Tag Archives: chronic pain

How Can People With Chronic Pain Quit Heroin?

You can manage chronic pain and quit heroin while learning how to reduce the risk of substance abuse. Painkillers or its derivatives are adequate for most and as the pain worsens relief demands more frequent doses leading to potential drug dependency.

Too often individuals attempt to self-medicate and trigger more serious health conditions. There are effective non-opioid drugs combined with different types of therapeutic and medical procedures for treating chronic pain and addiction.

The approach is multi-disciplinary; transitioning from heroin to a non-opioid medication, treatments for pain, and the introductions of precautions to prevent drug relapse.

More Than Just Pain

A vast majority of individual’s suffering with chronic pain are unaware they have a substance abuse problem. Besides the health considerations that will worsen over time substance abuse interferes with the body’s genetic makeup and biological functions. At this point, reversing the effect is difficult without some form of professional assistance.

For most, addiction to heroin occurs with long-term use as the chemicals change how our body responds. Did you know?

  • Heroin does not heal or repair the cause of chronic pain.
  • Heroin offers only short-term intervals for relieving chronic pain.
  • Heroin can cause mild to extreme side effects that interfere with day-to-day functions.

Heroin and other painkillers belong to the same class of drugs called opioids. Opioids attach to receptors found on the nerve cells in the brain interfering with the signals that alert the body to pain. For some, it may decrease the level of pain temporarily and prompt a feeling of euphoria.

Non-Opioid Pain Treatments

Heroin isn’t the only chronic pain treatment option. Like heroin, all medications or illegal drugs have potential risk factors. Contributing to these risks are personal health status and family medical disorders.

  • Do you know if other types of substance abuse or psychiatric disorders exist?

The outcome could be affected when one or more of these factors exist. This information helps to select the combinations of medicine and therapy for the individual’s lifestyle and level of pain.

Addiction programs incorporate specialized doctors and alternative health teams to help cope with the situation. Depending on the severity of heroin use the withdrawal process can cause:

  • Cold flashes
  • Insomnia
  • Muscle or bone pain
  • Restlessness

Treating chronic pain without heroin involves physical, psychological, and occupational therapies along with a medical supervisor of nonopioid pain treatments or medicine.

Getting Rid of The Pain Without Heroin

Chronic pain is manageable with medications and alternative practices achieving fewer adverse effects on your health. Treatment starts with understanding that both the physical and mental components of one’s health are involved in recovery.

Facts of treating pain with heroin:

  • The body builds a tolerance to heroin with long-term use
  • The pain remains.
  • Opioids (heroin) are addictive, dangerous and life-threatening.

Technology and medical advances address the source of the pain collectively with non-opioid medications and therapies. Recovery centers provide a safe and caring environment.

Residential programs offer personal and group follow-up care. The goal is to help teach individuals how to live life without addiction through a continuum of care.

Managing Life One Day A Time

The good news, physical dependence on heroin is reversible. By focusing on the cause of addiction and responding to chronic pain, you can learn how to deal with it and quit heroin.

  • It’s not a process that you can maneuver alone.
  • You need the help of trained professionals.

Recovery is a long journey and treatment to the addiction is only the first phase. To quit heroin, you must continue to maintain your physical and mental health one day at a time. See your doctor regularly for the pain to prevent a relapse. More important, if you experience a relapse urge, seek support – it happens from time to time.

Dealing with chronic pain is unbearable but blocking out the pain with heroin can only cause more damage to your health. Rather than live with addiction, there’s help available to minimize the effects of withdrawal and teach you how to manage a life with chronic pain instead.

Using heroin to quite chronic pain comes with a wide range of potential risks and side effects. Call our office at 800-737-0933 if you find yourself thinking about taking higher doses or more powerful drugs for pain.

What Does Addiction Have to Do With Pain?

You may have heard how pain medication such as opioids, are causing many to become addicted. However what does addiction have to do with pain? Aren’t these prescription medications meant to help people? The truth is much more complex than you realize.

For years physicians have prescribed painkillers to help their patients for very legitimate reasons. For example:

  • Recovering from an injury, such as a broken bone.
  • Coping with a serious illness, like cancer.
  • Struggling with chronic pain, such as back pain.
  • Bearing with migraine headaches.

The pain from these problems can be devastating; severely limiting or preventing people from working or even enjoying life. Thus, medications such as OxyContin, Vicodin, and Demerol became a popular solution. This is because these drugs seemed to help with pain management and reducing symptoms. However, these medications were also highly addictive.

What Does Pain Have to Do With Addiction?

The answer to this question lies in the chemical makeup of your brain. When any opiate drug is introduced into the body it makes its way to the brain via your bloodstream. Once there the chemical attaches itself to receptors in your brain that are sensitive to opiates. This activates the reward sensations that people experience when taking the drug, or doing other pleasurable activities such as eating or having sex.

The problem is that over time your brain develops a tolerance for the medication, and wants more. Thus greater amounts are required to achieve that same level of pleasure as before. This causes you to want obtain either more of the same drug or different drugs (such as heroin) in order to experience those pleasure sensations. For those who struggle with pain these drugs can be lifesaving-at first. However, as they gain a tolerance to the drugs they become dependent on them. Thus, you become addicted to a powerful chemical substance.

What does addiction have to do with pain? Pain is a gateway for people who may have serious medical problems that are looking for relief. Yet, they become trapped in a downward spiral of addiction. However, despite the seriousness of this addiction, there is hope. Substance abuse treatment can help you to break free from the grip of opioid addiction.

Are you ready to get started? Call us today at 800-737-0933 to begin your journey to recovery.

prescription drugs for older adults

I Need My Pain Medications, But I Want To Get Off of Them and Be Free But How?

When you have been in chronic pain, it can severely impact all aspects of your life. Trauma and injuries often necessitate pain medication. Any surgeries you may have had might have led you to need pain medication as well. Over time, pain medications, particularly opioid based medications, can lead to dependence.

When you become dependent on pain medication, if you stop taking the medication you will experience symptoms of withdrawal. This can happen to anyone who has relied on pain medication in order to relieve debilitating symptoms. Unfortunately, in addition to withdrawal symptoms, you may also experience a rebound of intense pain while you are detoxing from the pain medication. This can make it almost impossible to stop using on your own.

If you have found yourself experiencing withdrawal symptoms and rebound pain, you will need professional help from addiction specialists in order to recover from your dependence. The first step in your recovery will involve detoxing from the medication. During this period of time, you will need to be supervised so that the symptoms of withdrawal are minimized. Our addiction professionals will be able to provide supportive care during detox so that your concerns are heard and your needs are met.

How Can You Avoid Relapsing?

After your initial detox period, a longer stay in one of our facilities may be necessary. The longer you allow yourself to remain in treatment, the better your chances are for long term recovery. If you are experiencing a return of pain because you have stopped your medication, we will need to come up with a plan to manage your symptoms so that you will not relapse.

During your stay in one of our facilities, you will have opportunities for various therapies. Individual counseling can help you learn how to cope with stresses and triggers in your daily life without the use of addictive medications. You will be able to talk about your experiences and feelings which can help in your recovery. Group therapy may be helpful as well. It can be extremely empowering to know that you are not the only person who has struggled with addiction issues. You can also learn from others who may be further into their recovery about what is working for them, what they have learned, and what kinds of things have caused problems during their recovery.

If you or a loved one is currently struggling with an addiction to pain medication, call our addiction counselors today to learn about what we can do to help. We are here for you 800-737-0933

Officials Study Pain Treatment Alternatives to Reduce Opioid Addiction

alternatives for treating painWith much of the national focus in the substance abuse treatment and prevention field being on opiate addiction of late, researchers throughout the United States have been looking for alternatives to pain medication. This has lead to examination of treatments including magnets, electricity and non-narcotic medications.

A new study shows techniques like yoga, massage or meditation are so effective at handling chronic pain, that they could be an alternative to pain medication for many. This is important because the painkiller epidemic has continued to spread throughout the country thousands of people are losing their lives each year as a result of prescription opioid addiction.

Integrating a more holistic approach to managing pain is something that has gained more popularity over the years, and lately among medical doctors as well. The healthcare profession has come under scrutiny for the over-prescribing of narcotics, and now many are taking action to help reverse the trend, including a recent plea from the U.S. Surgeon General.

According to researchers, certain holistic methods are more effective than others. The studies show that patients who suffer from back problems are likely to benefit from yoga and acupuncture. Patients who report neck pain are likely to feel pain reduction if they receive massage therapy. Chronic migraine sufferers were also studied, it was discovered that these patients saw relief from the implementation of breathing and relaxing techniques.

“We don’t believe these approaches will be the entire answer, but may be used as an adjunct to help reduce the reliance on opioid medications and associated side effects. What we wanted to get from this review is to understand evidence-based approaches for pain management,” explained Richard Nahin, lead Epidemiologist at National Center for Complementary and Integrative Health.

The hope is that more research will be conducted to locate more effective ways to manage pain, while still providing effective care to patients. As too many people still become addicted to prescription painkillers, it is necessary to decrease the number of pills available to addicts and provide less harmful ways of addressing their symptoms. This research, combined with an increased focus on effective drug treatment strategies, will hopefully save future generations from succumbing to the prescription painkiller temptation.