Tag Archives: alcoholic

Is There a Way to Do an Alcoholism Detox Safely at Home?

Alcohol can be a subtle foe. It causes both a mental obsession in the mind of an alcoholic, plus an often insatiable physical craving. Alcoholism is a disease that will try to convince us that there’s nothing wrong with us.

This frightful combination of mental and physical effects makes for potentially dangerous withdrawal symptoms. Here’s a list of four dangerous symptoms of alcohol withdrawal, plus an explanation of why the benefits of supervised detox make it the smart choice.

Symptoms of Alcohol Withdrawal

If there were no inherent dangerous withdrawal symptoms associated with alcoholism, then it probably would be safe to detox at home. However, that is not reality. The truth is that there are a number of dangerous things that can happen during alcohol detox.

When we suddenly try to stop drinking after prolonged or heavy periods of drinking, changes are going to happen in our bodies and brains. The adjustment from drinking to complete abstinence creates often painful side effects. Here are some symptoms of alcohol withdrawal.

  • Insomnia – This is one of the more frequent side effects of alcohol withdrawal. The problem with losing sleep because your mind is craving alcohol isn’t the worst problem. However, lack of good sleep is what triggers dozens of other dangerous mental conditions.
  • Anxiety – Another one of the mental side effects of suddenly stopping your drinking is uncontrollable anxiety. Many alcoholics experience anxiety in normal everyday situations. When you abruptly remove alcohol, the level of anxiety can become emotionally dangerous.
  • Nausea – This is one of the common physical symptoms of alcohol withdrawal. When you get sick after a night of drinking, it may seem like an innocent and necessary evil of having had too much to drink.

However, it is not normal to vomit excessively without some virus or ailment to cause such. What happens during alcohol withdrawal is that your body is already dehydrated from drinking. Vomiting makes the problem even worse. Falling too far down the scale of dehydration can put you at serious medical risk.

  • Shaking – They are known as delirium tremens. When the body suddenly does not have a normal dose of alcohol, it can react violently. Delirium tremens is the uncontrollable shakes that we see happen in cinematic depictions of alcoholism.

The problem is that they happen in real-life as well. Delirium tremens can be so violent that they steal your ability to think rationally. Combined with insomnia and anxiety, hundreds of alcoholics who tried to detox themselves have made attempts to take their own lives.

Recovering alcoholics also tell tales of having horrible hallucinations during the period they were experiencing alcohol withdrawal. The medical bottom line is that when you deprive your body of alcohol after intense use, you are at risk both mentally and physically. Now let’s talk about the benefits of supervised alcohol detox.

Benefits of Supervised Alcohol Detox

The benefits of supervised alcohol detox are simple. They provide you with a medically safe environment surrounded by a professional staff that can help you handle the painful withdrawal phase safely.

  • Supervision – This is one key benefit to admitting yourself to a detox facility. The entire process is under the supervision of trained professionals.
  • Medical Safety – Every alcohol detox will have medical professionals to watch over you. As you experience withdrawal symptoms, they will be on-hand to provide trained medical assistance.
  • Counseling – The road to recovery from alcoholism often begins during the detox period. You will have caring people to talk to about your alcohol problems. There will be a chance for you to chart a course of action after you are out of danger.
  • Program Referral – Along with guided counsel, detox centers are frequently associated with treatment facilities. Even if they are not, there will be an opportunity for you to get a referral to a treatment program that could change your life.

There is nothing that can guarantee that alcohol detox is going to be easy. However, with proper supervision, the dangerous risks associated with alcohol withdrawal can be addressed. Basically, you remove the life-threatening risks from a potential life-threatening situation.

Trying to detox at home is a poor choice. First of all, it’s just not safe. There are too many unknown variables, some of which are potentially life-threatening. Why would you put yourself in such peril?

Detox facilities are staffed with medical professionals to make certain you’re safe. If you even think you have a problem with alcohol, get help today. Most importantly, if you’re trying to stop drinking, don’t try to detox yourself. It is not safe. Contact a detox center to help you at 800-737-0933.

Does a Florida Alcohol Rehab Help with Physical Health Issues Caused by Alcoholism?

If you have a problem with alcohol, you are not alone; according to a study published by the National Institute of Health, more than 16 million people in America have an alcohol use disorder (AUD). Even those who have not been formally diagnosed with AUD admit to binge drinking at least once per month, the study further revealed. Fortunately, many individuals have started to recognize the impact that alcohol abuse can have on their lives as well as the lives of their friends and loved ones. As such, many have sought the help of licensed rehab facilities to make their journey towards sobriety that much easier.

WHAT DOES OVERCOMING AN ALCOHOL USE DISORDER ENTAIL?

Most addiction experts will agree that overcoming an addiction to alcohol is a long journey, and it is also one that can be very taxing on the body once withdrawal symptoms start to present themselves. Some of the more common withdrawal symptoms associated with alcohol cessation include

  • Tremors
  • Profuse sweating
  • Hallucinations
  • Anxiety
  • Fatigue
  • Headaches
  • Arrhythmias
  • Insomnia
  • Nausea and vomiting
  • Confusion

It is important to note that the longer an individual has been drinking, the more intense these symptoms will become once they stop. Also worth noting, 1 in 20 people will develop delirium tremens after they have ended their relationship with alcohol. Commonly referred to as DTs by those in the addiction treatment industry, delirium tremens can cause grand mal seizures, which can be fatal. Along with seizures, delirium tremens can also trigger the following withdrawal symptoms:

  • Fevers
  • Extreme sensitivity to sounds and lights
  • Emotional distress
  • Severe confusion
  • Severe hallucinations

WHEN DO ALCOHOL WITHDRAWAL SYMPTOMS START?

The withdrawal symptoms associated with alcohol cessation occurs in the following three stages:

Stage 1 – This stage, which typically starts 8 hours after an individual’s last drink of alcohol, is characterized by stomach cramps, nausea, and anxiety.

Stage 2 – This stage, which can occur anywhere from 24 to 72 hours after an individual’s last drink of alcohol, is often characterized by an increase in body temperature, arrhythmias, and confusion.

Stage 3 – This stage, which can occur anywhere from 2 to 4 days after an individual’s last drink, is characterized by fever, severe agitation, seizures, and hallucinations.

Although having to endure these symptoms while trying to break free from an addiction to alcohol may seem overwhelming, there is some good news worth noting; most of these symptoms will eventually subside within 5 to 7 days.

HOW DO REHAB FACILITIES IN FLORIDA HELP INDIVIDUALS COPE WITH ALCOHOL WITHDRAWAL SYMPTOMS?

Most rehab facilities in Florida, and arguably nationwide, are well aware of the physical, emotional, and psychological challenges that individuals will face when they decide to stop drinking. For this reason, many will offer medication-assisted detox to help ease severe withdrawal symptoms, some of which include

Naltrexone – This medication is designed to ease alcohol cravings. There is also an extended-release variant called Vivitrol that offers even longer relief from cravings.

Acamprosate – This medication reduces cravings and eases severe withdrawal symptoms.

Disulfiram – This medication is often prescribed to discourage individuals from drinking. If an individual consumes alcohol while taking disulfiram, they will become sick.

WHY INPATIENT REHAB FOR AN ALCOHOL USE DISORDER MIGHT BE THE BETTER CHOICE

Although medication-assisted detox is offered at inpatient and outpatient rehab facilities alike, those who are serious about ending their relationship with alcohol should consider seeking treatment at an inpatient facility. After all, these facilities are known to offer round-the-clock monitoring, which can make detox much easier. Furthermore, because you remain onsite through your addiction recovery, you are less likely to fall victim to cravings and temptation. It is also worth noting that most inpatient facilities provide cognitive behavioral therapy and other forms of psychotherapy to address the psychological aspects of alcohol addiction. And these counseling sessions can go a long way toward helping individuals remain alcohol-free after completing rehab. To further improve an individual’s chances of achieving long-term sobriety, many inpatient facilities also offer access to recovery support groups, such as Alcoholics Anonymous.

BOTTOM LINE

In summation, overcoming an addiction to alcohol will take a lot of work. Fortunately, there is no shortage of rehab facilities throughout Florida that are ready to help make the journey a little easier. To learn more about alcohol detox or to find a treatment facility in your area, consider speaking with one of our addiction specialists today at 800-737-0933.

Do You Go to 12 Step Meetings During Alcoholic Rehab Programs?

Most addiction experts will agree that detox is the most critical aspect of overcoming an alcohol use disorder; however, there is much more involved when it comes to achieving long-term recovery success, which is where 12-step programs come into the picture. For those who may not be familiar with them, 12-step programs are support groups where individuals openly share their experiences related to destructive behaviors, such as alcohol addiction. However, they can also be beneficial to those struggling with other substance abuse problems or even an addiction to gambling.

In terms of alcohol addiction, 12-step programs will encourage members to follow established guidelines that are designed to help them achieve short and long-term sobriety. The most popular of these programs is Alcoholics Anonymous (AA). However, with the success of AA, several similar programs have also been established, including Narcotics Anonymous and Heroin Anonymous.

COMBINING 12-STEP PROGRAMS AND STANDARD ALCOHOL ADDICTION RECOVERY TREATMENTS

Although most individuals will attend a 12-step program after completing rehab, many rehab facilities will offer these programs in conjunction with other treatment modalities, including medically-assisted detox and addiction counseling. According to a study published by SAMSHA (Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration), more than 74 percent of rehab facilities in America will use 12-step programs alongside standard addiction recovery treatment to give individuals the best chance of achieving long-term recovery success.

WHAT HAPPENS IN A 12-STEP PROGRAM?

Generally speaking, those in the earlier stages of addiction recovery will attend a 12-step program 2 or more times per week. During these meetings, they will share their struggles and achievements related to their alcohol use disorder with others in the program. Although administered or coordinated through a licensed rehab facility, 12-step programs are not run by addiction counselors. Instead, they are led by individuals that are still in recovery and have a desire to help others remain alcohol-free. And they do this by sharing tips related to relapse prevention along with coping with cravings and temptations. While in a 12-step program, members will have a sponsor, someone who will explain how the program works and, more importantly, be there for them whenever they feel compelled to start drinking again.

WHAT ARE THE BENEFITS OF A 12-STEP PROGRAM?

A 12-step program provides individuals with the tools that they need to maintain their sobriety during and after completing rehab. Some of these tools include learning how to come to terms with their addiction, accepting the consequences of their actions while under the influence, and finding ways to repair the relationships that they damaged as a result of their addiction. Furthermore, studies show that many individuals are more likely to follow the advice of their sponsor in a 12-step program than the recommendations made by a licensed addiction therapist since they have gone through similar struggles when it comes to substance abuse. And for those without friends or family, these sponsors can help them from veering off course when it comes to maintaining their sobriety. In most cases, the treatment costs associated with a 12-step program is linked to the total cost of care, which is determined by the rehab facility. However, if an individual chooses to continue with these programs after completing rehab, they are free.

ARE 12-STEP PROGRAMS EFFECTIVE?

Most rehab facilities across the nation agree that 12-step programs play a critical role when it comes to helping individuals remain alcohol-free long-term, insomuch that many have made them part of the evidence-based treatments that they offer to those who are serious about putting alcohol abuse behind them for good. According to a 2013 study published by Social Work in Public Health, a peer-reviewed scientific journal, the earlier an individual takes part in a 12-step program, the less likely they are to relapse. It is important to note, however, that individuals will need to stick with these programs long-term to get the most out of them. To that point, a 2014 study published by the National Institute of Health revealed that 49 percent of individuals who completed formal rehab and continued to attend 12-step meetings were still alcohol-free after 8 years.

BOTTOM LINE

If you’re interested in learning more about how a 12-step program can help you end your relationship with alcohol or need help finding a rehab facility in your area, you’re encouraged to speak with one of our addiction specialists today at 800-737-0933.

How Can Families Support an Alcoholic in Recovery?

Alcoholism, like any disease, affects more than just the sufferer. Those close to alcoholics are also greatly impacted by the disease. It is natural and healthy to wonder how to best support an alcoholic in recovery because once one leaves treatment, continued reassurance from family and friends becomes vital to a favorable outcome.

Remaining sober is a lifelong process, and even when ample time has passed, the alcoholic will encounter roadblocks that threaten sobriety. Those close to an alcoholic must remember that although maintaining a sober lifestyle becomes less intimidating over time, it is never effortless. Recovering alcoholics have needs from their support network that go beyond verbal encouragement.

Expect Prolonged Hurdles

A prevalent mistake many make in their attempt to look after someone in recovery is believing that time spent in rehab is a cure-all. While entering a treatment program is a crucial first step in recovery, there is much more work to do upon departing rehab. In some respects, the months after leaving are more daunting than the time in treatment.

Once back out in the real world, navigating everyday life, alcoholics find themselves surrounded by triggers. Anything from passing a liquor store, to running into old drinking pals, can take a good day and throw it into a tailspin. Those hoping to provide support should respect that the alcoholic will battle triggers indefinitely and does not emerge from a treatment program magically cured of the urge to drink. Recognizing that battling alcohol abuse is a marathon and not a sprint is critical.

Maintain a Healthy Balance

Reassuring the alcoholic of ongoing support is essential, but there must be a balance. Loved ones cannot give so much of themselves that they feel as if they are losing their own identity. They should not go so far as to assume all of the alcoholic’s responsibilities. This includes household duties as well as financial obligations. Those in recovery do garner strength from those around them, but they should not be treated as if they are incompetent.

Recognizing possible codependency is mandatory for those who feel that their self-worth might be reliant on the relationship with the alcoholic. Nobody should lose their sense of self when providing care and compassion in any situation. Codependency is a learned behavior and can cause one to actually pave the way to a relapse. For this reason, it must be addressed if there is any sort of a codependent dynamic between an addict and a loved one.

Know Relapse Signs

It is not pessimistic to bone up on the signs of relapse because it can and does happen for some. Taking a drink is the final step of a slide back, and certain signs of an impending relapse are present before actual alcohol consumption takes place. One of the main signs involves the alcoholic failing to maintain the established treatment program and deeming it no longer necessary. Long after the drinking has ceased, physical withdrawal symptoms can rear their ugly head, and alcoholics will often drink in an effort to quell the physical afflictions.

In addition to knowing red flags, having an action plan in place, should a relapse occur, is imperative. Scrambling to formulate a plan after an unfortunate relapse is not ideal. Lack of preparation wastes valuable time. If bottom lines have been discussed, they must be followed for a higher likelihood of success for those who have suffered a slip. Developing a strategy should not be a secretive endeavor. The alcoholic can and should be part of the planning.

Those seeking information on how to support an alcoholic in recovery have already taken an admiral step by striving to educate themselves. If this is new territory, information is invaluable. Those with further questions can rely on our team of expert counselors who are on hand 24 hours per day at 800-737-0933.

How Can You Help an Alcoholic Parent You Don’t Live With?

It’s tough when someone you love is addicted to alcohol. And when the alcoholic in your life happens to be your parent, it can be particularly difficult to know how to help — or even whether you can make a difference. For adult children of alcoholics, watching a parent ruin their health and relationships with alcohol is often so devastating that even staying in touch is fraught with tension.

There’s only so much anyone can do to help an alcoholic who is not ready to recover. But there are some things you can do to help your parent eventually make that choice. Here’s how you can help and support an alcoholic parent you don’t live with anymore.

How to Talk to an Alcoholic Parent

One of the best things you can do for your parent is to have an honest conversation with them. This might be a little awkward, but you, as your parent’s child, have a particularly good chance of getting through to them eventually. That’s not to say that your first conversation with your parent will lead to them deciding to recover. But it does mean that gathering your courage and opening a dialogue is important, and you should do it sooner rather than later.

There are a few key things to remember when you talk to your parent about their drinking. First, find the right time to talk. Don’t talk to your parent when they are drunk, because that will make it difficult to have a productive conversation, and your parent will be more likely to get defensive.

Second, be sure to frame all your concerns as “I” statements. Emphasize to your parent that you love them and are concerned about their drinking habits. Don’t accuse them of anything, or they will probably argue. For instance, don’t say, “You’re an alcoholic and you need to do something about it.” Instead, say something like, “I’ve noticed that you’re drinking a lot lately, and I’m worried about your health.”

Using concrete examples during your conversation may help prevent your parent from becoming too argumentative. If your parent’s alcoholism has caused problems with their finances or relationships, for example, use those as talking points to support your case. Your parent may not be happy to hear it, but the more concrete evidence you provide to support your concern, the more likely they’ll be to consider what you say.

Finally, emphasize to your parent that help is available. The point of the conversation isn’t to make your parent feel like they’ve messed things up forever. Rather, it’s to help them see that they don’t have to continue living in an unhealthy way. Your parent may not be ready to accept help yet, but it’s important that they realize help is available in the first place.

Maintaining a Relationship with an Alcoholic Parent

It’s difficult for many adult children to stay close with a parent who is an alcoholic. But, as long as you feel safe around your parent, making an extra effort to stay in touch with them could make all the difference in the world to them. Call or text your parent frequently to let them know that you’re thinking of them, and plan to get together with them when you can. Find things to do that don’t involve drinking. Taking your parent’s mind off alcohol will be especially helpful if and when they decide to recover.

Be careful not to enable your parent. Providing unconditional love and support does not have to mean overlooking their unhealthy relationship with alcohol. Stay honest with your parent, and don’t make excuses for them, especially if their alcoholism leads them to make poor decisions. Maintain your own boundaries while letting your parent know that you are there to help them with recovery.

Getting Support for Yourself

Don’t forget to care for yourself while you try to help your alcoholic parent. The children of alcoholics often have emotional issues of their own, and you need and deserve support as much as your parent does. Make an effort to take care of your physical and emotional well-being by getting enough sleep, eating well, and seeing friends often. Support groups and therapy can also be helpful if you are struggling to cope with the realities of having an alcoholic parent.

Alcoholism is often called a family disease, and the children of alcoholics are affected by it even if they don’t live with their addicted parent anymore. Your compassion, support, and honesty can go a long way towards helping your parent recover and live a healthier life. If it’s time to get help for yourself or someone you love, call us today at 800-737-0933 to learn about options for recovery.

Identifying a Patient Broker Website for Drug Treatment in Florida

Patient brokering is a topic of high concern lately throughout Florida and the United States. This practice is finally coming out into the public eye and many citizens are just plainly disgusted. If you have never heard of patient brokering before, we’re going to go over what this practice is and how you can avoid falling victim to it.

What Is Patient Brokering?

Patient brokering is an illegal practice in which health care facilities pay ‘junkie hunters’ a referral fee to get access to a patient. Once the patient is signed up at their facility, they will charge the insurance company for a multitude of different procedures and tests. These procedures and tests aren’t actually performed and the health care facility pockets the insurance payments.

There are many ways that these disgraceful health care facilities are collecting patients. From having referrers on the street preying on those with an obvious drug or alcohol problem to online websites, these facilities will pay a high amount to anyone that will successfully score them another patient. This practice is illegal in every state, however, current providers are trying to use loopholes to get out of being charged.

It’s important that you take precautions when it comes to finding the right rehab facility for your loved one. You don’t want them to end up in these patient brokering facilities. This is not only because they scheme and rip off unsuspecting insurance companies, but they don’t actually help the patients. Many addicts who have fallen victim to these schemes have not received the help they needed to successfully become sober. Every failed attempt leaves those with addiction problems relapsing and makes it harder for them to accept trying another program.

 

The Main Signs That A Website Is A Patient Brokering Scheme

It’s hard not to search online for a care facility for your addicted loved one. There is a vast wealth of information from many quality facilities that truly want to help them. Unfortunately, telling the true centers from the fake ones takes a keen eye. Let’s look at some of the common signs that the website is brokering patients.

Start by looking for the basic contact information. You should be able to find a valid address and phone number for the facility. There should be the treating physician’s names as well. If a website lacks this basic information, it’s likely that the website is brokering patients. This typically occurs by having you call a number, which is tracked, that connects you to one of the scamming health care facilities. The facility then pays the website owner a referral fee when you call the number and book a visit.

Genesis House has been a licensed treatment center in South Florida for over 25 years.  Call us directly today at 800-737-0933