Tag Archives: addiction

Do Heroin Rehab Facilities Help Treat Other Opiate Addictions, Too?

In 2018, the United States government behind President Donald Trump finally stepped forward and proclaimed the country was in the middle of a opiate addiction crisis. The first opiate drug that usually comes to mind is heroin. Indeed, the nation is facing a crisis because of heroin abuse.

It's like a flashback to the 1970s and 1980s when both cocaine and heroin became the favorite illicit drugs among the nations's growing drug culture. The cocaine was picking people up and the heroin was putting them down. The government knew back then how devastating heroin could be to the American culture, yet did very little to stem the tide of heroin abuse.

Fast-forward to today and very little has changed. Actually things have gotten worse. People are now abusing other opiate-based drugs such as prescription painkillers and the ever-dangerous fentanyl. All of these substances create the same kind of euphoria. They also create the same kinds of side effects, including:

  • Shallow breathing and other breathing issues
  • Nausea, vomiting and diarrhea
  • Confusion and memory lapses
  • Damage to the pulmonary system - heart issues
  • Liver disease
  • High potential for overdose
  • Addiction - the ultimate side effect

In the case of fentanyl, the side effects can be as much as 10x more dangerous than the side effects from heroin. The problems related to opiates are escalating. That's why we see more and more addiction treatment centers offering drug-specific heroin addiction treatment programs. The beauty of having such a program is the same treatment protocol can then be easily extended to other opiates.

Do Heroin Rehabs Treat Other Opiate Addictions?

The short answer is yes. As mentioned above the same threaten protocol will work for any opiate type addiction because all opiate addictions affect the addict in the same way. The only real difference between the aforementioned drugs, aside from heroin and fentanyl being illicit drugs, is the strength of each drug. Prescription drugs are designed for everyday use. The lower potency of these pills will require the user to abuse these substances over a longer period of time before addiction occurs. With heroin, an addiction is possible with a few weeks of abuse. Fentanyl is so highly addictive that people have become addicted in days.

The way most rehabs approach treating addiction to each of these substances is the same, though the intensity of treatment might scale upwards for people addicted to heroin or fentanyl. The treatment of addiction to any opiate follows a simple formula:

  • Step 1 - Detox
  • Step 2 - Therapy and counseling
  • Step 3 - Recovery and relapse prevention

Here's a closer look at these three steps.

Step 1 - Detox

Opiates are all highly addictive substances when used improperly. Because of the potential for some rather severe withdrawal symptoms, a medically monitored detox program is usually mandated for anyone entering rehab with opiate addiction. The simple fact is many addicts need help getting past withdrawal symptoms like sleeping issues, tremors and convulsions, severe pain from cramping and hallucinations. If medical professionals are standing by to offer comfort and medicine when things get really uncomfortable, the patient stands a much better chance of getting past their cravings and withdrawal safely.

Step 2 - Therapy and Counseling

When detox has been completed, the patient should be able to participate in therapy and counseling at a high level. They need to approach this aspect of treatment with the utmost openness and honesty. This will make it easier to identify and address the personal issues that gave birth to the addiction and gave it a reason to keep going. By identifying specific issues and the triggers that prompt drug use, the patient will get the opportunity to develop better-coping skills, which will be needed as the first line of defense against relapses.

Step 3 - Recovery and Relapse Prevention

After rehab, recovery has begun. Staying clean requires a life-long commitment to following a set of rules in order to stay away from triggers and temptations. For people who need additional help with relapse prevention, resources like sober living, outpatient counseling and 12-Step meetings are available to help them fight the good fight.

If you are addicted to any type of opiate and want help, you are just one call away from salvation. For more information about our opiate addiction treatment programs, you can call us at 800-737-0933.

If You Go to Rehab More Than Once Following a Relapse, Do Your Patient Rights Change?

Every year, millions of Americans suffer from addiction. Many don't reach out for the help they need. Sometimes this is because they don't have adequate resources. But sometimes it's because of the stigma and misinformation surrounding rehab. If you're thinking about going to rehab, it's natural to be concerned about your patient rights. For those who have been to rehab before, one question you may have is: If you go to rehab more than once following a relapse, do your patient rights change?

The short answer is: No. You still have the same rights as any other patient.

The one exception would be if the rehab is a court-mandated program after you've been convicted of breaking the law. If you've been ordered to complete a treatment program, and you fail to comply with those terms, you might go to jail. However, this only applies if you're dealing with a court sentence. For people without court mandates, patient rights remain unchanged no matter how many times you go to rehab.

Understanding Patient Rights

In the United States, all medical patients have a bill of rights. Rehabilitation centers may add to this list of rights with their own policy outlines. If you have questions about any specific center's policies, you can ask one of their intake counselors.

Patient rights are the things you're entitled to as a medical patient. You still have the same medical rights no matter how many times you've relapsed. These rights cover a variety of areas. One important right is the right to privacy. Your medical information cannot be disclosed to anyone without your express permission. Other patient rights include the right to adequate care, bodily autonomy, consent, and accessibility services.

Autonomy and Freedom

When you go to rehab, you're admitting that you've lost control of your life. Many people worry they're just trading one loss of control for another. This can be especially true after a relapse. But every time you go to rehab, you have ultimate control over everything that happens, even if you've relapsed before.

You will need to comply with the center's policies. This means you can't bring prohibited items or break the rules. If you do, the center reserves the right to ask you to leave. But treatment centers aren't prison. There are no locks on the doors. Treatment only works if you want to be there. If you don't consent to be there, you can leave at any time.

Similarly, you'll have to consent to any medical treatment. If your doctor prescribes any new medications, they'll need to advise you about the benefits and drawbacks so you can make an informed decision. If you don't want medication, you won't be forced to take it. Your doctor may highly encourage you to comply with medical treatment, though, as it tends to be helpful with managing addiction.

Comprehensive Care

You have the right to a high quality standard of care. This remains your right no matter whether it's your first time in rehab or your tenth. The staff cannot discriminate against you or treat you poorly just because you've relapsed before.

You have the right to receive adequate nourishment that meets your nutritional needs. If you have a physical disability, you have the right to accessible accommodations. If you speak another language or use sign language, you have the right to an interpreter. Most of all, the center's resources should focus on helping you get better. Your doctors cannot administer improper medical treatment just because you've relapsed in the past.

Friends and Family

If you've relapsed multiple times, you may have a fraught relationship with your friends and family. It's important to establish a support network. With your consent, your treatment center may try to bring your family members in for family therapy. This helps you to establish healthy boundaries and plans for what to do in a crisis.

In some cases, when an addict has relapsed multiple times, their family members refuse to be a part of treatment going forward. They may feel they've been betrayed too many times. The center can encourage them to participate in treatment, but it can't force them. Just like you have the right to leave treatment, they have the right not to participate. They can't legally be forced to be a part of your treatment. Many family members can be convinced to participate if you show that you truly intend to get better, though.

If you're ready to take the first step toward treatment, our counselors are available to talk at 800-737-0933.

My Son Has a Drug Problem – How Do I Talk to Him About Rehab?

You've seen the signs of your son's drug problem. They are undeniable. Your son no longer has any interest in any of the hobbies that used to occupy his time. His school work is failing. He hasn't been able to keep up with his homework in college or his job. He's been irritable. He's lost weight and his eyes are bloodshot. Money has gone missing from your purse. You've found evidence of drugs in his room. You confronted him. He told you to leave him alone. You fear for his well-being, his future, and his life. He needs help, but you don't know how to talk to him about going to rehab.

Don't Put Off Until Tomorrow What You Can Do Today

The most important thing you need to do is take action. Don't let any more time be wasted. Addiction is merciless. It consumes a person. It's an illness that has a hold on your son. It is too difficult for him to walk away by himself. He is going to need the professional help of medical professionals in a rehab program that is tailored for him. You can point him in the right direction.

Put Love First for Your Son

When addiction is a dark shadow hanging over someone you love, it can make you frustrated and angry. You don't know how to find a solution. You may lose your patience or find yourself fighting all the time. Anger is not going to solve your son's problem and it won't help you to find a solution. You need to sit down in a quiet moment. Hold your son's hand. Look him in the eye and tell him you're worried about him. You want him to be well again. You love him more than anything in the world and can't stand to let drugs hurt him anymore. It's time to get help.

Rehab Can Give Your Son the Strength Needed to Put Addiction Behind Him

When you are open and honest with your son, you can move forward. Your compassion will go much farther than any attacks on his behavior. He can't erase the damage that has been done by drug addiction, but he can start fresh. Show your support for your son. Let your son know:

  • You will be by his side when it is time to enter rehab
  • You will continue to offer support while he is in rehab
  • You will be waiting for him when rehab is over
  • Your son is not alone

Rehab Will Provide the Care and Support Needed for a Successful Recovery

Once you have found the right drug rehab program, medical professionals will be able to take the steps needed to treat your son's addiction. The first step will be a thorough evaluation as the source of your son's addiction is identified. It's important for staff members to be aware of what type of drug is being used, how much is used on a regular basis, and how long it has been a habit. From that point, it will be possible to create a treatment plan that will get to the root cause of your son's addiction. Detox will clear all toxins from his system, paving the way for clear thinking. With a clear head, it will be possible to focus on what led to addiction, what your son's triggers may be, and what healthy strategies he can use to replace his addiction. It isn't going to happen overnight, but your son will be able to take positive steps forward when you find a program that is the right fit for him.

We are Here to Make sure Your Son Gets the Help He Needs

Let us help you with the burden of your son's addiction. We can lighten that load for both of you. Our representatives are here 24 hours a day, 7 days a week. You can contact us at 800-737-0933. We are ready to listen. Our compassionate representatives will be able to advise you about a rehab program that can suit your son's needs. Once you've found the right program, the journey to a life that is free from addiction can begin for your son. Call us today.

Who Will You Meet at a Crack Addiction Facility?

For those of you that have admitted that they have a problem with crack cocaine and are seeking treatment for this horrifying addiction, there is a sense of relief that the nightmare will soon be over. However, this sense of relief usually couples with a certain amount of trepidation about what you will find when you get to the treatment center. You undoubtedly have a lot of questions about what the experience of treatment will entail. Specifically, you are probably wondering who you will meet at a crack addiction facility.

Well, the good news is that you needn’t worry about what addiction treatment involves whatsoever. The people that you will meet at a crack addiction facility are some of the most caring and compassionate professionals you will ever encounter. Trained professionals in the addiction field often have personal experience with addiction themselves, and those who do not have still dedicated their lives to helping people afflicted with the horrible disease of addiction. Also, you will be meeting your peers, who are suffering from the same condition that you are and speak the same language of desperation and hope. Let’s look at the people who you will meet at a crack addiction facility.

You Will Meet the Admissions and Detox Staff

When you arrive at a treatment center, the first thing that you will do is meet with someone from admissions. The admissions staff are professionals in the addiction field who understand that you are probably nervous and maybe not feeling too well. They will do their best to make the admissions process quick and painless. Mostly, they must ask a few questions and have you sign some things.

The next people you will likely meet are the medical staff, including nurses and doctors. Most people entering a treatment facility need to be detoxified for a few days to prevent acute withdrawal symptoms. Crack cocaine, fortunately, does not require a physical detox, but if you are cross-addicted to substances such as alcohol or heroin, they might need to detox you for a couple of days. Either way, they will probably keep you in the detox unit under observation for at least a day to monitor your vital signs.

You Will Meet Your Peers.

When you transfer from the detox unit over to your residential unit, you will meet your peers, who are fellow addicts that you will be living with for 28 or 30 days. Residential units are gender specific, and this gender separation is usually encouraged around the campus of the facility as well to discourage distraction. You will be assigned to a room and will most likely have a roommate.

Remember that your relationships with your peers are every bit as important as your relationships with the staff. Much of the therapeutic work done in a treatment center occurs on a peer to peer basis, whether in a group session or on the unit. Don’t be afraid to take risks and share your issues with your peers. You will probably never see them after your discharge, and you will be amazed at how close you become with your peers in a short amount of time.

You Will Meet the Staff.

There are many different staff members that you will encounter at a treatment facility, and they have diverse specializations. Staff members can include psychiatrists, psychologists, clinicians, counselors, counselors in training, aftercare coordinators, family support counselors, personal trainers, dietitians, unit supervisors, and food service workers. Remember that all these employees are there to help you get the most out of your stay in treatment and most will go out of their way to assist you with anything reasonable. Staff members will treat you with respect, but they expect to be treated with respect as well and expect you to follow the rules and guidelines for treatment.

Your counselor or clinician is the most critical staff member of your treatment team. This individual will meet with you privately once or more a week and will also conduct group therapy sessions with you and your peers. The more open and honest that you are with your counselor or clinician, the more that they can help you.

So, congratulations on your decision to seek help for your addiction. You can expect a life of accomplishment and satisfaction after you get and stay abstinent from mood-altering substances. The next step is for you to place a call to a treatment facility. Do this now, because what do you have to gain from waiting any longer? Call now at  800-737-0933.

Can You Have a Loved One Involuntarily Committed to Inpatient Rehab in Florida?

When you dearly love a person who is battling alcoholism or drug addiction, it is often familiar to wonder if you could invariably have your loved one committed to an inpatient rehab program. Frequently, those who love the person fighting addiction ordinarily see the specific need for inpatient rehab before he or she sees it. Many states possess laws that directly address this topic.

Florida is among the states where you can have your loved one committed to an inpatient drug rehabilitation involuntarily. The laws that may help you in accomplishing this goal include:

- The Emergency Examination and Treatment of Incapacitated Person’s Act
- The Florida Mental Health Act
- The Florida Marchman Act

A collective goal of using the Emergency Examination and Treatment of Incapacitated Person's Act is to force a loved one into a detox program or alcohol and drug detoxification. When using the Florida Mental Health Act, the loved one must possess an underlying mental condition. In most cases, people use the Florida Marchman Act to legally force a loved one into inpatient drug and alcohol programs.

What is the Florida Marchman Act?

The Florida Marchman Act is in place to support families in involuntary commitment to an assessment, detoxification, and/or inpatient drug and alcohol programs when they are unwilling to do it for themselves. The act permits families to petition the court to assess the person, and then order detox or other drug and alcohol-related programs. The person in question does not have to be a Florida resident to have this act invoked on them, just must be present in Florida at the time the petition is filed. Additionally, while an attorney is not always necessary, appropriate assistance with the process is found to be greatly beneficial because the most innocent mistake may cause the case to be thrown out of court.

What is Necessary in Order to Invoke the Act?

To invoke the Florida Marchman Act, it is necessary for three different people with direct knowledge of the person's substance or alcohol abuse to petition the court. It is vital to be able to demonstrate to the court that the loved one has lost self-control due to their drug or alcohol abuse. Because some people do not associate with their blood family, and not everyone is married, the three familiar people can be anyone who possesses the necessary knowledge and concern for the person to be assessed.

After Filing a Petition, how does the Process Work?

To invoke the act, a Petition for Involuntary Assessment and Stabilization must first be filed and a hearing set. You are basically telling the judge you want to have your loved one assessed, and their behavior stabilized. When the hearing is over, your loved one may be held up to five days in so that he or she may be adequately assessed. After this time, a recommendation is made to the court regarding your loved one.

When this is complete, you must then file a Petition for Treatment so that a second hearing may be held. During this hearing the judge will review the assessment and recommendation, and then render a judgment based on the information received. If your loved one violates the court order and refused treatment, or leaves the treatment program, they may face incarceration.

It is often said that while addiction is hard on the ones engulfed directly in the battle, it is equally as hard on those who love them, perhaps in some cases even more difficult. You are looking at the situation with a lucid mind and sober eyes. It is overwhelmingly likely that your loved one's vision is still very much blurred. If you are prepared to undertake the next step, contact us today at 800-737-0933. We are here to be of assistance during these difficult times.

How Long Can a Person Be Required to Get Addiction Treatment Under the Marchman Act?

If your loved one is addicted to drugs or alcohol, you may be wondering what options you have to seek help for them if they are unwilling or unable to seek treatment on their own. Fortunately, the state of Florida provides a way for addicts and their loved ones to seek treatment involuntarily or voluntarily under the Marchman Act. If your loved one does not reside in the state of Florida, the Marchman Act will not apply; however, other states may have similar legislation.

What Is The Marchman Act

The Hal S. Marchman Alcohol and Other Drug Services Act of 1993 is a Florida state statute that allows voluntary and involuntary assessment and stabilization of individuals who are suspected of abusing alcohol or drugs. The Marchman Act is similar to the Baker Act, which provides for involuntary commitment of an individual with a mental health disorder. In the case of involuntary assessment under the Marchman Act, a court may or may not be involved, and certain criteria must be met. If there is court involvement, filing fees may be required.

How To Get Help for a Loved One Under the Marchman Act

Unfortunately, many addicts are unable to recognize that they have a problem with drugs or alcohol. If your loved one does not agree to seek treatment voluntarily, they can still be required to undergo stabilization and assessment on an involuntary basis. In an emergency situation, an individual can be taken into protective custody without court involvement and held for up to three days. In order to seek involuntary treatment for someone on a non-emergency basis, a sworn affidavit can be filed at your local courthouse in the state of Florida.

The person seeking to have someone involuntarily committed under the Marchman Act must:

  • be able to show that their loved one lacks self-control in regards to drugs or alcohol and is unwilling to seek treatment voluntarily. Additionally, the person who is the subject of a Marchman Act petition must
  • Have inflicted physical harm, attempted to inflict physical harm, threatened to inflict physical harm, or be likely to inflict physical harm to himself or herself or to another person, or
  • Due to drug and alcohol addiction, have impaired judgment to the point where he or she is incapable of making rational decisions.

How Does the Marchman Act Work

Once you have filed a sworn affidavit and a Petition for Involuntary Assessment and Stabilization, a court hearing is set. Following the hearing, your loved one may be held on an involuntary basis for up to five days. A Petition for Treatment must then be filed with the court, and a second hearing will be held. Upon the results of that hearing, your loved one may be held for up to 60 days for treatment of his or her substance abuse disorder. If a judge deems it necessary, there can also be a 90-day extension of involuntary treatment.

If an individual who is court-ordered to treatment under the Marchman Act leaves a treatment facility in violation of a court order, he or she must appear in court and will be ordered back to treatment. If he or she does not comply, the individual will be ordered again to return to treatment or to face incarceration. However, the goal of the Marchman Act is to treat individuals with substance abuse disorders and not incarcerate them.

How Long Can My Loved One Be Held Under the Marchman Act?

If an individual is taken into protective custody, he or she may be detained up to three days. Juveniles or individuals admitted on an emergency basis may be held 3-5 days. With court involvement, 60 days with a possible 90 day extension is the maximum length of time.

Take the First Step To Get Help For Your Loved One Today

Many addicts are in denial about their addiction to drugs or alcohol or feel powerless to seek help on their own and need a concerned loved one to make the decision for them. If this describes your drug or alcohol addicted loved one, you may feel compelled to seek life-saving substance abuse treatment for them, possibly against their will if necessary. Sometimes, this can be overwhelming for the loved one of an addict. Call us today at 800-737-0933 to explore the next steps to getting help for your loved one.

What Resources Can You Use to Help Heroin Addicts?

It seems 10 lifetimes that America has been dealing with a heroin abuse epidemic. The drug became popular and a problem in the 1960's and remains a menace today. One would think the country would have perfected ways to treat heroin addicts, but the reality is it hasn't. So what exactly can you do to help a heroin addict?

What we know is there really is only one viable method of treatment for heroin addiction. Folks often try conventional counseling with a therapist, but it hardly makes a dent. The Internet is full of home remedies and self-help methods of treatment and again, it hardly makes a dent. What these option have in common is they fail to address both the addiction and the causes of the addiction.

That really leaves the addict with one choice, getting treatment from a reputable drug and alcohol treatment facility. For your part, you can be a good friend or loved one. You can look out for them in anticipation of a crisis that almost always comes. When that crisis does come, it will be time for you to tap into the resources at your disposal.

What Resources You Have to Help a Heroin Addict

While it may not be your responsibility, you still have an obligation to look after your loved ones. If someone you care about is addicted to heroin, it's going to be tough watching them struggle and simply do nothing. Unfortunately, doing nothing equates to enabling, and that's the last thing you want to do. With that in mind, here's a few resources you can use to help your loved one get the help they need.

Educate Yourself

Unless you understand the nuances of heroin addiction, you'll find there's much for you to learn. The Internet is filled with information about heroin addiction. It might be worthwhile to contact your own physician and ask them to help educate you. Of course, a reputable drug addiction treatment center is going to be willing to sit down with you and offer up information.

Intervention

Armed with some knowledge about heroin addiction, you might want to consider putting on an intervention. This would give you a great opportunity to get other people involved in the process. Remember, the goal of an intervention is to motivate the heroin addict to seek help. Here's a few dos and don'ts to consider when running an intervention.

  • Be prepared and rehearse what is going to be discussed
  • Try to keep things positive by having each person mention how much they care
  • Don't make accusations
  • Don't let the subject of the intervention take over the proceedings
  • Discuss possible treatment options and offer to be supportive

You can anticipate your loved one being a bit overwhelmed. They might need a little time to let the intervention process sink in. You should give them that time. By not pressing and keeping things positive, there's an excellent chance they will agree to get help. If not, don't panic. You can stay diligent and hopefully they will come around.

Help With the Treatment Facility Selection Process

When your loved one is ready to accept they have an illness and get help, it would be an excellent idea for you to be prepared to offer assistance with the rehab selection process. The first thing you can help with is finding out how much of the treatment process you loved one's healthcare insurance provider is willing to cover. For any shortage, you could help locate other financial resources.

From there, you can help your loved one find the right treatment facility. There has been a dramatic transformation in the addiction treatment industry over the last few years. They place much more emphasis on providing custom treatment programs that fit a patient's needs and circumstances. With this in mind, you might want to discuss your loved one's situation with multiple treatment facilities. Eventually, you will find one that has exactly what you and your loved one are needing.

While your loved on is in treatment, you could actually start the process of locating aftercare resources. This might include a sober living home, 12-Step meetings and counseling resources.

We hope the information we have provided above will help you save your loved one. When your loved one is ready to admit defeat and ask for help, we encourage you to pick up the phone and call one of our professional counselors at 800-737-0933.

How Does a Christian Drug Recovery Program Differ From a Secular Recovery Program?

Seeking help for a drug or alcohol addiction is often the first lifesaving step on the road to recovery. Today with numerous options for battling addiction, it can be overwhelming to decide where to start or what method of treatment would be the most beneficial to your situation. The most common types of addiction counseling are Christian-based and secular-based. Being educated about the methodology of both counseling types can help you to decided what form of counseling would be best for you.

What Is Christian-Based Counseling?

Christian counseling is one of the oldest forms of treatment for addiction tracing back to 1784. Dr. Benjamin Rush observed individuals who had overcome their addiction through faith, and this led to widespread Christian revivals focusing on addiction treatment. Christian counseling is based on the biblical principles that surrendering to God’s will, instead of relying on human will, is the best way to overcome addiction. Christian counseling can also be especially beneficial for individuals who were once spiritual in helping those individuals rebuild their faith.

What Is Secular Counseling?

A key component of secular recovery methods for addiction is finding a sponsor or mentor to help with counseling and accountability. A mentor can be a psychiatrist, a psychologist, a life coach, or a committed, compassionate individual. The basis for secular recovery is accomplishing sobriety through willpower, making healthy choices, and intentional social connections, such as weekly support groups. Secular counseling is ideal for individuals who value self-belief over traditional religious beliefs.

Similarities and Differences

In both forms of treatment, abstinence from drugs and/or alcohol is essential. Christian and secular counseling both utilize a 12-step process to achieve abstinence and break addiction. The beginning steps of the secular 12-step program target mental health issues, such as anxiety and depression, while the first steps of the Christian program focus on re-establishing the principles of the individual’s faith. Both forms of recovery incorporate scientifically proven therapy techniques, such as animal therapy, addiction education, adventure therapy, and relapse prevention. Christian and secular recovery programs rely on individuals building new social structures to maintain sobriety. With secular programs, this looks like social interaction built upon sobriety, such as the mentor/mentee relationship and support groups. In Christian recovery programs, individuals are encouraged to become involved in faith-based social structures, such as attending church or joining a bible study.

Ultimately the biggest difference in the effectiveness of secular and Christian-based counseling is the personal beliefs of the individual seeking treatment. Personal beliefs can play a major factor in the success rate of certain types of recovery programs. Before choosing a recovery method, it’s also important to read testimonies from past clients and to look at client-care provided even after treatment is complete. If you’re ready to seek counseling for a drug or alcohol addiction, please call us today at 800-737-0933!

How Can I Convince My Spouse That I Need to Go to Rehab in FL?

Enrolling in an inpatient or outpatient rehabilitation program in Florida is one of the best ways to provide yourself with the tools and resources necessary to overcome an addiction. Even when you have attempted to rid an addiction from your life in the past, it can quickly become stressful and overwhelming to maintain sobriety without the proper support and guidance. Convincing your spouse that you need to go to rehab in Florida is possible with honest communication and the willpower to move forward together with a working plan of action.

Review the Benefits of Rehabilitation Centers and Facilities

Before discussing the option of attending a rehab inpatient or outpatient program with your spouse, it is important to review the benefits that rehabilitation centers and facilities offer. Understanding the significance of the role rehabilitation centers and programs play when getting sober is essential when creating a plan of action to stick to for your future.

  • Zero-tolerance zones. Rehab centers and facilities offer zero-tolerance zones to minimize the risk of temptation while also keeping enrolled individuals free from any possession of drugs and alcohol. Most rehabilitation centers and programs do not allow any form of drugs or alcohol on the premises, including cigarette tobacco. A zero-tolerance zone helps to build a sense of community while allowing you to feel at ease and relaxed without wanting to use drugs or alcohol during your stay.
  • Implement routine into your everyday life again. Routines are a necessary part of human life, and work to ensure productivity throughout each day. Without routine, you are much more likely to turn to use drugs and substances again when feeling bored or despondent.
  • Connect with individuals who have similar pasts and experiences.
  • Work directly with an individual counselor or therapist.
  • Rediscover hobbies and activities that were once a source of joy in your life. Feeling depressed, anxious, and alone are all common emotions felt when struggling with an addiction. Relearn how to enjoy hobbies and activities you once enjoyed once you begin on your path to living a sober life.

Discuss Detox Management Solutions

When you are struggling to overcome a severe addiction that poses a threat of physical withdrawal symptoms, discuss detox management solutions at local rehab facilities and centers with your spouse. Rehab centers and facilities that provide medically-monitored detox solutions help prevent potential health risks and the safety issues of those enrolled in programs. A medically-monitored detox solution ensures your health is the top priority for everyone working with you until your withdrawal symptoms and effects have passed.

Express the Need for Daily Routine

Share your need and desire for a daily routine with your spouse when discussing rehab options that are right for you in Florida. Having a daily routine is a way to reduce the risk of feeling the temptation to use drugs or alcohol again due to feeling bored or unmotivated. With a set sleeping schedule and a routine in place, spend more time focusing on your future, setting goals, and managing everyday household tasks. Learn how to better balance your time and make the most out of any free time you have each day after work without turning to use substances again.

Discuss Your Addiction Candidly With Your Spouse

The only way to truly connect with your spouse regarding your addiction is to speak candidly and openly about your struggles and challenges. Opening up about your addiction to your spouse is one of the best ways to find relief and support when you want to move forward in your life. A spouse who understands and loves you for who you are will remain by your side and support your decision to enroll in a local rehabilitation program or center.

Inform Your Spouse of Therapy and Counseling Programs Available

Share resources you have found regarding local rehabilitation options with your spouse. Discuss group therapy sessions, individual counseling, and both inpatient and outpatient rehab programs that are ideal for you and your needs. Ask for advice and input from your spouse so you feel less alone without isolating your loved ones while you work towards living a sober and drug-free life.

An understanding spouse will provide unwavering support for you with your goals of maintaining sobriety and attending local rehabilitation meetings or programs after work. Working together with your spouse and loved ones is a way to feel loved and supported even at your most difficult times throughout your journey to sobriety.  If you need more advice or help call today at 800-737-0933.

Why Can Heroin Relapse Be More Dangerous Than Other Types of Drug Relapse?

Addiction to opioids, in particular, heroin, has reached epic proportions in the United States. In 2017 alone, more than 15,000 deaths from heroin overdose are estimated to have occurred. It is common knowledge that heroin is a dangerous and addictive drug, but many people do not realize that many of these overdose deaths occur during a relapse. In order to understand why heroin relapse is more dangerous than other types of drug relapse, it is important to understand the body’s physical dependence on heroin.

Heroin’s Effect on the Brain

When someone injects or snorts heroin, it travels to the brain and binds to opiate receptors. This causes neurons in the brain to release dopamine. Dopamine is a “feel good” chemical that induces an overall sense of euphoria and well-being. In addition to feelings of euphoria and pain relief, the respiratory system, in particular, the instinct to breathe, is impaired. When too much heroin is taken at once, the person can become unconscious and stop breathing. This is called an overdose.

An overdose of heroin can happen quickly. People around the user may think they simply fell asleep, but when breathing stops, the brain can not get the oxygen it needs to sustain life. If the effects of the heroin are not reversed quickly, permanent brain damage and death can occur.

How Heroin Addiction Occurs

When heroin is used repeatedly over time, the brain builds up a tolerance to the drug. Users then need to use more heroin in order to feel the same effects. Once tolerance occurs, the brain starts to become dependent on heroin in order to function normally. Without the presence of heroin, withdrawal occurs.

Withdrawal from heroin can range from discomfort to agonizing. A person experiencing withdrawal will seek out more heroin in order to stop the negative effects of withdrawal. This is how addiction to heroin occurs.

When a person decides to stop using heroin and enter treatment for their disease they will experience withdrawal. During treatment at a facility, there are support people available to help manage the uncomfortable withdrawal symptoms. Withdrawal symptoms can last from a few days to a few weeks, depending on the length and severity of the addiction.

Why is Heroin Relapse so Dangerous?

As the body becomes accustomed to functioning normally without heroin, its tolerance for the drug also lessens. While a person is in the throes of addiction, they may have needed to use large amounts of heroin in order to function because of high tolerances. When a person is no longer physically addicted to heroin, their tolerance level is lowered. When a person relapses and begins using heroin again, they often overestimate the amount they will need to feel high. This lowered tolerance also increases the risk of overdose and death during relapses.

In order to prevent a relapse from heroin addiction, a long-term treatment program should be used. After withdrawal symptoms cease, therapy and support must be implemented for a greater chance of recovery. Recovery from heroin addiction can be a lifelong struggle for some people and the right treatment program can greatly increase the odds of staying clean and preventing relapse.

Triggers and Warning Signs of Heroin Relapse

It is important to recognize the triggers and warning signs of relapse. Many recovering heroin addicts will need to completely rebuild their life and find new friends and social activities to engage in, which can be a daunting task. Some triggers for heroin relapse include:

  • Feelings of stress, fear, depression, anxiety, guilt and loneliness
  • Seeing drug use on television or movies
  • Spending time with friends or family members associated with heroin use
  • An urge to have more fun during social events
  • Using alcohol or other drugs
  • Big life changes such as a death of a loved one, divorce, or unemployment
  • Boredom

It can also be important for loved ones to recognize the warning signs of relapse so that an increase in therapy or reentry into a treatment program can occur before relapse. Some of these warning signs include:

  • Attitude changes
  • Attending social events with friends associated with past drug use
  • A decline in appearance due to lack of hygiene, sleep, or appetite
  • Dishonestly
  • An increase in irresponsible behavior like skipping therapy, not attending school, or skipping work

If you or someone you love are struggling with heroin addiction or concerned about relapse reach out to us at 800-737-0933. Our counselors are available twenty-four hours a day to answer any questions you may have.