Tag Archives: heroin detox

Pointers For Staying Sober After Going Through An Opiate Detox Center

An addiction problem has been recognized. The addict has successfully undergone professional opiate detox, which is no easy feat. The drugs are now out of the addict’s system, and the addict and his/her loved ones are left to figure out how to accomplish holistic recovery and continue the prized sobriety. Here are some pointers for staying sober after going through an opiate detox center.

Go From Detox Straight Into A Rehab Program

Addiction programs vary greatly, but most include four broad key elements:

•Intake
•Detox
•Rehabilitation
•Recovery

Intake simply collects information, and it’s the point at which professionals will determine if and how you need to be detoxed. Once you’ve detoxed and your initial withdrawals from the opiates are manageable, it will be up to you, if voluntary, or the entity that’s ordered your placement in a facility, if involuntary, as to whether you continue forward to the rehabilitation phase.

It’s important to understand that physical detox is only the start of recovery. There’s a long road ahead of it still to be traversed. Some choose to try to rehab themselves. However, if available to you, a rehabilitation program can be an invaluable aspect of sobriety.

Rehabilitation treatment should be aimed at holistically addressing all areas of your life, not just your substance addiction. It will explore cognitive behavior therapies. Expect to explore areas such as:

•Mental state
•Personal history for the core of addiction behaviors
•Nutrition
•Physical health
•Family therapy
•Individual therapy
•Group therapy
•Necessary pharmaceutical treatment
•Developing long-term recovery strategies

Remember that there’s not a one-size-fits-all treatment for addiction. There’s a lot of inpatient and outpatient options available. Find a program that’s a good match for your needs and circumstances, and then be ready to commit however much time is deemed necessary to complete the program.

Take Advantage Of Follow Up Programs

Recovery can be short lived if you don’t have adequate support as you transition from the reclusiveness of rehab back to your daily life. Research aftercare and follow up programs to continue the help you need to traverse addiction.

Such programs may include a slow or plotted reintroduction to normal day-to-day life, such as through weekend reprieves at an addiction center or going from the rehab center into a sober living facility. Follow up programs have many other offerings including:

•Drug and alcohol testing
•Nicotine addiction support
•Group, individual, and family therapies
•Help forming new patterns and lifestyle choices
•Stress reduction and coping skills
•Strategies for family members to support their recovering loved ones
•Job and vocational training
•Anger management classes
•Group activities and outings with other dealing with addiction

Find Sober Friends

One of the biggest risks to a recovering addict’s sobriety is returning to socialize with those not sober. There’s tremendous self-inflicted pressure to be who you once were and do what you once did to fit in where you once fit in; there’s also a tremendous amount of peer pressure to be the “old you.” It’s painful, but the lifestyles and behaviors of others that no longer align with the sober you should be cut away. Removing this temptation from your life will make room for relationships that do support and enable you to progress along the path of recovery.

Tips for building new sober support:

•Work on reestablishing trust and honesty within healthy relationships
•Find a new circle of friends
•Join a social activity that excludes addictive substances

Abandon Old Stomping Grounds

It’s the same as with friends. You can’t hangout in the same places sober as you did not sober. Doing so brings forth memories and temptations that do nothing but eat away at your resolve, self-esteem, and goals to move forward.

Evaluate Your Total Environment

From where you live to where you work, carefully examine each facet of how you’re living to determine if it supports or detracts from your sobriety. Maybe you’re a waitress in Palm Beach serving alcohol. Maybe you live in South Florida area heavy with recreational drug users or have a roommate that throws frequent parties.

There will hopefully be a time when the actions of others and your environment plays a lesser role in your sobriety, but these changes are particularly important in the early timeframes of recovery. And, it’s okay if those changes need to be permanent. Prioritize yourself and your sobriety and work to remove anything unsupportive or not conducive.

For many, abandoning friends, lifestyles, hangouts, jobs, and/or homes all add up to questioning who they are as a person - an identity crisis. It will require focusing on the positive, not negative. A new environment gives you vast room to explore new possibilities without every single moment being something that triggers your cravings.

Focus On Mental Health

Stress, depression, anxiety, and other negative emotions can quickly and easily result in relapse. Meditation and a routine exercise program are useful tools for both your mental and physical health. These bathe your brain in feel good endorphins and chemicals and release tension held in muscles. As you see the results of routine exercise and meditation, you’ll also feel more self-confident and be refocused on your personal goals, not the history of your addition. Include a well-balanced diet that supports mental health; if you’re not participating in an after care program, then consult a nutritionist for a diet plan.

Always Be Self-Aware

Relapse most often has a personal trigger behind it. Know thy own self. Understand your vulnerabilities, weaknesses, and triggers. Capture these thoughts immediately verses letting them swirl around unaddressed until they become overwhelming. Talk with a sober friend or family member, counselor, or support group to determine the best way to address the issue.

Addicts often times have an undiagnosed co-occurring mental health issue, whether it be depression or OCD, that affects their long-term sobriety. Mental illness worsens substance abuse. Substance abuse then worsens mental illness. Worsening mental illness then increases substance abuse. It can be a vicious cycle if not addressed. Be honest in your intake and rehabilitation processes so that any mental health issues can be identified and addressed if they exist.

These seven pointers for staying sober after going through an opiate detox center can help you reach your long-term sobriety objective. Are you ready to start or continue on your road to recovery? Call us today 800-737-0933

Reasons To Avoid Opiate Addiction Doctor And Work Towards Complete Detox

People who have undergone substance abuse know that it is really simple for others to advise that they just quit at once. The process of letting go of addictive substances is just that -- a process.

Getting started on the process of overcoming addiction can be the toughest part that many find hard to overcome on their own. Withdrawal symptoms of different substances can range in strength and nature. These include:

  • Shaking and tremors
  • Chills/Fever
  • Sleep Pattern Change
  • Pain
  • Sweating
  • Anxiety, depression, and other uncomfortable emotional/mental reactions
  • Appetite fluctuations

To avoid these symptoms and stop taking addictive stubstances, many go to their doctor to prescribe them an opioid medication. The substnces in these medications bind to the same receptors that the abusive substance does. This temporarily fulfills the craving and before one knows it, they are addicted to something else.

Why Choose Detox Over Medication

The alternative to taking addictive opioid medications is going for detox therapy. Detox therapy is the first part of healing and curing addictions. The detox aims to clean out all of the addictive substances and toxins out of your body. These substances in the blood are precisely what causes the withdrawal symptoms.

Detox helps you transition safely from the state of addiction towards therapy so that you can concentrate on the protocol of the therapy instead of fighting with yourself over the cravings.

There is a great comfort in knowing that there is someone who knows what they are doing when you are experiencing a withdrawal crisis. You don't have to do it on your own. In the cases of alcohol and benzodiazepine addictions, the symptoms can be potentially dangerous, and when under supervision, medication can be administered to help you overcome it safe and sound.

Even if you do not require medical interventions, you can still benefit from a detox. The clearing of the addictive substances from your body will help carry you through in your decision to stop for good. The confidence of making it through something that you didn't think you could earlier will give you the motivation for further therapy.

Detox and therapy are a healing process that has a goal of curing your life at the root and the things that triggered your addiction in the first place. You can receive help along this healing journey for a new life. Call us today 800-737-0933

The Myths Surrounding Suboxone Detox

Addiction is a problem that plagues an alarming number of people in the United States. In recent years, opioid dependence has become a growing concern. The prescription drug Suboxone, a combination of Buprenorphine and Naloxone, is a partial opioid agonist. It is used to treat individuals with opioid addiction, however, this medication is not meant for long term use. If you or someone you know is using Suboxone to treat opioid addiction or recreationally, you may have concerns about stopping this drug; therefore, it is important to know the facts.

Common Fears About a Suboxone Detox

• Once you are on Suboxone, you can’t get off it
• Suboxone withdrawals last forever
• If Suboxone is stopped, you will be extremely sick
• Suboxone withdrawal is painful and scary

The Truth About Suboxone Detox

The good news is that those fears listed are not reality. The first two points are complete fiction. The last two points may be true if you try to do it alone. The most critical step in healing is to ensure you have the appropriate resources to avoid physiological and psychological effects of withdrawal that would otherwise be worse if done without guidance and supervision.

What Can You Do?

There are facilities that deal with these types of withdrawals and have the tools to offer you a holistic approach during this time. If you are ready to seek help, you will be provided with a nurturing and understanding environment that can assist you with rebuilding structure and meaning into your life. These facilities use a personal approach to care for you as you overcome your addiction. Not only are the physiological symptoms of withdrawal treated, but the mind and spirit are treated as well.

You Are Not Alone

There are a myriad of professionals available to treat you and to ease your fears so that you can return to the healthy you that you deserve. It is also important to keep in mind that there are thousands of people just like you. They, too, may be nervous about seeking help or the possible ramifications of stopping Suboxone. Please know that you are not alone, and getting healthy does not require a painful ordeal. There are professionals ready and willing to help.

Hopefully, armed with some facts, you are ready to seek the help that you deserve. Our devoted counselors are available 24 hours a day. Call us today at 800-737-0933

How Much Will Insurance Cover For Heroin Detox?

Heroin addiction is a devastating disease that afflicts many people today including teenagers and adults. One of the questions that we are asked frequently at our center is whether or not insurance will cover a heroin detox. We hear from many people who are interested in getting clean and staying with us for a heroin detox, but they worry about coming up with the money.

Insurance companies often have provisions that include heroin addiction. These coverages typically involve treatment at a reputable facility that has a detoxification process and a recovery process. One of the reasons insurance companies cover heroin detox programs is because of the devastating health effects of heroin use. Heroin use causes both mental and physical problems with the latter including liver and kidney diseases.

 

How Do I Find Out if My Insurance Company Covers Heroin Detox Programs?

The best way to find out if your insurance company covers heroin detox programs is to speak directly with an agent. Sometimes speaking to an agent over the phone can be difficult and we recommend speaking with an agent in person if possible to review the coverage for your particular plan. Once you find out which programs are covered by your insurance provider and the type of coverage you can expect to receive, you can contact the rehab center to set up additional payment plans for any fees not covered by your insurance company.

What affects the type of coverage you will receive for heroin detox programs?

  • State You Live In
  • Your Insurance Provider
  • Your Insurance Plan
  • Program Type: Inpatient Vs. Outpatient

When reviewing health insurance guidelines for heroin detox coverage, you will also want to ask your provider about inpatient vs. outpatient therapy. Most heroin detox centers start with inpatient heroin detox therapy to ensure that patients are following all steps of treatment including therapy sessions and abstaining from the drug. Most patients benefit from starting with inpatient detox programs before moving to outpatient detox programs because of the undivided one-on-one attention. The outpatient therapy detox programs are best for patients who have better control over their addiction and are simply looking for additional support.

Ready to take action and beat your addiction today? Contact 800-737-0933 to get started. We know that reaching out isn't easy, but it is the first step towards a life of freedom. You deserve to experience everything that life has to offer and we want to help you reach your potential living a heroin-free life.

Why Does Heroin and Other Opiates Cause Constipation?

Opioids and opiates are drugs that depress your central nervous system. This means your breathing and other bodily systems slow down. But opioids are notorious for causing constipation. Why is this?

Your gastrointestinal system also slows down when you take opioids. Not only this, your GI tract has receptors for the opiates that you produce naturally. The opiates and opioids that you take then bind to these receptors. This causes the usual contractions in your large and small intestines to decrease. Opioids may also paralyze your stomach so that it cannot process food the way it usually does. Food not only stays in your stomach, but opioids interfere with the enzymes needed to break it down. Even if everything else was working, opiates even reduce the urge to move your bowels. When you do try to move your bowels:

  • The feces are hard, dry and painful. This is because the longer it takes for the stool to pass through your large intestine, or colon, the more water your body absorbs from them.
  • You have to strain at stool.
  • Even when you do have a bowel movement, it feels incomplete. There is actually a word for this: tenesmus.

The constipation that happens when you take opioids can occur at any time when you are taking the drug. It also doesn’t go away over time like other side effects, because you GI tract doesn’t adapt to the drug the way the rest of your body does. Indeed, the longer you take the drug, the worse your constipation gets. Moreover, the usual remedies that help normal constipation do not work well when you are constipated from opioid use.

Complications of Opiate Caused Constipation

The complications of constipation caused by opioid use is rarely life-threatening, but can be very uncomfortable, and degrade your quality of life. Common complications include:

  • Hemorrhoids, which occur when the veins in the rectum or anus dilate and fail due to straining.
  • Diverticulosis, which are tiny pouches in the wall of the large intestine. If these pouches become inflamed, it can lead to a condition called diverticulitis. Diverticulitis can be serious.
  • Fecal impaction, which happens when a large amount of hard stool simply cannot be passed. This is often accompanied by a watery discharge from the rectum, nausea and malaise.

Call Genesis House for Help

If you need detox for your opiate use and its complications, give us a call at Genesis House. Our number here is 800-737-0933

What Happens During Heroin Detox?

Heroin is one of the most addictive drugs, and the detox period can be tough. However, once you're through the detox stage, you'll be on the road to recovery. Although detox is slightly different for everyone, it can be helpful to have a general idea of what happens.

The severity of the withdrawal symptoms will vary depending on how dependent the brain is on the substance. Common withdrawal symptoms include:

  • Muscle pain
  • Insomnia
  • Sweating
  • Nausea and vomting

Heroin greatly increases dopamine levels in the brain. After prolonged or repeated use, the brain becomes unable to produce sufficient amounts of dopamine on its own and has to readjust to functioning without the drug. Therefore, many people also experience psychological withdrawal symptoms, like anxiety, agitation, and paranoia.

Timeline of Heroin Detox

Heroin withdrawal symptoms usually start between six and 12 hours of the last dose. The symptoms usually peak around the second day. By the third or fourth day, the symptoms typically subside a little, but the discomfort isn't completely gone. It's important to eat properly during this time to help your immune system. Many people experience shivers and abdominal cramping during the third, fourth, and fifth days.

Withdrawal symptoms often end after about seven days. For those who were severely addicted, the symptoms may last for 10 days, but they rarely last for longer. However, some symptoms, like trouble sleeping and loss of appetite, may persist for a few more days.

Although the acute withdrawal stage typically ends in under 10 days, the entire detox process can last for several months because the brain changes caused by heroin take a long time to reverse. This is known as PAWS, or post-acute withdrawal symptoms.

If you begin a supervised detox program, the process will typically begin with an intake and evaluation, which will let your healthcare providers determine an appropriate treatment plan. You'll probably have a physical exam and be asked questions about mental health symptoms. Then, your medical professionals will come up with a plan for your immediate detox and long-term treatment.

Even though the effects of detox and withdrawal are rarely fatal, it's very important to go through detox under medical supervision. This reduces the risk of relapse and provides medical care in case there are complications. If you or a loved one is struggling with a heroin addiction, call us at 800-737-0933 for the care you need.