Tag Archives: detox

What Services Will You Get at a Medical Detox Center That You Wouldn’t Get Elsewhere?

One of the first steps in the process of beating addiction, after admitting that there is an existing problem and accepting help, is detoxification. This is the process in which all the toxins from drugs and/or alcohol are cleansed from the body. The thought of detox is overwhelming for many. Detox centers decrease the levels of dread and stress because they offer professional support throughout the entire process.

Types of Detox Centers

There are two main types of detox centers. These are medical detox centers and social detox centers. Medical detox includes:

- medical doctors
- detox medications
- supportive medications

Detox medications can include Methadone for those addicted to opiates and supportive medications include Ativan for alcoholics. Methadone is commonly used for pain management and to block the effects of opiates during detox. Ativan is used to help reduce the symptoms of Alcohol Withdrawal Syndrom when detoxing from alcohol.

On the other hand, social detox only includes social and psychological support during the detox process. Should medical issues arise, the client is transferred to a medical facility equipped to handle the issue. Social detox is not normally recommended to those battling with alcohol, sedatives, or opiates.

Stages of Detox

There are often three stages of detox. They are:

- Evaluation
- Stabilization
- Building acceptance of the necessity of future help

During the evaluation stage, tests are performed for drugs and alcohol and prior medical history is discussed. Then, the plan of action is devised. Stabilization often makes up the largest part of detox. Medical and psychological assistance are both provided, as needed, during this stage. The final stage of detox is building acceptance of the necessity of professional help beyond detox. Future help increases the chances of sustaining sobriety.

How Long Does Detox Take?

According to the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Association (SAMHSA), it takes an average of 8 days to detox. However, this time frame varies due to several different factors. Some of these factors include:

- Drug of choice
- Frequency of use
- Detox Setting

For some, the process could be over in hours, but others it could take weeks. It depends on each person's individual circumstances.

Detoxification is usually a scary thought to those seeking to recover. However, fear should never be a deterrent. Professional detox makes the process bearable for a lot of people who are battling substance abuse or addiction. If you are you ready to start your journey, call us today at 800-737-0933.

Will a Free Detox Center Provide the Same Care As One You Pay For?

Substance abuse and addiction can be a painful process for individuals and families. Entering a treatment center or rehabilitation facility can be expensive. Sometimes most of the costs are left up to the individual. For those who need treatment, free detox centers are available.

There are several types of detox centers in which you can get access to free or low-cost detox treatment. If you have insurance, detox centers may be fully or partially covered. State-funded detox centers can provide discounts or offer free services to individuals with no income and no insurance.

Faith-based detox centers are geared towards individuals who want to focus on their faith as part of their treatment plan. But, not all of them are free. It's important to do your research before entering a free detox center. Learn more about detox centers and the different types that could fit your needs.

What Are Free Detox Centers?

Free detox centers are treatment centers for drug or substance abusers. It gives them access to medical treatment to overcome their withdrawal and addiction problems. However, they may not receive the same amount of care or treatment they would at a rehab facility. Not all detox centers provide facilities, counseling, and ongoing support. These short-term clinics just provide patients with the care they need to start their recovery. They can also provide them with additional resources to get started on the road to recovery and where to find additional help and guidance.

Who Can Use Free Detox Centers?

Free detox centers are helpful for the homeless, low-income individuals, or those who don't have insurance. Dealing with addiction and substance abuse can be difficult for many individuals and their families. Sometimes it's hard to afford the type of care you need. Those who can't pay for rehabilitation or treatment choose to go to a detox center instead.

Using Insurance to Pay for Detox Center

Since 2014, the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act requires all health insurance plans, including Medicaid, to provide coverage for substance abuse treatment. As of 2018, this law is still intact. Depending on your insurance plan, you may have to pay for some of your treatment. Many insurance plans may provide addiction and substance abuse services before your deductible is met, making it easier to enter a detox center.

Using a State-Funded Detox Center

Some states provided funding for substance abuse and addiction treatment. They even accept patients who have no insurance or have little to no income. These programs come with long waiting lists. You also have to meet certain criteria before you're eligible for free services. You must prove some or all of the following information before you enter a free detox center:

  • Official residency within your state-funded
  • Proof of income (or no income) or no insurance
  • Proof of your addiction and need for assistance

Once you meet some or all of the requirements, various treatment options are available. Find out the different detox programs provided to you by contacting your state mental health or substance abuse agency.

Trying a Faith-Based Detox Program

There are several faith-based programs that have free detox centers. Be aware that not all of them provide medically supervised detox programs. Also, they require individuals to undergo detox before accessing the other services their programs provide.

Faith-based programs integrate faith into their treatment programs. This is a great option for individuals who are focused on their faith. Contact your leaders of faith to help you determine which faith-based detox programs are available in your area. Not all faith-based detox centers are free. Ask about costs before entering treatment.

Addiction can affect every aspect of an individual's life. It can damage your relationships with your loved ones, your friends, and your family members. It can cause health problems and mental health issues.

Worrying about the costs of treatment causes additional stress when you're trying to recover from substance abuse. There are resources available for pregnant women, veterans, young people, and those living in poverty. However, if you have an income or insurance, free detox may not be available. Don't give up hope just yet, though. There are resources available to individuals to help pay for your detox program, such as payment plans, scholarship programs, and insurance coverage.

Ready to get started on the road to recovery? Contact our trained counselors today. We can help you find the right treatment plan you need and determine the costs. Our counselors are available 24 hours a day. Call us today for more information at 800-737-0933.

How Florida Addiction Treatment Can Help You Stay Out Of Legal Trouble

If you are living in the cycle of addiction, you are not alone. Addiction affects countless Americans and individuals all across the globe. It can affect your health, emotional and mental well being, and also get you into legal complications.

Help from a reputable treatment center near you is within reach. Learn more about the connection between addiction and legal problems below or reach out to us now to discover the right treatment option for your needs.

How Can Addiction Lead to Problems with the Law?

Addiction is considered a disease in which affected individuals have little to no control over their use of potentially harmful substance such as street drugs, prescription drugs and alcohol. When you are addicted, your body physically depends on a substance to feel comfortable. This occurs over time as a result of repeated use.

If an addicted person does not get an adequate amount of a substance, he or she may experience an array of uncomfortable withdrawal symptoms and ultimately, attempt to obtain more drugs or alcohol to ease the pain. Some of the most common withdrawal symptoms include nausea, difficulty falling asleep or excessive sleeping and bodily aches and pains. Mood complications such as unexplainable aggression or violent outbursts and depression can also be present.

If you use illegal substance such as street drugs, you put yourself at risk for suffering serious legal complications such as jail time, probation and fines. If you drive while under the influence of a substance, you can suffer from similar consequences and get your license suspended or revoked entirely. Addiction can seriously hinder your independence and ability to maintain your daily responsibilities as well. Other potential legal scenarios related to addiction include:

  • Domestic violence
  • Public intoxication
  • Public fighting or outbursts

The only way to eliminate your risk of incurring legal problems caused by addiction is to break free from the disease entirely. However, imagining your life free from drugs or alcohol can be challenging, especially if you are currently using.

Choosing to seek help is the first step towards recovery. With 24/7 support from our professional and caring counselors, you can count on us to help you through every step of the treatment process. Get started today by calling 800-737-0933

prescription drugs for older adults

I Need My Pain Medications, But I Want To Get Off of Them and Be Free But How?

When you have been in chronic pain, it can severely impact all aspects of your life. Trauma and injuries often necessitate pain medication. Any surgeries you may have had might have led you to need pain medication as well. Over time, pain medications, particularly opioid based medications, can lead to dependence.

When you become dependent on pain medication, if you stop taking the medication you will experience symptoms of withdrawal. This can happen to anyone who has relied on pain medication in order to relieve debilitating symptoms. Unfortunately, in addition to withdrawal symptoms, you may also experience a rebound of intense pain while you are detoxing from the pain medication. This can make it almost impossible to stop using on your own.

If you have found yourself experiencing withdrawal symptoms and rebound pain, you will need professional help from addiction specialists in order to recover from your dependence. The first step in your recovery will involve detoxing from the medication. During this period of time, you will need to be supervised so that the symptoms of withdrawal are minimized. Our addiction professionals will be able to provide supportive care during detox so that your concerns are heard and your needs are met.

How Can You Avoid Relapsing?

After your initial detox period, a longer stay in one of our facilities may be necessary. The longer you allow yourself to remain in treatment, the better your chances are for long term recovery. If you are experiencing a return of pain because you have stopped your medication, we will need to come up with a plan to manage your symptoms so that you will not relapse.

During your stay in one of our facilities, you will have opportunities for various therapies. Individual counseling can help you learn how to cope with stresses and triggers in your daily life without the use of addictive medications. You will be able to talk about your experiences and feelings which can help in your recovery. Group therapy may be helpful as well. It can be extremely empowering to know that you are not the only person who has struggled with addiction issues. You can also learn from others who may be further into their recovery about what is working for them, what they have learned, and what kinds of things have caused problems during their recovery.

If you or a loved one is currently struggling with an addiction to pain medication, call our addiction counselors today to learn about what we can do to help. We are here for you 800-737-0933

Having a Conversation With Your Union About Needing Drug Detox

Even though anybody who is struggling with an addiction to drugs and alcohol should seek treatment, many are afraid to do so. Addiction has been so villified in our culture that admitting that you have a problem feels like admitting that you have a terrible character flaw. This is especially true when it comes to the workplace. Drug use is grounds for disciplinary action in many jobs, so we can understand if you're afraid to ask for time off to check into a drug rehab center.

Realistically, you should have nothing to fear from your employer if your drug and alcohol use hasn't caused any serious problems at work. After all, people are allowed to take a leave of absence if they're recovering from an illness or injury, and an addiction is no different from any other illness. However, you still might run into problems if your employer happens to be less than sympathetic about your situation. Fortunately, you might still be in luck if you are a part of a union that will fight for your right to seek treatment and keep your job.

What Your Union Can Do For You During Substance Abuse

While there is no guarantee that your union will be able to help pay for your detox or ensure that you are compensated for any wages that will be lost while you're away from work, it does help to have them on your side. Before you seek treatment for your addiction, contact your union representative to find out how they can help you. At the very least, they will be able to stick up for you and ensure that you will be able to return to your job once you've completed your detox. Depending on the type of health insurance you have through your union or your employer, some or all of your detox and treatment may even be covered. When you do have this conversation with your union, explain the situation in as much detail as possible. If you haven't had any disciplinary issues due to your substance abuse, make that clear. Even if you have had issues with your employer in the past, let your union know that it was due to your drug and alcohol use, and that you are checking into a rehab center to become clean and improve your job performance.

Whether you are a member of a union or you simply want to be free of your addiction once and for all, don't hesitate to contact Genesis House at 800-737-0933 if you have any questions.

What is Drunk Packing?

Drunk packing has gained popularity recently, after a college student died after his friends practiced the trend. Drunk packing involves rolling a drunk person onto their stomach and placing something heavy, like a backpack, on their pack. The goal is that this will prevent them from rolling over onto their back and choking on their own vomit.

Who practices drunk packing?

You may be wondering if someone you care about could fall prey to this trend. This new practice is common on college campuses, especially among those who are afraid to call for help when a friend has alcohol poisoning. Because of this, many who use this method are underage. The intention with drunk packing is good, but misguided. You may think that someone can only choke on their vomit if they are on their back, so they are protected and can sleep safely.

The Problems with Drunk Packing

  • You can choke in any position.
  • The weight of the backpack can do more harm than good.
  • Choking is not the only danger faced by someone with alcohol poisoning.

Because young people are the ones most effected by this trend, it is important that they are educated in the matter. Drunk packing is not safe. If you or a friend has practiced this, or you suspect that someone you love is drunk packing, there are a couple important facts of which you should be aware. First, most schools have amnesty policies. This means that you will not get in trouble for calling for help. If someone is drunk enough that you are worried for their safety, it is better to be safe than sorry and seek medical help. Second, drunk packing may become a punishable offense in itself, now that someone has died after being drunk packed. It is no longer a way to stay out of trouble, because the risks have been made public.

So, what should you do about this new trend? If you believe that you or someone you care about is in danger from drunk packing and alcoholism, we at Genesis House are here to help. You can reach us 24 hours a day on our toll free number: 800-737-0933

3 Reasons You Shouldn’t Go To a Local Detox Center To Get Clean

Choosing to get into recovery from addiction is a courageous decision that is typically not easy to make. Once you make that decision, several factors must be considered to assure your optimal success such as:

  • Cost
  • How to pay for treatment
  • In-network or out-of-network providers
  • Type of treatment center such as general population, women-only, men-only, LGBT-specific, Christian, etc.
  • Location.

While each factor plays a significant role in the equation of achieving lifelong recovery, location is one of the most significant factors.

Addiction is both a physiological and psychological disease. The physiological component of the disease is always addressed first because of the detox process. The detox process consists of going through withdrawal under the supervision of medical personnel and cleansing the system of drugs and alcohol. It is imperative for you to go through detox under the supervision of medical personnel to assure safe, comfortable withdrawal. Depending on your addiction, especially alcoholism, the withdrawal symptoms may be fatal. Examples of common withdrawal symptoms are:

  • Body aches
  • High blood pressure
  • Rapid heartrate
  • Nausea
  • Vomiting
  • Tremors
  • Seizures
  • Hallucinations
  • Insomnia
  • Anxiety
  • Depression

Regardless of the detox center you choose, choosing a distant detox center, as opposed to a local detox center, will be more beneficial for your long-term success.

Three Reasons Why You Should Choose a Distant Detox Center

Despite health insurance, financial, and convenience challenges, you should make every effort to go to a detox center that is distant from your home. Numerous studies have shown that those who travel a distance from their home to go to detox and treatment have higher long-term success rates. There are several reasons why this is the case:

  • Being away from Relapse-Triggers

People, places, neighborhoods, and culture in the environment where you were active in your addiction are some examples of relapse triggers. It would be very hard to focus on your recovery and maintain sobriety when the neighborhood where you used to always go to seek drugs is merely a few miles away and the people who you have used drugs with are right outside the door of the detox facility. If you choose a local detox facility, it will be even more of a struggle to start your new life in recovery when your old life is literally right outside the door of the facility. Many recovering individuals attest to being tempted to use when they are in the same scenery where they were active in their addiction.

  • Being Distant from Distractions that May Derail Your Recovery

During the detox process, it is very common for recovering individuals to second-guess themselves. Knowing that your friends, family, and home are just a walk or ride away makes it much more easier for you to give into the temptation of giving up on the recovery process. If you were in another state and/or a plane-ride away from your friends, family, and home, it would be much more difficult for you to simply give up on the recovery process because it would be much more challenging to get to them.

Though friends and family want the best for you and may be beneficial later on in the recovery process, they tend to be more of a detriment than a benefit in the early recovery process. Being in proximity to them makes it easier for you to be entangled in their lives and issues, which would be a major distraction when you need to strictly focus on your recovery.

  • Higher-Quality Treatment is Often Found Elsewhere

Unfortunately, high-quality treatment does not exist in every area. As you may already know, Florida is the hub for high-quality addiction treatment. California and Utah are also areas renowned for high-quality addiction treatment. If you do not live in any of those areas, your local detox and rehab centers may not be as experienced as the ones in Florida, California, or Utah. The educational and experience requirements may be lower for counselors and staff, and state-funded rehab centers may have less amenities. Florida, California, and Utah are ideal healing environments because of the beautiful scenery, which does not exist in every state.

Genesis House is located in South Lake Worth, Florida. They have been providing superior detox and residential treatment for over 25 years. If you or your loved one is interested in detox and/or treatment or simply has general questions, call them today at 800-737-0933 

How Long Should I Be On Suboxone To Get Completely Clean?

Heroin is a dangerous drug derived from the opium poppy. It is illegal in the United States. Heroin is highly addictive. Drug rehab centers often use another drug, Suboxone, to help people break their heroin addictions. Read on for more information on Suboxone and its use in treating heroin addiction.

When you abuse a drug like heroin, your body develops a tolerance for it. This means that you must take increasing dosages of heroin in order to get the same high. When you attempt to quit using heroin, you experience withdrawal symptoms, including the following:

  • Feeling jittery
  • Vomiting
  • Getting chills
  • Muscle aches and pains

Suboxone is a drug that contains buprenorphine. Buprenorphine is used to treat not only heroin addiction but other opioid addictions, too. Buprenorphine, a partial agonist to opioids, produces a mild form of the effects of opioids. It basically fools the brain into thinking your opioid craving has been met, though it does not produce the same high. However, because Buprenorphine and Suboxone do not create the same high as opioids, Suboxone and Buprenorphine are difficult to form an addiction to. Naloxone, another component of Suboxone, works as an antagonist to opioids.

Length of Use for Suboxone

Suboxone is a drug that must usually be taken for a long time to promote opioid recovery. Because Suboxone is a partial agonist, it still allows people to form some opioid dependence. When addicts attempt to stop taking Suboxone, they need to taper their dosage under the care of a medical professional.

People who take Suboxone for a short period, such as a month, usually end up relapsing and returning to opioid abuse. Thus, Suboxone should be taken for an extended period. Taking it for six months to one year is the norm, and many people take it for even longer. However, every patient is different. A medical professional can monitor the patient's progress and advise on how long each patient should take Suboxone.

Suboxone should be used only under the guidance provided in a professional treatment program or under the care of a healthcare professional. Rehab clinicians can administer the correct dosage, and Suboxone can also be prescribed by a doctor. By pairing Suboxone with other therapies, clinicians and physicians can help addicts fight their addictions. Call us today for help 800-737-0933

What You Should Know About Pain Pill Addiction- It Is Not Uncommon as You May Think

Pain pills or painkillers refer to a wide variety of drugs; however, the ones that are highly abused are opioids, sedatives, and stimulants. Hydrocodone, oxycodone, xanax, valium, and dexedrine are among the highly abused prescription pills. The effectiveness of these drugs makes them addictive. These pain pills work on the opioid receptors of your brain to numb pain and create an addictive high.

One of the tell-tale signs that you have a pain pill addiction is when your mind is focused on when you will take your next dose and whether your supply is sufficient. Pre-occupation with your pain medication may later cause you to exceed the doctor's recommended dose. Eventually, you begin going to more than one doctor for the same subscription or going to other sources to replenish your medication supply. Afterwards, you will realize that your pain, the reason you were on the prescription pills, subsided a long time ago but you are still on pain meds. Before you know it, you are having problems with your personal relationships and your daily routine activities.

 

How Pain Pill Addiction Can Affect Your Body

Pain killer abuse is likely to affect different parts of your body. Opiates suppress your body's capacity to breathe and interrupt the normal functioning of your lungs. Medical research has determined that opiate abuse is likely to cause pneumonia.

Pain pill addiction is also associated with constipation. Abusing pain killers will mean that one may need to use laxatives to facilitate bowel movement and this is likely to damage the sphincter or anus.

Prescription drug abuse can also affect your liver. Every drug you take is broken down and processed by your liver. Therefore, the liver can store toxins after the breakdown process. The most notable cause of liver damage is acetaminophen, a component in many prescription formulas. Drugs such as Lortab, Vicodin, and Percocet have high levels of acetaminophen.

Another devastating effect of addiction to prescription pills is rhabdomyolysis and kidney failure. Rhabdomyolysis occurs when a person lies completely immobilized after abusing pain killers to the point of becoming comatose. The addict's tissues start to disintegrate and the chemicals produced during this breakdown pour into their blood stream and begin damaging other organs. This is one of the main causes of kidney failure. Damage of the heart may also occur, including heart attack.

Many people manage chronic pain using prescription medication. A high percentage of these people unknowingly slide into pain pill addiction. If you experience any of the above tell-tale signs of addiction to prescription medication, you need to consult a doctor before your problem becomes a tragedy. If you are ready to put your addiction problem behind you, call Genesis House at 800-737-0933 and trust us to get your life back on track.

Cocaine and Crack: What’s The Difference?

Crack cocaine received lots of media attention as it became more common in the 1980s. Politicians spoke about crack being the most dangerous drug in America, tearing apart communities, and causing violent crimes. Cocaine, although still considered a harmful drug, didn't receive as much attention. What's the real difference between crack and cocaine?

Crack and powder cocaine are both cocaine, but they're different forms of the drug. Powder cocaine is made from HCL, or hydrochloride, a type of salt. Crack, which is usually in rock form, has been processed to remove the HCL, which makes it more rapidly absorbed into your system.

Cocaine is typically more expensive than crack, which explains why most people associate crack with lower-income communities. Crack also carries harsher prison sentences. There's a minimum of five years in prison for possessing 28 grams of crack, while the minimum sentence for 500 grams of cocaine is also five years. The average prison term for crack possession is much longer than cocaine possession.

Crack and Cocaine Addiction

The effects of cocaine hit within five minutes, peak in 30 minutes, and usually last for an hour or two. However, the effects of crack hit in less than one minute, peak in five minutes, and last less than an hour. This is mostly due to a difference in administration, not a difference in how the drugs are created or processed. Powder cocaine is usually snorted, while crack is usually inhaled by smoking. Crack is also sometimes injected, which also brings about immediate and powerful effects. If powder cocaine is injected, it hits you as quickly as crack does.

Both drugs have similar short-term effects, but crack is typically more powerful because your body absorbs it so quickly. They also have similar long-term effects, including:

  • Cardiovascular damage
  • Respiratory problems
  • Seizures
  • Hyperpyrexia (high fever)

There is some debate on whether crack is more addictive than cocaine. Crack may be more psychologically addictive because of the immediate and powerful effects and because of the need to use it repeatedly to maintain the effects. However, both have very similar physiological effects on the body. Overall, there is no difference in physical addiction or dependence between crack and cocaine.

Although there are some differences between crack and cocaine, both are very harmful and addictive drugs. Addiction to either requires professional treatment for a successful recovery. If you or a loved one is struggling with an addiction, call us at 800-737-0933 for help.