Tag Archives: detox center

Can a Detox Center Help if I’m Afraid of Pain from Detoxing from Drugs and Alcohol?

There are hundreds of reasons that people become addicted to drugs. For many, experiencing chronic pain caused by medical conditions can create the need for pain relief that fuels addiction. While addiction can actually make the pain worsen, it won’t go away once you get clean in a detox center. You will still have that underlying pain and that’s one reason many people are reluctant to seek help in getting clean. If you are afraid of how you will deal with the pain, you should be aware that medication isn’t the only way to manage your pain.

As you begin a detoxing from drugs, you may feel alone, but your caregivers in the facility will be there to help you. In addition to helping you flush the drugs out of your system, they will also help you to address the causes of your addiction. For those suffering from chronic pain, this means helping you find healthier ways of coping with your pain. This doesn’t always mean you won’t be given medication, but you will also be encouraged to look for other methods for managing your pain.

Beginning Detox as a Chronic Pain Sufferer

Once you decide to participate in a medically supervised detox, there is a procedure you must follow. You won’t just jump into treatment without preparation. Instead, an intake procedure will allow your caregivers to evaluate your condition. While one focus of this process is to determine the type and severity of your addiction, the intake will also be used to evaluate your health status. This means evaluating any mental illnesses that may be affecting you, as well as determining what physical medical conditions you may be experiencing.

This examination will also help them determine how much pain you typically experience. In addition to conducting a physical examination, they will also ask you questions about your medical conditions and your pain levels. Through this process, they can determine how best to address your pain issues as you detox from drugs or alcohol. While you may think your caregivers don’t understand, they are experienced in dealing with chronic pain patients and it’s important for you to trust them.

No Painkillers Doesn’t Always Mean No Drugs

Typically, doctors prescribe opioid painkillers to help patients manage chronic pain. While these medications are effective in managing pain, they’re also highly addictive and today’s doctors are looking for alternative methods of managing pain. In the detox center, your caregivers may find that your pain level is severe enough that you do need some type of medication, though they will not continue feeding your addiction with opioid-based painkillers. Instead, they may prescribe non-addictive painkillers, such as those used to treat depression and epileptic seizures. Sometimes, methadone or buprenorphine may be prescribed as a replacement drug, but these drugs will be administered at low, controlled dosages.

You may also begin attending therapy sessions in the detox center. These sessions will provide psychological counseling that will help you address the causes of your addiction. As such, you’ll receive therapy designed to teach you healthier coping mechanisms for your pain. Your therapist will likely begin behavioral modification therapy to help you manage how you react to pain.

Exploring Other Alternatives to Painkillers

While you may not believe it, there are actually many natural ways for dealing with pain and some maybe even more effective than the painkillers you were taking. Since these are natural treatments and therapies, you won’t experience the negative side effects that the drugs caused. Each facility will offer different resources, so it may be helpful to discuss the pain management options in advance. If you can find a detox center that offers the pain management options that you find interesting, you may be more open to benefit from those types of treatment.

By way of an example, acupuncture and chiropractic care have been found to be very effective in helping to treat pain caused by a variety of chronic medical conditions. You may also benefit from massage therapy. Your caregivers may also encourage you to begin working out and using weights. In addition to benefiting your overall health, regular physical exercise will help you strengthen your bones, muscles, and tissue, which will reduce the inflammation that causes pain.

The first step to recovering from your addiction is getting clean, but you don’t have to take on that challenge without help. To learn more about the detox process, call our counselors at 800-737-0933. We can answer your questions and help you get started in the recovery process.

What to Expect During Intake at a Florida Detox Center

You’re tired of living with addiction. You’re ready to change things and have decided to start the process by going to a Florida detox center. Now you have a whole new set of questions. What should you bring? What is the first day of intake like? Learning these details now will make the transition to life in treatment easier.

Most detox centers in Florida follow a similar process when you check in. You’ll be calmer if you know what to expect on that first day. Always remind yourself that recovery is a gift you’re giving yourself.

What Is Intake Like at a Detox Center in Florida?

Every detox center is different, but the majority follow a similar procedure to get you checked in and settled. Before you head out, keep these pointers in mind.

  • Medically-supervised detox is a safe, comfortable way to withdraw from drugs or alcohol. You won’t get sick or have to endure any withdrawal symptoms.
  • Getting drugs or alcohol out of your system is the first step to your new, sober life.
  • The counselors are there to help you. When you start to feel nervous or shaky, talk to them. They’ve walked many an addict and alcoholic through their first-day fears.

What to Expect on Your First Day

When you first show up at the center, you’ll be greeted and welcomed. An intake counselor will go over your paperwork to make sure that everything is in place.

You should have:

  • Your insurance card and related paperwork.
  • Your driver’s license or other identification.
  • A list of medications that are currently prescribed to you by a doctor.
  • Paperwork regarding any grants or government assistance you’re receiving.
  • Copy of any payment plan agreement that you signed.
  • Credit or debit card.

If you’re going into inpatient rehab, you’ll be shown to your room, where a counselor unpacks your bags to make sure you haven’t carried in any alcohol, drugs or other prohibited items. You probably received a list of items that you can’t bring to the detox center. This includes:

  • Drugs or alcohol, including alcohol in personal care products.
  • Pornography or other offensive materials.
  • Playing cards or items related to gambling.
  • Clothing or other items that promote drinking or drug use.
  • Medications or supplements that are not in sealed bottles.

During the first day, you’ll also meet with the medical staff. They’ll check you for any medical problems that need immediate attention. If you are undergoing medically-supervised detox or have been referred for medical treatment, you’ll be given a day and time for that.

Other Types of Intake

If you’re checking into a sober living home or halfway house, the intake process is similar. Your bags will be checked for prohibited substances. You’ll meet with an addictions counselor to go over your goals and expectations. You’ll also be given the house rules and your schedule of required meetings.

If you’re attending outpatient treatment, you obviously won’t have any bags to check. Remember that during outpatient treatment, just as in inpatient rehab, you will have regular, random drug tests. You’ll also have a set schedule of meetings and sessions that you’re required to attend.

What Type of Schedule Will You Have?

Typically, your daily schedule at an inpatient rehab, outpatient center or sober living home will include the following:

  • Individual and group counseling sessions.
  • Attendance at 12-step meetings.
  • Support group meetings.
  • Recreational and social activities.
  • Mealtimes.
  • Visiting hours.

What is Medical Detox Like?

In many rehab centers, the first part of your treatment is medical detox.

Be prepared to spend the might at the detox clinic. The time required to detox depends on several factors including the type of substance you’re addicted to and the amount in your system.

  • Medical detox allows your body to get rid of drugs and alcohol without the agony of withdrawal.
  • Detox will make you feel calm and comfortable.
  • Your detox is done in a private room in a medical setting.
  • Your withdrawal is monitored by specially-trained doctors and nurses.

Find the Right Detox Center in Florida

Going into a Florida detox is the best decision you can make for yourself and your family. If you’re ready to build a new life free from addiction, get started by calling our counselors anytime at 800-737-0933.

Is Treatment Really Necessary for a Drug Addiction?

Addiction is a chronic disease. It is not something that an individual could escape overnight. There is a process to addiction treatment that focuses not only on stopping the drug usage but assisting the person in becoming a productive member of society. Effective treatment addresses issues such as trauma, co-occurring disorders and triggers. These problems may not be apparent or acknowledged as a potential catalyst for addiction.

Over an extended period of time, excessive drug use begins to affect the cognitive functioning. This has an adverse effect on several areas of the brain, including the part responsible for controlling and regulating behavior. Consequently, individuals with an addiction have a difficult time with judgment and making the right decisions.

Treatment is also essential for managing withdrawal symptoms and preventing relapse. Based on the nature of addiction, relapsing is likely to occur. Treatment is necessary for addressing any underlying issues contributing to addiction and ensuring that the individual can continue on their journey to recovery even once treatment ends.

What are the Types of Treatment for Drug Addiction?

There are many treatment programs and aftercare options that combines mental and medical services. The two general types of treatment are inpatient and outpatient services. Inpatient treatment offers an individual the opportunity to focus solely on his or her recovery. An inpatient treatment provides a greater opportunity for success by establishing a support system that may not be present at home. It is the best option for individuals with severe issues such as co-existing mental disorders. The residential setting ensures safety, medical well-being and a drug-free environment.

Outpatient treatment serves as a guide, assisting people with addictions through various phases of their recovery. It is beneficial for people who have reached later stages of their journey. With outpatient behavioral treatment, individuals meet with counselors regularly and different therapeutic approaches are applied. Therapy is used and necessary in both inpatient and outpatient care. Some of the common forms of addiction therapy include:

  • Cognitive-behavioral therapy
  • Family therapy
  • Individual therapy
  • Trauma therapy

Addiction is a serious matter and no one should battle it alone. If you our someone you know is fighting an addiction, do not hesitate to seek treatment options today. Call us at 800-737-0933

How Long Am I Required to Stay at a Drug Treatment Center in Florida?

When someone checks into a drug treatment center, one of the first questions they often ask is, “How long am I required to be here?” Unfortunately, there’s no one correct answer to that question. Everyone who checks into a rehab center is a little different, with their own issues and their own reasons for seeking treatment, so the amount of time someone spends at a treatment center varies from one person to the next. Most people can expect to stay in a treatment center for at least 30 days. People are able to overcome most physical addictions during this time, and it is usually the treatment period that is covered by most health insurance plans. After that, the treatment will be up to the patient.

Cost For Additional Drug Treatment

The cost of treatment is often a major deciding factor when it comes to how long someone stays in treatment. Even though the first 30 days are often covered by the treatment plan, many people who feel that they need to stay longer have to pay for it out of their own pockets. There are of course some people who can afford to stay for a longer period of time if they feel they need to, but most people won’t be able to afford to stay much longer. In most cases, people can expect to spend 30 days in treatment.

Ongoing Care 

It is important to note that substance abuse treatment doesn’t end with a month-long stay in rehab. That may be enough for most people to overcome a physical addiction, but actually being free from drugs and alcohol requires a lot of work. It can take months or even years to fully recover from a substance abuse problem, which often requires people to rethink their entire lives and spend years in therapy addressing the circumstances that drove them to use drugs and alcohol in the first place.

Whether you spend only 30 days in treatment to overcome a physical addiction or serveral months in a more comprehensive treatment program, there is no doubt that overcoming an addiction is one of the most challenging things you can do. If you need any support, do not hesitate to contact Genesis House at 800-737-0933

How Long Should I Be On Suboxone To Get Completely Clean?

Heroin is a dangerous drug derived from the opium poppy. It is illegal in the United States. Heroin is highly addictive. Drug rehab centers often use another drug, Suboxone, to help people break their heroin addictions. Read on for more information on Suboxone and its use in treating heroin addiction.

When you abuse a drug like heroin, your body develops a tolerance for it. This means that you must take increasing dosages of heroin in order to get the same high. When you attempt to quit using heroin, you experience withdrawal symptoms, including the following:

  • Feeling jittery
  • Vomiting
  • Getting chills
  • Muscle aches and pains

Suboxone is a drug that contains buprenorphine. Buprenorphine is used to treat not only heroin addiction but other opioid addictions, too. Buprenorphine, a partial agonist to opioids, produces a mild form of the effects of opioids. It basically fools the brain into thinking your opioid craving has been met, though it does not produce the same high. However, because Buprenorphine and Suboxone do not create the same high as opioids, Suboxone and Buprenorphine are difficult to form an addiction to. Naloxone, another component of Suboxone, works as an antagonist to opioids.

Length of Use for Suboxone

Suboxone is a drug that must usually be taken for a long time to promote opioid recovery. Because Suboxone is a partial agonist, it still allows people to form some opioid dependence. When addicts attempt to stop taking Suboxone, they need to taper their dosage under the care of a medical professional.

People who take Suboxone for a short period, such as a month, usually end up relapsing and returning to opioid abuse. Thus, Suboxone should be taken for an extended period. Taking it for six months to one year is the norm, and many people take it for even longer. However, every patient is different. A medical professional can monitor the patient’s progress and advise on how long each patient should take Suboxone.

Suboxone should be used only under the guidance provided in a professional treatment program or under the care of a healthcare professional. Rehab clinicians can administer the correct dosage, and Suboxone can also be prescribed by a doctor. By pairing Suboxone with other therapies, clinicians and physicians can help addicts fight their addictions. Call us today for help 800-737-0933