Tag Archives: family

How Can Families Support an Alcoholic in Recovery?

Alcoholism, like any disease, affects more than just the sufferer. Those close to alcoholics are also greatly impacted by the disease. It is natural and healthy to wonder how to best support an alcoholic in recovery because once one leaves treatment, continued reassurance from family and friends becomes vital to a favorable outcome.

Remaining sober is a lifelong process, and even when ample time has passed, the alcoholic will encounter roadblocks that threaten sobriety. Those close to an alcoholic must remember that although maintaining a sober lifestyle becomes less intimidating over time, it is never effortless. Recovering alcoholics have needs from their support network that go beyond verbal encouragement.

Expect Prolonged Hurdles

A prevalent mistake many make in their attempt to look after someone in recovery is believing that time spent in rehab is a cure-all. While entering a treatment program is a crucial first step in recovery, there is much more work to do upon departing rehab. In some respects, the months after leaving are more daunting than the time in treatment.

Once back out in the real world, navigating everyday life, alcoholics find themselves surrounded by triggers. Anything from passing a liquor store, to running into old drinking pals, can take a good day and throw it into a tailspin. Those hoping to provide support should respect that the alcoholic will battle triggers indefinitely and does not emerge from a treatment program magically cured of the urge to drink. Recognizing that battling alcohol abuse is a marathon and not a sprint is critical.

Maintain a Healthy Balance

Reassuring the alcoholic of ongoing support is essential, but there must be a balance. Loved ones cannot give so much of themselves that they feel as if they are losing their own identity. They should not go so far as to assume all of the alcoholic’s responsibilities. This includes household duties as well as financial obligations. Those in recovery do garner strength from those around them, but they should not be treated as if they are incompetent.

Recognizing possible codependency is mandatory for those who feel that their self-worth might be reliant on the relationship with the alcoholic. Nobody should lose their sense of self when providing care and compassion in any situation. Codependency is a learned behavior and can cause one to actually pave the way to a relapse. For this reason, it must be addressed if there is any sort of a codependent dynamic between an addict and a loved one.

Know Relapse Signs

It is not pessimistic to bone up on the signs of relapse because it can and does happen for some. Taking a drink is the final step of a slide back, and certain signs of an impending relapse are present before actual alcohol consumption takes place. One of the main signs involves the alcoholic failing to maintain the established treatment program and deeming it no longer necessary. Long after the drinking has ceased, physical withdrawal symptoms can rear their ugly head, and alcoholics will often drink in an effort to quell the physical afflictions.

In addition to knowing red flags, having an action plan in place, should a relapse occur, is imperative. Scrambling to formulate a plan after an unfortunate relapse is not ideal. Lack of preparation wastes valuable time. If bottom lines have been discussed, they must be followed for a higher likelihood of success for those who have suffered a slip. Developing a strategy should not be a secretive endeavor. The alcoholic can and should be part of the planning.

Those seeking information on how to support an alcoholic in recovery have already taken an admiral step by striving to educate themselves. If this is new territory, information is invaluable. Those with further questions can rely on our team of expert counselors who are on hand 24 hours per day at 800-737-0933.

Should I Get Ongoing Support After Going To Rehab?

Recovery does not end after going to rehab. The Betty Ford foundation defines recovery as a “voluntarily maintained lifestyle characterized by sobriety, personal health, and citizenship.” There is no mastery level of recovery; recovery is a lifelong process. Though the idea of recovery being a lifelong process may sound daunting to you at first, life in recovery is full of rich rewards. Recovery is not possible if citizenship is not a part of it; therefore, ongoing support is a must after going to rehab.

There are several sources of support that you can turn to after going to rehab:

Twelve Step Meetings

Twelve Step Meetings (e.g. Alcoholics’ Anonymous, Narcotics’ Anonymous, Sex Addicts Anonymous, etc.) are the oldest and most renowned form of support after going to rehab. The theory behind them is having addicts come together for mutual aid.

Outpatient Treatment

Treating the psychological component of addiction often takes longer than the length of your stay in rehab. Intensive-outpatient meets three to five times a week for three hours. The program includes counseling, group therapy, and education. Regular outpatient rehab is similar to meeting with a therapist once or twice a week for one to two hours. Group therapy and education may also be a part of outpatient rehab.

Twelve Step Alternatives

There are several alternatives to 12-Step Programs (e.g. SMART Recovery, LifeRing Secular Recovery, Women for Sobriety, etc.). There are many paths to the road to recovery. The 12-Steps are not for everybody. Research has shown 12-Step Alternatives are just as effective -if not more effective than the 12 Steps. Spiritual/religious fellowships (e.g. church) are even effective support for some people.

Why Ongoing Support After Rehab is a Must

While professionals can provide insight based on textbooks and research, the best support for a recovering addict is other recovering addicts. Other newly-recovering addicts can provide empathy that you cannot receive elsewhere. Since they are going through the same challenges and experiences as you are, you can collaborate with them on finding solutions to living a successful life in recovery. Being around healthy people is a must for successful recovery, and other recovering addicts who are actively working a program are healthy people.

Genesis House is located in Lake Worth, Florida. Our detox and residential treatment programs can help you jumpstart your new life in recovery. In addition, we provide dual diagnosis, Christian rehab, specialized rehab for uniform officers, and family programs. Most major health insurance plans are accepted.

If you are interested in Genesis House, call them today at 800-737-0933

Are There Any LGBT Specific Substance Abuse Treatment Centers in Florida?

While the disease of addiction is equally devastating for all sufferers and their loved ones, seeking a specific type of addiction treatment may be more beneficial for you or your loved one. The common specific types of addiction treatment are gender-specific treatment, faith-specific treatment, and even LGBT-specific treatment. There are certain issues that are specific to certain groups of sufferers of addiction, and LGBT-specific treatment will address issues that are specific to you or your loved one as a LGBT individual.

Florida is the epitome of a recovery environment because of the warm climate and beach scenery, which makes it a desirable healing environment. It is the recovery capital of the United States because of its plethora of addiction treatment centers and massive recovery community. Since Florida has a plethora of treatment centers, there is a wide variety of treatment centers to choose from in Florida.

There are many inpatient and outpatient LGBT specific substance abuse treatment centers throughout Florida. The majority of them are in the central region and southern region of Florida.

There are also several in the northern region of Florida. In addition to substance abuse treatment centers, there are also community centers where the LGBT recovery community can congregate.

 

The Benefits of Choosing an LGBT Specific Substance Abuse Treatment Center

If you or your loved one is suffering from addiction and identifies as LGBT, there will be certain LGBT specific underlying issues that will need to be addressed in the recovery process such as bullying, family misunderstanding, intimacy issues, etc. It is most beneficial for you or your loved one to start the recovery process in an environment that is fully devoted to the LGBT community. Along with a focus on LGBT specific issues, there are also several benefits to choosing an LGBT specific substance abuse treatment center.Non-Biased Counselors and Staff

At an LGBT specific treatment center, you or your loved one will not have to worry about having to deal with counselors and staff who are biased against or do not understand LGBT people. All of the staff at an LGBT treatment center will be objectively focused on helping you or your loved one without LGBT being an issue.

Judgement-free Environment

All of the other clients at an LGBT treatment center will also be LGBT, so you or your loved one will not have to worry about dealing with judgement and mistreatment from other clients in the treatment center.

Connecting with Recovering Peers

Community is a significant part of recovery. People tend to connect best with those who relate to them. Being in an LGBT Treatment Center will provide you or your loved one with a strong sense of community because the others in the treatment center can easily relate to you or your loved one.

If you or your loved one identify as LGBT and are suffering from addiction, Genesis House is a treatment center in Lake Worth Florida is a great option. Call today at 800-737-0933 

We Must Walk Before We Run!

A common thing I hear from fellow addicts in the 12 step meetings is "when will I get my family's trust back?" or "when can I make my amends for my addiction?" Now this is great to feel remorse and want to make the situation right with their loved ones but it takes time. Let's face it, when we get sober many of us are not the same people as when we were while using substances, now we become more aware of the past.

When we get to step 9 and make our amends, it does not stop there. Changing the way we live is a lifetime process and perhaps the most significant amends we can make. Therefore, we show our amends through actions, not just words.

We may not be at step 9 yet, but we want to show our loved ones we are working to get better. Each day we make amends by doing the next right thing we are and the way, we are "making it right" is shown through our actions, no words are needed. The ones we love will see it rather than us having to tell them and trust me, that will mean more! Later, when we get to step 9 our words will line up with our behaviors. We are right where we are supposed to be, even if it does not feel that way.

Today we can work on an actively "living our amends" by building our integrity and doing the right thing, even when others are not looking. During step 9 we make amends, but the process is everyday in our lives. There is no finish line, we must race to achieve a prize, "no" we walk before we run. Keep walking the path of recovery and you will be running before you know it!
 
-SN

Should my family be involved in my treatment?

Choosing to get treatment for your addiction is one of the hardest and bravest decisions a person can make. It's saying you're finally ready to move on with your life and get to a place of health and prosperity. On the road to recovery, one important decision many addicts have to make is whether or not to involve their family in their treatment.

The road to recovery is a very personal journey, but that doesn't mean you can't involve others to help. Whether you wish to do that, though, is entirely your choice. There's no set way to achieve recovery, and there's no set requirements for what you have to do in your family life in order to qualify for treatment.

Even so, it's highly recommended that those undergoing treatment have a reliable support network in place for the worst times. While family may not qualify for everyone, if you feel that your family can fill this need for support, it could be highly beneficial to choose to do this.

Making the Decision

In the end, it will be up to you to choose who you involve in your treatment. While your family is a good choice for support, it is not the only one. It will be your choice as to how you advance along the path to recovery.

Maybe it's out of shame, or maybe you don't have a good relationship with them, or maybe they've somehow been enabling your behavior. Whatever the reason is, there is no requirement for having your family be your support network during treatment. Whether it will benefit or hinder your progress is up to you.

Regardless, though, rehab can definitely be a way to help you reconnect with family and mend familial relationships. Whether it's before, during, or after treatment, many can benefit from reaching out to family for help and support, even those they have distanced themselves from in the past.

In the end, addiction is considered a family disease due to its impact on everyone within the addict's family and social circle. If your family is willing to help, it might be worth it to consider letting them. The choice is yours to make, though.

If you or a loved one struggle with addiction and are ready to seek treatment, consider contacting Genesis House at 1-800-737-0933, or online through email at info@genesishouse.net.