Tag Archives: detox

Is Suboxone Only Used During Detox?

Suboxone is a medication that is prescribed to treat opioid use disorder. It is a combination of buprenorphine and naloxone. Suboxone is used to decrease the appearance of opioid withdrawal symptoms. It is a long-acting medication and lasts for approximately 24 hours. Suboxone is a film that is placed in the cheek or under the tongue when administered. The side effects of suboxone can include constricted pupils, low blood pressure, lethargy, and respiratory depression. The risk of overdosing on suboxone is drastically lower than overdosing on another opioid like heroin. Suboxone was approved for use in the United States for medical purposes in 2002.

The long-term outcomes of suboxone as a treatment for opioid use disorder are better than quitting opioid use overall. Cravings for opioids are decreased when using suboxone, which prevents individuals from seeking out other opioids to use. Suboxone is a first-line treatment for opioid use disorder and has been shown as effective in the treatment and long-term recovery for individuals who were dependent on opioids in the past. Suboxone is typically prescribed during detox and in doctors offices. Individuals are given their prescription and they do not have to be monitored, unlike individuals who must go into a clinic each day to receive their dose of methadone.

Individuals who are stable and are not able to visit a clinic each day to receive medication may prescribed suboxone. Further, individuals who have other medical conditions that visit their doctor regularly may be prescribed suboxone. Other individuals who may be prescribed suboxone include those who have jobs that require them to remain alert and are not able to be under a sedating medication like methadone. Suboxone is also recommended to treat individuals who may be affected negatively by methadone use. These populations include individuals who abuse alcohol, the elderly, individuals who take large doses of benzodiazepines, and individuals with a low level of tolerance to opioids. Further, suboxone is prescribed to individuals who are engaging in therapy and counseling in order to treat their opioid use disorder. The use of suboxone in combination with therapy is more successful in treating opioid use disorder than treating it with suboxone alone.

If you would like more information regarding suboxone therapy or treatment for opioid use disorder, call us today at 800-737-0933.

Is Is Opiate Detox Dangerous if You Don’t Get Medical Supervision?

Opiate drugs that are commonly abused include heroin and prescription painkillers including Oxycontin, Morphine, and Fentanyl. Withdrawal and detox from opioids can create symptoms of withdrawal within hours after the last dose taken. The symptoms can last for several days up to a week or longer. Withdrawal from opioids without medical supervision may not be fatal, but it may lead to the use of opioids again in order to relieve the withdrawal symptoms.

Signs of withdrawal from opiates may be mild to severe and depend on individual factors. Individual factors include how much of a substance an individual has been using and how long they have been using the substance. Further, the type of opioid that has been taken, the way in which the drug was taken (i.e., intravenously, orally, smoked, nasal inhalation), any underlying health or mental conditions, or any co-morbid mental health issues. Previous trauma, family history of addiction, biological factors, environmental factors, and stressful surroundings may also affect the way in which withdrawal symptoms emerge and appear.

Withdrawal symptoms from opioid substances include:

  • Muscle cramping
  • Depression
  • Anxiety
  • Cravings to use opiates
  • Agitation
  • Depression
  • Nausea

Options for Detox

There are a number of methods for treatment and detox for the removal of opiates from the body. Some treatment methods are more in-depth and comprehensive than others. Medical detox includes both psychological and pharmacological treatment methods while under the supervision of a team of medical and mental health professionals within a safe and secure setting. Standard detox is able to take place on an outpatient basis (i.e., outside the hospital setting). The withdrawal symptoms related to opiate detoxification are very uncomfortable and medical detox may provide the most comfortable and secure setting for treatment.

Within a medical detox, vital signs (e.g., blood pressure, body temperature, heart rate, and respiration levels) are able to be monitored closely) Further, medical professionals are able to prescribe and administer medications that may make the detox process more comfortable and allow for the regulation of the body and brain functioning. Mental health professionals will also be available to provide evaluations and assess levels of stabilization during detox. There is no specific timeline for detox from opioids, but it typically lasts between five and seven days.

If you or a loved one is struggling with opiate addiction or seeking to begin detox from opiates, please contact us at 800-737-0933. Our counselors are available 24 hours a day and are able to provide you with information specific to your case and needs.

What Can You Expect from a Medical Detox Center?

When someone is dealing with addiction and ready to get help, one of the first steps is detox or the process of stopping drug or alcohol use. This process can involve some uncomfortable or dangerous physical symptoms — which is where a medical detox center comes in. These centers are staffed with doctors and nurses who are trained in addition and detox, so they can help your loved one get through withdrawal safely.

Detox is almost always uncomfortable; in some cases, it can be life-threatening. Medical detox centers monitor the symptoms, help manage pain, and provide invaluable support for both mental and physical health. This process helps keep the patient as comfortable as possible. When the detox is over, most people are ready to continue on with addiction treatment. For many people with addiction, the fear of the unknown is serious; when that’s the case, it’s helpful to know exactly what to expect when you take a friend or family member to a medical detox center.

Consultation, Evaluation, and Admission to a Medical Detox Center

When you arrive at a medical detox center, the first step is an evaluation and consultation. Your loved one will meet with a substance abuse specialist to discuss the situation. This person, sometimes in combination with an admissions professional, will figure out what’s needed during the detox process. They will come up with a care plan that takes into account factors such as:

  • History of drug or alcohol use
  • The current level of drugs or alcohol in your system
  • Prior treatment experience
  • Medical history and current health issues
  • Mental health concerns

It’s important to encourage your loved one to be completely honest during this process; even when it’s hard, this honesty helps the medical team create the most comfortable detox plan. During the intake process, the health professional will also request drug testing. This helps the center figure out exactly what substances are in the person’s system, so they can create an appropriate plan for detox. Once they have a plan, the medical team will explain it to you thoroughly — at the end of the process, you should know exactly what to expect and understand exactly what the doctors and nurses will do. If you’re happy with the treatment plan, you’ll need to fill out intake forms and be admitted to the facility.

Stabilizing the Patient

The next step in medical detox is stabilization. During this stage, your loved one will stay in the detox facility. Since there are no more drugs and alcohol coming into their system, they will start to go into withdrawal. Exact withdrawal symptoms vary dramatically based on the substance and the person’s history. The doctors and nurses at the facility help keep the patient comfortable during the process. They may prescribe medications to help control pain or keep the patient safe. In some cases, the medical staff delivers fluids and nutritional supplements if the patient can’t keep down water and food. Most importantly, they provide constant supervision, so your loved one is always safe and unable to relapse.

Another important part of medical detox is psychological support. Detox is stressful, so the facility’s mental health staff are a key part of the process. They take away some of the fear by explaining what to expect, and they provide a soothing, comforting presence during the worst moments. This support is instrumental in getting your loved one through the fear and anxiety that comes with detoxing.

Preparing for the Next Steps

For most people with addiction, medical detox on its own isn’t enough to treat the problem. It stabilizes them, so they’re mentally and physically strong enough to undergo further treatment. This might include a rehab center or outpatient therapy, depending on the situation.

At the end of the medical detox process, when the substances are out of your loved one’s body and they’re thinking clearly, the healthcare team will talk about the next steps. Usually, with the help of a counselor, they’ll come up with a plan moving forward. Most importantly, they help prepare the patient mentally for the things they can expect in treatment and make them aware of their options. This process helps the person feel that there is hope, and that help for addiction is available.

If you or a loved one is in need of medical detox, or if you simply want to find out more about addiction treatment options, we’re just a call away. We can help you figure out the best next step for your unique situation; just call us today at 800-737-0933.

Does Suboxone Cause or Affect Mood Swings?

Suboxone is a medication that is prescribed to treat opiate addiction. Suboxone contains a combination of buprenorphine and naloxone. Buprenorphine is a medication containing opioids and naloxone is a substance that blocks the effects of opioid medication (e.g., pain relief and feelings of well-being) that often lead individuals to seek out opioids after recovery. Suboxone has several side effects and may cause issues with mental health and mood swings.

Suboxone as a TreatmentThis medication is prescribed in several different types of situations. Doctors may prescribe Suboxone in order to aid the process of withdrawal and detoxification. Doctors also prescribe Suboxone as a long term maintenance medication for opiate addiction. Individuals who meet certain criteria may be able to continue to take Suboxone for an extended period of time in order to control cravings and allow their brain to heal and begin to block the cravings for opioid use. Suboxone has also been prescribed to individuals who suffer from chronic pain as an alternative to traditional narcotic pain relievers.

There are several pros and cons related to Suboxone use. It helps control cravings, has anti-depressant qualities, and blocks the effects of narcotic opioids. As for the cons of Suboxone, it is an extremely powerful synthetic opioid, it may cause constipation, there is a period of withdrawal after quitting Suboxone, and it may induce depression and other issues related to mental health. Suboxone also has a high risk of abuse.

Side Effects of Suboxone UseSuboxone works in such a way that it binds to the opioid receptors located in the brain, which causes changes in the user's mental state and behaviors. Changes in behavior related to Suboxone use can include:

  • Lethargy
  • Cravings
  • Distress
  • Fear
  • Anxiety
  • Agitation
  • Mood Swings
  • Impaired memory

Suboxone also causes physical side effects. Physical side effects of Suboxone use may include:

  • Headaches
  • Changes in appetite
  • Stomach pain
  • Dependency
  • Issues with coordination
  • Insomnia
  • Cramps
  • Muscle Aches
  • Reduced breathing
  • Liver damage
  • Withdrawal symptoms (e.g., joint pain and excessive sweating)

Does Suboxone Cause or Affect Mood Swings? Due to the fact that Suboxone is an extremely powerful mind-altering drug, it may cause mood swings, depression, agitation, and may make people taking it to act out of character and engage in violent behavior. Suboxone alters the brain chemistry of its users and may affect their behavior, specifically if they quit taking the medication abruptly. As stated before, the side effects of Suboxone can include depression, anxiety, mood swings, and insomnia.

Long-term use of Suboxone can cause many issues. Long-term Suboxone users have reported that quitting Suboxone is more difficult than quitting heroin or Oxycontin. This is due to the long-half life Suboxone. It is able to stay in the user's system for approximately eight to nine days. This makes the detoxification process from Suboxone last for weeks to months. This long detoxification process includes uncomfortable side effects that are both physical and mental in nature. This includes mood swings and depression.

If you or a loved one is having difficulty with Suboxone use, please contact us today at 800-737-0933. Our counselors are available 24 hours a day and are ready to assist you and consult with you regarding your specific needs.

How Do Medical Professionals Handle Heroin Addiction in Comparison to Other Drug Addictions?

Heroin is one of the most dangerous and addictive street drugs in the world. It is an opiate that will rewrite the brain's perception of pleasure and reward in ways that many other substances do not, so withdrawal from the substance can be far more painful than from other drugs. This is why medical professionals have to handle heroin addiction much more delicately than addiction from other substances.

Detox

The first and perhaps most important step in treating heroin addiction is the detoxification process. This can be harrowing for patients under the most ideal circumstances, and it should never be attempted alone. Many patients need to undergo medical detox, which ensures that they are weaned off of heroin in a controlled environment instead of quitting outright. They may also be provided with medications to help them control their withdrawal symptoms, which is often a crucial part of the rehab process. This usually involves taking suboxone, a medication that can in itself be addictive and should only be taken in a clinical setting.

Counseling

Much of what makes heroin addiction treatment different from other addiction treatment is getting over the physical addiction and managing the harsh withdrawal symptoms, but it is far from the only element of treatment. Once a patient has properly detoxed and is mostly over their physical addiction, they often have to undergo counseling and treatment to address the reasons why they turned to heroin in the first place. This process can take anywhere from a few months to several years depending on the patient's situation. As we said before, heroin alters the brain's perception of pleasure and reward, and any addiction treatment will involve basically rewriting one's thought process. This cognitive therapy and counseling can be just as difficult as overcoming the physical addiction, and it should be taken very seriously.

There is no doubt that heroin is one of the most dangerous illicit drugs available today. It is part of the reason why there is such a severe opiate addiction epidemic in the United States, and it continues to claim thousands of lives every year. If you or a loved one is struggling with an addiction to heroin, know that there is hope for you. Contact our treatment center today at 800-737-0933 for more information. Our counselors are available 24 hours a day, and they will gladly help you find the treatment that you need.

What Protocols Will the Medical Staff Follow During a Detox in Florida?

Anyone who has overcome addiction can attest to how difficult it is to go through a detox program and coping with withdrawal symptoms. Fortunately, medically-assisted detox, which is a treatment supervised by physicians and mental health professionals, has made this part of recovery considerably more palatable. For those who have never experienced withdrawal, the symptoms can be not only painful but also life-threatening.

Given these facts, most drug treatment facilities are staffed with professionals who are well-versed in the detox process and capable of supporting the mental and physical needs of the patient. In this article, we will be going over the protocols that the medical staff in most drug treatment facilities follow and what you can expect as you go through a recovery program.

WHAT TO EXPECT DURING A MEDICAL DETOX

Understanding that the needs of each individual patient can vary, many drug recovery programs provide personalized treatments aimed at helping patients overcome their addiction. It is worth noting that these treatments place a strong emphasis on treat not only the body but also the mind. As such, most drug recovery programs require patients to successfully each stage of treatment before moving on to the next. These stages include an evaluation, stabilization, and awareness building, which are all used to gauge how well each patient is progressing through recovery. Now that we have identified these the three stages, let's take a closer look at them individually:

EVALUATION

The evaluation stage is an opportunity for those involved in the patient's care to gather information and outline a course of treatment that suits the needs of the patient. During this initial stage, physicians will also administer breath, urine, and blood tests to detect drugs and other contaminants that may still be in the patient's system. This information, along with mental and medical health history, is critical in mapping out an effective detox strategy for the patient.

STABILIZATION

Stabilization is not only the most important but also most time-consuming aspect of any detox program. This stage entails explaining to the patient what they can expect while undergoing detox and providing them with medical or psychological treatments as needed.

AWARENESS BUILDING

The awareness building stage marks the final stage of detox for the patient whereby they will be taught coping skills to help them avoid falling victim to cravings, which could result in relapse. One of the biggest misconceptions associated with drug recovery programs is that completing detox and surviving withdrawal guarantees sobriety, which couldn't be further from the truth. Awareness building is designed to ensure patients remain drug and alcohol-free once they have completed detox and return to the real world.

In summation, there are many factors that dictate whether or not an individual will be successful in overcoming their addiction. Most drug treatment facilities are cognizant of this fact and will work collectively towards ensuring a favorable outcome for all of their patients. Call us today at 800-737-0933.

Should Suboxone Be Taken Forever or Just During Detox?

Given its effectiveness, Suboxone is one of the most commonly prescribed medications for those looking to overcome an opiate addiction. It's easy to understand why in light of the medication's capacity to ease withdrawal symptoms while also producing a less intense "high." Suboxone is comprised of two separate medications, Naloxone and Buprenorphine, which offer unique benefits when it comes to helping individuals break free of their addiction. As such, it is not surprising to find that many people want to continue using the Suboxone long-term. In this article, we will take a look at the consequences of long-term use and why it should be avoided.

WHAT IS SUBOXONE?

Although we touched in this briefly in the preface of the article, contains Naloxone, which is highly effective in easing the excruciating pain symptoms associated with opioid withdrawal. The medication can also be used to reverse an opioid overdose. Basically, the drug acts as an antagonist by binding to opioid receptors and blocking the transmission of opioids to the brain. Also, it prevents agonist, the chemical compound that elicits a physiological response when combined with brain receptors.

Now that we have a general understanding of the role of Naloxone, let's focus our attention on Buprenorphine. Unlike naloxone, buprenorphine works by attaching to opioid receptors and stimulating them, which makes it possible to soothe withdrawal symptoms without eliciting the same feelings of euphoria and sedation typical of other opioids.

WHAT ARE THE EFFECTS OF LONG-TERM SUBOXONE USE?

In short, long-term Suboxone usage increases the likelihood of addiction; in fact, according to a report published by SAMHSA (Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration), the misuse of Suboxone resulted in 3,000 emergency room visits in 2005 and exceeded 30,000 in 2010. Although the inclusion of Naloxone as a deterrent to abuse is effective, some individuals have found ways of bypassing this safeguard.

That said, some people have been known to vacillate between Suboxone and their primary drug of choice. Needless to say, such actions can quickly result in relapse. So why are so many people interested in long-term use even after they have undergone detox? Most likely it is for the high that is derived from the medication and to resolve any residual symptoms they may be experiencing, physical or psychological.

HOW TO TAKE SUBOXONE PROPERLY

Suboxone can be taken in a variety of ways; however, patients who undergo treatment are usually prescribed sublingual tablets, which can be dissolved under the tongue before being absorbed by the body. In addition, the medication is also available as a sublingual film; in this case, the film is placed against the interior cheek wall where it will dissolve before being absorbed by the body. That said, both variations work by releasing small doses of Suboxone over a 10-minute time frame.

Although the medication can be administered in a variety of ways, the pill form of Suboxone is a preferred choice when it comes to short-term treatment. As far as dosage is concerned, most patients will be started on a very low dose of Suboxone, usually 6 to 8 mg. This low dose allows physicians to gauge the effectiveness of the medication as well as patient tolerance. That aside, if patients abuse or abruptly stop taking Suboxone, they are usually presented with the following symptoms:

  • Muscle aches
  • Diarrhea
  • Vomiting
  • Insomnia
  • Agitation
  • Anxiety

Obviously, this is not an entire list of symptoms; however, it is a list of the ones commonly reported by current and former patients.

CONCLUSION

In summation, opioid addiction is one of the most challenging addictions for anyone to overcome. After all, the substances are highly addictive, easily accessible, and provides a feeling of euphoria that some find insatiable. While Suboxone can be helpful during the detox, long-term use should be avoided in light of the possibility of abuse, addiction, and relapse.

A more plausible alternative would be to combine short-term Suboxone use with counseling, which can include learning to cope with stress and avoiding triggers that can lead to relapse, for example. Also, it worth noting that many find the support of friends and family invaluable while they are their journey towards breaking their addiction. Call one of our counselors today at 800-737-0933.

Is an Opiate Detox in Florida Ever Dangerous?

Trying to withdraw from opiates on your own can be a dangerous and potentially life-threatening move. Considering the risk to health and life, an opiate detox at a Florida rehab is perhaps the safest way to end your addiction to opiates.

Professional treatment at an accredited rehab is not only safe, but it also offers an opportunity to uncover underlying reasons for your addiction. It allows you to get treatment for mental health disorders linked to drug abuse. It caters to family members and loved ones by involving them in specialized family therapy sessions. And, it equips you with tools and skills to manage drug use triggers to reduce the chance of relapse during and after rehab.

Tapering Off Opiates With Medically-Assisted Detox

Opiates, also called opioids, are drugs made from the opium poppy plant. They are commonly prescribed for treating chronic pain. Codeine, Oxycodone, Fentanyl, Morphine, and Hydrocodone are some examples of prescription opioids. However, opiates are used illicitly in a more raw and potent form and are called "street drugs."

Heroin is a widely abused "street" drug. It is highly addictive and is the reason why many individuals between the ages of 18-30 undergo opiate detox in Florida. They know that quitting opiates "cold turkey" and going through detox on their own increases the risk of relapse or overdose.

Tapering off the substance is the best way to gradually remove it from the body and allow the body and brain to slowly return to a state of "normalcy." Medication may be administered to you during detox by a trained professional to assist in managing severe withdrawal symptoms.

Opiate Withdrawal Symptoms

Opiate withdrawal symptoms may begin within 6-30 hours after the last dose. Factors such as how severe the addiction is and what type of drug is involved will determine when symptoms begin. Short-acting opiates produce symptoms within 6-12 hours while long-acting opiates do so around 30 hours following the last use. One or more of these symptoms could develop and may vary in severity from person to person:

  • Strong cravings
  • Runny nose or teary eyes
  • Nausea, vomiting, or diarrhea
  • Excessive sweating
  • Irritability
  • Restlessness
  • Insomnia
  • Persistent yawning
  • Aggressing
  • Anxiety
  • Muscle aches or stomach cramps
  • Mood swings
  • Increased heart rate or blood pressure

Opiate Withdrawal Timeline

Opiate withdrawal can be done at an inpatient or outpatient program. Inpatient rehabs allow you to live-in for the duration of treatment while outpatient centers offer you the opportunity to continue to live at home, work, and care for family members. Nevertheless, both programs have proven to provide effective detox services and therapy.

However, each person's detox experience is unique. Withdrawal symptoms and the length of time it takes to completely withdraw depend on the level of addiction, the type of drug abused, dosage, and how the brain reacts to the removal of the drug from the body. Days 1-7 is reportedly the most difficult stage. The entire detox process may last several weeks to several months.

The following is a general withdrawal timeline that may be helpful in letting you know what to expect:

Days 1-7: The first and second day is marked by symptoms such as strong cravings, compulsive drug-seeking, restlessness, sweating, trouble sleeping, and muscle aches. Other symptoms may develop around days 3-5 and may include nausea, vomiting, tremors, dilated pupil, increased heart rate, high blood pressure, and stomach ache. Some individuals experience diarrhea, chills, and abdominal cramps.

Day 7 and onwards: Around the end of the first week, there is usually a marked improvement in physical symptoms. At the same time, psychological symptoms start to kick in. Anxiety, depression, insomnia, irritability, emotional outbursts, remorse, and impulsive behaviors are common. By now, the desire to use drugs is not as strong as the first week. Once you're stabilized, you may transition into therapy to begin the second stage of addiction treatment.

Finding a Detox Center Near You

Finding the right detox center may pose a bit of challenge since you may prefer to connect with one that can provide the services to match your needs. If you live in South Florida, you can locate a treatment center and give them a call to find out what types of programs they offer and how to get admitted.

During the evaluation, the medical team will recommend either outpatient or residential treatment depending on your recovery needs. Addiction treatment programs are usually comprehensive and include referral to behavioral therapy to help reduce the risk of relapse after formal treatment ends.

Just remember that sobriety involves a desire to overcome drug addiction, a positive mindset towards treatment, and a commitment to staying sober. Call one of our counselors today at 800-737-0933.

What Services Will You Get at a Medical Detox Center That You Wouldn’t Get Elsewhere?

One of the first steps in the process of beating addiction, after admitting that there is an existing problem and accepting help, is detoxification. This is the process in which all the toxins from drugs and/or alcohol are cleansed from the body. The thought of detox is overwhelming for many. Detox centers decrease the levels of dread and stress because they offer professional support throughout the entire process.

Types of Detox Centers

There are two main types of detox centers. These are medical detox centers and social detox centers. Medical detox includes:

- medical doctors
- detox medications
- supportive medications

Detox medications can include Methadone for those addicted to opiates and supportive medications include Ativan for alcoholics. Methadone is commonly used for pain management and to block the effects of opiates during detox. Ativan is used to help reduce the symptoms of Alcohol Withdrawal Syndrom when detoxing from alcohol.

On the other hand, social detox only includes social and psychological support during the detox process. Should medical issues arise, the client is transferred to a medical facility equipped to handle the issue. Social detox is not normally recommended to those battling with alcohol, sedatives, or opiates.

Stages of Detox

There are often three stages of detox. They are:

- Evaluation
- Stabilization
- Building acceptance of the necessity of future help

During the evaluation stage, tests are performed for drugs and alcohol and prior medical history is discussed. Then, the plan of action is devised. Stabilization often makes up the largest part of detox. Medical and psychological assistance are both provided, as needed, during this stage. The final stage of detox is building acceptance of the necessity of professional help beyond detox. Future help increases the chances of sustaining sobriety.

How Long Does Detox Take?

According to the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Association (SAMHSA), it takes an average of 8 days to detox. However, this time frame varies due to several different factors. Some of these factors include:

- Drug of choice
- Frequency of use
- Detox Setting

For some, the process could be over in hours, but others it could take weeks. It depends on each person's individual circumstances.

Detoxification is usually a scary thought to those seeking to recover. However, fear should never be a deterrent. Professional detox makes the process bearable for a lot of people who are battling substance abuse or addiction. If you are you ready to start your journey, call us today at 800-737-0933.

Will a Free Detox Center Provide the Same Care As One You Pay For?

Substance abuse and addiction can be a painful process for individuals and families. Entering a treatment center or rehabilitation facility can be expensive. Sometimes most of the costs are left up to the individual. For those who need treatment, free detox centers are available.

There are several types of detox centers in which you can get access to free or low-cost detox treatment. If you have insurance, detox centers may be fully or partially covered. State-funded detox centers can provide discounts or offer free services to individuals with no income and no insurance.

Faith-based detox centers are geared towards individuals who want to focus on their faith as part of their treatment plan. But, not all of them are free. It's important to do your research before entering a free detox center. Learn more about detox centers and the different types that could fit your needs.

What Are Free Detox Centers?

Free detox centers are treatment centers for drug or substance abusers. It gives them access to medical treatment to overcome their withdrawal and addiction problems. However, they may not receive the same amount of care or treatment they would at a rehab facility. Not all detox centers provide facilities, counseling, and ongoing support. These short-term clinics just provide patients with the care they need to start their recovery. They can also provide them with additional resources to get started on the road to recovery and where to find additional help and guidance.

Who Can Use Free Detox Centers?

Free detox centers are helpful for the homeless, low-income individuals, or those who don't have insurance. Dealing with addiction and substance abuse can be difficult for many individuals and their families. Sometimes it's hard to afford the type of care you need. Those who can't pay for rehabilitation or treatment choose to go to a detox center instead.

Using Insurance to Pay for Detox Center

Since 2014, the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act requires all health insurance plans, including Medicaid, to provide coverage for substance abuse treatment. As of 2018, this law is still intact. Depending on your insurance plan, you may have to pay for some of your treatment. Many insurance plans may provide addiction and substance abuse services before your deductible is met, making it easier to enter a detox center.

Using a State-Funded Detox Center

Some states provided funding for substance abuse and addiction treatment. They even accept patients who have no insurance or have little to no income. These programs come with long waiting lists. You also have to meet certain criteria before you're eligible for free services. You must prove some or all of the following information before you enter a free detox center:

  • Official residency within your state-funded
  • Proof of income (or no income) or no insurance
  • Proof of your addiction and need for assistance

Once you meet some or all of the requirements, various treatment options are available. Find out the different detox programs provided to you by contacting your state mental health or substance abuse agency.

Trying a Faith-Based Detox Program

There are several faith-based programs that have free detox centers. Be aware that not all of them provide medically supervised detox programs. Also, they require individuals to undergo detox before accessing the other services their programs provide.

Faith-based programs integrate faith into their treatment programs. This is a great option for individuals who are focused on their faith. Contact your leaders of faith to help you determine which faith-based detox programs are available in your area. Not all faith-based detox centers are free. Ask about costs before entering treatment.

Addiction can affect every aspect of an individual's life. It can damage your relationships with your loved ones, your friends, and your family members. It can cause health problems and mental health issues.

Worrying about the costs of treatment causes additional stress when you're trying to recover from substance abuse. There are resources available for pregnant women, veterans, young people, and those living in poverty. However, if you have an income or insurance, free detox may not be available. Don't give up hope just yet, though. There are resources available to individuals to help pay for your detox program, such as payment plans, scholarship programs, and insurance coverage.

Ready to get started on the road to recovery? Contact our trained counselors today. We can help you find the right treatment plan you need and determine the costs. Our counselors are available 24 hours a day. Call us today for more information at 800-737-0933.