Tag Archives: detox

How Do Medical Professionals Handle Heroin Addiction in Comparison to Other Drug Addictions?

Heroin is one of the most dangerous and addictive street drugs in the world. It is an opiate that will rewrite the brain's perception of pleasure and reward in ways that many other substances do not, so withdrawal from the substance can be far more painful than from other drugs. This is why medical professionals have to handle heroin addiction much more delicately than addiction from other substances.

Detox

The first and perhaps most important step in treating heroin addiction is the detoxification process. This can be harrowing for patients under the most ideal circumstances, and it should never be attempted alone. Many patients need to undergo medical detox, which ensures that they are weaned off of heroin in a controlled environment instead of quitting outright. They may also be provided with medications to help them control their withdrawal symptoms, which is often a crucial part of the rehab process. This usually involves taking suboxone, a medication that can in itself be addictive and should only be taken in a clinical setting.

Counseling

Much of what makes heroin addiction treatment different from other addiction treatment is getting over the physical addiction and managing the harsh withdrawal symptoms, but it is far from the only element of treatment. Once a patient has properly detoxed and is mostly over their physical addiction, they often have to undergo counseling and treatment to address the reasons why they turned to heroin in the first place. This process can take anywhere from a few months to several years depending on the patient's situation. As we said before, heroin alters the brain's perception of pleasure and reward, and any addiction treatment will involve basically rewriting one's thought process. This cognitive therapy and counseling can be just as difficult as overcoming the physical addiction, and it should be taken very seriously.

There is no doubt that heroin is one of the most dangerous illicit drugs available today. It is part of the reason why there is such a severe opiate addiction epidemic in the United States, and it continues to claim thousands of lives every year. If you or a loved one is struggling with an addiction to heroin, know that there is hope for you. Contact our treatment center today at 800-737-0933 for more information. Our counselors are available 24 hours a day, and they will gladly help you find the treatment that you need.

What Protocols Will the Medical Staff Follow During a Detox in Florida?

Anyone who has overcome addiction can attest to how difficult it is to go through a detox program and coping with withdrawal symptoms. Fortunately, medically-assisted detox, which is a treatment supervised by physicians and mental health professionals, has made this part of recovery considerably more palatable. For those who have never experienced withdrawal, the symptoms can be not only painful but also life-threatening.

Given these facts, most drug treatment facilities are staffed with professionals who are well-versed in the detox process and capable of supporting the mental and physical needs of the patient. In this article, we will be going over the protocols that the medical staff in most drug treatment facilities follow and what you can expect as you go through a recovery program.

WHAT TO EXPECT DURING A MEDICAL DETOX

Understanding that the needs of each individual patient can vary, many drug recovery programs provide personalized treatments aimed at helping patients overcome their addiction. It is worth noting that these treatments place a strong emphasis on treat not only the body but also the mind. As such, most drug recovery programs require patients to successfully each stage of treatment before moving on to the next. These stages include an evaluation, stabilization, and awareness building, which are all used to gauge how well each patient is progressing through recovery. Now that we have identified these the three stages, let's take a closer look at them individually:

EVALUATION

The evaluation stage is an opportunity for those involved in the patient's care to gather information and outline a course of treatment that suits the needs of the patient. During this initial stage, physicians will also administer breath, urine, and blood tests to detect drugs and other contaminants that may still be in the patient's system. This information, along with mental and medical health history, is critical in mapping out an effective detox strategy for the patient.

STABILIZATION

Stabilization is not only the most important but also most time-consuming aspect of any detox program. This stage entails explaining to the patient what they can expect while undergoing detox and providing them with medical or psychological treatments as needed.

AWARENESS BUILDING

The awareness building stage marks the final stage of detox for the patient whereby they will be taught coping skills to help them avoid falling victim to cravings, which could result in relapse. One of the biggest misconceptions associated with drug recovery programs is that completing detox and surviving withdrawal guarantees sobriety, which couldn't be further from the truth. Awareness building is designed to ensure patients remain drug and alcohol-free once they have completed detox and return to the real world.

In summation, there are many factors that dictate whether or not an individual will be successful in overcoming their addiction. Most drug treatment facilities are cognizant of this fact and will work collectively towards ensuring a favorable outcome for all of their patients. Call us today at 800-737-0933.

Should Suboxone Be Taken Forever or Just During Detox?

Given its effectiveness, Suboxone is one of the most commonly prescribed medications for those looking to overcome an opiate addiction. It's easy to understand why in light of the medication's capacity to ease withdrawal symptoms while also producing a less intense "high." Suboxone is comprised of two separate medications, Naloxone and Buprenorphine, which offer unique benefits when it comes to helping individuals break free of their addiction. As such, it is not surprising to find that many people want to continue using the Suboxone long-term. In this article, we will take a look at the consequences of long-term use and why it should be avoided.

WHAT IS SUBOXONE?

Although we touched in this briefly in the preface of the article, contains Naloxone, which is highly effective in easing the excruciating pain symptoms associated with opioid withdrawal. The medication can also be used to reverse an opioid overdose. Basically, the drug acts as an antagonist by binding to opioid receptors and blocking the transmission of opioids to the brain. Also, it prevents agonist, the chemical compound that elicits a physiological response when combined with brain receptors.

Now that we have a general understanding of the role of Naloxone, let's focus our attention on Buprenorphine. Unlike naloxone, buprenorphine works by attaching to opioid receptors and stimulating them, which makes it possible to soothe withdrawal symptoms without eliciting the same feelings of euphoria and sedation typical of other opioids.

WHAT ARE THE EFFECTS OF LONG-TERM SUBOXONE USE?

In short, long-term Suboxone usage increases the likelihood of addiction; in fact, according to a report published by SAMHSA (Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration), the misuse of Suboxone resulted in 3,000 emergency room visits in 2005 and exceeded 30,000 in 2010. Although the inclusion of Naloxone as a deterrent to abuse is effective, some individuals have found ways of bypassing this safeguard.

That said, some people have been known to vacillate between Suboxone and their primary drug of choice. Needless to say, such actions can quickly result in relapse. So why are so many people interested in long-term use even after they have undergone detox? Most likely it is for the high that is derived from the medication and to resolve any residual symptoms they may be experiencing, physical or psychological.

HOW TO TAKE SUBOXONE PROPERLY

Suboxone can be taken in a variety of ways; however, patients who undergo treatment are usually prescribed sublingual tablets, which can be dissolved under the tongue before being absorbed by the body. In addition, the medication is also available as a sublingual film; in this case, the film is placed against the interior cheek wall where it will dissolve before being absorbed by the body. That said, both variations work by releasing small doses of Suboxone over a 10-minute time frame.

Although the medication can be administered in a variety of ways, the pill form of Suboxone is a preferred choice when it comes to short-term treatment. As far as dosage is concerned, most patients will be started on a very low dose of Suboxone, usually 6 to 8 mg. This low dose allows physicians to gauge the effectiveness of the medication as well as patient tolerance. That aside, if patients abuse or abruptly stop taking Suboxone, they are usually presented with the following symptoms:

  • Muscle aches
  • Diarrhea
  • Vomiting
  • Insomnia
  • Agitation
  • Anxiety

Obviously, this is not an entire list of symptoms; however, it is a list of the ones commonly reported by current and former patients.

CONCLUSION

In summation, opioid addiction is one of the most challenging addictions for anyone to overcome. After all, the substances are highly addictive, easily accessible, and provides a feeling of euphoria that some find insatiable. While Suboxone can be helpful during the detox, long-term use should be avoided in light of the possibility of abuse, addiction, and relapse.

A more plausible alternative would be to combine short-term Suboxone use with counseling, which can include learning to cope with stress and avoiding triggers that can lead to relapse, for example. Also, it worth noting that many find the support of friends and family invaluable while they are their journey towards breaking their addiction. Call one of our counselors today at 800-737-0933.

Is an Opiate Detox in Florida Ever Dangerous?

Trying to withdraw from opiates on your own can be a dangerous and potentially life-threatening move. Considering the risk to health and life, an opiate detox at a Florida rehab is perhaps the safest way to end your addiction to opiates.

Professional treatment at an accredited rehab is not only safe, but it also offers an opportunity to uncover underlying reasons for your addiction. It allows you to get treatment for mental health disorders linked to drug abuse. It caters to family members and loved ones by involving them in specialized family therapy sessions. And, it equips you with tools and skills to manage drug use triggers to reduce the chance of relapse during and after rehab.

Tapering Off Opiates With Medically-Assisted Detox

Opiates, also called opioids, are drugs made from the opium poppy plant. They are commonly prescribed for treating chronic pain. Codeine, Oxycodone, Fentanyl, Morphine, and Hydrocodone are some examples of prescription opioids. However, opiates are used illicitly in a more raw and potent form and are called "street drugs."

Heroin is a widely abused "street" drug. It is highly addictive and is the reason why many individuals between the ages of 18-30 undergo opiate detox in Florida. They know that quitting opiates "cold turkey" and going through detox on their own increases the risk of relapse or overdose.

Tapering off the substance is the best way to gradually remove it from the body and allow the body and brain to slowly return to a state of "normalcy." Medication may be administered to you during detox by a trained professional to assist in managing severe withdrawal symptoms.

Opiate Withdrawal Symptoms

Opiate withdrawal symptoms may begin within 6-30 hours after the last dose. Factors such as how severe the addiction is and what type of drug is involved will determine when symptoms begin. Short-acting opiates produce symptoms within 6-12 hours while long-acting opiates do so around 30 hours following the last use. One or more of these symptoms could develop and may vary in severity from person to person:

  • Strong cravings
  • Runny nose or teary eyes
  • Nausea, vomiting, or diarrhea
  • Excessive sweating
  • Irritability
  • Restlessness
  • Insomnia
  • Persistent yawning
  • Aggressing
  • Anxiety
  • Muscle aches or stomach cramps
  • Mood swings
  • Increased heart rate or blood pressure

Opiate Withdrawal Timeline

Opiate withdrawal can be done at an inpatient or outpatient program. Inpatient rehabs allow you to live-in for the duration of treatment while outpatient centers offer you the opportunity to continue to live at home, work, and care for family members. Nevertheless, both programs have proven to provide effective detox services and therapy.

However, each person's detox experience is unique. Withdrawal symptoms and the length of time it takes to completely withdraw depend on the level of addiction, the type of drug abused, dosage, and how the brain reacts to the removal of the drug from the body. Days 1-7 is reportedly the most difficult stage. The entire detox process may last several weeks to several months.

The following is a general withdrawal timeline that may be helpful in letting you know what to expect:

Days 1-7: The first and second day is marked by symptoms such as strong cravings, compulsive drug-seeking, restlessness, sweating, trouble sleeping, and muscle aches. Other symptoms may develop around days 3-5 and may include nausea, vomiting, tremors, dilated pupil, increased heart rate, high blood pressure, and stomach ache. Some individuals experience diarrhea, chills, and abdominal cramps.

Day 7 and onwards: Around the end of the first week, there is usually a marked improvement in physical symptoms. At the same time, psychological symptoms start to kick in. Anxiety, depression, insomnia, irritability, emotional outbursts, remorse, and impulsive behaviors are common. By now, the desire to use drugs is not as strong as the first week. Once you're stabilized, you may transition into therapy to begin the second stage of addiction treatment.

Finding a Detox Center Near You

Finding the right detox center may pose a bit of challenge since you may prefer to connect with one that can provide the services to match your needs. If you live in South Florida, you can locate a treatment center and give them a call to find out what types of programs they offer and how to get admitted.

During the evaluation, the medical team will recommend either outpatient or residential treatment depending on your recovery needs. Addiction treatment programs are usually comprehensive and include referral to behavioral therapy to help reduce the risk of relapse after formal treatment ends.

Just remember that sobriety involves a desire to overcome drug addiction, a positive mindset towards treatment, and a commitment to staying sober. Call one of our counselors today at 800-737-0933.

What Services Will You Get at a Medical Detox Center That You Wouldn’t Get Elsewhere?

One of the first steps in the process of beating addiction, after admitting that there is an existing problem and accepting help, is detoxification. This is the process in which all the toxins from drugs and/or alcohol are cleansed from the body. The thought of detox is overwhelming for many. Detox centers decrease the levels of dread and stress because they offer professional support throughout the entire process.

Types of Detox Centers

There are two main types of detox centers. These are medical detox centers and social detox centers. Medical detox includes:

- medical doctors
- detox medications
- supportive medications

Detox medications can include Methadone for those addicted to opiates and supportive medications include Ativan for alcoholics. Methadone is commonly used for pain management and to block the effects of opiates during detox. Ativan is used to help reduce the symptoms of Alcohol Withdrawal Syndrom when detoxing from alcohol.

On the other hand, social detox only includes social and psychological support during the detox process. Should medical issues arise, the client is transferred to a medical facility equipped to handle the issue. Social detox is not normally recommended to those battling with alcohol, sedatives, or opiates.

Stages of Detox

There are often three stages of detox. They are:

- Evaluation
- Stabilization
- Building acceptance of the necessity of future help

During the evaluation stage, tests are performed for drugs and alcohol and prior medical history is discussed. Then, the plan of action is devised. Stabilization often makes up the largest part of detox. Medical and psychological assistance are both provided, as needed, during this stage. The final stage of detox is building acceptance of the necessity of professional help beyond detox. Future help increases the chances of sustaining sobriety.

How Long Does Detox Take?

According to the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Association (SAMHSA), it takes an average of 8 days to detox. However, this time frame varies due to several different factors. Some of these factors include:

- Drug of choice
- Frequency of use
- Detox Setting

For some, the process could be over in hours, but others it could take weeks. It depends on each person's individual circumstances.

Detoxification is usually a scary thought to those seeking to recover. However, fear should never be a deterrent. Professional detox makes the process bearable for a lot of people who are battling substance abuse or addiction. If you are you ready to start your journey, call us today at 800-737-0933.

Will a Free Detox Center Provide the Same Care As One You Pay For?

Substance abuse and addiction can be a painful process for individuals and families. Entering a treatment center or rehabilitation facility can be expensive. Sometimes most of the costs are left up to the individual. For those who need treatment, free detox centers are available.

There are several types of detox centers in which you can get access to free or low-cost detox treatment. If you have insurance, detox centers may be fully or partially covered. State-funded detox centers can provide discounts or offer free services to individuals with no income and no insurance.

Faith-based detox centers are geared towards individuals who want to focus on their faith as part of their treatment plan. But, not all of them are free. It's important to do your research before entering a free detox center. Learn more about detox centers and the different types that could fit your needs.

What Are Free Detox Centers?

Free detox centers are treatment centers for drug or substance abusers. It gives them access to medical treatment to overcome their withdrawal and addiction problems. However, they may not receive the same amount of care or treatment they would at a rehab facility. Not all detox centers provide facilities, counseling, and ongoing support. These short-term clinics just provide patients with the care they need to start their recovery. They can also provide them with additional resources to get started on the road to recovery and where to find additional help and guidance.

Who Can Use Free Detox Centers?

Free detox centers are helpful for the homeless, low-income individuals, or those who don't have insurance. Dealing with addiction and substance abuse can be difficult for many individuals and their families. Sometimes it's hard to afford the type of care you need. Those who can't pay for rehabilitation or treatment choose to go to a detox center instead.

Using Insurance to Pay for Detox Center

Since 2014, the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act requires all health insurance plans, including Medicaid, to provide coverage for substance abuse treatment. As of 2018, this law is still intact. Depending on your insurance plan, you may have to pay for some of your treatment. Many insurance plans may provide addiction and substance abuse services before your deductible is met, making it easier to enter a detox center.

Using a State-Funded Detox Center

Some states provided funding for substance abuse and addiction treatment. They even accept patients who have no insurance or have little to no income. These programs come with long waiting lists. You also have to meet certain criteria before you're eligible for free services. You must prove some or all of the following information before you enter a free detox center:

  • Official residency within your state-funded
  • Proof of income (or no income) or no insurance
  • Proof of your addiction and need for assistance

Once you meet some or all of the requirements, various treatment options are available. Find out the different detox programs provided to you by contacting your state mental health or substance abuse agency.

Trying a Faith-Based Detox Program

There are several faith-based programs that have free detox centers. Be aware that not all of them provide medically supervised detox programs. Also, they require individuals to undergo detox before accessing the other services their programs provide.

Faith-based programs integrate faith into their treatment programs. This is a great option for individuals who are focused on their faith. Contact your leaders of faith to help you determine which faith-based detox programs are available in your area. Not all faith-based detox centers are free. Ask about costs before entering treatment.

Addiction can affect every aspect of an individual's life. It can damage your relationships with your loved ones, your friends, and your family members. It can cause health problems and mental health issues.

Worrying about the costs of treatment causes additional stress when you're trying to recover from substance abuse. There are resources available for pregnant women, veterans, young people, and those living in poverty. However, if you have an income or insurance, free detox may not be available. Don't give up hope just yet, though. There are resources available to individuals to help pay for your detox program, such as payment plans, scholarship programs, and insurance coverage.

Ready to get started on the road to recovery? Contact our trained counselors today. We can help you find the right treatment plan you need and determine the costs. Our counselors are available 24 hours a day. Call us today for more information at 800-737-0933.

How Florida Addiction Treatment Can Help You Stay Out Of Legal Trouble

If you are living in the cycle of addiction, you are not alone. Addiction affects countless Americans and individuals all across the globe. It can affect your health, emotional and mental well being, and also get you into legal complications.

Help from a reputable treatment center near you is within reach. Learn more about the connection between addiction and legal problems below or reach out to us now to discover the right treatment option for your needs.

How Can Addiction Lead to Problems with the Law?

Addiction is considered a disease in which affected individuals have little to no control over their use of potentially harmful substance such as street drugs, prescription drugs and alcohol. When you are addicted, your body physically depends on a substance to feel comfortable. This occurs over time as a result of repeated use.

If an addicted person does not get an adequate amount of a substance, he or she may experience an array of uncomfortable withdrawal symptoms and ultimately, attempt to obtain more drugs or alcohol to ease the pain. Some of the most common withdrawal symptoms include nausea, difficulty falling asleep or excessive sleeping and bodily aches and pains. Mood complications such as unexplainable aggression or violent outbursts and depression can also be present.

If you use illegal substance such as street drugs, you put yourself at risk for suffering serious legal complications such as jail time, probation and fines. If you drive while under the influence of a substance, you can suffer from similar consequences and get your license suspended or revoked entirely. Addiction can seriously hinder your independence and ability to maintain your daily responsibilities as well. Other potential legal scenarios related to addiction include:

  • Domestic violence
  • Public intoxication
  • Public fighting or outbursts

The only way to eliminate your risk of incurring legal problems caused by addiction is to break free from the disease entirely. However, imagining your life free from drugs or alcohol can be challenging, especially if you are currently using.

Choosing to seek help is the first step towards recovery. With 24/7 support from our professional and caring counselors, you can count on us to help you through every step of the treatment process. Get started today by calling 800-737-0933

prescription drugs for older adults

I Need My Pain Medications, But I Want To Get Off of Them and Be Free But How?

When you have been in chronic pain, it can severely impact all aspects of your life. Trauma and injuries often necessitate pain medication. Any surgeries you may have had might have led you to need pain medication as well. Over time, pain medications, particularly opioid based medications, can lead to dependence.

When you become dependent on pain medication, if you stop taking the medication you will experience symptoms of withdrawal. This can happen to anyone who has relied on pain medication in order to relieve debilitating symptoms. Unfortunately, in addition to withdrawal symptoms, you may also experience a rebound of intense pain while you are detoxing from the pain medication. This can make it almost impossible to stop using on your own.

If you have found yourself experiencing withdrawal symptoms and rebound pain, you will need professional help from addiction specialists in order to recover from your dependence. The first step in your recovery will involve detoxing from the medication. During this period of time, you will need to be supervised so that the symptoms of withdrawal are minimized. Our addiction professionals will be able to provide supportive care during detox so that your concerns are heard and your needs are met.

How Can You Avoid Relapsing?

After your initial detox period, a longer stay in one of our facilities may be necessary. The longer you allow yourself to remain in treatment, the better your chances are for long term recovery. If you are experiencing a return of pain because you have stopped your medication, we will need to come up with a plan to manage your symptoms so that you will not relapse.

During your stay in one of our facilities, you will have opportunities for various therapies. Individual counseling can help you learn how to cope with stresses and triggers in your daily life without the use of addictive medications. You will be able to talk about your experiences and feelings which can help in your recovery. Group therapy may be helpful as well. It can be extremely empowering to know that you are not the only person who has struggled with addiction issues. You can also learn from others who may be further into their recovery about what is working for them, what they have learned, and what kinds of things have caused problems during their recovery.

If you or a loved one is currently struggling with an addiction to pain medication, call our addiction counselors today to learn about what we can do to help. We are here for you 800-737-0933

Having a Conversation With Your Union About Needing Drug Detox

Even though anybody who is struggling with an addiction to drugs and alcohol should seek treatment, many are afraid to do so. Addiction has been so villified in our culture that admitting that you have a problem feels like admitting that you have a terrible character flaw. This is especially true when it comes to the workplace. Drug use is grounds for disciplinary action in many jobs, so we can understand if you're afraid to ask for time off to check into a drug rehab center.

Realistically, you should have nothing to fear from your employer if your drug and alcohol use hasn't caused any serious problems at work. After all, people are allowed to take a leave of absence if they're recovering from an illness or injury, and an addiction is no different from any other illness. However, you still might run into problems if your employer happens to be less than sympathetic about your situation. Fortunately, you might still be in luck if you are a part of a union that will fight for your right to seek treatment and keep your job.

What Your Union Can Do For You During Substance Abuse

While there is no guarantee that your union will be able to help pay for your detox or ensure that you are compensated for any wages that will be lost while you're away from work, it does help to have them on your side. Before you seek treatment for your addiction, contact your union representative to find out how they can help you. At the very least, they will be able to stick up for you and ensure that you will be able to return to your job once you've completed your detox. Depending on the type of health insurance you have through your union or your employer, some or all of your detox and treatment may even be covered. When you do have this conversation with your union, explain the situation in as much detail as possible. If you haven't had any disciplinary issues due to your substance abuse, make that clear. Even if you have had issues with your employer in the past, let your union know that it was due to your drug and alcohol use, and that you are checking into a rehab center to become clean and improve your job performance.

Whether you are a member of a union or you simply want to be free of your addiction once and for all, don't hesitate to contact Genesis House at 800-737-0933 if you have any questions.

What is Drunk Packing?

Drunk packing has gained popularity recently, after a college student died after his friends practiced the trend. Drunk packing involves rolling a drunk person onto their stomach and placing something heavy, like a backpack, on their pack. The goal is that this will prevent them from rolling over onto their back and choking on their own vomit.

Who practices drunk packing?

You may be wondering if someone you care about could fall prey to this trend. This new practice is common on college campuses, especially among those who are afraid to call for help when a friend has alcohol poisoning. Because of this, many who use this method are underage. The intention with drunk packing is good, but misguided. You may think that someone can only choke on their vomit if they are on their back, so they are protected and can sleep safely.

The Problems with Drunk Packing

  • You can choke in any position.
  • The weight of the backpack can do more harm than good.
  • Choking is not the only danger faced by someone with alcohol poisoning.

Because young people are the ones most effected by this trend, it is important that they are educated in the matter. Drunk packing is not safe. If you or a friend has practiced this, or you suspect that someone you love is drunk packing, there are a couple important facts of which you should be aware. First, most schools have amnesty policies. This means that you will not get in trouble for calling for help. If someone is drunk enough that you are worried for their safety, it is better to be safe than sorry and seek medical help. Second, drunk packing may become a punishable offense in itself, now that someone has died after being drunk packed. It is no longer a way to stay out of trouble, because the risks have been made public.

So, what should you do about this new trend? If you believe that you or someone you care about is in danger from drunk packing and alcoholism, we at Genesis House are here to help. You can reach us 24 hours a day on our toll free number: 800-737-0933