Tag Archives: detox

Will I Be Discharged from the Military for Going To a Substance Abuse Detox Program?

It’s a well-known fact that drug and alcohol abuse is common among veterans. However, alcohol and substance abuse is a significant problem among active-duty members who are part of the armed forces as well. Many service personnel are willing to get help but are unsure of what will happen to them when they enter a detox program. They are worried that they will be dishonorably discharged if they admit they need help. While this is a valid concern, most service personnel can receive the treatment they need while staying active duty. Read on to learn more about drug use in the military.

Drug Abuse and the Military

The abuse of illegal and prescription substances among military members can be just as problematic as it is for those in the private sector. Drug abuse affects a person’s ability to make rational decisions and can lead to poor performance on the job. For military members, drug use can easily put fellow soldiers at risk. The use of drugs can cause problems when it comes to discipline, readiness, and the physical and mental health of the service member. It may also create problems within the unit by disrupting the unity of the soldiers. An addicted member can also put a whole unit at risk when they are deployed to an active war zone.

Prescription drugs, such as opioid painkillers and sedatives, are most often abused by military members. Alcohol abuse is another widespread problem in the military. While illicit drugs are not as common an issue, they are still prevalent through the military community. Because of wartime experiences, many active-duty military members find themselves dealing with PTSD, anxiety, depression, and other mental health disorders. Many turn to drugs to combat these feelings, only to find themselves addicted. For members who had mental health concerns before being deployed to a war zone, drugs and alcohol may be the only way they know how to cope.

Help for Military Members

Too many military members do not seek the help that they need because they are afraid of the repercussions. However, many members can and do go through detox and treatment at a reputable rehab even while on active duty. Drug testing is mandatory for all military members. While they may be asked to perform a random urinalysis, commanders can and will order “probable cause testing” if they believe any service member may be using illegal drugs.

Any service member who comes up positive for illicit drugs will be offered the chance to go to treatment and detox. A trained professional will initially access the situation and may recommend treatment for the individual. A commanding officer will refer a service member to treatment if they have had an issue with the police, such as a DUI or disorderly conduct charge. The type of detox and treatment will depend on many factors, such as the availability of services, the severity of the addiction, and the cost of detox.

Confidentiality and Disciplinary Action During Treatment

Confidentiality is often an issue that keeps service members from seeking treatment. However, confidentiality is limited in different cases. For example, service members who have been arrested or have threatened to harm themselves will show up on the commander’s radar. Some programs also require that the partner of the addict become involved in treatment.

While many service members do not want others involved, the commander’s involvement should be thought of as a positive thing. They can help the service member stay sober after detox and treatment are over. They will also want to know any type of information that could affect how fit the person is for duty. It is their job to ensure the safety of their entire unit.

Overall, the military will not discharge a service member because of a drug or alcohol problem. They will offer counseling and therapy services through their own facilities, or they may recommend the individual to a civilian facility. While some service members will face disciplinary action, the military will be more concerned that they seek help for their problem. Any service member who is dealing with a drug or alcohol addiction should seek the help they need right away.

Contact Us Now

If you or someone you love in the military is abusing drugs and needs treatment, don’t hesitate. Our facility can help you or your loved one detox from drugs or alcohol and learn to live a sober life. When you are ready to take that first important step, give us a call at 800-737-0933.

What Are Some Surprising Drug Detox Effects You Might Not Expect?

Drug detox is often one of the most difficult stages in addiction recovery. The effects of drug abuse change the brain and body on a chemical level, which plays into the addiction process. Not surprisingly, you may experience a few drug detox effects that you might not expect.

Since each person’s body interacts with addictive substances in different ways, detox effects can take different forms. Knowing what to expect can go a long way towards helping you get the supports you need to make it past the detox period. Here are a few surprising drug detox effects to watch for along with a brief overview on what causes these effects.

What Causes Drug Detox Effects?

Addictive substances take an ongoing toll on the body on both a physical and psychological level. While the desired effect may be to get high or escape from the events of the day, these substances accomplish this by altering important chemical processes in the brain and body. After a certain point, the brain and body begin to rely on the drug’s effects to function normally.

Here are just a few substances that fall in this category:

  • Alcohol
  • Heroin
  • Crack, cocaine
  • Prescription painkillers
  • Benzodiazepines
  • Prescription stimulants, such as Ritalin and Adderall

Drug detox effects, also known as withdrawal effects, develop out of the chemical imbalance created when drug use stops. More often than not, the severity of withdrawal effects experienced reflects the degree of imbalance left behind by the drug’s effects. Since each person’s physical makeup interacts with addictive substances in different ways, the types of withdrawal effects experienced can vary from person to person in type and intensity.

Here are a handful of effects you might not expect to experience during drug detox:

Confused Thinking

The effects of drug addiction specifically target the brain’s cognitive processes, which include reasoning, learning and memory. As drug use continues, these systems continue to undergo chemical changes that directly impact a person’s priorities and motivations. These changes account for the incessant cravings and ongoing preoccupation with getting and using addictive substances.

Confused thinking results from the chaos that develops within the brain’s chemical system when drug use stops. In effect, the brain develops a psychological dependence on the drug’s effects in the same way the body develops a physical dependence. In the absence of the drug’s effects, it becomes difficult to carry out mental tasks that require concentration, focus and planning.

Severe Depression

Depression and substance abuse tend to go hand-in-hand. Drug abuse often becomes a form of escape from depression. On the flip-side, abusing drugs for any length of time breeds the types of brain chemical processes that cause depression. In turn, the brain’s increasing susceptibility to depression is part of the reason why a person requires increasingly larger doses of the drug over time.

For these reasons, stopping drug use typically brings on feelings of severe depression. The severity of the depression varies depending on how long a person abused drugs and the types of drugs used. In the most severe of cases, suicidal tendencies can run especially high.

Intense Anxiety

While most everyone has experienced some level of anxiety in one form or another, the experience doesn’t typically the point where it interferes with a person’s ability to function throughout the day. As a drug detox effect, anxiety levels can be overwhelming and in the most extreme cases, a person can experience full-blown panic attacks.

Signs of intense anxiety and developing panic attacks include:

  • Restlessness
  • Tremors
  • Rapid breathing
  • Increased heart rate
  • Light-headedness
  • Tightness in the chest

Extreme Moods

Extreme moods are another drug detox effect you might not expect. Changes in mood can be triggered by anything and don’t necessarily have to make sense. Addictive substances force the brain to secrete large amounts of serotonin and dopamine, which promote happiness and a sense of well-being. In effect, neurotransmitter levels are severely depleted when drug use stops.

Extreme moods to watch for include:

  • Violent outbursts
  • Aggressive behavior
  • Feelings of despair

Unfortunately, there are no shortcuts when it comes to addiction recovery. While drug detox can be a difficult experience, it’s very doable when you have the right supports in place. If you have more questions or need information on drug detox programs, call us today at 800-737-0933 to speak with one of our addiction counselors.

Can Detox Centers Help Me Get Clean if I’m Homeless?

Dealing with a drug addiction and homelessness at the same time is hard. You may worry about your safety on the streets when you are under the influence of drugs. While you may know that you need help to deal with your addiction, you might not know where to turn. There are many programs available that can offer you support, and it is reassuring to know that detox centers can help you get clean if you’re homeless. In fact, going to a detox center is the safest and most effective way to stop using drugs or alcohol when you have a serious addiction.

Your addiction might have led you to make choices that led to your homelessness, or you might have started using drugs or alcohol to cope with the pain after losing your home or job. Either way, you’ll find nonjudgemental and caring people when you go to a treatment facility. The staff at a detox center only cares about helping you get clean so that you can get your life back on track.

Go Through Detox In a Safe Environment

The detox process is often unpredictable, and you need to be prepared for having serious symptoms that could impact your safety and health. A few of the most common detox symptoms that people experience include the following:
•nausea
•seizures
•fatigue
•mood swings
•increased pain

The symptoms that you experience will depend upon the types of drugs that you use along with your body’s dependence upon the substance. You should also know that abruptly quitting certain drugs without professional assistance can lead to increased cravings. Your risk for serious withdrawal symptoms also goes up if you have ever quit and had a relapse or if you’ve had an overdose.

While it might be scary to think about having withdrawal symptoms, you can feel better knowing that they are temporary. In most cases, you will be finished with the most challenging part of the detox process within a few days to a week. After that, you will begin to work on learning how to manage your addiction so that you can stay sober once you finish the program. The benefit of going to a detox center rather than trying to get sober on the street is that you also receive personalized treatment that includes management of your withdrawal symptoms. Feeling comfortable and supported makes it easier to stay strong as your body adjusts to living without drugs or alcohol.

Get Help for Your Mental Health

The detox process is only the first step toward managing your addiction. You will also need to learn how to take care of your mental health. There are many mental health conditions that can lead to someone using drugs as a method for coping such as PTSD and depression. You may also have developed a mental health condition such as anxiety after you became homeless. Once again, this is an area where you benefit from seeking professional care.

In a drug and alcohol treatment program, you gain the ability to work with professionals who can help you figure out what causes you to drink or do drugs. You can also receive services that include intensive counseling to help you begin to feel better mentally. If you have family nearby, then your rehab program can also help you to begin healing those relationships through family counseling. Group therapy is another type of treatment that helps you to not feel so alone, and you can even participate in recreational activities that help you feel normal and healthy again.

Find Hope for the Future

Both homelessness and addiction can make the future feel bleak. Getting sober turns this completely around, and you will find that your stay at a detox center helps you to start rebuilding your belief that life is good. Your counseling team will help you to begin to put together a plan for how you can live safely and sober after treatment.

When you enter rehab as a homeless person, you are connected to resources that can help you to begin to find a job, a home and renew your family relationships. While it will not be easy, you can expect to continue to improve your life after your treatment is complete by continuing to follow the plan that your team helps you put together for getting your life back on track.

Are you ready to regain control over your life by ending your addiction? We can help you get into a detox center that changes your life. Give us a call today at 800-737-0933!

Is There a Way to Do an Alcoholism Detox Safely at Home?

Alcohol can be a subtle foe. It causes both a mental obsession in the mind of an alcoholic, plus an often insatiable physical craving. Alcoholism is a disease that will try to convince us that there’s nothing wrong with us.

This frightful combination of mental and physical effects makes for potentially dangerous withdrawal symptoms. Here’s a list of four dangerous symptoms of alcohol withdrawal, plus an explanation of why the benefits of supervised detox make it the smart choice.

Symptoms of Alcohol Withdrawal

If there were no inherent dangerous withdrawal symptoms associated with alcoholism, then it probably would be safe to detox at home. However, that is not reality. The truth is that there are a number of dangerous things that can happen during alcohol detox.

When we suddenly try to stop drinking after prolonged or heavy periods of drinking, changes are going to happen in our bodies and brains. The adjustment from drinking to complete abstinence creates often painful side effects. Here are some symptoms of alcohol withdrawal.

  • Insomnia – This is one of the more frequent side effects of alcohol withdrawal. The problem with losing sleep because your mind is craving alcohol isn’t the worst problem. However, lack of good sleep is what triggers dozens of other dangerous mental conditions.
  • Anxiety – Another one of the mental side effects of suddenly stopping your drinking is uncontrollable anxiety. Many alcoholics experience anxiety in normal everyday situations. When you abruptly remove alcohol, the level of anxiety can become emotionally dangerous.
  • Nausea – This is one of the common physical symptoms of alcohol withdrawal. When you get sick after a night of drinking, it may seem like an innocent and necessary evil of having had too much to drink.

However, it is not normal to vomit excessively without some virus or ailment to cause such. What happens during alcohol withdrawal is that your body is already dehydrated from drinking. Vomiting makes the problem even worse. Falling too far down the scale of dehydration can put you at serious medical risk.

  • Shaking – They are known as delirium tremens. When the body suddenly does not have a normal dose of alcohol, it can react violently. Delirium tremens is the uncontrollable shakes that we see happen in cinematic depictions of alcoholism.

The problem is that they happen in real-life as well. Delirium tremens can be so violent that they steal your ability to think rationally. Combined with insomnia and anxiety, hundreds of alcoholics who tried to detox themselves have made attempts to take their own lives.

Recovering alcoholics also tell tales of having horrible hallucinations during the period they were experiencing alcohol withdrawal. The medical bottom line is that when you deprive your body of alcohol after intense use, you are at risk both mentally and physically. Now let’s talk about the benefits of supervised alcohol detox.

Benefits of Supervised Alcohol Detox

The benefits of supervised alcohol detox are simple. They provide you with a medically safe environment surrounded by a professional staff that can help you handle the painful withdrawal phase safely.

  • Supervision – This is one key benefit to admitting yourself to a detox facility. The entire process is under the supervision of trained professionals.
  • Medical Safety – Every alcohol detox will have medical professionals to watch over you. As you experience withdrawal symptoms, they will be on-hand to provide trained medical assistance.
  • Counseling – The road to recovery from alcoholism often begins during the detox period. You will have caring people to talk to about your alcohol problems. There will be a chance for you to chart a course of action after you are out of danger.
  • Program Referral – Along with guided counsel, detox centers are frequently associated with treatment facilities. Even if they are not, there will be an opportunity for you to get a referral to a treatment program that could change your life.

There is nothing that can guarantee that alcohol detox is going to be easy. However, with proper supervision, the dangerous risks associated with alcohol withdrawal can be addressed. Basically, you remove the life-threatening risks from a potential life-threatening situation.

Trying to detox at home is a poor choice. First of all, it’s just not safe. There are too many unknown variables, some of which are potentially life-threatening. Why would you put yourself in such peril?

Detox facilities are staffed with medical professionals to make certain you’re safe. If you even think you have a problem with alcohol, get help today. Most importantly, if you’re trying to stop drinking, don’t try to detox yourself. It is not safe. Contact a detox center to help you at 800-737-0933.

Why Does Detox From Benzos Make You More Anxious?

Benzodiazepine withdrawal (frequently shortened to benzo withdrawal) is a group of symptoms that emerge when a patient decreases or stops their use of these medications. Whether prescribed or used recreationally, once tolerance has developed and physical and psychological dependence has been established, the patient will most likely experience some of these symptoms, some of which may last longer than others and vary in intensity depending on the patient’s length of use and the amount they have been using. One of the most common symptoms is rebound anxiety, which means that their anxiety feels much worse than it did prior to starting the medication. So, why does detox from benzos make you more anxious?

How do Benzos Work?

Benzos work by “amping up” the patient’s GABA, a brain chemical that blocks certain communication between nerve cells and the brain. Because low GABA levels are linked to anxiety and mood disorders, many people start using benzos for anxiety relief. In fact, about 5% of adults have been prescribed benzos in the last year, usually as a short-term bandaid during a stressful life event (death of a loved one, divorce, or other traumatic occurrences). Benzos are also often prescribed in people with chronic anxiety for short periods (generally a couple of weeks) while the patient undergoes therapy to learn healthy ways to cope with their symptoms.

However, they also produce compelling “feel-good” and sedative effects that are very appealing to many people, particularly those who struggle with anxiety. Additionally, benzos create tolerance very quickly, especially shorter-acting benzos like Xanax, the result of which is the need to take increasingly higher doses to produce these same effects. This combination creates a perfect storm for dependence to develop.

What Happens During Benzo Withdrawal?

Most benzo withdrawal symptoms begin to manifest within 24 hours of the last dose. They can last from a few days to several months, depending on the strength and quantity of the drug and the length of time it has been used. Early withdrawal symptoms, experienced within a few hours of cessation of the drug, include the swift return of anxiety.

As time away from the drug increases, more symptoms appear, including:

  • intense anxiety
  • panic
  • insomnia
  • muscle spasms or tension
  • nausea, vomiting, and other gastric upset
  • mood swings, trouble concentrating, and cloudy thinking

This list is by no means all-inclusive, and every patient is different. However, because of the uncertainty and unpredictability of the number and severity of withdrawal symptoms, it is important to seek treatment when making the decision to stop using benzos.

What is Rebound Anxiety?

During the early stages of benzo withdrawal, the patient can experience any number and combination of the symptoms listed. Even those who have been taking benzos as prescribed can, and often will, suffer from rebound anxiety along with other symptoms.

The “rebound effect” in benzo withdrawal occurs when a medication that had an effect on the symptoms it was being used to treat (whether diagnosed by a physician or as a form of self-soothing or self-medicating) is discontinued. It is characterized by intense waves of anxiety, irritability, panic, insomnia, and other mood disturbances. It can be frightening for patients who have been taking benzos for anxiety, even as exactly prescribed, to be overcome with anxiety and panic. Indeed, rebound anxiety during benzo withdrawal can lead to relapse very quickly. This is why it is important that the patient gets proper treatment and support during withdrawal.

The good news is that help is available, along with support. The need for support and healthy coping skills cannot be stressed enough when it comes to combatting dependence on benzos. As with any other recovery process, the knowledge that they are not alone, that there are people who understand and are willing and able to help, is pivotal to a successful detox and long-term recovery. There are many different treatment options available, and even the most hopeless-seeming cases can and do have successful recoveries. Life after benzos is not only possible, it can be fulfilling and rewarding.

If you’re ready to make a start, you can reach a counselor 24-hours a day by calling 800-737-0933. We’re ready to provide you with the knowledge you need to take the first steps on your path to recovery.

What Kinds of Alcohol Detox Programs Are Covered with Health Insurance?

Just a few short years ago, health insurance plans frequently neglected to cover alcohol detox programs. Despite the fact that alcoholism causes a tragic number of chronic health ailments and deaths each year, health insurances seemed all too willing to treat the effects of alcoholism but not very willing to cover services that would prevent those health outcomes from occurring. It is only in the past few years that health insurance providers have stepped up their responsibility and recognized that alcohol detox programs are a life-saving service. Today there are many alcohol detox programs that are covered by health insurance.

You will need to check with your specific health insurance provider to find out what facilities are covered within their network, but you should be pleased to discover that most of today’s detox programs are covered by health insurance. There are many different types of detoxes to choose from. Here are a few of the most commonly covered by insurance.

7-30 Day Medical Detox

The duration of a detox program is usually a week, and these medical detox programs are often provided in hospital settings that use medication to help ease the pain and anxiety of early withdrawal symptoms. Alcohol withdrawal has many dangerous medical complications that can occur, including seizures and delirium tremens. Many alcoholics choose to undergo medical detox, and health insurance is extremely likely to cover a medical detox that lasts between 7 and 30 days.

During a stay in medical detox, you will usually at some point also speak with a counselor who can help to ease the more psychological symptoms of detox. You’ll also have a caseworker who will help to direct you to services that might be more long-term. A medical detox treats alcoholism like any other disease, and you will likely have doctors and nurses to help you through the process.

Holistic Detox Centers

Holistic detox centers treat alcoholism with a “whole body” approach. Since your whole body suffers from alcoholism, then your whole body will benefit from healing. They will work with you to ease the symptoms of withdrawal using more natural methods. You will receive a variety of different treatments that might include:

  • Music therapy
  • Meditation
  • Nutrition guidance
  • Art therapy

Residential Programs

A residential program is more than just a period of detox, but you might be referred to a residential program after you’ve completed detox, so the residential program is an extension of the detox in many ways. These programs are long-term, and they can last for as little as 3 months to even a year or more in time. You’ll have more freedom in a long-term residential program, and you will likely be able to work outside the residential facility, have visitors, and go out and even have a normal life outside of the residential program. Drug testing and procedures to “sign-in” and “sign out” of the facility helps them to maintain a drug and alcohol-free environment.

Not every residential facility is covered by insurance, but there are other programs that often pay for these facilities and make them free for people who have limited income and resources. Even if your insurance doesn’t cover a residential program, please inquire about guidelines for receiving free entry into these programs. You’ll often find that they’re free to low-income clients or clients who meet other guidelines of the facility. As you can see, insurance covers more programs now than ever before, and your best bet is to research a program you are interested in and then contact your insurance or the program and see if insurance covers it. If you’re suffering from alcoholism, the first step is to get into a program. It can literally save your life. Over the past few years, health insurance has realized that alcohol detox programs prevent many of the severe and costly physical ailments that alcohol causes. Today they realize how important it is to pay for detoxes and get help before the consequences of alcoholism are even more costly and deadly, and their revelation about the importance of detox is your good fortune.

If you want to find an alcohol detox that can help you today, please call us now at 800-737-0933. We accept many different types of insurances and strive to work with all of the people who come to us for help on solutions to treatment. We hope you will call us and begin your journey to recovery today.

What Are Signs Your Body is Detoxing from Alcohol that Require Medical Intervention?

At some point, most people who drink alcohol have experienced a few of the signs of withdrawal in the form of a hangover. Yet, serious alcohol withdrawal symptoms go far beyond feeling a little queasy and having a headache. Trying to quit alcohol on your own after you have been drinking heavily for a period of time can lead to dangerous symptoms that place your sobriety and life at risk. When you are wondering what are the signs that your body is detoxing from alcohol that require medical attention, it is likely that you already suspect that you may be at risk for having severe detox symptoms.

Although it is hard to predict who will have these severe symptoms, there are some common factors that can let you know if you might be someone who needs medical intervention. The most dangerous detox symptoms tend to occur in people with an alcohol addiction who drink heavily on a regular basis. You may also be at risk of developing severe withdrawal symptoms if you have tried and failed to quit on your own before due to the severity of health changes such as shaking and nausea. Anyone who has every had an alcohol overdose should also seek medical assistance with quitting.

What Are the Signs of Alcohol Withdrawal?

The first symptoms of alcohol withdrawal typically appear within a few hours to a couple of days after you put down your first drink. General alcohol withdrawal symptoms include the following.
•headache
•nausea
•tremors, especially in your hands
•vomiting
•sweating

While some of these symptoms might occur in anyone after a round of heavy drinking, you do need to know that they can be extremely severe in people whose bodies are dependent upon alcohol. For instance, you might have persistent vomiting that poses a risk for you becoming dehydrated. Alternatively, you might find that your hands shake so bad that you cannot perform your normal daily activities. If your symptoms are severe enough to interfere with your ability to function normally, then you need to seek medical attention right away. In some instances, these symptoms could cause you to give up your resolve and pick up another drink. They could also be the beginning of some of the worst withdrawal symptoms that you can experience.

What Is Delirium Tremens?

You’ve likely heard of delirium tremens before. This syndrome, which is also known as the DTs or shakes, consists of a range of extremely severe symptoms that can lead to a coma or even death. These symptoms can occur several days after you stop drinking, and your risk of developing this syndrome continues through the first week of withdrawal. Delirium tremens is considered to be a medical emergency, and you cannot try to continue withdrawing on your on at this point.

Delirium tremens causes a range of symptoms that include whole body tremors and seizures. People who are developing this syndrome also experience hallucinations that may generate a sense of fear and paranoia. You may find it impossible to sleep, or you may fall into a deep slumber that is parked by periods of restlessness. You may also experience a dangerously high fever or have changes in your blood pressure or heart rate that must be addressed by a medical professional.

What Does Medical Intervention Involve?

Medical intervention helps you to get through the most severe symptoms without risking your safety. When you enter a detox program, the medical intervention staff conducts a thorough physical exam and assessment of your symptoms. They will take note of any symptoms that are severe enough to interfere with your recovery. Once they have a firm idea of your current state of health, they can then use this information to develop a treatment plan that keeps you safe and helps your body to begin the healing process.

During your time in detox, you may be provided with several different types of care to help you get through the first stage of recovery. In most cases, you will need to stay in inpatient care, which requires you to spend the night at the facility. For severe and life-threatening symptoms, you may be given medication that helps you to feel better and get proper rest. You will also begin receiving therapeutic assistance with learning how to cope with the symptoms while finding ways to end your addiction to alcohol.

The detox process is easier and safer when you have lots of support. Are you ready to begin your recovery? Give us a call today at 800-737-0933.

Can I Go to Outpatient Opiate Detox Without Missing Work?

Are you considering entering into detox? Are you ready to give up a life of using drugs and alcohol to take the journey towards health and happiness? If this sounds like an amazing idea, then it is time to check out your local opiate detox clinic. Don’t wait any longer to get clean and sober when you have the option to work towards a better life!

Now that you have made the decision to attend rehab it is time to find the one that is best for you. You may have been thinking about attending a rehab that provides round-the-clock care for weeks or months at a time. Unfortunately, this option may not be the best one for your situation. You may be worried about whether you can attend an outpatient opiate detox without missing any time from work. If so, read on to learn more.

Substance Abuse and Job Performance

Employers have plenty of cause for concern when it comes to substance abuse in the workplace. Employees who are under the influence of drugs, alcohol, or both are a danger to themselves and others. They are generally less productive, miss more work, and can cause hazardous situations for themselves and others. They are more likely to cause an accident in the workplace and often perform very poorly when they are at work. Substance-addicted employees often take longer breaks and are often found sleeping on the job, especially if they are addicted to opiates or heroin.

If you are struggling to hold down a job because of your substance abuse, then it is even more important to get into an outpatient opiate detox as soon as possible. However, you won’t want to miss work to do so. Luckily, there are many other rehab options that will allow you to work around your schedule while still providing you with the best services possible.

Outpatient or Inpatient- What Should I Choose?

Inpatient rehab allows patients to stay at the center day and night. Many inpatient services last for weeks or months. They offer comprehensive services that will help any level of addict get off of drugs and alcohol. Unfortunately, inpatient rehab will require you to put your entire life on hold to attend. You’ll have to give up your job, school, and all other responsibilities to check into the clinic all day and all night.

Outpatient rehab is the best option for you if you need to keep your job but also want to utilize rehab services. Outpatient rehab may also be known as a partial hospitalization program. These programs allow you to go through the entire process of detox and therapy without having to give up your job.

Is Outpatient Right for Me?

You’re probably wondering whether an outpatient rehab is right for your situation. These programs are probably your best choice if you:

• Can’t miss any work
• Have obligations you can’t ignore
• Cannot afford a longer rehab stay
• Do not want to commit to rehab full-time
• Are looking to keep to your daily schedule as much as possible

Outpatient rehab centers are the best option when you need to work around your schedule at work. Some facilities offer Monday through Friday sessions that last up to eight hours. If you work nights, then this may be the best option for you. If you work during the day, then evening facilities will work better for your situation. Rehabs also offer weekend care that you can utilize while still keeping your job, as long as you don’t usually work weekends.

What to Expect

Even though you are working around your work schedule the rehab that you choose will still expect you to put in the time and effort. You’ll be expected to attend as many therapy sessions as possible during your time there. This will include individual counseling, dual diagnosis therapy, group therapy, and possibly family sessions. You’ll be asked to make it on time and to stay for the entire session.

You can also expect detox services through outpatient care. If you are worried that you won’t be given the same treatment, don’t fret. All outpatient rehab clinics will provide you with qualified, reputable doctors and nurses who will help you through the detox process. You can still expect medically-supervised detox services, even through outpatient clinics.

Call Today to Find Out More

What are you waiting for? Call us at 800-737-0933 to learn how we can help you get off opiates. We have trained, professional staff who will help you every step of the way. Call or stop by to find out more.

Is A Florida Rapid Detox A Good Choice If Normal Detox Is Too Hard?

Detoxification and withdrawal are always the very first steps in addiction recovery. Unfortunately, they are also the most challenging. Whether going “cold turkey”, taking part in a medication-assisted program, or trying to gradually wean yourself off of drugs on your own, you may find yourself struggling to make it through this initial phase. Fortunately, a Florida rapid detox center can be an excellent alternative to normal detox, especially for those who have tried traditional detoxification methods before, and with little success.

Florida detox is designed to expedite an incredibly uncomfortable process that typically last several weeks. With this cutting-edge detoxification method, it’s possible to circumvent the physical and emotional challenges of withdrawal almost entirely. When choosing rapid detox programs, patients are placed under anesthesia for a period of approximately four to six hours. During this time, opioid antagonist drugs are used to totally eliminate prescription painkillers or heroin from their systems. Once awakened, people will find that all drugs and drug residues have been effectively flushed from their bodies so that no withdrawal symptoms remain. If the fear of withdrawal-related pain has been preventing you from seeking the help you need, this manner of detoxification can provide a swift and virtually painless alternative.

What You Need To Know About Rapid Detox

Although rapid detox can be a better and more comfortable way to start the recovery process, it should not be seen as a shortcut to total wellness. This process merely eliminates harmful drugs from patients’ systems and prepares them for the next leg of their journeys in addiction treatment. The many psychological and emotional effects of drug abuse must still be addressed. More importantly, patients will still need to learn more about the underlying causes of their substance use disorder, discover healthy coping strategies, and establish sustainable plans for keeping their lives on track.

It is also important to note that this procedure is performed entirely under IV sedation. As such, there are several risks associated with rapid detox that are not common with normal detoxification methods. Full-service rapid detox clinics, however, are staffed around the clock by seasoned teams of highly trained medical professionals. Not only can these individuals help mitigate the risks associated with rapid detox, but they can also assist patients in becoming mentally and physically ready for all that lies ahead. With this support, many people show far better tolerance for detoxification challenges, and go on to experience impressive levels of overall treatment success.

Opioid Treatment And The Use Of Maintenance Drugs

To fully understand the potential benefits of rapid detox, Florida locals must consider the alternatives. MAT or medication-assisted treatment is designed to minimize withdrawal symptoms with maintenance drugs such as suboxone or methadone. Unfortunately, these maintenance drugs can lead to new forms of addiction and drug dependence. For patients who are looking to totally free themselves from the damaging effects of substance abuse, this particular route isn’t always appealing. In a sense, it can leave patients trading one opioid problem for another. Moreover, as MAT patients progress in their recoveries, many find that the doses of their maintenance medications increase, rather than decline. This is due in large part to the body’s innate ability to increase its tolerance with prolonged exposure. It is also the result of insufficient knowledge of the best methods for controlling and managing the effects of these maintenance drugs. Rapid detox can help patients bypass the need for suboxone or methadone altogether. For those struggling with opiate addiction, there are a number of medications that can be used to control ongoing physical cravings that might otherwise derail their recoveries. While these products are unlikely to cause addiction, they cannot be used until patients are entirely opioid-free. With rapid detox, those who are committed to recovery can access these non-addictive support products within just a matter of hours.

Rapid Detox Can Set The Stage For Total Freedom

Many people are inspired to start recovery by a desire for personal freedom. Having your life controlled by a virtually unceasing craving for drugs can be devastating. With medication-assisted opioid treatment, there is often the risk of becoming dependent upon the very maintenance drugs that are meant to make you better. Conversely, Florida’s rapid detox will give you near-instant access to support products that will eliminate your cravings and that aren’t known to be addictive. With these services, you can sidestep the initial and most challenging stages of drug treatment. If you’re ready to free yourself from the binds of opiate addiction, we’re here to help. Call us now at 800-737-0933.

How Can I Manage Pain Symptoms During a Hydrocodone Detox?

If you’re ready to end your relationship with hydrocodone, there are a few things that you should know. Similar to other drugs, the withdrawal symptoms that come with going through detox can be severe and, in some cases, may even lead to relapse. Some of the withdrawal symptoms commonly associated with abrupt hydrocodone cessation include nausea, vomiting, diarrhea, fatigue, anxiety, and depression. And these symptoms can last between 5 and 7 days on average. While all of these symptoms are unpleasant, most will agree that the pain associated with coming off of the powerful narcotic is by far the worse. Fortunately, many rehab facilities provide substance abuse treatments that can help ease pain and many other symptoms that make achieving sobriety difficult.

WHAT TO EXPECT WHILE DETOXING FROM HYDROCODONE

Now that we have a basic understanding of the withdrawal symptoms that one is likely to face as they work toward ending their relationship with hydrocodone, let’s take a closer look at the withdrawal timeline. According to a study published by Medical News Today, an online resource for medical news aimed at both physicians and the general public, hydrocodone withdrawal symptoms often present themselves within 6 to 12 hours following an individual’s last dose. And all of these symptoms, including pain, can vary in intensity depending on how long an individual has been using and how much of the drug they were consuming before starting their detox journey.

MANAGING PAIN WHILE DETOXING FROM HYDROCODONE

When it comes to helping individuals cope with pain symptoms associated with coming off of hydrocodone, many rehab facilities will offer medication-assisted detox, which includes the use of various prescription-based medications that have been approved by the FDA (Food and Drug Administration). Along with helping to soothe pain, many of these same medications are effective in easing many of the other symptoms that can make getting through detox challenging, such as nausea, vomiting, and diarrhea, for example. That said, some of the prescription-based medications used by most rehab facilities include

Buprenorphine – This FDA-approved medication is classified as a partial opioid agonist, which means that it blocks opioid receptors in the brain that are responsible for triggering the euphoric high that comes with abusing hydrocodone and many other opioids. It is also worth noting that buprenorphine is a long-acting partial opioid agonist that carries a low risk for abuse. Along with pain, this prescription-based medication also provides relief from several other symptoms, including anxiety, sweating, and vomiting.

Clonidine – Commonly prescribed to treat high blood pressure and ADHD (attention deficit hyperactivity disorder), clonidine is yet another FDA-approved medication that is used to treat severe withdrawal symptoms. Studies show that clonidine helps block chemicals in the brain that would otherwise lead to sympathetic nervous system activity, a condition that triggers muscle pain, anxiety, sweating, and vomiting while individuals are going through detox.

Methadone – Similar to buprenorphine, methadone is a long-acting partial opioid agonist that works by blocking opioid receptors in the brain, which, in turn, eases pain and other symptoms associated with coming off of hydrocodone. It is important to note that methadone is highly addictive. Therefore it must be taken as prescribed to avoid the risk of substituting one drug problem for another one.

NON-PRESCRIPTION PAIN MANAGEMENT TREATMENTS

Ideally, individuals who are trying to overcome an addiction to hydrocodone should seek the help of a licensed rehab facility, preferably one that offers medication-assisted detox. However, for those who are trying to quit using on their own, there are over-the-counter medications that you can take to ease severe withdrawal symptoms, including

Tylenol – For those who are struggling with minor aches and pains while going through detox, Tylenol can provide some much-needed relief. However, much like prescription-based medication, it must be taken responsibly. Therefore, you will want to follow the instructions on the packaging for safe and effective dosing.

Loperamide – Also known as Imodium, loperamide is an over-the-counter medication that can help combat diarrhea. Studies show that loperamide works by reducing movement in the gut, which can reduce bowel movements while bulking up loose stool.

Electrolytes – While detoxing from hydrocodone, it is not uncommon to experience vomiting and diarrhea, both of which can result in a loss of fluids and dehydration. The best way to combat both of these problems is by consuming sports drinks, such as Gatorade, that contain electrolytes. Staying hydrated can also help ease pain symptoms as well.

BOTTOM LINE

All in all, there are many ways to cope with pain and other symptoms associated with overcoming hydrocodone addiction. To learn more about the prescription and at-home treatments detailed in this article, consider speaking with one of our friendly addiction specialists today at 800-737-0933.