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What Types of Medication Will an FL Heroin Rehab Center Prescribe to Help With Detox?

Addiction is filled with irony and contradiction. For instance, doctors prescribe medications to help patients with things like seizures, depression, sleep disorders, and pain. When taken properly, this medication can produce wonderful results, giving the patient a much better quality of life.

The irony and contradiction come because these very same medications can be very harmful if misused and abused. The line between good and bad results is indeed very thin. For a moment, let's consider pain medications like morphine or Oxycontin. The proper doses of this medication can relieve a patient's chronic pain. That's a good thing for anyone who doesn't have any other alternatives. However, these medications are opiates and opiates are highly addictive. Addiction to these medications can produce side effects like:

  • Loss of motor function throughout the body
  • Memory loss and mental lapses
  • Breathing and blood pressure problems
  • Sleeping issues like insomnia
  • Nausea and vomiting

Even the decision to stop using these drugs after an addiction has been created can cause significant withdrawal symptoms like tremors, hallucinations, convulsions, depression, suicidal thoughts and anxiety.

The reason for this discussion is because certain medications are used in the addiction treatment process. That is ironic and definitely a contradiction. The information below will address the types of medications used during the detox process and how those drugs help as well as what risks they create.

Types of Medication an FL Heroin Rehab Center Can Prescribe to Help With Detox?

When people enter rehab with a significant addiction, their minds and bodies have an extremely high level of dependence on the drug(s) of choice. Before a patient is going to be able to focus on the rigors of therapy and counseling, they need time to wean themselves off all substances. During that process, the aforementioned withdrawal symptoms come into play. The purpose of a detox program is to get patients past their cravings and withdrawal symptoms as safely as possible.

If at all possible, it's a good thing if the patient can detox as naturally as possible. Maybe good nutritional and exercise programs are all they will need to eliminate their issues. With that said, that's a best-case scenario that's usually only applicable to people with a moderate addiction. Otherwise, a medically monitored detox program is needed.

In a medically monitored detox program, patients go through detox under the watchful eye of medical professionals. If severe discomfort becomes apparent, the doctors have the ability to prescribe certain medications to help with issues like pain or sleeping issues. In the case of people with a "severe" addiction, tapering medications may be used to help the patient slowly and safely wean off drugs. Some of the common medications used in a Florida detox program include:

  • Disulfiram and naltrexone for alcohol addiction
  • Methadone or Suboxone for opiate addiction
  • Buprenorphine for opiate addiction
  • Ritalin for cocaine and meth addictions

Let's look closer at the benefits of these drugs in the detox and addiction treatment process.

Disulfiram and Naltrexone for Alcohol Addiction

These medications are often used to decrease the cravings a patient has while going through the detox process. The effects of these drugs replace the effects of alcohol, creating less desire for booze. These drugs have proven very effective in relapse prevention.

Methadone or Suboxone for Opiate Addiction

Both of these medications are used for severe addictions to heroin and painkillers. They are tapering medications that offer the body lower doses of the active ingredients found in opiates. They are intended for long-term detox programs with diminishing doses over several weeks. They are also addictive.

Buprenorphine for Opiate Addiction

Another tapering drug for heroin addiction. The difference is this drug doesn't contain opiates as an active ingredient. Instead, it's considered a partial opioid agonist, which activates the same opioid receptors but produces a much safer response.

Ritalin for Cocaine and Meth Addictions

Ritalin is a stimulant drug prescribed to treat ADHD. Doctors and scientists have found that while the drug acts to stimulate the same receptors in the brain, the intake process is much slower, which results in a lower propensity for addiction. It's good for long-term use.

If you would like more information about the medications we might use during your addiction treatment, you need to call us immediately. You can reach one of our professional staff members at 800-737-0933.

Drug Detox Program For People Who Have Become Addicted To Medications Prescibed By A Doctor

How could something so good turn out to be so bad? That's a question often posed by prescription medication users who become addicts. Yes, doctor prescribed painkillers to help patient's get relief from pain. When those medications are misused or abused, the results can become tragic.

Pain medications almost always contain some form of opiate. Opiates are the operative ingredient found in heroin. Heroin is one of the most highly addictive illicit drugs on the planet. Along with a bevy of distressing side effects, opioids also produce some rather dangerous withdrawal symptoms. Anyone addicted to painkillers has to be conscious of these withdrawal symptoms should they choose to stop using. Here's a sampling of said withdrawal symptoms:

  • Severer muscle and stomach cramps
  • Respiration and pulmonary issues
  • Diarrhea and vomiting
  • Convulsions and tremors
  • Hallucinations

Under no circumstance should someone addicted to painkillers try to stop on their own. It would be prudent for the individual to seek help from a professional, reputable drug rehab facility.

The Detox Process

Prior to getting help for any personal issues that may have led to their addiction, most addicts need time to detox. Detox can be administered in-house at a rehab facility or through a dedicated detox facility. Clinicians will generally prescribe a detox program based on the depth and longevity of the patient's addiction.

The primary objective of detox is to get patients through the withdrawal process with a minimum of discomfort. This can be a real challenge for patients addicted to painkillers. For the most part, they are placed in a medically monitored detox program. Under the watchful eye of medical professionals, patients are monitored on a constant basis. If a patient starts to show signs of distress, doctors have the ability to prescribe medications that should help the patient move forward.

During the detox process, there are three primary concerns:

  • Patients will have difficulty breathing
  • Patients will exhibit a substantial loss of appetite
  • Patients will have difficulty sleeping

It might take a patient up to a week to clear the most serious withdrawal symptoms, but once the patient gets clear, they should be ready to focus on therapy and counseling.

If you are ready to seek help for your addiction, we are ready to provide that help. You can get started on recovery by calling us at 800-737-0933

Will Detox Program in Florida Really Help Me Get Clean And Stay Off Opiates?

Seeking treatment for opiate addiction can seem daunting and leave those struggling with addiction feeling lost and helpless. The first step toward recovery is learning your options and deciding on a course of treatment. Any opiate rehabilitation program will begin with the necessary first step in the process of getting clean: detoxing from the substance.

Of all of the steps in the process toward getting clean and recovering, the detoxification process is surely one that can raise fear. You may have heard about both the physical and mental challenges that come about during detoxification, and it's important to accept and expect them. A counselor or doctor can walk you through the different phases of detoxification and physical withdrawal and what symptoms to expect in order to remove the element of surprise and alleviate apprehension as much as possible.

Detox should be undergone under the supervision of trained staff at a medical facility or recovery center. The process can take several days, and it's best to have staff medically managing the intense withdrawal symptoms as well as monitoring both your physical and mental state throughout. When appropriate and necessary, the overseeing medical staff may prescribe various medications to assist with the withdrawal symptoms, the most common being methadone.

What Comes After Detox?

Detoxing alone does not cure a person from addiction. While it does provide the body with the opportunity to clear itself of dangerous substances, detox does not address the psychological, emotional, and social aspects of a person's opiate addiction, and it's important to recognize that these factors are often even more critical that the physical aspect. In order for recovery to be productive and long-lasting, behavioral issues, triggers, and environmental factors need to be identified and coping skills need to be learned.

This post-detox treatment can be conducted in both inpatient and outpatient settings, though round-the-clock inpatient programs tend to produce better results. By having 24-hour access to care, you are given the physical and psychological support to address any issues that may arise during this trying time. Stays can last anywhere from 30 days to many months, depending on you and your dedication to and participation in your treatment progress.

If you're ready to make the first steps toward sober living free from opiates, we can help. Contact one of our counselors at 800-737-0933 to start your journey toward recovery today.