Tag Archives: alcohol addiction

What Are Some Ways to Weather the 48 to 72 Hour Period of Alcohol Withdrawal?

Making the decision to check into a rehab center is one you will be grateful for the rest of your life. Whether you are addicted to alcohol or some type of substance, you’ll find the help that you need from reputable rehab personnel who only have your best interests in mind. You’ll be given personalized, one-on-one treatment that will help you get through your addiction while you move on to a better you, one step at a time.

However, you may be worried about what will happen if you go into rehab when you are addicted to alcohol. Alcohol withdrawal can be difficult, if not fatal, if you are not under the care of a professional doctor while you are going through it. Read on to learn some important ways you can weather the 48 to 72 hour period of alcohol withdrawal so that you can go on to learn how to lead a sober and fulfilling life.

Symptoms of Alcohol Withdrawal

First, you will want to understand what symptoms you may experience so that you know what to expect once you stop drinking. If you have been drinking alcohol heavily for even just a few weeks, you could experience physical problems when you decide to stop. This is known as alcohol withdrawal, and the symptoms can easily range from very mild to very serious. The symptoms you experience will depend on the amount of alcohol you have indulged in, for how long, and your level of health.

After six hours of not drinking, you may experience anxiety, nausea, insomnia, vertigo, headaches, vomiting, shaky hands, irritability, anger, sweating, and more. More serious side effects can include mild hallucinations. About 5% of men and women who experience alcohol withdrawal will have delirium tremors, or “DTs”. The DTs are serious symptoms that include very vivid hallucinations and seizures. They can also cause a fever, high blood pressure, intense sweating, confusion, and a racing heart.

Getting Through Alcohol Withdrawal

Alcohol withdrawal may be easier or harder than you think. It takes time and patience to allow the alcohol to completely disappear from your body. However, you can expect the first 24 to 48 hours to be the hardest. Read on for some tips that will help you get through the worst of your alcohol withdrawal symptoms.

Take a cold shower- Taking a cold shower can help clear your mind of your racing thoughts and the urge to drink. It can also help if you are sweating and uncomfortable. Plus, a cold shower has many other health benefits!

Avoid anyone who drinks- You must always stay away from the people or even places that will cause you to want to pick up a drink. Stay far away from anyone who will enable you during this period of withdrawal. You may even want to announce a break from people over social media so that you have a reason to ignore calls and messages from those who do not have your best interests at heart.

Eat healthy- It’s easy to go for junk food when you are in withdrawal because your body will be craving the sugar it used to get from alcohol. Balance out the sugar levels by consuming lots of healthy fruits and vegetables during the first few days of withdrawal while leaving the sugary snacks behind.

Drink plenty of water- Alcohol quickly causes dehydration to occur. During withdrawal you may feel nauseated, so make sure you are drinking plenty of fluids. While water is important, you should also drink fluids that contain plenty of electrolytes, such as sports drinks.

Exercise when you can- We know that you won’t feel like it during withdrawal, but we can assure you that exercise will help. Even a small amount of exercise will release the endorphins in your brain that create the happy and content feelings we are all chasing. You’ll also have a sense of accomplishment when you exercise- a big deal when you are struggling with addiction.

Ride out your cravings- Don’t fool yourself into thinking your cravings will immediately disappear- they won’t. You’ll think about drinking alcohol many times during the withdrawal period. Just remember, the cravings WILL go away. The first 48 hours are the hardest part of alcohol withdrawal, so keep reminding yourself that you are getting through the worst and that it will get better.

We Can Help

Remember, you never have to go through alcohol withdrawal alone. When you are ready to get started on the path to sobriety, let us pave the way. Give us a call at 800-737-0933 to learn more.

What Are Signs Your Body is Detoxing from Alcohol that Require Medical Intervention?

At some point, most people who drink alcohol have experienced a few of the signs of withdrawal in the form of a hangover. Yet, serious alcohol withdrawal symptoms go far beyond feeling a little queasy and having a headache. Trying to quit alcohol on your own after you have been drinking heavily for a period of time can lead to dangerous symptoms that place your sobriety and life at risk. When you are wondering what are the signs that your body is detoxing from alcohol that require medical attention, it is likely that you already suspect that you may be at risk for having severe detox symptoms.

Although it is hard to predict who will have these severe symptoms, there are some common factors that can let you know if you might be someone who needs medical intervention. The most dangerous detox symptoms tend to occur in people with an alcohol addiction who drink heavily on a regular basis. You may also be at risk of developing severe withdrawal symptoms if you have tried and failed to quit on your own before due to the severity of health changes such as shaking and nausea. Anyone who has every had an alcohol overdose should also seek medical assistance with quitting.

What Are the Signs of Alcohol Withdrawal?

The first symptoms of alcohol withdrawal typically appear within a few hours to a couple of days after you put down your first drink. General alcohol withdrawal symptoms include the following.
•headache
•nausea
•tremors, especially in your hands
•vomiting
•sweating

While some of these symptoms might occur in anyone after a round of heavy drinking, you do need to know that they can be extremely severe in people whose bodies are dependent upon alcohol. For instance, you might have persistent vomiting that poses a risk for you becoming dehydrated. Alternatively, you might find that your hands shake so bad that you cannot perform your normal daily activities. If your symptoms are severe enough to interfere with your ability to function normally, then you need to seek medical attention right away. In some instances, these symptoms could cause you to give up your resolve and pick up another drink. They could also be the beginning of some of the worst withdrawal symptoms that you can experience.

What Is Delirium Tremens?

You’ve likely heard of delirium tremens before. This syndrome, which is also known as the DTs or shakes, consists of a range of extremely severe symptoms that can lead to a coma or even death. These symptoms can occur several days after you stop drinking, and your risk of developing this syndrome continues through the first week of withdrawal. Delirium tremens is considered to be a medical emergency, and you cannot try to continue withdrawing on your on at this point.

Delirium tremens causes a range of symptoms that include whole body tremors and seizures. People who are developing this syndrome also experience hallucinations that may generate a sense of fear and paranoia. You may find it impossible to sleep, or you may fall into a deep slumber that is parked by periods of restlessness. You may also experience a dangerously high fever or have changes in your blood pressure or heart rate that must be addressed by a medical professional.

What Does Medical Intervention Involve?

Medical intervention helps you to get through the most severe symptoms without risking your safety. When you enter a detox program, the medical intervention staff conducts a thorough physical exam and assessment of your symptoms. They will take note of any symptoms that are severe enough to interfere with your recovery. Once they have a firm idea of your current state of health, they can then use this information to develop a treatment plan that keeps you safe and helps your body to begin the healing process.

During your time in detox, you may be provided with several different types of care to help you get through the first stage of recovery. In most cases, you will need to stay in inpatient care, which requires you to spend the night at the facility. For severe and life-threatening symptoms, you may be given medication that helps you to feel better and get proper rest. You will also begin receiving therapeutic assistance with learning how to cope with the symptoms while finding ways to end your addiction to alcohol.

The detox process is easier and safer when you have lots of support. Are you ready to begin your recovery? Give us a call today at 800-737-0933.

How Are Holistic Alcohol Detox Programs Different from Traditional Ones?

In recent years, the drug and alcohol addiction treatment community has collectively come to realize prior traditional addiction treatment methods weren’t working. The realization likely came from the reality that relapse rates had been hovering around the 70% mark for decades. That kind of number is unacceptable, something that surely played a role in prompting addiction therapists to find better methods for treating addiction sufferers.

That’s not to say that traditional treatment methods have been abandoned altogether. They are still being practiced by leading therapists all over the US. What’s different in the addiction treatment community is the use of other treatment methods as either alternative to traditional methods or to enhance the effectiveness of traditional treatment methods.

The two most prominent additions to the list of viable treatment methodologies for drug and alcohol addiction sufferers has been evidence-based therapies and the use of holistic programs.

Evidence-based therapies include options like Cognitive Behavioral Therapy and Dialectical Behavioral Therapy. Using these options, therapists will attempt to connect clients to the client’s thoughts or feelings that might be driving the client’s need to self-medicate away their trouble. By making clients aware of their negative thoughts or feelings, it gives clients the opportunity to make a conscious effort to turn the negatives into positives, which would hopefully put an end to the client’s addictive behaviors.

As a more interesting addition to the list of newer treatment options, holistic treatment options are rising in popularity and effectiveness. That includes the use of holistic methods for drug and alcohol detox programs. Given the importance of what is taking place, it seems like a good idea to discuss the differences between holistic detox programs and traditional detox programs.

How Are Holistic Alcohol Detox Programs Different from Traditional Ones?

The goal of any good detox program is to help clients go through withdrawal from drugs or alcohol as safely and pain-free as possible. This is a really important part of addiction treatment because there’s little chance a client will be able to get through therapy if they face complications from withdrawal.

The best way to point out the differences between holistic detox programs and traditional detox programs is to simply describe what takes place under each option. That permits you, the reader, to see for yourself exactly how these options differ.

According to the Merriam-Webster dictionary, the definition of holistic is: “relating to or concerned with wholes or with complete systems rather than with the analysis of, treatment of, or dissection into parts. // holistic medicine attempts to treat both the mind and the body.”

At this point, the stage has been set to compare these two detox program options.

Holistic Detox Program

In a holistic treatment environment of any kind, the facilitators will attempt to offer the treatment without medicinal intervention. That’s certainly true in an addiction treatment setting. In a holistic detox program, the hope is the client with being able to detox without having to take relief medications. What the client will experience is a focus on their physical, mental and spiritual health.

The holistic detox process uses exercise and nutrition as ways to start repairing the client’s body from the harm it has undergone due to drugs or alcohol. Medication is avoided unless absolutely necessary. While the body is mending, the client is taught how to use holistic options like meditation and yoga relaxation exercises to start mending their spirituality. In the meanwhile, counseling is provided to start healing mental and emotional issues.

The entire process is like tuning a piano. Methods are used to treat the parts so they can come together to be a better whole.

Traditional Detox Programs

Traditional detox programs are primarily concerned with the client’s physical health. In a medically monitored detox program, the client’s detox process will be monitored by medical staffers. There’s still hope the client will through withdrawal without needing medication. However, the medical staff will be standing by to offer medication should the client start to show signs of suffering. There will likely be attempts to teach clients about the importance of exercise and nutrition, but not much effort is made to address a client’s spirituality or mental state.

If you are a longtime drug user and addiction sufferer, you’ll likely need to start treatment with an assignment to a detox program. We can offer you one of the two options described above. Call us now at 800-737-0933. After we receive your call, we will start working with you to make sure you understand everything you need to know about our facility and treatment options.

Does a Florida Alcohol Rehab Reduce My Chances of Relapse?

Many individuals that are in the process of making the decision to go to a Florida Alcohol Rehab wonder about the effectiveness of the treatment. As clients of these treatment facilities, these individuals undergo customized programs to help them reach sobriety. While sobriety is a lifelong journey, these treatment facilities can play a significant role in preventing relapse.

Individuals that seek treatment from a Florida alcohol rehab will be equipped with the tools necessary to unlearn habits of alcohol addiction. Moreover, these individuals are provided with multiple support systems and resources to help them overcome temptation when faced with the threat of relapse.

 Reducing the Chances of Relapse with Alcohol Rehab

While rehab won’t completely eliminate the chance of someone relapsing, it does help to reduce it. According to statistics, between 40 – 60% of those going through recovery will experience a relapse. This is because there are many physical and psychological factors that trigger cravings and the desire to use substances after becoming sober.

Though all individuals that overcome past substance abuse will have to work through these triggers, undergoing treatment at a rehab center will help to reduce the likelihood of relapse. When in a Florida treatment center, team members like doctors and therapists provide their clients with the tools to maintain their sobriety after they leave rehab.

During treatment, clients will undergo detox to target the physical triggers that tie them to substance abuse. As relapse also has behavioral and emotional triggers, these treatment centers also use specific treatments to target these triggers. Treatment like Cognitive Behavioral Therapy will help to reduce the chance of relapse. CBT helps an individual explore how their thoughts relate to their actions. Additionally, this therapy helps clients modify their negative thought patterns, which will positively affect their behavior overall.

Preventing Relapse

Though the potential for relapse exists for individuals in recovery, there are several ways to prevent relapse. Relapse often occurs when old memories trigger cravings for substance abuse. Similarly, during particularly stressful situations, others may believe turning to substance use will help relieve this stress.

The following strategies will help an individual prevent relapse

  • Move to a sober living environment
  • Take each day as it comes
  • Join support groups
  • Create a schedule and stay busy
  • Remain accountable to loved ones, mentors, and support group

Experts agree that one will be more likely to prevent relapse if they are able to develop effective coping behaviors, avoid risk factors, and create a strong support system. One will be at greater risk of relapse if they consistently miss support group meetings, believe their substance use is uncontrollable, or discontinue their coping behaviors.

To better prevent relapse, it’s also helpful to create relapse prevention plans. This plan should be referred to whenever an individual is tempted to go back to substance use. Relapse prevention plans should include the following information:

  • Someone to call
  • Safe places to go
  • A list of reasons to stay sober
  • Stress-relief strategies
  • Schedules for local AA meetings and similar support group meetings
  • Telephone numbers for crisis lines
  • Addresses for emergency services

Steps to Take If Relapse Occurs

When an individual relapses, this doesn’t mean that they’ve failed. This is an opportunity for one to become sober again and keep practicing sobriety.

The first few moments after a relapse are critical. After recognizing that they have relapsed, an individual needs to find safety. If it is likely that an overdose has occurred, 911 should be called immediately. In other situations, calling a sponsor loved one, or therapist is the right step to take after overdosing.

After the risk of overdose has passed, it’s essential to go to a safe environment without any access to substances, as this type of environment will be free of negative influences that will trigger one’s desire to use again. In the event of a substance abuse relapse, this individual needs to enter into recovery again, whether it is through inpatient treatment, outpatient therapy, or through the help of a support group.

After a severe relapse, it’s necessary to undergo a supervised detox to ensure that the individual overcomes dependence safely.

There is no clear-cut path to sobriety. If you have any questions regarding substance abuse and relapse, please contact us at 800-737-0933. Our counselors are available 24 hours a day to speak with you.