Tag Archives: detox

How Can I Manage Pain Symptoms During a Hydrocodone Detox?

If you’re ready to end your relationship with hydrocodone, there are a few things that you should know. Similar to other drugs, the withdrawal symptoms that come with going through detox can be severe and, in some cases, may even lead to relapse. Some of the withdrawal symptoms commonly associated with abrupt hydrocodone cessation include nausea, vomiting, diarrhea, fatigue, anxiety, and depression. And these symptoms can last between 5 and 7 days on average. While all of these symptoms are unpleasant, most will agree that the pain associated with coming off of the powerful narcotic is by far the worse. Fortunately, many rehab facilities provide substance abuse treatments that can help ease pain and many other symptoms that make achieving sobriety difficult.

WHAT TO EXPECT WHILE DETOXING FROM HYDROCODONE

Now that we have a basic understanding of the withdrawal symptoms that one is likely to face as they work toward ending their relationship with hydrocodone, let’s take a closer look at the withdrawal timeline. According to a study published by Medical News Today, an online resource for medical news aimed at both physicians and the general public, hydrocodone withdrawal symptoms often present themselves within 6 to 12 hours following an individual’s last dose. And all of these symptoms, including pain, can vary in intensity depending on how long an individual has been using and how much of the drug they were consuming before starting their detox journey.

MANAGING PAIN WHILE DETOXING FROM HYDROCODONE

When it comes to helping individuals cope with pain symptoms associated with coming off of hydrocodone, many rehab facilities will offer medication-assisted detox, which includes the use of various prescription-based medications that have been approved by the FDA (Food and Drug Administration). Along with helping to soothe pain, many of these same medications are effective in easing many of the other symptoms that can make getting through detox challenging, such as nausea, vomiting, and diarrhea, for example. That said, some of the prescription-based medications used by most rehab facilities include

Buprenorphine – This FDA-approved medication is classified as a partial opioid agonist, which means that it blocks opioid receptors in the brain that are responsible for triggering the euphoric high that comes with abusing hydrocodone and many other opioids. It is also worth noting that buprenorphine is a long-acting partial opioid agonist that carries a low risk for abuse. Along with pain, this prescription-based medication also provides relief from several other symptoms, including anxiety, sweating, and vomiting.

Clonidine – Commonly prescribed to treat high blood pressure and ADHD (attention deficit hyperactivity disorder), clonidine is yet another FDA-approved medication that is used to treat severe withdrawal symptoms. Studies show that clonidine helps block chemicals in the brain that would otherwise lead to sympathetic nervous system activity, a condition that triggers muscle pain, anxiety, sweating, and vomiting while individuals are going through detox.

Methadone – Similar to buprenorphine, methadone is a long-acting partial opioid agonist that works by blocking opioid receptors in the brain, which, in turn, eases pain and other symptoms associated with coming off of hydrocodone. It is important to note that methadone is highly addictive. Therefore it must be taken as prescribed to avoid the risk of substituting one drug problem for another one.

NON-PRESCRIPTION PAIN MANAGEMENT TREATMENTS

Ideally, individuals who are trying to overcome an addiction to hydrocodone should seek the help of a licensed rehab facility, preferably one that offers medication-assisted detox. However, for those who are trying to quit using on their own, there are over-the-counter medications that you can take to ease severe withdrawal symptoms, including

Tylenol – For those who are struggling with minor aches and pains while going through detox, Tylenol can provide some much-needed relief. However, much like prescription-based medication, it must be taken responsibly. Therefore, you will want to follow the instructions on the packaging for safe and effective dosing.

Loperamide – Also known as Imodium, loperamide is an over-the-counter medication that can help combat diarrhea. Studies show that loperamide works by reducing movement in the gut, which can reduce bowel movements while bulking up loose stool.

Electrolytes – While detoxing from hydrocodone, it is not uncommon to experience vomiting and diarrhea, both of which can result in a loss of fluids and dehydration. The best way to combat both of these problems is by consuming sports drinks, such as Gatorade, that contain electrolytes. Staying hydrated can also help ease pain symptoms as well.

BOTTOM LINE

All in all, there are many ways to cope with pain and other symptoms associated with overcoming hydrocodone addiction. To learn more about the prescription and at-home treatments detailed in this article, consider speaking with one of our friendly addiction specialists today at 800-737-0933.

Can Opiate Detox Facilities Help Manage Withdrawal Through Medication?

When abused, opiate drugs exert a hold on the mind and body that lingers for much longer than you might expect. The longer you abuse opiates the harder it is to stop taking these drugs. For these reasons, opiate detox facilities use medication treatment for withdrawal to help patients make it through the detox stage of recovery. Keep reading to see how opiates work on the brain’s chemical processes and how medication treatment for withdrawal can help you take back your life from addiction.

Opiate Effects on the Brain

Not too many types of drugs can interfere with the brain’s chemical makeup like opiates do. Opiate-based drugs, such as Vicodin, hydrocodone, codeine and heroin have a chemical composition that closely resembles that of certain neurotransmitter chemicals in the brain. Dopamine, norepinephrine and serotonin neurotransmitters all share chemical compounds that are similar to opiates. These similarities enable opiate-based drugs to change the brain’s chemical makeup over time.

As opiates change the brain’s chemical system, the brain becomes increasingly dependent on opiates to function normally. As this takes place, the brain cells that interact with opiates become less sensitive to opiate effects over time. This means, larger doses of the drug are needed to keep the brain running as it should.

After a certain point, long-term abuse of opiates or taking large doses on a regular basis will disrupt the brain’s ability to regulate the body’s systems. Once this happens, a severe physical dependence on the drug has developed. The systems most affected by opiate dependence include:

  • The limbic system, which regulates emotions
  • Cognitive-based systems, which regulate thinking and behavior
  • Sleep cycles
  • The reward system, which regulates learning and motivation

Opiate Detox Withdrawal Effects

Opiate detox facilities focus on easing the withdrawal effects that occur when opiate use stops. Withdrawal effects reflect the state of disarray the body is in due to the chemical imbalances caused by opiate abuse. When opiate abuse stops, the brain can’t yet produce the number of neurotransmitters needed to keep the body’s systems running normally. As a result, the following withdrawal effects occur:

  • Severe depression
  • Nausea and vomiting
  • Fever and profuse sweating
  • Anxiety
  • Tremors
  • Mental fog

Opiate detox facilities use medication treatment for withdrawal to help the brain’s chemical system adjust to detox. In the absence of some form of medication support, withdrawal effects can quickly overwhelm your efforts to stop using. When this happens, the risk of relapse runs especially high.

Treating Opiate Withdrawal With Medication

While many may believe overcoming addiction is a matter of willpower, opiate addiction is a chronic physical condition, much like heart disease and diabetes. Long-term opiate abuse leaves behind long-term damage in the brain. Medications used to treat opiate withdrawal support the brain’s chemical processes so that it can function normally. The severity of your abuse problem will determine how you’ll need to keep taking medication.

Medications Used to Treat Opiate Withdrawal

Medication-based treatments for opiate withdrawal use specially formulated, opiate-derived drugs that interact with the same brain neurotransmitter processes as opiates. These medications produce controlled effects that don’t set off the abuse-addiction cycle like heroin and prescription painkillers do. In turn, these controlled effects work to wean the brain and body off addictive opiates.

Two medications -methadone and Suboxone- are commonly used in the treatment of opiate withdrawal. When ingested on a daily basis, these medications relieve the effects of withdrawal and also help reduce drug cravings. Methadone and Suboxone differ in how they accomplish these ends.

Methadone is a full opiate agonist, meaning it helps the brain produce needed levels of neurotransmitter chemicals. As a controlled substance, opiate detox facilities must distribute methadone on a daily basis. In this way, overdose risks can be prevented.

Suboxone contains two medications: buprenorphine and naloxone. Buprenorphine is a partial opioid agonist. It has a built-in ceiling effect that greatly lowers the risk for overdose. This mechanism also prevents patients from getting high on the drug.

Naloxone, the second ingredient, acts as an opioid antidote. As an opioid antidote, naloxone acts as a safety precaution by triggering severe withdrawal in cases where patients try to dissolve and inject Suboxone. Unlike methadone, Suboxone can be prescribed by a doctor so there’s no need for daily visits to a clinic facility.

If you’re considering medication treatments for opiate withdrawal or have more questions about how it all works, our addiction counselors can help. Call us today at 800-737-0933 and find out how to get started.

How Will Drug Detoxing Affect My Life Once Withdrawal Is Over?

Detox is an incredibly challenging part of the recovery process. It is also the first and most important step to getting well. This is the time during which people abstain from drugs entirely. It gives their bodies the opportunity to rid themselves of dangerous, illicit substances and all the harmful residues they entail. It additionally shows people how their bodies feel without using. The longer that people go without illicit substances; the more that their bodies are able to relearn normal functioning. Due to these and many other reasons, drug detoxing is not generally something that people are encouraged to do at home on their own.

The length of a person’s detox period is determined by the type or types of substances he or she has been using, the length of drug use, and the amount of drugs and their potency among other factors. After one to two weeks of abstinence, however, most people will find that their systems are clean, and that their minds are ready to start tackling the challenges of long-term sobriety. Although drug detoxing is an absolutely essential part of recovery, however, there are many other steps that people will need to take to ensure lasting success.

Detoxing Opens The Door To Mental And Emotional Clarity

Many drug rehab patients are astounded by just how differently they think and feel after detoxing. The effects of drugs on your mind and emotions cannot be fully known until you have taken a sufficient amount of time away from them. One thing that’s common after detoxing, however, is a significant increase in willpower and personal resolve. Saying no to unhealthy habits and behaviors invariably becomes easier when the body is no longer physically dependent upon drugs. Moreover, rehab patients have the clarity of mind post-detox to truly benefit from individual and group counseling sessions that are aimed at revealing the underlying causes of their addictions.

Once you have broken you physical dependency on drugs, you can learn more about the different lifestyle factors and life events that have contributed to your emotional dependency. For instance, some people find that they are using drugs to help numb the trauma of past events. Others discover that early behavioral conditioning and low self-esteem are both contributors to their drug use. There are even people who learn that co-occurring disorders such as chronic anxiety or chronic depression have led them to use drugs to obtain relief. Knowing the source of addictive behaviors makes it easier for people to overcome them. This, however, is knowledge that can only be gained after a successful detox.

Drug Detoxing Is A Key Step In Reclaiming Your Freedom

After breaking their physical dependencies, patients can enjoy a renewed sense of personal freedom. If you are someone who is constantly thinking about drugs, where your next fix will come from, or how you’re going to continue hiding and justifying your addictive behaviors, this freedom will provide tremendous relief. You will be able to start pursuing and living a lifestyle that you can be proud of, mending damaged relationships, and rebuilding your personal and professional reputations. Detox can be the launching point into a whole new life entirely.

One reason why people are discouraged from detoxing on their own is the fact that this step is but one of many on the road to recovery. A lot of drug users find that they still crave drugs quite strongly for several weeks or months after detox. Rehab is a multi-pronged effort at educating people and building healthy coping skills so that temptation and other triggers for relapse can be successfully overcome.

The Benefits Of Supervised Drug Detoxing

It is also important to note that detox isn’t always medically safe to do alone. Certain substances can result in severe physical dependency that causes dangerous side effects when use is stopped suddenly. Sometimes the symptoms of withdrawal can be so severe as to affect a person’s general physical functioning. When you detox in a medically supervised environment, however, the risks of getting clean drop dramatically. More importantly, all of the professionals who work in detox facilities can use various strategies and tools to make your detox a safe and comfortable one. Understanding that this is an incredibly challenging process, detox centers work hard to make it as easy and pleasant for patients as possible.

The first step to getting well is always withdrawing from the very substances that lie at the heart of your addiction. Rehab centers are excellent places for the withdrawal process as they set the stage for lasting success in recovery. If you want to regain your freedom and reclaim control of your life, we are here to help. Get in touch with us today by calling 800-737-0933.

Is Detoxing from Drugs and Alcohol Really Worth It?

If you’re looking to change your life and undergo a detox program, you may be wondering if it’s really worth it. Detoxing can be a difficult experience and the painful symptoms of withdrawal are often what keep many people from getting clean. If this sounds like something you’re struggling with, please continue reading.

The Effects of Continuing Drug and Alcohol Abuse

Although the symptoms of detoxification and drug or alcohol withdrawal are painful, the damages that these substances are doing to your body may be irreversible. Detoxification will be a temporary pain, while the lasting effects of drug or alcohol addiction can lead to the end of your life. Weighing out the benefits, gain, and risks of detoxing can help you reason through making the decision and finding the resolve to make this life-altering change.

The Risk and Benefits of Detox

It’s important to examine the risks and benefits of a detox program. Understanding the struggles you may face will help you be prepared and stay in the program. Knowing the benefits that await you after recovery can also help keep you motivated if things get tough.

Risks

  • Withdrawal symptoms. Withdrawal can be incredibly unpleasant and may often lead to avoiding getting treatment for an addiction. This means you will likely experience nausea, headaches, mood swings and difficulty sleeping while going through withdrawal. The symptoms will also depend on the substance you are detoxing from.
  • Less barrier to emotional pain. If what lead you to seek out drugs or alcohol was the desire to use these substances to help cope with a trauma or an emotionally painful circumstance, you may be finding yourself having to face those things after detoxing. This means it will be extra important for you to find healthy tools and coping skills to improve these circumstances.

Benefits

  • A new lease on life. If you have felt your life is over, you may find that the battle against addiction does not have to be a losing one. You can regain your courage, confidence, and ambition for leading a life you want to live. There are many individuals who have struggled with addiction then go on to lead successful and meaningful lives, many of them going on to help others who have also struggled with addiction.
  • Healthiness. While struggling with an addiction, managing your health can be an uphill battle. The deteriorating effects of drug and alcohol abuse damage many of your major organs and can prevent you from thriving. Once you get clean, you may find your health improving in ways you haven’t seen in years.
  • Better relationships. When you are struggling with an addiction, family, and friends may not be able to reach you. If your life is being consumed with the ongoing battle, it’s hard to make space to connect and build your relationships. After recovery, many people find they’re able to pick up relationships that had been set aside during their abuse.
  • A Bright Future. Once you have dealt with the troubles of addiction and been able to move beyond it, you may feel a renewed confidence that if you can get through this, you can get through anything. With this mentality, doors can open. If you have had any dreams in life, you can now revisit them and begin to work towards that brighter future.

Planning For a Successful Detox Program

Detoxing can be tough, but it can bring so many benefits to your life. To help you set yourself up for successful, be sure to carefully develop a plan for recovery. Utilizing multiple means of support can help negate some of the difficult symptoms and improve the benefits you experience after detoxing.

Tips to Help Detoxing

  • Seek the help of a qualified and supportive counselor. Ongoing counseling can be life-changing for many people. Finding someone to work with who you can trust can help you build a refuge where you can share the struggles and pains you are going through.
  • Enter into a quality detox program. Finding somewhere that understands the specific drug you are detoxing from and has the facilities that can help you will help to improve their ability to help you detox.
  • Seek the support of loved ones and family. Celebrate your small accomplishments with those who love you.
  • Find a nearby support group and build a network that will encourage and celebrate your progress with you.

If you’re ready to get help, reach out to one of our counselors today and we can begin building a recovery plan for you. Contact us any time at 800-737-0933

How Heavily Do Christian Rehabs Rely on God for Help with Treatment?

There is natural compassion inherent within the Christian community. It’s not surprising that there are a number of Christian-based drug and alcohol treatment facilities. The disease of addiction affects all walks of life, including those of a staunch religious belief.

A Christian rehab will help you understand that a Higher Power, who they will choose to call God, can provide the spiritual tools that you need to get the job done. Using these tools is your responsibility.

Let’s try to explain a couple of points to help you understand what you might expect from a Christian rehab and why you shouldn’t be afraid of the God concept. As you travel your own journey in recovery, you may find that while Christian rehabs appear to rely heavily on God, it’s something that nearly every recovery philosophy uses to some degree.

Filling an Emptiness

One principle of Christian-based treatment philosophy is an attempt to fill an emptiness that nearly every addict or alcoholic has experienced. The empty feelings could be because of a number of reasons. There is frequently an unexplainable inability to stay away from drugs or alcohol because getting high fictionally fills this void.

The baffling sense of powerlessness to avoid mind-altering solutions to these feelings stems from something that is missing. By providing a source of internal strength to rely on when these urges become overwhelming, is an important part of recovery.

While a Christian treatment center will not insist that you blindly accept a particular spiritual belief, they suggest strongly that you search for a power greater yourself. It is this source of strength that it is believed addicts and alcoholics can find the power to recover.

Without such a source, addicts and alcoholics are left to their own devices. Eventually, they are prone to relapse. A Christian treatment facility will try to help you discover this source. They will not insist that you believe one way or another.

However, you will be offered suggestions that could become keys to help change how you experience God. It is through three personality changes that many agnostic or non-believers were able to develop this source and live clean and sober lives.

Come to Believe

Three important keys to successful recovery are honesty, open-mindedness, and willingness. Those with longtime sobriety call it the HOW of their program. Each piece gradually fits together to help you find this source of power you can rely on when tempted.

The willingness and open-mindedness to consider other viewpoints and ideologies without contempt is essential. People in recovery from all walks of life have insisted that to ignore the wisdom and insight of religious and professional experts is akin to stubbornness.

It is referred to as contempt prior to investigation. Once you open yourself to the possibility that there might be a different perspective to deal with your drug or alcohol problem, you be amazed at the results.

It is at this point in their recovery that many mentions coming to believe in something greater than themselves. There are stories about starting with a tree or using a recovery group as a higher power.

The ultimate result of an open mind was that they gave themselves a chance at recovery. That is what every treatment center strives to do. They want to give you the best chance at recovering from drug addiction or alcoholism that they can. It is the same with the Christian-based recovery model.

If you sit with most devout followers of any religious faith, they will most likely insist that God of any divinity does not do for us what we can do for ourselves. They do not insist that God is somehow a hands-off type of business executive, but we must do the work to stay clean and sober.

Christian rehabs offer a God-based recovery solution that is open to all faiths, even people without any belief at all. Since most recovery philosophies rely on you discovering some type of power beyond yourself, you would be correct to assume Christian rehabs rely on a God.

The concept of that God will be yours to discover as you understand it to be. If you feel you have a problem with drugs or alcohol, your spiritual beliefs are secondary. Getting help is a priority. The first step to a new and exciting life is to ask for help.

As your journey in living clean and sober evolves, you’ll grow to appreciate how God works in a variety of recovery philosophies. Christian-based or otherwise, each relies on some concept of a Higher Power. What you choose to be your Higher Power is up to you. Call us today at 800-737-0933.

Why Is Long Term Drug Treatment a Good Idea Even if You’re Sure You’re Better?

After the initial detox period, there’s a period of enormous relief. The physical withdrawal symptoms subside. Alienated friends and family are relieved to hear you’re sober, and they might begin speaking to you again and reestablishing lost relationships. You might even feel like a million bucks, even if you’re only a month or two into your journey. Some people even start feeling better two weeks into recovery. Every day is a new day, and it seems like you’ve learned your lesson.

Curiously enough, many alcoholics and drug addicts relapse during this period of reprieve. It’s the moment that the pain is in the past, that they start feeling better, that they are most tempted to believe they’ve defeated the problem and can now safely have a drink or two, or maybe they believe they can have a pill or two. Before they know it, they’re right back in the cycle, wondering how they went from feeling so good to being stuck right back in the place they were in before.

Early Recovery Basics

Early recovery is tough during the detox stage, but it’s a period of extreme relief and hopefulness after the initial physical symptoms wear off. Because of this, it’s a dangerous period for some alcoholics and drug addicts. More than a few have gone through this cycle a few times before finally deciding that the seemingly overnight recovery a month in are but an illusion. Recovery is a long-term deal, and you’re never able to safely go back and have a drink or drug or two.

Long term drug treatment is a good idea for a number of reasons. The dangerous 1-2 month period where you think you’ve conquered addiction is a good example. No, you’re not having withdrawal symptoms, but that’s because you haven’t used. If you relapse, you’ll surely go right back where it all started, and so many addicts and alcoholics fall into that trap of using after only a short time sober. Long-term treatment facilities and sober living communities give you the chance to establish long-term sobriety in a safe environment. The longer you’re sober, the better.

Long-term Treatment Means Long-term Sobriety

When you enter a long-term treatment facility, you’re committing to learning the principles of recovery that are so difficult to grasp on the outside sometimes. Temptations lurk around every corner in the real world, from the happy beer commercial to the friend who calls you up for a toke or two. Someone once said that freedom is a prison of its own, and there’s no better example of this. Sometimes you want to give up some of your freedom for the safety of a sober living environment.

Long-term residential programs allow you to work on the outside, too, but they hold you accountable for staying in the program. For example, they let you go to work and come back to the residence, but they will also randomly drug test you to make sure you’re following the rules of the program. For many addicts and alcoholics, this overseeing and holding accountable is a blessing that keeps them sober longer. Yes, one day they’ll have to get back out there, but for now, they’re learning how to live life on life’s terms, with the help of trained counselors and staff.

Long-term Resources

The final reason that long term programs are so helpful is because there are some people in recovery who lost their entire lives to addiction. They may not have food, a home, or a job. Starting over from scratch wouldn’t be easy for anyone, but it’s especially trying for someone who’s dealing with real life without drugs for the first time in a long time. A sober living facility provides some measure of financial, occupational, and food support to people rebuilding their lives.

Don’t get sober for a month or two and assume “that’s that!” Recovery is a lifelong adventure, and it only gets better as time goes on. By staying in a long-term residential program or by staying in for another longer-term program for a couple of months, you’re going to increase your chances of learning the basic principles of recovery and life on life’s terms. You’ll also have access to greater community resources that can help you rebuild a life that’s not just drug free, but happy, too.

If you’re interested in a long-term drug treatment program, just call us when you’re ready to get started at 800-737-0933. Our team will show you how great life in long-term recovery can be.

Is Christian Based Rehab Open to All Protestant Denominations and Catholocism?

Christianity is a broad term, as there are many different protestant denominations and Catholic churches to choose from. There are even different types of Catholicism that people might subscribe to. One thing that all Christian faiths have in common is that the central figure of hope in the religion is Jesus Christ. His love, compassion, and philosophy on life is a central focus in the lives of most Christians. The first question many have about Christian based rehabs is whether or not they’re open to every single denomination and Catholics, too.

The general answer is yes! Christian rehabs base their treatment strategies around the central tenants of the Christian faith. While those basic principles and histories may differ, all Christians worship, pray to, and draw strength from the life of Jesus Christ and his promise to care for us. Therefore, in almost every Christian detox or long-term rehab, you’ll find a blend of Christians of all faiths.

Exceptions to the Rule

Some detoxes and long-term centers, and even residential homes, will focus in on one protestant denomination or a type of Catholicism. For example, there may be a Baptist rehab that invites Baptists to get help through the healing power of Christ as seen through the faith of Baptists. Likewise, there may be a Catholic rehab center that helps Catholics get better. Despite the overall rehab using that central faith to help patients get well, it doesn’t mean that all the patients have to be Baptists or Catholics. It simply means that the treatment approach will use those specific faiths to help people get well.

Because drug addiction and alcoholism are such dangerous illnesses, and they so often accompany mental illness, it’s natural that Christian rehabs would be all-inclusive no matter what denomination or type of Catholicism you practice. The Christian faith itself welcomes all types of people into its fold, no matter what kind of life they’ve lived or what issues they’re facing in life.

How Christian Rehabs Differ

The main difference between Christian treatment centers and others is that a Christian detox will feature the teaching of Christ and the Christian religion very prominently. You won’t just learn to live your life again through medical and scientific strategies. You may rely on your knowledge of the bible and the will of God to draw inspiration during rehab, or you may use prayer heavily, even in group meetings, to get help from a God that patients are relying on to help them get well.

There are medical detoxes and long-term programs that use Christianity’s healing powers as well as the medical knowledge we have as well. For example, you might be able to take Suboxone in A Christian detox. Christian rehabs will also have doctors on staff, too, but they will believe in the Christian faith and may incorporate it into their healing strategies. There are some detoxes and rehabs that don’t take a medical approach at all and instead entirely rely on Christianity and faith to help patients get well.

Choose What Works for You

Christians are just like ordinary people. They just operate through life with a different belief system and a greater faith in God. Some people don’t have any faith in God at all or even believe in God. Others believe in God so much that they can draw on that faith to begin getting better from the horrors of drug addiction and alcoholism. A Christian rehab center will be inclusive of anyone who wants to get well, but like all treatment programs, you will follow the path that they have created for healing. If you have a strong aversion to religion, then it might be difficult to get well in a Christian treatment program.

If you have a strong faith in God but it has been shaken because of your drug addiction, this type of treatment center will be ideal for you. Calling to see about the rules of the specific detox will shed more light over what kinds of patients that they accept, but Christian programs don’t turn people away. They’re there to help in their way. As you get into the program more, you may find your faith growing stronger, and as you recover, you may learn that as long as you keep an open mind, there’s always a way to recover from drug and alcohol addiction.

The first step to getting well is to call us for more information about Christian based programs. When you’re ready to get started, call us at 800-737-0933.

What’s the Typical Timeline of a 90 Day Rehab Program?

Seeking treatment for addiction is probably the hardest thing for you after recognizing your dependency habit on substances. With the stigma surrounding addiction and its demand for other resources such as drugs and medical attention, many people wish the treatment would be somewhat shorter. Unfortunately, the road to sobriety will be long and tough, but the fruits are worth the effort.

The 90-day drug rehab program is arguably one of the best forms of treatment, especially for people who have struggled with drug addiction for prolonged periods. With so many psychological, physical and emotional factors impacting drug addiction, it’s crucial to give yourself enough time to heal inside out. Detox and stopping substance use is one thing, but learning how to cope with life after treatment and avoiding temptations is an entirely different thing. The 90-day rehab program provides a comprehensive approach, as follows:

Intake and admission

Before you are admitted to the rehab facility, your doctor will examine your health condition and decide if you are the right candidate for the 90-day rehab program. The results should also help the doctor determine the best approach for your situation. If you have other mental disorders such as anxiety and depression, the facility may refer you to dual diagnosis associated programs. Admission and intake take even a day, depending on the availability of spots and emergency involved.

Detox

After arrival and admission at the rehab facility, you will undergo the detoxification phase. The phase entails of weaning you off drugs. It could take anywhere between a few days to some weeks for the substances to leave your system entirely. You will spend the first few days under intense medical monitoring as you recover from withdrawal symptoms. Depending on the level of addiction, detoxification may include the administration of drugs to make the withdrawal symptoms bearable.

Therapy

Within the first thirty days after the detox phase, you will be ushered into the therapy phase. Therapy may include cognitive behavioral therapy sessions, one-on-one counselling, psychotherapy, family therapy and the 12-step recovery program. The purpose of therapy is to equip you with adequate skills to help you understand addiction and your triggers. They also give your therapist time and space to determine the best treatment method for you.

A larger facet of counselling is to provide a healing ground where you will discuss your troubles and address all underlying factors that led you to your addiction habit. You will learn how to identify thought patterns that may trigger back the use of drugs. Therapy also offers a platform for family and friends to provide support for their loved ones through the journey. Therapy a long process and continues to take place even after the 90-day treatment period.

Relapse prevention

The second thirty days may involve more than just therapy, trying to understand addiction. Now that you are well accustomed to drug dependency and its probably triggers, your therapist will recommend that you move to the next step, which is learning about relapse prevention. You will start preparing for a sober life by learning skills on how to avoid temptations and enabling factors. Your support system may come in handy and also learn how to help you prepare for sobriety after treatment. Here, you learn how to live on your own with minimal supervision.

Preparation for discharge

The last thirty days of the 90-day rehab program will polish all the lessons picked up during the program. This period allows you to prepare for life outside a rehab center, look for a job and a place to stay to begin life on a clean slate. You will learn about all after-care services and sponsor programs that help you keep up with sobriety after treatment. All through, your therapist will pick the best time to introduce new lessons and coping mechanisms.

The 90-day program gives you ample time to heal, recover and rediscover yourself. In most cases, there is no limited duration to the amount of time you would want to take during addiction treatment. Some patients prefer to extend the treatment to continue exploring their substance abuse issues. Most experts reveal that the longer you take to recover from treatment under professional supervision and assistance, the higher your chances of long-term sobriety and recovery.

If you are ready to start the 90-day treatment program today, contact us at 800-737-0933. We are dedicated to helping our patients heal and rediscover themselves to regain back their lives and continue living a fulfilled life. Don’t wait; start your addiction treatment today!

How Long Does it Take to Detox From Suboxone?

How Long Does it Take to Detox From Suboxone?

Suboxone is a medication-assisted therapy used to assist in recovery from heroin and other opioid addictions. It is a combination of two medications: naloxone and buprenorphine. Buprenorphine is a low dose opioid that allows those detoxing from opioids to taper off the drug, rather than doing so abruptly, which can cause a wide range of physical symptoms and ailments, while naloxone binds to the opioid receptors in the brain blocking the high an individual would receive from the low dose of opioids in the buprenorphine.

Suboxone is typically taken for at least 90 days and, if needed, longer. Because Suboxone is an opioid itself, there can be withdrawal symptoms if the medication is stopped abruptly. If you or your loved one has taken the medication, you may be wondering, how long does it take to detox from Suboxone and what withdrawal symptoms to expect. Here is a quick guide.

What Are The Symptoms of Suboxone Withdrawal?

The symptoms of Suboxone withdrawal are very similar to those of heroin and other opioids. These symptoms can vary from person to person but typically include:

  • Difficulty concentrating
  • Headache
  • Fever/Chills
  • Depression
  • Anxiety
  • Muscle and body aches
  • Difficulty concentrating
  • Nausea and/or vomiting
  • Cravings

The severity of withdrawal typically depends on the method used to cease the medication. Abrupt cessation or “quitting cold turkey” is not encouraged as it does not give the body a chance to adjust to not having the medication. To increase the manageability of withdrawal symptoms, tapering is encouraged.

How Long Does It Take to Detox From Suboxone?

While each individual is different, it generally takes about 30 days for physical withdrawal symptoms to be alleviated. Physical withdrawal symptoms are typically at their worst during the first three days of stopping the medication and slowly start to subside after that. During the first week or two, you or your loved one may also experience insomnia or mood swings, but those too will start to dissipate with some time and should not be a problem once you hit week three or four.

It is very important to note that you or your loved one may experience intense cravings after the 30-day mark. It is especially important to remain vigilant and keep in contact with a counselor or other support system during this time due to the fact that the potential for relapse increases during this time.

How Can I or My Loved One Make Detox From Suboxone Easier?

The best thing you or your loved one can do to make detoxing from Suboxone a bit easier, both mentally and physically, is to gradually decrease the intake of the medication. Abruptly stopping Suboxone increases the risk for more severe symptoms throughout the detox. Also, making sure to be in contact with a treatment specialist and/or support group throughout the detox process will also make Suboxone detox more manageable and decrease the chance for relapse.

Detoxing from Suboxone can be difficult. The physical symptoms can wreak havoc on the body and the cravings carry the risk of relapse. Having a good detox plan in place prior to stopping Suboxone increases the likelihood of success for you or your loved one. Do you know someone who would like to quit Suboxone or would you like to quit yourself? We are here to help. Our caring and compassionate counselors are available 24/7. Give us a call at 800-737-0933.

Will a Long Term Rehab Help Me Find Housing if My Current Home Isn’t Healthy?

If you’re struggling with the disease of addiction, you may realize that your living situation is one of the primary reasons you can’t stay sober. This is quite common for those who have an addiction to drugs or alcohol, but there are plenty of options available. A long-term rehab facility will not only help you get sober, but they can help you find housing if your current home situation isn’t healthy. This is one of the main benefits of working with a caring staff who wants to help you stay sober long after you leave treatment.

In treatment, you may not even realize that your living situation isn’t healthy until you begin working in group therapy and individual sessions. Many people begin to have clarity in treatment and realize if they hope to stay sober, they need to replace some people and places in their life. It’s also important to learn how to stay sober despite any external circumstances, which can include your family, spouse, children or parents. By the time you discharge from treatment, you’ll have living options as well as a sense of confidence that you can stay clean and sober.

Understanding Toxic Living Environments

There is a wide range of reasons why people begin drinking or using drugs, and you’ll be able to get down to the root of your problems while you’re in treatment. Although there are reasons you may have started to abuse substances, you also need to realize what factors in your life are keeping you in your sickness. Although you may have an extremely loving family or spouse, they may be contributing to your addiction. Some of the most common ways that your living situation can affect your addiction include the following as well as more:

  • People in your house abuse alcohol or drugs
  • Loved ones enable your addiction
  • Co-dependent relationships
  • Communication issues
  • Verbal, physical or emotional abuse

One of the best options after treatment is sober living, and this is a place where you’ll be with others who are trying to overcome their addiction as well. If you realize it’s a bad idea to move back home because it might lead to a relapse, sober living maybe your best option. In sober living, not only will you be able to go back to work or school, but you will also have the support that you need. Early recovery can be difficult, but it can be extremely beneficial to have others who live with you that are there to talk whenever you need someone to listen.

You should also realize that finding alternative housing in early sobriety may not be a permanent thing. For some people, they have a loving family, but you might be someone who needs to have some space to continue strengthening your recovery. The disease of addiction hurts everyone involved, so you and your loved ones may not yet be in a position to live together right after treatment. When you go into a sober living home, you and your loved ones will have additional time to heal, and then you can return to your old living situation with a strong foundation of recovery and begin rebuilding your relationships.

Overcoming Your Addiction

When you’re in treatment, you’re going to receive therapy that’s going to help you get to the root causes of your addiction. Overcoming addiction involves taking responsibility for your recovery and understanding that others may not change just because you’re getting sober. You’re going to work with a professional therapist who is going to help you begin to understand that the drugs and alcohol are only a symptom of the problem. Some of the primary challenges you face maybe not knowing how to manage the stresses of life without using healthy coping skills.

Support in Treatment

In treatment, you’re going to be with your peers who are also trying to overcome their addiction, and you’ll see that you’re not alone. Those who are also in treatment will be there to support you and lend a listening ear if you’re struggling with your home life. Sometimes it’s more beneficial to get suggestions from others in early recovery who understand exactly what you’re going through. Those you meet in treatment will also be there to help support you in your recovery after you leave treatment to help you on your recovery journey.

If you’re looking for a treatment center that can help you get sober and find housing after treatment, allow us to assist you. Give us a call today to find out more at 800-737-0933.