Tag Archives: heroin addiction

How Do Medical Professionals Handle Heroin Addiction in Comparison to Other Drug Addictions?

Heroin is one of the most dangerous and addictive street drugs in the world. It is an opiate that will rewrite the brain’s perception of pleasure and reward in ways that many other substances do not, so withdrawal from the substance can be far more painful than from other drugs. This is why medical professionals have to handle heroin addiction much more delicately than addiction from other substances.

Detox

The first and perhaps most important step in treating heroin addiction is the detoxification process. This can be harrowing for patients under the most ideal circumstances, and it should never be attempted alone. Many patients need to undergo medical detox, which ensures that they are weaned off of heroin in a controlled environment instead of quitting outright. They may also be provided with medications to help them control their withdrawal symptoms, which is often a crucial part of the rehab process. This usually involves taking suboxone, a medication that can in itself be addictive and should only be taken in a clinical setting.

Counseling

Much of what makes heroin addiction treatment different from other addiction treatment is getting over the physical addiction and managing the harsh withdrawal symptoms, but it is far from the only element of treatment. Once a patient has properly detoxed and is mostly over their physical addiction, they often have to undergo counseling and treatment to address the reasons why they turned to heroin in the first place. This process can take anywhere from a few months to several years depending on the patient’s situation. As we said before, heroin alters the brain’s perception of pleasure and reward, and any addiction treatment will involve basically rewriting one’s thought process. This cognitive therapy and counseling can be just as difficult as overcoming the physical addiction, and it should be taken very seriously.

There is no doubt that heroin is one of the most dangerous illicit drugs available today. It is part of the reason why there is such a severe opiate addiction epidemic in the United States, and it continues to claim thousands of lives every year. If you or a loved one is struggling with an addiction to heroin, know that there is hope for you. Contact our treatment center today at 800-737-0933 for more information. Our counselors are available 24 hours a day, and they will gladly help you find the treatment that you need.

Is It Possible to Get Off Heroin Without Medical Intervention?

Some drugs you can stop taking cold turkey. While you will experience some withdrawal symptoms, there won’t be deadly consequences. Heroin is not one of these drugs. Heroin is becoming the drug of choice, and its usage is up over 250 percent in the pasts few years. The first goal is to break the psychological dependence then the need for the substance. The problem is this drug gives an immediate impact that affects not only the mind but the neurological system. Caution must be taken.

Side Effects from Withdrawing

Is it possible to get off heroin without help from a medical team? Yes, you can pull yourself off heroin, but it’s not recommended. You must understand what this substance does to the brain to understand how to end your drug use successfully. With each use, the brain is rewired, and the perceptions of pleasure and rewards are altered. Due to its impact on the mind and body, it’s imperative to be weaned off slowly or given another medication to help with the transition. If you stop this drug without tapering, you will experience some of the following:

•Nervousness
•Muscle Cramps
•Temperature
•Queasiness and Vomiting
•Cravings for The Drug
•Suicidal Ideation
•Dehydration
•Extensive Sweating
•Seizures
•Death

The Difference in Using A Medical Team

The process of coming off any drug is both delicate and complicated. For severe drug addictions, inpatient therapy is recommended. Having a team of people surrounding you can ensure that you are safe and medically stable. One of the best ways physicians and rehabilitation centers can accomplish this is by using the drug Suboxone. There is a lot of controversy regarding the use of this medication, but it does help many people conquer heroin.

Using Suboxone To Combat Heroin

The controversy with suboxone is that it’s two medications in one, which has opioid properties. One of the medications, buprenorphine, stimulates the brain like heroin. However, it only stimulates half the brain. Unlike the popular drug, it doesn’t cause euphoria or the severe dependence issues. What it does is reduces the withdrawal symptoms. The other medication, naloxone, helps to block the effects caused by the drugs. It can block the receptors and raise the threshold. No wonder this medication is used by so many to help people get off serious drugs.

Prescription medications like suboxone can help people get their life back and reduce the damage caused by opiates. Some say that this is the drug that can combat the heroin addiction issues faced in this country. The goal is to use it for a short period, and eventually, you can wean off this drug also. Because this medication also has a risk of addiction, it should be administered in an inpatient setting to ensure that the doses can be altered.

Why Going It Alone Is Not Advisable?

While inpatient treatment is recommended for opiates, there are also short-term programs that are not as extensive for those who need outpatient services. Outpatient services allow people who have only had their addiction for a short time get help without interrupting their job or family life. However, this is not recommended for someone who has a severe habit, has been addicted for many years, or is wanting to do a medically assisted detox.

During a typical outpatient program, you receive your testing, counseling, and go through all the steps before going home at the end of the day. Whether on an inpatient or outpatient basis, there is a big responsibility when you undertake such a journey. It’s going to be difficult, it will take everything you have, and it will challenge you and your entire family. However, it will all be worth it in the end.

Getting and staying sober is a journey. You take things day-by-day, and you won’t ever arrive at a location. You get better; you slip up, you start all over again. Each time you learn more about conquering and living life to its fullest. You learn the harm the drugs are doing to you, and you vow to yourself that you will never go back again.

Are you tired of living your life wondering where your next high will come from? Do you want to restore your relationships with your family and friends? Do you want to have a job and a normal life once again? We can help you get through this challenging time. Our trained professionals are waiting to help at 800-737-0933. Call anytime day or night.

What Programs Are Available at Heroin Treatment Centers?

Heroin is an opioid drug that is easy to get addicted to. Your brain holds receptors that will react to the chemicals found in these types of drugs, causing you to crave more of it. As easy as it is to get addicted to it, it’s way tougher to beat without the necessary support and medical intervention. That’s why you usually find specialized programs available at Heroin treatment centers. They’re designed to help you kick Heroin out of your system and to learn healthier alternatives to dealing with life’s issues.

There are a few different ways that treatment facilities help you recover from an addiction to a drug like Heroin. Let’s explore what those programs are and how they help you.

Detox Programs at Heroin Treatment Centers

This is the most important step to your recovery. Getting Heroin out of your system and then keeping it out will be necessary. Unfortunately, without professional help, you’ll find trying to get rid of the drug near impossible to do. Once the drug wears off, withdrawal symptoms surface. This can be so debilitating that many people turn to heroin, again, in order to deal with the negative effects. Thus making recovery that much harder to get.

A detox program often will use other medications to help you deal with withdrawals while you wait it out. These, however, will need medical supervision to ensure nothing goes wrong. Some meds a center might use to help in the detox process are:

  • Buprenorphine
  • Naltrexone
  • Methadone

Therapy Programs at Heroin Treatment Centers

While the detox process is powerful with the use of medications, it’s more effective when combined with a facility’s therapy program. A professionally trained counselor can help you understand why your addiction may have happened in the first place. You can explore any issues you may have and learn new coping strategies to use instead of turning to heroin to be your solution.

Some centers offer other types of therapies as well. You could get into an exercise routine that not only gets you physically fit, but it will help promote great mental health too. Also, you could learn some beneficial life skills to use when you go back to your life and have to deal with everyday problems. Adding therapy or counseling sessions to your treatment program increases your chances of becoming addiction-free.

Family Programs at Heroin Treatment Centers

Individual therapy will be necessary to get down to the root of your addiction causes. But, most centers don’t want you to feel isolated and alone in your recovery. You need moral support, not just from the staff or other peers going through the same program as you, but from your family as well. Most centers feel that family involvement is a huge benefit in the rehab process.

You’ll find many facilities offering family programs to help you immerse yourself in therapy right along with them. They become an invaluable support line to cheer you on to recovery. Heroin may have isolated you, but a family treatment program will help sew your relationship back together. This will also help your family members understand where you’re coming from, so they can help you better.

After Care Programs at Heroin Treatment Centers

It’s always great to leave a treatment center feeling addiction-free, but getting over a heroin addiction will take more time than just a few weeks or months. Once you leave, you should still have support, periodically, to keep you off heroin for good. Without it, you could revert to your addiction days and use heroin or maybe another addictive drug. A good facility won’t let you leave without having some kind of aftercare support to keep you going strong.

Typically, you’ll attend group therapy sessions. You may have already started one while you were in the recovery program, but this kind of service is important for your aftercare. You have moral support from others who have been in your shoes and know exactly what it’s like. They can be your best cheer-leading team to inspire you to beat the addiction for good. Sharing your story and learning from others is an important part of your aftercare recovery process.

Since heroin addiction is so hard to get rid of, you should try to use all these treatments when you can. Each part of the program holds important aspects to your recovery and should be used together for maximum benefit. If you have questions or would like to know more about heroin treatments, call us at 800-737-0933.

The New Faces of Heroin Addiction

heroinneedleAmerica is in the midst of a serious opiate problem, ranging from using painkillers non-medically to shooting heroin. A few decades ago, the average heroin user was an older male. Today, that’s far from the reality of the current scene.

Despite the push to educate families and communities about the dangers of heroin abuse, more and more children and young adults seem to be turning to the drug. In fact, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), heroin use has more than doubled among 18 to 25 year olds over the past decade. It has also doubled among females and caucasians. In other words, heroin addiction isn’t just happening to 45 year-old minority males in urban areas – it is happening to white teenage girls in suburbia as well.

While we are generally aware that painkiller abuse often leads to heroin addiction, there hasn’t been sufficient change in prescribing practices yet for opiate narcotics. Far too many people are becoming dependent on pain pills, thus leading to severe addictions.

“I can remember the first time I sniffed a ‘Perc 30’ off a toilet seat in the eighth grade with a friend of mine. And I picked up the needle and heroin when I was 15,” recalled Lindsey Beardsley when talking about her evolution into heroin addiction. Starting with pills and moving to heroin is so common that treatment centers are bracing for an even greater influx of patients in the coming years.

Unfortunately, stories like Lindsey’s are popping up all over the country in growing numbers. In order to reverse this trend and save lives, the issue must be addressed on multiple fronts, from treatment and prevention to doing a better job of educating healthcare workers, teachers and parents.