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How Long Does it Take to Detox From Suboxone?

How Long Does it Take to Detox From Suboxone?

Suboxone is a medication-assisted therapy used to assist in recovery from heroin and other opioid addictions. It is a combination of two medications: naproxen and buprenorphine. Buprenorphine is a low dose opioid that allows those detoxing from opioids to taper off the drug, rather than doing so abruptly, which can cause a wide range of physical symptoms and ailments, while naproxen binds to the opioid receptors in the brain blocking the high an individual would receive from the low dose of opioids in the buprenorphine.

Suboxone is typically taken for at least 90 days and, if needed, longer. Because Suboxone is an opioid itself, there can be withdrawal symptoms if the medication is stopped abruptly. If you or your loved one has taken the medication, you may be wondering, how long does it take to detox from Suboxone and what withdrawal symptoms to expect. Here is a quick guide.

What Are The Symptoms of Suboxone Withdrawal?

The symptoms of Suboxone withdrawal are very similar to those of heroin and other opioids. These symptoms can vary from person to person but typically include:

  • Difficulty concentrating
  • Headache
  • Fever/Chills
  • Depression
  • Anxiety
  • Muscle and body aches
  • Difficulty concentrating
  • Nausea and/or vomiting
  • Cravings

The severity of withdrawal typically depends on the method used to cease the medication. Abrupt cessation or “quitting cold turkey” is not encouraged as it does not give the body a chance to adjust to not having the medication. To increase the manageability of withdrawal symptoms, tapering is encouraged.

How Long Does It Take to Detox From Suboxone?

While each individual is different, it generally takes about 30 days for physical withdrawal symptoms to be alleviated. Physical withdrawal symptoms are typically at their worst during the first three days of stopping the medication and slowly start to subside after that. During the first week or two, you or your loved one may also experience insomnia or mood swings, but those too will start to dissipate with some time and should not be a problem once you hit week three or four.

It is very important to note that you or your loved one may experience intense cravings after the 30-day mark. It is especially important to remain vigilant and keep in contact with a counselor or other support system during this time due to the fact that the potential for relapse increases during this time.

How Can I or My Loved One Make Detox From Suboxone Easier?

The best thing you or your loved one can do to make detoxing from Suboxone a bit easier, both mentally and physically, is to gradually decrease the intake of the medication. Abruptly stopping Suboxone increases the risk for more severe symptoms throughout the detox. Also, making sure to be in contact with a treatment specialist and/or support group throughout the detox process will also make Suboxone detox more manageable and decrease the chance for relapse.

Detoxing from Suboxone can be difficult. The physical symptoms can wreak havoc on the body and the cravings carry the risk of relapse. Having a good detox plan in place prior to stopping Suboxone increases the likelihood of success for you or your loved one. Do you know someone who would like to quit Suboxone or would you like to quit yourself? We are here to help. Our caring and compassionate counselors are available 24/7. Give us a call at 800-737-0933.

Will a Long Term Rehab Help Me Find Housing if My Current Home Isn’t Healthy?

If you’re struggling with the disease of addiction, you may realize that your living situation is one of the primary reasons you can’t stay sober. This is quite common for those who have an addiction to drugs or alcohol, but there are plenty of options available. A long-term rehab facility will not only help you get sober, but they can help you find housing if your current home situation isn’t healthy. This is one of the main benefits of working with a caring staff who wants to help you stay sober long after you leave treatment.

In treatment, you may not even realize that your living situation isn’t healthy until you begin working in group therapy and individual sessions. Many people begin to have clarity in treatment and realize if they hope to stay sober, they need to replace some people and places in their life. It’s also important to learn how to stay sober despite any external circumstances, which can include your family, spouse, children or parents. By the time you discharge from treatment, you’ll have living options as well as a sense of confidence that you can stay clean and sober.

Understanding Toxic Living Environments

There is a wide range of reasons why people begin drinking or using drugs, and you’ll be able to get down to the root of your problems while you’re in treatment. Although there are reasons you may have started to abuse substances, you also need to realize what factors in your life are keeping you in your sickness. Although you may have an extremely loving family or spouse, they may be contributing to your addiction. Some of the most common ways that your living situation can affect your addiction include the following as well as more:

  • People in your house abuse alcohol or drugs
  • Loved ones enable your addiction
  • Co-dependent relationships
  • Communication issues
  • Verbal, physical or emotional abuse

One of the best options after treatment is sober living, and this is a place where you’ll be with others who are trying to overcome their addiction as well. If you realize it’s a bad idea to move back home because it might lead to a relapse, sober living maybe your best option. In sober living, not only will you be able to go back to work or school, but you will also have the support that you need. Early recovery can be difficult, but it can be extremely beneficial to have others who live with you that are there to talk whenever you need someone to listen.

You should also realize that finding alternative housing in early sobriety may not be a permanent thing. For some people, they have a loving family, but you might be someone who needs to have some space to continue strengthening your recovery. The disease of addiction hurts everyone involved, so you and your loved ones may not yet be in a position to live together right after treatment. When you go into a sober living home, you and your loved ones will have additional time to heal, and then you can return to your old living situation with a strong foundation of recovery and begin rebuilding your relationships.

Overcoming Your Addiction

When you’re in treatment, you’re going to receive therapy that’s going to help you get to the root causes of your addiction. Overcoming addiction involves taking responsibility for your recovery and understanding that others may not change just because you’re getting sober. You’re going to work with a professional therapist who is going to help you begin to understand that the drugs and alcohol are only a symptom of the problem. Some of the primary challenges you face maybe not knowing how to manage the stresses of life without using healthy coping skills.

Support in Treatment

In treatment, you’re going to be with your peers who are also trying to overcome their addiction, and you’ll see that you’re not alone. Those who are also in treatment will be there to support you and lend a listening ear if you’re struggling with your home life. Sometimes it’s more beneficial to get suggestions from others in early recovery who understand exactly what you’re going through. Those you meet in treatment will also be there to help support you in your recovery after you leave treatment to help you on your recovery journey.

If you’re looking for a treatment center that can help you get sober and find housing after treatment, allow us to assist you. Give us a call today to find out more at 800-737-0933.

Is Detoxing from Drugs and Alcohol Always Painful?

The fact that you’re beginning to consider rehabilitation for drug or alcohol addiction is a commendable situation. Taking this step means that you’ll be on your way to a brighter life. However, as you’re navigating the process, you likely have an array of concerns and questions, and some of those inquiries may very well pertain to whether or not detoxing from drugs and alcohol is always painful.

Detox and Pain

As you may know, the detox stage is an important part of recovery from an addiction to drugs or alcohol. Without going through this stage, your recovery efforts are likely to suffer, which is an important element to consider. Even though you may experience some pain during the detox process, understand that fighting through it is so important. To have a true answer to your question about pain and detox, you have to understand a few important elements:

  • understanding detox and pain
  • individual factors
  • trained professionals
  • necessary component
  • accomplishment
  • companionship and understanding

Understanding Detox and Pain

You may wonder why the pain would even play a role in detox at all. Keep in mind that your body has become addicted to a certain substance. Without that substance, you may start to go through withdrawal. Withdrawal can have a variety of effects on your body, and levels of pain could come into fruition. What you should recognize though is that the pain may or may not be severe. Also, rehabilitation centers typically offer medically supervised detox. During this stage, you are under the care of medical professionals who can attend to your needs and foster a safe and healthy detox process.

Individual Factors

Whether or not detox will hurt, and the extent to which this process will cause pain is going to depend upon individual factors as well. If you have been using a hard drug for a long time, then the pain may very well be worse than it would be in other cases. For example, if you have recently started having problems with alcohol, the detox process may cause minimal physical pain to your body if it causes any at all. You should also take your individual threshold for pain into account. Some people simply do not feel pain as badly as others do.

Trained Professionals

Choosing the right rehabilitation center can also help you to better manage the pain that may come along with detox. In other words, you should look for a center that has staff members who are open and honest with you about what to expect during the process. Furthermore, the professionals should also speak with you about methods to reduce the pain and encourage you to continue through detox as it is a vital component of the process.

Necessary Component

The answer is clearly that detox does not always cause pain. However, it can. Knowing that pain can play a role in this early step might scare you away from pursuing a treatment program. In the long run, opting for detox is a less painful and jarring option than remaining addicted to drugs or alcohol. What you can do is remind yourself that going through detox isn’t optional when you want to heal from your addiction. Understanding that detox is a necessary part of the process can help you to feel a sense of empowerment.

Accomplishment

You can also think about detox in a positive light. Instead of focusing on the pain, shift your attention to the fact that after you go through detox, you have completed one part of the process. You still have a number of stages to go through, but you should feel accomplished in getting through detox. In fact, the accomplishment that you feel after your detox can provide motivation and encouragement for you as you continue on your journey to recovery.

Companionship and Understanding

Knowing that you aren’t alone can also act as a source of inspiration. Other people are going through detox as well. Even though you may not see them right now, they are there. You are all on your way toward an incredible journey that will allow you to have a new life. Also, once you are finished with this stage of the program, you can join with others who understand.

As you can see, your detox stage might be painful, and it might not be. Fortunately, you can call 800-737-0933 to discuss a specific plan of treatment with trusted professionals.

How Long Does a Dose of Suboxone Work?

What is Suboxone?

Buprenorphine/Naloxone, also known as Suboxone, is an opioid medication used for assisting people who have an addiction to opioids. Brand names of Suboxone also include Bunavial, Zubsolv, and Cassipa. Suboxone uses a blend of buprenorphine and naloxone to assist people in drug withdrawal. When combined with treatment and therapy, Suboxone works well to help addicts get off opioids.

How long does a dose of Suboxone work?

Suboxone begins working soon after it dissolves under a person’s tongue or on their cheek. Most people take one dose of Suboxone as a film dissolved on the tongue. One does get taken every day as directed by a person’s physician.

What does Suboxone do to treat people?

Buprenorphine/naloxone works in the brain to get people addicted to opioids off these drugs. Some of the medicines that Suboxone substitutes for include:

• Heroin.
• Fentanyl.
• Hydrocodone.
• Oxycodone.
• Morphine.

Buprenorphine partially works like an opioid because it is a partial opioid antagonist. It works weaker than full antagonists like methadone and heroin. The opioid effects level off even when dosages increase, reducing the risk of side effects, dependency, and misuse. Suboxone lowers the full impact of opioids, so it helps people addicted to opioids abstain from taking an excess of opioid drugs.

Naloxone, another component in Suboxone, blocks opioid effects when it gets dissolved in a person’s mouth. If naloxone gets injected instead of taken orally, the person taking the drug becomes very ill when they experience withdrawal symptoms. This detail discourages individuals from injecting Suboxone. Suboxone works best, along with counseling and other types of rehabilitation support.

What are the symptoms of opioid dependence?

• Some of the signs of opioid addiction might include:
• An inability to stop using opioids even though they cause relationship and health problems.
• Needing to take more opioids to get the same effect.
• Having withdrawal symptoms when you can’t get the opioids.
• Giving up previously enjoyable activities to use the drug.
• Spending a lot of time finding a way to use drugs.

Signs of withdrawal from opioids include:
• Runny nose.
• Sweating.
• Shaking.
• Nausea and vomiting.
• Diarrhea.
• Achy body.
• Irritability.
• Irritability.

What shouldn’t you do when you take Suboxone?

Don’t start taking Suboxone early. Wait to take it until your doctor instructs you to, or you may have withdrawal symptoms. If you’re pregnant or if there’s a chance you’re pregnant, tell your doctor before you start Suboxone therapy. Continue taking Suboxone for the entire time that your doctor instructs. Follow all instructions about reducing Suboxone levels when it becomes time to stop taking the drug. Don’t miss doses, as this action might cause you to relapse. Suddenly stopping Suboxone for any reason might cause unpleasant withdrawal symptoms. Some antibiotics don’t work well with Suboxone, so let your health care provider know that you’re taking this medication. Take this medication following the instructions provided for you. Don’t take any other drugs with Suboxone unless you have your doctor’s permission.
Can I become addicted to Suboxone?
Yes, addiction remains a possibility when taking this drug. As long as you follow medication instructions, you should be gradually weaned from Suboxone over time.

When Suboxone is used as prescribed and under a doctor’s supervision, the medication works well to help people safely get off opioids. You must follow the doctor’s instructions to achieve the desired effects without addiction, however. If you suddenly stop taking Suboxone, you will have withdrawal symptoms. So please consult your doctor before you quit taking Suboxone.

This prescription is a controlled substance (CIII) and is regulated by the government. Some individuals who use street drugs or who abuse prescription drugs might want your drugs. Selling or giving Suboxone to someone else remains against the law. Using Suboxone in ways other than prescribed can cause addiction. Taking this medication via injection increases your chances of addiction.

Taking Suboxone might get you off opioids for good. But for them to work correctly, you have to follow the instructions to get the right benefits. If you find that you can’t get off Suboxone when it comes time to start tapering off the drug, you need to ask for help. We can help you stay off opioids and Suboxone, too. Please contact our office right away at 1-234-456-7890 for more information and a consultation with our specialists.

What Are the Most Important Things to Know About Drug Detoxing?

What are some of the most significant facts to know about going through drug detox? You already know you’ve got a lot of work ahead of you. But what can you expect to happen during the detox process?

How long will drug detox take?

The amount of time it takes to drug detox depends totally on the drugs you’ve been using and the length of time you used them. In general, however, drug detox takes somewhere from seven days to two weeks. Some drugs take longer. Getting off drugs remains a challenge for everyone who does it. Staying off drugs for the long term also includes a lot of hard work. Ask your medical professional for more information on detoxing from a specific drug or alcohol.

How does drug detox feel?

You need professional and emotional support to get through the drug or alcohol detox process. This support helps keep people withdrawing from drugs to stay clean and sober and to prevent a relapse.

When detoxing, many individuals become nauseated and vomit. You need help keeping hydrated, and anti-nausea medications assist in relieving vomiting. Exercise and hydration both work well to combat some of the physical and emotional symptoms of withdrawal that you might feel. Anti-diarrhea medications also assist people with stomach upset due to withdrawal. Some medicines work well to less severe withdrawal symptoms if you stop taking heroin or opiates. Suboxone is a legal medication that works as a replacement for these two drugs. Once the opioids leave your system, you can gradually reduce the amount of the substitute medication you take.

Many recovering addicts experience sleep problems and hypersensitivities during withdrawal from substances such as benzodiazepines. Detoxing at a medically staffed detox center allows you to have medical help with severe withdrawal symptoms so that you won’t experience as much discomfort. Also, addicts sometimes start taking drugs to self-medicate mental health issues such as depression or bipolar disorder. If you become depressed or experience emotional problems during withdrawal, a health care provider can prescribe you drugs to ease these problems, too.

Should I drug detox at home?

No, you shouldn’t drug detox at home, especially by yourself. If it were easy to detox using will power, you would have been clean and sober by now. But, drug and alcohol withdrawal is serious business. Tempting as it might appear, drug detox needs to be left to the experts. Some people who go through drug detox become violently ill. People sometimes die during the process of detoxing. You require a trained staff to help you get off your drugs of choice and reliable folks to keep you safe while you go through withdrawal.

Most people become very ill while they detox. You might also have seizures, hallucinations, and experience a wide variety of distressing side effects from not using your drug of choice. When you detox in a medical facility, you don’t only gain a better chance at completing the detox process, but you might also qualify for medications to reduce your uncomfortable drug withdrawal symptoms. Other severe physical and mental problems that might occur during detox include:

• Delirium tremens.
• Grand mal seizures.
• Intense cravings for the missing drug or alcohol. These fierce cravings might bring about an overdose.
• Extreme nausea and vomiting, leading to dehydration and malnutrition.
• Low blood pressure.]
• Kidney failure.
• A chance of choking on your vomit.
• Coma.
• Death.

Can I successfully drug detox? Or am I hooked for life?

You can successfully detox from drugs and alcohol. If you quit taking your medication of choice or stop drinking, your body can begin to heal itself. Once your body releases all of the addictive toxins from it, you do need to find out why you started to use in the first place. To accomplish this task, you need to go to a reputable rehab program. Most rehabs offer individual and group therapy, training, and education about why you might have started using. Medical help remains available to keep you off your previous drug or alcohol addiction. You might receive family therapy and get to participate in a sober living program. Sober living enables you to live in a home-like setting and gradually work your way back into interacting with the world outside your treatment placement. Please make the call and contact us for more detox information and a new start in life without drugs and addiction.

Is Suboxone Only Used During Detox?

Suboxone is a medication that is prescribed to treat opioid use disorder. It is a combination of buprenorphine and naloxone. Suboxone is used to decrease the appearance of opioid withdrawal symptoms. It is a long-acting medication and lasts for approximately 24 hours. Suboxone is a film that is placed in the cheek or under the tongue when administered. The side effects of suboxone can include constricted pupils, low blood pressure, lethargy, and respiratory depression. The risk of overdosing on suboxone is drastically lower than overdosing on another opioid like heroin. Suboxone was approved for use in the United States for medical purposes in 2002.

The long-term outcomes of suboxone as a treatment for opioid use disorder are better than quitting opioid use overall. Cravings for opioids are decreased when using suboxone, which prevents individuals from seeking out other opioids to use. Suboxone is a first-line treatment for opioid use disorder and has been shown as effective in the treatment and long-term recovery for individuals who were dependent on opioids in the past. Suboxone is typically prescribed during detox and in doctors offices. Individuals are given their prescription and they do not have to be monitored, unlike individuals who must go into a clinic each day to receive their dose of methadone.

Individuals who are stable and are not able to visit a clinic each day to receive medication may prescribed suboxone. Further, individuals who have other medical conditions that visit their doctor regularly may be prescribed suboxone. Other individuals who may be prescribed suboxone include those who have jobs that require them to remain alert and are not able to be under a sedating medication like methadone. Suboxone is also recommended to treat individuals who may be affected negatively by methadone use. These populations include individuals who abuse alcohol, the elderly, individuals who take large doses of benzodiazepines, and individuals with a low level of tolerance to opioids. Further, suboxone is prescribed to individuals who are engaging in therapy and counseling in order to treat their opioid use disorder. The use of suboxone in combination with therapy is more successful in treating opioid use disorder than treating it with suboxone alone.

If you would like more information regarding suboxone therapy or treatment for opioid use disorder, call us today at 800-737-0933.

Is Is Opiate Detox Dangerous if You Don’t Get Medical Supervision?

Opiate drugs that are commonly abused include heroin and prescription painkillers including Oxycontin, Morphine, and Fentanyl. Withdrawal and detox from opioids can create symptoms of withdrawal within hours after the last dose taken. The symptoms can last for several days up to a week or longer. Withdrawal from opioids without medical supervision may not be fatal, but it may lead to the use of opioids again in order to relieve the withdrawal symptoms.

Signs of withdrawal from opiates may be mild to severe and depend on individual factors. Individual factors include how much of a substance an individual has been using and how long they have been using the substance. Further, the type of opioid that has been taken, the way in which the drug was taken (i.e., intravenously, orally, smoked, nasal inhalation), any underlying health or mental conditions, or any co-morbid mental health issues. Previous trauma, family history of addiction, biological factors, environmental factors, and stressful surroundings may also affect the way in which withdrawal symptoms emerge and appear.

Withdrawal symptoms from opioid substances include:

  • Muscle cramping
  • Depression
  • Anxiety
  • Cravings to use opiates
  • Agitation
  • Depression
  • Nausea

Options for Detox

There are a number of methods for treatment and detox for the removal of opiates from the body. Some treatment methods are more in-depth and comprehensive than others. Medical detox includes both psychological and pharmacological treatment methods while under the supervision of a team of medical and mental health professionals within a safe and secure setting. Standard detox is able to take place on an outpatient basis (i.e., outside the hospital setting). The withdrawal symptoms related to opiate detoxification are very uncomfortable and medical detox may provide the most comfortable and secure setting for treatment.

Within a medical detox, vital signs (e.g., blood pressure, body temperature, heart rate, and respiration levels) are able to be monitored closely) Further, medical professionals are able to prescribe and administer medications that may make the detox process more comfortable and allow for the regulation of the body and brain functioning. Mental health professionals will also be available to provide evaluations and assess levels of stabilization during detox. There is no specific timeline for detox from opioids, but it typically lasts between five and seven days.

If you or a loved one is struggling with opiate addiction or seeking to begin detox from opiates, please contact us at 800-737-0933. Our counselors are available 24 hours a day and are able to provide you with information specific to your case and needs.

What Can You Expect from a Medical Detox Center?

When someone is dealing with addiction and ready to get help, one of the first steps is detox or the process of stopping drug or alcohol use. This process can involve some uncomfortable or dangerous physical symptoms — which is where a medical detox center comes in. These centers are staffed with doctors and nurses who are trained in addition and detox, so they can help your loved one get through withdrawal safely.

Detox is almost always uncomfortable; in some cases, it can be life-threatening. Medical detox centers monitor the symptoms, help manage pain, and provide invaluable support for both mental and physical health. This process helps keep the patient as comfortable as possible. When the detox is over, most people are ready to continue on with addiction treatment. For many people with addiction, the fear of the unknown is serious; when that’s the case, it’s helpful to know exactly what to expect when you take a friend or family member to a medical detox center.

Consultation, Evaluation, and Admission to a Medical Detox Center

When you arrive at a medical detox center, the first step is an evaluation and consultation. Your loved one will meet with a substance abuse specialist to discuss the situation. This person, sometimes in combination with an admissions professional, will figure out what’s needed during the detox process. They will come up with a care plan that takes into account factors such as:

  • History of drug or alcohol use
  • The current level of drugs or alcohol in your system
  • Prior treatment experience
  • Medical history and current health issues
  • Mental health concerns

It’s important to encourage your loved one to be completely honest during this process; even when it’s hard, this honesty helps the medical team create the most comfortable detox plan. During the intake process, the health professional will also request drug testing. This helps the center figure out exactly what substances are in the person’s system, so they can create an appropriate plan for detox. Once they have a plan, the medical team will explain it to you thoroughly — at the end of the process, you should know exactly what to expect and understand exactly what the doctors and nurses will do. If you’re happy with the treatment plan, you’ll need to fill out intake forms and be admitted to the facility.

Stabilizing the Patient

The next step in medical detox is stabilization. During this stage, your loved one will stay in the detox facility. Since there are no more drugs and alcohol coming into their system, they will start to go into withdrawal. Exact withdrawal symptoms vary dramatically based on the substance and the person’s history. The doctors and nurses at the facility help keep the patient comfortable during the process. They may prescribe medications to help control pain or keep the patient safe. In some cases, the medical staff delivers fluids and nutritional supplements if the patient can’t keep down water and food. Most importantly, they provide constant supervision, so your loved one is always safe and unable to relapse.

Another important part of medical detox is psychological support. Detox is stressful, so the facility’s mental health staff are a key part of the process. They take away some of the fear by explaining what to expect, and they provide a soothing, comforting presence during the worst moments. This support is instrumental in getting your loved one through the fear and anxiety that comes with detoxing.

Preparing for the Next Steps

For most people with addiction, medical detox on its own isn’t enough to treat the problem. It stabilizes them, so they’re mentally and physically strong enough to undergo further treatment. This might include a rehab center or outpatient therapy, depending on the situation.

At the end of the medical detox process, when the substances are out of your loved one’s body and they’re thinking clearly, the healthcare team will talk about the next steps. Usually, with the help of a counselor, they’ll come up with a plan moving forward. Most importantly, they help prepare the patient mentally for the things they can expect in treatment and make them aware of their options. This process helps the person feel that there is hope, and that help for addiction is available.

If you or a loved one is in need of medical detox, or if you simply want to find out more about addiction treatment options, we’re just a call away. We can help you figure out the best next step for your unique situation; just call us today at 800-737-0933.

Does Suboxone Cause or Affect Mood Swings?

Suboxone is a medication that is prescribed to treat opiate addiction. Suboxone contains a combination of buprenorphine and naloxone. Buprenorphine is a medication containing opioids and naloxone is a substance that blocks the effects of opioid medication (e.g., pain relief and feelings of well-being) that often lead individuals to seek out opioids after recovery. Suboxone has several side effects and may cause issues with mental health and mood swings.

Suboxone as a TreatmentThis medication is prescribed in several different types of situations. Doctors may prescribe Suboxone in order to aid the process of withdrawal and detoxification. Doctors also prescribe Suboxone as a long term maintenance medication for opiate addiction. Individuals who meet certain criteria may be able to continue to take Suboxone for an extended period of time in order to control cravings and allow their brain to heal and begin to block the cravings for opioid use. Suboxone has also been prescribed to individuals who suffer from chronic pain as an alternative to traditional narcotic pain relievers.

There are several pros and cons related to Suboxone use. It helps control cravings, has anti-depressant qualities, and blocks the effects of narcotic opioids. As for the cons of Suboxone, it is an extremely powerful synthetic opioid, it may cause constipation, there is a period of withdrawal after quitting Suboxone, and it may induce depression and other issues related to mental health. Suboxone also has a high risk of abuse.

Side Effects of Suboxone UseSuboxone works in such a way that it binds to the opioid receptors located in the brain, which causes changes in the user’s mental state and behaviors. Changes in behavior related to Suboxone use can include:

  • Lethargy
  • Cravings
  • Distress
  • Fear
  • Anxiety
  • Agitation
  • Mood Swings
  • Impaired memory

Suboxone also causes physical side effects. Physical side effects of Suboxone use may include:

  • Headaches
  • Changes in appetite
  • Stomach pain
  • Dependency
  • Issues with coordination
  • Insomnia
  • Cramps
  • Muscle Aches
  • Reduced breathing
  • Liver damage
  • Withdrawal symptoms (e.g., joint pain and excessive sweating)

Does Suboxone Cause or Affect Mood Swings? Due to the fact that Suboxone is an extremely powerful mind-altering drug, it may cause mood swings, depression, agitation, and may make people taking it to act out of character and engage in violent behavior. Suboxone alters the brain chemistry of its users and may affect their behavior, specifically if they quit taking the medication abruptly. As stated before, the side effects of Suboxone can include depression, anxiety, mood swings, and insomnia.

Long-term use of Suboxone can cause many issues. Long-term Suboxone users have reported that quitting Suboxone is more difficult than quitting heroin or Oxycontin. This is due to the long-half life Suboxone. It is able to stay in the user’s system for approximately eight to nine days. This makes the detoxification process from Suboxone last for weeks to months. This long detoxification process includes uncomfortable side effects that are both physical and mental in nature. This includes mood swings and depression.

If you or a loved one is having difficulty with Suboxone use, please contact us today at 800-737-0933. Our counselors are available 24 hours a day and are ready to assist you and consult with you regarding your specific needs.

How Do Medical Professionals Handle Heroin Addiction in Comparison to Other Drug Addictions?

Heroin is one of the most dangerous and addictive street drugs in the world. It is an opiate that will rewrite the brain’s perception of pleasure and reward in ways that many other substances do not, so withdrawal from the substance can be far more painful than from other drugs. This is why medical professionals have to handle heroin addiction much more delicately than addiction from other substances.

Detox

The first and perhaps most important step in treating heroin addiction is the detoxification process. This can be harrowing for patients under the most ideal circumstances, and it should never be attempted alone. Many patients need to undergo medical detox, which ensures that they are weaned off of heroin in a controlled environment instead of quitting outright. They may also be provided with medications to help them control their withdrawal symptoms, which is often a crucial part of the rehab process. This usually involves taking suboxone, a medication that can in itself be addictive and should only be taken in a clinical setting.

Counseling

Much of what makes heroin addiction treatment different from other addiction treatment is getting over the physical addiction and managing the harsh withdrawal symptoms, but it is far from the only element of treatment. Once a patient has properly detoxed and is mostly over their physical addiction, they often have to undergo counseling and treatment to address the reasons why they turned to heroin in the first place. This process can take anywhere from a few months to several years depending on the patient’s situation. As we said before, heroin alters the brain’s perception of pleasure and reward, and any addiction treatment will involve basically rewriting one’s thought process. This cognitive therapy and counseling can be just as difficult as overcoming the physical addiction, and it should be taken very seriously.

There is no doubt that heroin is one of the most dangerous illicit drugs available today. It is part of the reason why there is such a severe opiate addiction epidemic in the United States, and it continues to claim thousands of lives every year. If you or a loved one is struggling with an addiction to heroin, know that there is hope for you. Contact our treatment center today at 800-737-0933 for more information. Our counselors are available 24 hours a day, and they will gladly help you find the treatment that you need.