approximately 24 hours. Suboxone is a film that is placed in the cheek or under the tongue when administered. The side effects of suboxone can include constricted pupils, low blood pressure, lethargy, and respiratory depression. The risk of overdosing on suboxone is drastically lower than overdosing on another opioid like heroin. Suboxone was approved for use in the United States for medical purposes in 2002. The long-term outcomes of suboxone as a treatment for opioid use disorder are better than quitting opioid use overall. Cravings for opioids are decreased when using suboxone, which prevents individuals from seeking out other opioids to use. Suboxone is a first-line treatment for opioid use disorder and has been shown as effective in the treatment and long-term recovery for individuals who were dependent on opioids in the past. Suboxone is typically prescribed during detox and in doctors offices. Individuals are given their prescription and they do not have to be monitored, unlike individuals who must go into a clinic each day to receive their dose of methadone. Individuals who are stable and are not able to visit a clinic each day to receive medication may prescribed suboxone. Further, individuals who have other medical conditions that visit their doctor regularly may be prescribed suboxone. Other individuals who may be prescribed suboxone include those who have jobs that require them to remain alert and are not able to be under a sedating medication like methadone. Suboxone is also recommended to treat individuals who may be affected negatively by methadone use. These populations include individuals who abuse alcohol, the elderly, individuals who take large doses of benzodiazepines, and individuals with a low level of tolerance to opioids. Further, suboxone is prescribed to individuals who are engaging in therapy and counseling in order to treat their opioid use disorder. The use of suboxone in combination with therapy is more successful in treating opioid use disorder than treating it with suboxone alone. If you would like more information regarding suboxone therapy or treatment for opioid use disorder, call us today at 800-737-0933.

How Do I Tell if the Rehab Facilities Near Me Are Any Good?

When you feel as though your entire life is spinning out of control due to substance abuse, it’s imperative that you find a rehab center that can provide the services you need to get your life back on track. Whether you are seeking a rehab facility for yourself or for someone close to you, finding the right treatment program is critical. It’s not uncommon for many people looking for a treatment center to wonder whether a facility near them is any good. This is one of the most important decisions you will make when it comes to addiction recovery, so it is important to know what to look for in a facility. Numerous factors need to be taken into consideration in choosing a substance abuse treatment center. Among those factors include whether the facility in question offers the specific services that the person struggling with addiction needs. Whether or not the treatment facility offers after-care and follow-up services should also be considered. Taking the time to learn as much as you can about a facility can help to guide you in choosing the right program for yourself or your loved one.

Finding Out About the Services Offered by an Addiction Treatment Center

In determining whether or a facility is the right choice, consider whether the program offers a dual diagnosis. Many individuals struggling to overcome addiction also have other clinical conditions, such as anxiety, depression, post-traumatic stress disorder, or eating disorders. It’s also not uncommon for the individual to not even be aware that he or she also has other disorders. For this reason, it’s important to select a facility that offers a dual diagnosis. In a program with a dual diagnosis, incoming clients are provided with an assessment to determine whether they are also struggling with other disorders. Clients who also have other clinical conditions can benefit from receiving treatment not only for their addiction but also for their other conditions. A solid addiction treatment program should also provide a holistic approach to treatment. This means that the program should not just focus on treating the addiction with counseling services but should also provide other forms of treatment that target body, mind, and spirit. Such forms of treatment might include:• Individual and group counseling• Meditation• Nutritional counseling• Stress relief training

Other Factors to Consider When Selecting an Addiction Treatment Program

Additionally, it’s important to consider other factors in determining whether an addiction treatment program is a right choice for your needs. For instance, take some time to research the facility that you are considering and find out whether the program has longevity. Generally, it’s a good idea to steer away from any treatment program that has not been in business for a while. Although some such facilities might be perfectly fine, a facility that hasn’t been in business very long could eventually end up failing if they utilize unlawful or unethical business practices. Overall, treatment centers that have been open longer typically have longevity due to the fact that they provide good service and adhere to ethical standards. Furthermore, you should try to stay away from any treatment center that provides guarantees for success rates. It is simply impossible for a treatment center to provide a guarantee of success for an individual in recovery. Ultimately, it is up to that individual as to whether he or she will continue following the treatment plan after leaving the facility. Ideally, it’s important to look for a program that offers ongoing support group meetings even after clients leave the treatment center.

Do You Need a Treatment Center Near You?

It’s only natural to have a desire to enter a treatment program near you or choose one within a close vicinity for your loved one. One thing to keep in mind is that close proximity does not necessarily mean that a treatment facility is the best choice for your needs or the needs of your loved one. Keep in mind that when you or your loved one enters a treatment program, it will be imperative that he or she be able to fully focus on treatment. Finding the right addiction treatment program may seem as though it is a daunting task, especially given the number of options available. If you are still uncertain as to whether a facility might be the right choice, it’s a good idea to contact the facility directly and obtain as much information as possible, including the various services offered. If you are ready to take that next step, call us today at 800-737-0933 to learn about our addiction treatment center in Southwest Florida.

Can You Do an Outpatient Detox if You Can’t Miss Work?

It is not always such an easy matter to obtain treatment for drug abuse. There is no shortage of addiction treatment centers and programs around Florida and the country. Yet despite this, there are a variety of considerations that can make it harder to access such treatment than it should ideally be. Among the most common complaints of individuals struggling with an addiction is that their medical professional will likely recommend inpatient detox and other rehab treatment when they have to be at their daily jobs. The problem for most working professionals is that they can not simply disappear from their workplace for a few weeks of intensive inpatient treatment. It is not so well known that the overwhelming majority of people struggling with addiction have jobs and keep up mostly normal lives. The SAMHSA Substance Abuse & Mental Health Services Administration reports that a stunning 76 percent of individuals who struggle with drug and alcohol abuse have jobs. There are far too many individuals who worry that stepping forward to get help will be a blow to their jobs or careers, potentially costing them their positions. The good news is that the government has enacted several laws to protect individuals who suffer from addiction disorders. These safeguard them from discrimination in the workplace and especially from losing their jobs for addiction that is now treated as a legitimate mental illness. Inpatient Rehab Is Not the Only Addiction Treatment OptionThe important thing to keep in mind is that this inpatient rehab is not the only means of getting help for such addictions. It is especially helpful for those people who have a more serious addiction who believe that they will not resist future relapse temptations or those who have already suffered one or more relapses in their past. The fact is that living in such a facility literally 24 hours each day over a period of weeks will not be optional for all people. The alternative outpatient rehab permits those individuals who need to keep up with their everyday lives to do so. They will attend the treatment center and program several times each week for medical supervision and treatment, support group meetings, counseling, and drug tests. Government Laws Protect Your Rehab Program RightsTwo major pieces of legislation protect American workers and their jobs when you seek out rehab program treatment for drug addiction. This is the ADA Americans With Disabilities Act as well as the FMLA Family & Medical Leave Act. These ensure that those with addictions will not be discriminated against so that they can take advantage of the help that they require in treatment without being fired from their essential jobs. The fact is that after entering one of the rehab programs, you become completely protected by the ADA. You can not be fired for addiction-related reasons or for inconveniences caused by the treatment requirements, regardless of whether or not you miss work as a result of such treatment. In the event that you are fired, you are able to file charges for discrimination versus your employer. This is true for all government employers (including local and state government) and private firms who have at least 15 employees. You Are Entitled to 12 Weeks of Medical Leave for Addiction Disorder TreatmentThe FMLA allows for qualified employees to take advantage of 12 weeks of medical leave surrounding addiction treatment and disorders every year. The law can not make employers pay you for that time, but they are required to make it available it to you. If you are a contract or part-time employee, it may not be an available option. The law also enables you to apply for disability benefits during your treatment so that you do not have to do without compensation for weeks of work missed. This is an option for many people who find that they need inpatient detox to have effective drug addiction treatment. The caveat is that this proves to be a complex and somewhat difficult process to successfully complete. You must demonstrate that you do not earn more than the present income limit in order to become qualified for such disability. The other restrictions are as follows:
  • Not earning more than $1,000 each month
  • The disability cannot exceed a year
  • The addiction issue is significantly affecting your working capabilities
It is still an option and worth looking into if your job will not pay you for the missed weeks of work should you find it necessary to become an inpatient at a drug rehab facility. This is especially the case if this addiction disorder is more severe and has been ongoing. If you are ready to seek out help, our counselors are here for you now. Please contact us today at 800-737-0933 to speak with one of our assistants 24 hours per day.

What Can You Expect from a Medical Detox Center?

When someone is dealing with addiction and ready to get help, one of the first steps is detox or the process of stopping drug or alcohol use. This process can involve some uncomfortable or dangerous physical symptoms — which is where a medical detox center comes in. These centers are staffed with doctors and nurses who are trained in addition and detox, so they can help your loved one get through withdrawal safely. Detox is almost always uncomfortable; in some cases, it can be life-threatening. Medical detox centers monitor the symptoms, help manage pain, and provide invaluable support for both mental and physical health. This process helps keep the patient as comfortable as possible. When the detox is over, most people are ready to continue on with addiction treatment. For many people with addiction, the fear of the unknown is serious; when that’s the case, it’s helpful to know exactly what to expect when you take a friend or family member to a medical detox center.

Consultation, Evaluation, and Admission to a Medical Detox Center

When you arrive at a medical detox center, the first step is an evaluation and consultation. Your loved one will meet with a substance abuse specialist to discuss the situation. This person, sometimes in combination with an admissions professional, will figure out what’s needed during the detox process. They will come up with a care plan that takes into account factors such as:
  • History of drug or alcohol use
  • The current level of drugs or alcohol in your system
  • Prior treatment experience
  • Medical history and current health issues
  • Mental health concerns
It’s important to encourage your loved one to be completely honest during this process; even when it’s hard, this honesty helps the medical team create the most comfortable detox plan. During the intake process, the health professional will also request drug testing. This helps the center figure out exactly what substances are in the person’s system, so they can create an appropriate plan for detox. Once they have a plan, the medical team will explain it to you thoroughly — at the end of the process, you should know exactly what to expect and understand exactly what the doctors and nurses will do. If you’re happy with the treatment plan, you’ll need to fill out intake forms and be admitted to the facility.

Stabilizing the Patient

The next step in medical detox is stabilization. During this stage, your loved one will stay in the detox facility. Since there are no more drugs and alcohol coming into their system, they will start to go into withdrawal. Exact withdrawal symptoms vary dramatically based on the substance and the person’s history. The doctors and nurses at the facility help keep the patient comfortable during the process. They may prescribe medications to help control pain or keep the patient safe. In some cases, the medical staff delivers fluids and nutritional supplements if the patient can’t keep down water and food. Most importantly, they provide constant supervision, so your loved one is always safe and unable to relapse. Another important part of medical detox is psychological support. Detox is stressful, so the facility’s mental health staff are a key part of the process. They take away some of the fear by explaining what to expect, and they provide a soothing, comforting presence during the worst moments. This support is instrumental in getting your loved one through the fear and anxiety that comes with detoxing.

Preparing for the Next Steps

For most people with addiction, medical detox on its own isn’t enough to treat the problem. It stabilizes them, so they’re mentally and physically strong enough to undergo further treatment. This might include a rehab center or outpatient therapy, depending on the situation. At the end of the medical detox process, when the substances are out of your loved one’s body and they’re thinking clearly, the healthcare team will talk about the next steps. Usually, with the help of a counselor, they’ll come up with a plan moving forward. Most importantly, they help prepare the patient mentally for the things they can expect in treatment and make them aware of their options. This process helps the person feel that there is hope, and that help for addiction is available. If you or a loved one is in need of medical detox, or if you simply want to find out more about addiction treatment options, we’re just a call away. We can help you figure out the best next step for your unique situation; just call us today at 800-737-0933.