Tag Archives: heroin

Is a Heroin Rehab Center Able to Treat Low-Income Patients?

The devastating impact of the American Opioid Epidemic has left millions of people struggling with addiction they don’t know how to treat. Those from low-income neighborhoods are more likely to suffer from addiction, but they are also less likely to reach out for treatment because they do not believe they can afford it.

Heroin addiction is a serious substance use disorder that requires professional rehab. The good news is that even if you are unemployed or work a low-income job, you can still receive quality rehabilitation and escape the self-destructing cycle of heroin addiction.

What Are the Treatment Options for Heroin?

Most cases of heroin addiction are severe, meaning they require residential or intensive, all-day treatment programs instead of weekly meetings. There are some forms of long-term residential treatment that last six months to a year; this type of treatment is ideal for people with severe, enduring addictions who also have co-occurring mental health problems. There is an extreme, intense emphasis placed on the self and tackling addiction from the inside out.

Long-term treatment might be effective, but it isn’t an option for many. Instead, short-term programs offer inpatient treatment for 30 to 90 days. As heroin detox typically takes anywhere from two weeks to a month, it’s recommended that clients stay in treatment for at least 60 days. There are some 12-step residential programs that are even shorter and last around six weeks.

If you cannot take off work or afford a residential program, outpatient heroin treatment is also available. Because heroin is so addictive, intensive outpatient programs (IOPs) are the best treatment option. These programs typically last 30 days, but some will last six to eight weeks. Some people may continue their addiction treatment after a residential program by attending an outpatient program.

Forms of Heroin Treatment

Both psychotherapy and medication can be used to help you overcome heroin addiction. Methadone is a common medication prescribed to help treat heroin dependency; avoiding withdrawal and slowly coming off heroin is much easier on the mind and body than abruptly stopping. In fact, quitting heroin entirely right away can be life-threatening and is never recommended.

Therapy such as Cognitive Behavioral Therapy (CBT) is a major element in many addiction treatment models; this form of therapy focuses on helping clients identify their irrational beliefs and negative thinking patterns that contribute to addiction. Self-acceptance, self-esteem building and trauma recovery can also serve major roles during the heroin treatment period.

Group therapy is also implemented in most programs. Support from others who are also going through addiction can be helpful in overcoming the feelings of loneliness, isolation, and hopelessness many people encounter as they let go of drugs and begin to work toward a sober future.

What’s most important to remember is that there is no “one size fits all” treatment for heroin addiction or any substance use disorder, for that matter. You have a unique experience and addiction that is influenced by your upbringing, life experiences and personality. The best rehab will embrace your uniqueness and help you identify the core strengths you possess and help you apply them as you take ownership of your recovery.

Paying for Heroin Treatment

Living in poverty, struggling with low-income or being unemployed can be a major stressor that causes you to rely on heroin as an escape. Your escape ultimately becomes your biggest problem and barrier in life; in order to overcome it, you’ll have to push beyond the ease of using money as an excuse and reach out to rehabs capable of helping you regardless of your annual salary.

Even those who are currently homeless can find treatment. Help is, naturally, easier to acquire if you have large sums of money and can finance a long stay at a luxury rehab, but there are many organizations and rehabs that want to make treatment accessible and affordable to everyone.

Financing plans are available at many residential and outpatient rehabs. With these options, you can enter treatment and even have the cost deferred until you have a stable income can make payments without jeopardizing your welfare.

To learn more about what type of rehab is available near you, contact us today at 800-737-0933. We help people from all walks of life get connected to the treatment programs that help them overcome addiction for good.

What Life Skills Can You Learn in Heroin Rehab?

Have you ever wondered why some people have no issue getting through addiction treatment and staying sober for the rest of their lives while others live a life with chronic relapses and distress? Both groups cease to amaze us in the addiction treatment community. As for the way, there are actually several potential explanations.

For a lot of people who constantly relapse, it’s sometimes never getting to the bottom of the root cause of their addiction that cause the problems. Other people just have difficulty sticking with a program. On the other side of the coin, it’s possible they entered rehab with a moderate addiction or perhaps, they have tremendous support from family and friends, both things making them strong enough to survive.

If it was possible to identify one particular reason for the variance, it would likely have something to do with the coping and life skills someone is able to develop during treatment. For the remaining portion of this document, we are going to discuss the importance of life skill and which life skills seem to make the biggest difference.

What Life Skills Can You Learn in Heroin Rehab?

Before we discuss specific life skills, a little bit of information about what we mean about life skills and its importance seems in order. Life skills are the tools people use to manage their everyday lives. In a normal person, there are the skills that come into play to cover every aspect of an individual’s life.

Most people live regulars lives. When stress and frustration come calling, they are able to use the life skills they learned as kids and teenagers to deal with what’s in front of them. It doesn’t mean they don’t struggle and have problems, it just means their problems never seem to get bad enough to lead them into danger.

The folks who end up caught in the cycle of addiction don’t always have the right coping and life skills. When unable to properly manage their lives, they become vulnerable to outside influences like drugs and alcohol. The big attraction of substance abuse is it gives the user a way out. It gives them a way to medicate away the pain, stress, and frustration of everyday life. What little bit they had of life skills before they started using dissipates into nothing, leaving them to be like a lake without water in it.

In addiction therapy, the focus is put on isolating the real issues. Once the real issues can be identified, the client, working with a counselor, can begin to develop better life skills. Let’s discuss some specific life skills which might prove effective.

Managing Finances

Money issues create a lot of financial problems and stress in our lives. They are also the easiest issues to rectify with the proper training. In rehab, counselors teach their clients how to create a budget and live within the confines of that budget. Organized finances is always a good way to prevent money issues.

Learning to Communicate

Addiction sufferers tend to break away from family and friends in an attempt to isolate themselves. Somewhere along the line they completely lose whatever ability they had to communicate in the first place. Being able to communicate feelings and emotions to friends and relatives while in recovery is absolutely necessary. The addiction sufferer needs the ability to speak up when they are bothered and perhaps on the verge of a relapse. Communication skills are a very important part of recovery.

Leadership Skills

Success in life is an important part of keeping us all happy and satisfied with our lives. Addiction sufferers typically have a breakdown in the ways they interact with people. They tend to withdraw or simply go with the flow. By motivating and teaching them to be leaders of their own lives and perhaps in their careers, that sense of control will often inspire them to keep things moving in a positive direction.

Living Healthy Lives

When people look good on the outside and feel good physically on the inside, it diminishes their desire to punish themselves with drugs or alcohol. In treatment, there’s always some focus put on nutrition and getting proper exercise. The routine of exercising and eating well creates certain stability within a person’s life.

If your addiction is causing you hardship, you need help. We would be happy to help you with everything from detox to learning better coping and life skills. For more information about our services, we want you to call one of our representatives at 800-737-0933.

How Do Medical Professionals Handle Heroin Addiction in Comparison to Other Drug Addictions?

Heroin is one of the most dangerous and addictive street drugs in the world. It is an opiate that will rewrite the brain’s perception of pleasure and reward in ways that many other substances do not, so withdrawal from the substance can be far more painful than from other drugs. This is why medical professionals have to handle heroin addiction much more delicately than addiction from other substances.

Detox

The first and perhaps most important step in treating heroin addiction is the detoxification process. This can be harrowing for patients under the most ideal circumstances, and it should never be attempted alone. Many patients need to undergo medical detox, which ensures that they are weaned off of heroin in a controlled environment instead of quitting outright. They may also be provided with medications to help them control their withdrawal symptoms, which is often a crucial part of the rehab process. This usually involves taking suboxone, a medication that can in itself be addictive and should only be taken in a clinical setting.

Counseling

Much of what makes heroin addiction treatment different from other addiction treatment is getting over the physical addiction and managing the harsh withdrawal symptoms, but it is far from the only element of treatment. Once a patient has properly detoxed and is mostly over their physical addiction, they often have to undergo counseling and treatment to address the reasons why they turned to heroin in the first place. This process can take anywhere from a few months to several years depending on the patient’s situation. As we said before, heroin alters the brain’s perception of pleasure and reward, and any addiction treatment will involve basically rewriting one’s thought process. This cognitive therapy and counseling can be just as difficult as overcoming the physical addiction, and it should be taken very seriously.

There is no doubt that heroin is one of the most dangerous illicit drugs available today. It is part of the reason why there is such a severe opiate addiction epidemic in the United States, and it continues to claim thousands of lives every year. If you or a loved one is struggling with an addiction to heroin, know that there is hope for you. Contact our treatment center today at 800-737-0933 for more information. Our counselors are available 24 hours a day, and they will gladly help you find the treatment that you need.

How Can People With Chronic Pain Quit Heroin?

You can manage chronic pain and quit heroin while learning how to reduce the risk of substance abuse. Painkillers or its derivatives are adequate for most and as the pain worsens relief demands more frequent doses leading to potential drug dependency.

Too often individuals attempt to self-medicate and trigger more serious health conditions. There are effective non-opioid drugs combined with different types of therapeutic and medical procedures for treating chronic pain and addiction.

The approach is multi-disciplinary; transitioning from heroin to a non-opioid medication, treatments for pain, and the introductions of precautions to prevent drug relapse.

More Than Just Pain

A vast majority of individual’s suffering with chronic pain are unaware they have a substance abuse problem. Besides the health considerations that will worsen over time substance abuse interferes with the body’s genetic makeup and biological functions. At this point, reversing the effect is difficult without some form of professional assistance.

For most, addiction to heroin occurs with long-term use as the chemicals change how our body responds. Did you know?

  • Heroin does not heal or repair the cause of chronic pain.
  • Heroin offers only short-term intervals for relieving chronic pain.
  • Heroin can cause mild to extreme side effects that interfere with day-to-day functions.

Heroin and other painkillers belong to the same class of drugs called opioids. Opioids attach to receptors found on the nerve cells in the brain interfering with the signals that alert the body to pain. For some, it may decrease the level of pain temporarily and prompt a feeling of euphoria.

Non-Opioid Pain Treatments

Heroin isn’t the only chronic pain treatment option. Like heroin, all medications or illegal drugs have potential risk factors. Contributing to these risks are personal health status and family medical disorders.

  • Do you know if other types of substance abuse or psychiatric disorders exist?

The outcome could be affected when one or more of these factors exist. This information helps to select the combinations of medicine and therapy for the individual’s lifestyle and level of pain.

Addiction programs incorporate specialized doctors and alternative health teams to help cope with the situation. Depending on the severity of heroin use the withdrawal process can cause:

  • Cold flashes
  • Insomnia
  • Muscle or bone pain
  • Restlessness

Treating chronic pain without heroin involves physical, psychological, and occupational therapies along with a medical supervisor of nonopioid pain treatments or medicine.

Getting Rid of The Pain Without Heroin

Chronic pain is manageable with medications and alternative practices achieving fewer adverse effects on your health. Treatment starts with understanding that both the physical and mental components of one’s health are involved in recovery.

Facts of treating pain with heroin:

  • The body builds a tolerance to heroin with long-term use
  • The pain remains.
  • Opioids (heroin) are addictive, dangerous and life-threatening.

Technology and medical advances address the source of the pain collectively with non-opioid medications and therapies. Recovery centers provide a safe and caring environment.

Residential programs offer personal and group follow-up care. The goal is to help teach individuals how to live life without addiction through a continuum of care.

Managing Life One Day A Time

The good news, physical dependence on heroin is reversible. By focusing on the cause of addiction and responding to chronic pain, you can learn how to deal with it and quit heroin.

  • It’s not a process that you can maneuver alone.
  • You need the help of trained professionals.

Recovery is a long journey and treatment to the addiction is only the first phase. To quit heroin, you must continue to maintain your physical and mental health one day at a time. See your doctor regularly for the pain to prevent a relapse. More important, if you experience a relapse urge, seek support – it happens from time to time.

Dealing with chronic pain is unbearable but blocking out the pain with heroin can only cause more damage to your health. Rather than live with addiction, there’s help available to minimize the effects of withdrawal and teach you how to manage a life with chronic pain instead.

Using heroin to quite chronic pain comes with a wide range of potential risks and side effects. Call our office at 800-737-0933 if you find yourself thinking about taking higher doses or more powerful drugs for pain.

What Types of Medication Will an FL Heroin Rehab Center Prescribe to Help With Detox?

Addiction is filled with irony and contradiction. For instance, doctors prescribe medications to help patients with things like seizures, depression, sleep disorders, and pain. When taken properly, this medication can produce wonderful results, giving the patient a much better quality of life.

The irony and contradiction come because these very same medications can be very harmful if misused and abused. The line between good and bad results is indeed very thin. For a moment, let’s consider pain medications like morphine or Oxycontin. The proper doses of this medication can relieve a patient’s chronic pain. That’s a good thing for anyone who doesn’t have any other alternatives. However, these medications are opiates and opiates are highly addictive. Addiction to these medications can produce side effects like:

  • Loss of motor function throughout the body
  • Memory loss and mental lapses
  • Breathing and blood pressure problems
  • Sleeping issues like insomnia
  • Nausea and vomiting

Even the decision to stop using these drugs after an addiction has been created can cause significant withdrawal symptoms like tremors, hallucinations, convulsions, depression, suicidal thoughts and anxiety.

The reason for this discussion is because certain medications are used in the addiction treatment process. That is ironic and definitely a contradiction. The information below will address the types of medications used during the detox process and how those drugs help as well as what risks they create.

Types of Medication an FL Heroin Rehab Center Can Prescribe to Help With Detox?

When people enter rehab with a significant addiction, their minds and bodies have an extremely high level of dependence on the drug(s) of choice. Before a patient is going to be able to focus on the rigors of therapy and counseling, they need time to wean themselves off all substances. During that process, the aforementioned withdrawal symptoms come into play. The purpose of a detox program is to get patients past their cravings and withdrawal symptoms as safely as possible.

If at all possible, it’s a good thing if the patient can detox as naturally as possible. Maybe good nutritional and exercise programs are all they will need to eliminate their issues. With that said, that’s a best-case scenario that’s usually only applicable to people with a moderate addiction. Otherwise, a medically monitored detox program is needed.

In a medically monitored detox program, patients go through detox under the watchful eye of medical professionals. If severe discomfort becomes apparent, the doctors have the ability to prescribe certain medications to help with issues like pain or sleeping issues. In the case of people with a “severe” addiction, tapering medications may be used to help the patient slowly and safely wean off drugs. Some of the common medications used in a Florida detox program include:

  • Disulfiram and naltrexone for alcohol addiction
  • Methadone or Suboxone for opiate addiction
  • Buprenorphine for opiate addiction
  • Ritalin for cocaine and meth addictions

Let’s look closer at the benefits of these drugs in the detox and addiction treatment process.

Disulfiram and Naltrexone for Alcohol Addiction

These medications are often used to decrease the cravings a patient has while going through the detox process. The effects of these drugs replace the effects of alcohol, creating less desire for booze. These drugs have proven very effective in relapse prevention.

Methadone or Suboxone for Opiate Addiction

Both of these medications are used for severe addictions to heroin and painkillers. They are tapering medications that offer the body lower doses of the active ingredients found in opiates. They are intended for long-term detox programs with diminishing doses over several weeks. They are also addictive.

Buprenorphine for Opiate Addiction

Another tapering drug for heroin addiction. The difference is this drug doesn’t contain opiates as an active ingredient. Instead, it’s considered a partial opioid agonist, which activates the same opioid receptors but produces a much safer response.

Ritalin for Cocaine and Meth Addictions

Ritalin is a stimulant drug prescribed to treat ADHD. Doctors and scientists have found that while the drug acts to stimulate the same receptors in the brain, the intake process is much slower, which results in a lower propensity for addiction. It’s good for long-term use.

If you would like more information about the medications we might use during your addiction treatment, you need to call us immediately. You can reach one of our professional staff members at 800-737-0933.

What Resources Can You Use to Help Heroin Addicts?

It seems 10 lifetimes that America has been dealing with a heroin abuse epidemic. The drug became popular and a problem in the 1960’s and remains a menace today. One would think the country would have perfected ways to treat heroin addicts, but the reality is it hasn’t. So what exactly can you do to help a heroin addict?

What we know is there really is only one viable method of treatment for heroin addiction. Folks often try conventional counseling with a therapist, but it hardly makes a dent. The Internet is full of home remedies and self-help methods of treatment and again, it hardly makes a dent. What these option have in common is they fail to address both the addiction and the causes of the addiction.

That really leaves the addict with one choice, getting treatment from a reputable drug and alcohol treatment facility. For your part, you can be a good friend or loved one. You can look out for them in anticipation of a crisis that almost always comes. When that crisis does come, it will be time for you to tap into the resources at your disposal.

What Resources You Have to Help a Heroin Addict

While it may not be your responsibility, you still have an obligation to look after your loved ones. If someone you care about is addicted to heroin, it’s going to be tough watching them struggle and simply do nothing. Unfortunately, doing nothing equates to enabling, and that’s the last thing you want to do. With that in mind, here’s a few resources you can use to help your loved one get the help they need.

Educate Yourself

Unless you understand the nuances of heroin addiction, you’ll find there’s much for you to learn. The Internet is filled with information about heroin addiction. It might be worthwhile to contact your own physician and ask them to help educate you. Of course, a reputable drug addiction treatment center is going to be willing to sit down with you and offer up information.

Intervention

Armed with some knowledge about heroin addiction, you might want to consider putting on an intervention. This would give you a great opportunity to get other people involved in the process. Remember, the goal of an intervention is to motivate the heroin addict to seek help. Here’s a few dos and don’ts to consider when running an intervention.

  • Be prepared and rehearse what is going to be discussed
  • Try to keep things positive by having each person mention how much they care
  • Don’t make accusations
  • Don’t let the subject of the intervention take over the proceedings
  • Discuss possible treatment options and offer to be supportive

You can anticipate your loved one being a bit overwhelmed. They might need a little time to let the intervention process sink in. You should give them that time. By not pressing and keeping things positive, there’s an excellent chance they will agree to get help. If not, don’t panic. You can stay diligent and hopefully they will come around.

Help With the Treatment Facility Selection Process

When your loved one is ready to accept they have an illness and get help, it would be an excellent idea for you to be prepared to offer assistance with the rehab selection process. The first thing you can help with is finding out how much of the treatment process you loved one’s healthcare insurance provider is willing to cover. For any shortage, you could help locate other financial resources.

From there, you can help your loved one find the right treatment facility. There has been a dramatic transformation in the addiction treatment industry over the last few years. They place much more emphasis on providing custom treatment programs that fit a patient’s needs and circumstances. With this in mind, you might want to discuss your loved one’s situation with multiple treatment facilities. Eventually, you will find one that has exactly what you and your loved one are needing.

While your loved on is in treatment, you could actually start the process of locating aftercare resources. This might include a sober living home, 12-Step meetings and counseling resources.

We hope the information we have provided above will help you save your loved one. When your loved one is ready to admit defeat and ask for help, we encourage you to pick up the phone and call one of our professional counselors at 800-737-0933.

Why Can Heroin Relapse Be More Dangerous Than Other Types of Drug Relapse?

Addiction to opioids, in particular, heroin, has reached epic proportions in the United States. In 2017 alone, more than 15,000 deaths from heroin overdose are estimated to have occurred. It is common knowledge that heroin is a dangerous and addictive drug, but many people do not realize that many of these overdose deaths occur during a relapse. In order to understand why heroin relapse is more dangerous than other types of drug relapse, it is important to understand the body’s physical dependence on heroin.

Heroin’s Effect on the Brain

When someone injects or snorts heroin, it travels to the brain and binds to opiate receptors. This causes neurons in the brain to release dopamine. Dopamine is a “feel good” chemical that induces an overall sense of euphoria and well-being. In addition to feelings of euphoria and pain relief, the respiratory system, in particular, the instinct to breathe, is impaired. When too much heroin is taken at once, the person can become unconscious and stop breathing. This is called an overdose.

An overdose of heroin can happen quickly. People around the user may think they simply fell asleep, but when breathing stops, the brain can not get the oxygen it needs to sustain life. If the effects of the heroin are not reversed quickly, permanent brain damage and death can occur.

How Heroin Addiction Occurs

When heroin is used repeatedly over time, the brain builds up a tolerance to the drug. Users then need to use more heroin in order to feel the same effects. Once tolerance occurs, the brain starts to become dependent on heroin in order to function normally. Without the presence of heroin, withdrawal occurs.

Withdrawal from heroin can range from discomfort to agonizing. A person experiencing withdrawal will seek out more heroin in order to stop the negative effects of withdrawal. This is how addiction to heroin occurs.

When a person decides to stop using heroin and enter treatment for their disease they will experience withdrawal. During treatment at a facility, there are support people available to help manage the uncomfortable withdrawal symptoms. Withdrawal symptoms can last from a few days to a few weeks, depending on the length and severity of the addiction.

Why is Heroin Relapse so Dangerous?

As the body becomes accustomed to functioning normally without heroin, its tolerance for the drug also lessens. While a person is in the throes of addiction, they may have needed to use large amounts of heroin in order to function because of high tolerances. When a person is no longer physically addicted to heroin, their tolerance level is lowered. When a person relapses and begins using heroin again, they often overestimate the amount they will need to feel high. This lowered tolerance also increases the risk of overdose and death during relapses.

In order to prevent a relapse from heroin addiction, a long-term treatment program should be used. After withdrawal symptoms cease, therapy and support must be implemented for a greater chance of recovery. Recovery from heroin addiction can be a lifelong struggle for some people and the right treatment program can greatly increase the odds of staying clean and preventing relapse.

Triggers and Warning Signs of Heroin Relapse

It is important to recognize the triggers and warning signs of relapse. Many recovering heroin addicts will need to completely rebuild their life and find new friends and social activities to engage in, which can be a daunting task. Some triggers for heroin relapse include:

  • Feelings of stress, fear, depression, anxiety, guilt and loneliness
  • Seeing drug use on television or movies
  • Spending time with friends or family members associated with heroin use
  • An urge to have more fun during social events
  • Using alcohol or other drugs
  • Big life changes such as a death of a loved one, divorce, or unemployment
  • Boredom

It can also be important for loved ones to recognize the warning signs of relapse so that an increase in therapy or reentry into a treatment program can occur before relapse. Some of these warning signs include:

  • Attitude changes
  • Attending social events with friends associated with past drug use
  • A decline in appearance due to lack of hygiene, sleep, or appetite
  • Dishonestly
  • An increase in irresponsible behavior like skipping therapy, not attending school, or skipping work

If you or someone you love are struggling with heroin addiction or concerned about relapse reach out to us at 800-737-0933. Our counselors are available twenty-four hours a day to answer any questions you may have.

What Programs Are Available at Heroin Treatment Centers?

Heroin is an opioid drug that is easy to get addicted to. Your brain holds receptors that will react to the chemicals found in these types of drugs, causing you to crave more of it. As easy as it is to get addicted to it, it’s way tougher to beat without the necessary support and medical intervention. That’s why you usually find specialized programs available at Heroin treatment centers. They’re designed to help you kick Heroin out of your system and to learn healthier alternatives to dealing with life’s issues.

There are a few different ways that treatment facilities help you recover from an addiction to a drug like Heroin. Let’s explore what those programs are and how they help you.

Detox Programs at Heroin Treatment Centers

This is the most important step to your recovery. Getting Heroin out of your system and then keeping it out will be necessary. Unfortunately, without professional help, you’ll find trying to get rid of the drug near impossible to do. Once the drug wears off, withdrawal symptoms surface. This can be so debilitating that many people turn to heroin, again, in order to deal with the negative effects. Thus making recovery that much harder to get.

A detox program often will use other medications to help you deal with withdrawals while you wait it out. These, however, will need medical supervision to ensure nothing goes wrong. Some meds a center might use to help in the detox process are:

  • Buprenorphine
  • Naltrexone
  • Methadone

Therapy Programs at Heroin Treatment Centers

While the detox process is powerful with the use of medications, it’s more effective when combined with a facility’s therapy program. A professionally trained counselor can help you understand why your addiction may have happened in the first place. You can explore any issues you may have and learn new coping strategies to use instead of turning to heroin to be your solution.

Some centers offer other types of therapies as well. You could get into an exercise routine that not only gets you physically fit, but it will help promote great mental health too. Also, you could learn some beneficial life skills to use when you go back to your life and have to deal with everyday problems. Adding therapy or counseling sessions to your treatment program increases your chances of becoming addiction-free.

Family Programs at Heroin Treatment Centers

Individual therapy will be necessary to get down to the root of your addiction causes. But, most centers don’t want you to feel isolated and alone in your recovery. You need moral support, not just from the staff or other peers going through the same program as you, but from your family as well. Most centers feel that family involvement is a huge benefit in the rehab process.

You’ll find many facilities offering family programs to help you immerse yourself in therapy right along with them. They become an invaluable support line to cheer you on to recovery. Heroin may have isolated you, but a family treatment program will help sew your relationship back together. This will also help your family members understand where you’re coming from, so they can help you better.

After Care Programs at Heroin Treatment Centers

It’s always great to leave a treatment center feeling addiction-free, but getting over a heroin addiction will take more time than just a few weeks or months. Once you leave, you should still have support, periodically, to keep you off heroin for good. Without it, you could revert to your addiction days and use heroin or maybe another addictive drug. A good facility won’t let you leave without having some kind of aftercare support to keep you going strong.

Typically, you’ll attend group therapy sessions. You may have already started one while you were in the recovery program, but this kind of service is important for your aftercare. You have moral support from others who have been in your shoes and know exactly what it’s like. They can be your best cheer-leading team to inspire you to beat the addiction for good. Sharing your story and learning from others is an important part of your aftercare recovery process.

Since heroin addiction is so hard to get rid of, you should try to use all these treatments when you can. Each part of the program holds important aspects to your recovery and should be used together for maximum benefit. If you have questions or would like to know more about heroin treatments, call us at 800-737-0933.

Why Outpatient Detox Should Be Coupled With Ongoing Treatment

Drug and alcohol addiction is a serious disease. It affects nearly every aspect of your life including your job, your relationships with family and friends, and your health. In order for you to resume a normal life free from drugs and alcohol, the treatment must be taken as seriously as the disease. Recovery is a process that not only includes removing drugs and alcohol from your body but also learning how to cope with life without using them.

Detoxing from drugs and alcohol is the first step towards a sober life. During outpatient detox, you may go through some uncomfortable withdrawal symptoms. This initial detox may seem like the hardest part to go through, but recovery needs to include ongoing treatment in order to prevent relapse and be successful.

When you are addicted to drugs or alcohol, they become your first priority. Everything else in your life gets pushed to the side in order to satisfy the addiction. Now that you are determined to end your addiction, you need to learn how to live life again without being under the influence.

Types of Ongoing Treatment

You may have been experiencing underlying mental health issues and chose to self-medicate with drugs and alcohol. Unfortunately, now that the drugs and alcohol are gone, the mental health issue you were experiencing before will most likely return. One on one counseling can help you manage any mental health issues that may be present during your recovery treatment. Counseling can help you learn effective coping strategies to deal with life stressors and triggers that may give you cravings for your drug of choice. Therapy can help you define goals you would like to set for yourself both during and after your treatment.

Group therapy is helpful for patients starting out in recovery. Attending group therapy sessions gives you an opportunity to share your own experiences, what is working for you in recovery and what you need to work on. It is also helpful to hear about other recovering addicts’ similar experiences and what challenges they may be facing.

Twelve-step support groups like alcoholics anonymous and narcotics anonymous have proven to be incredibly helpful for recovering addicts. Like group therapy, this is a way to hear about others’ experiences and what they have learned from them. It is a good way to learn how others cope with cravings or how they manage their daily lives without drugs or alcohol.

The initial detox period needs to be incorporated with ongoing treatment in order to be successful. A serious illness like addiction needs to be treated seriously so that you can live a healthy, sober life. Our counselors are available twenty-four hours a day to help you begin your new sober life. Call today 800-737-0933

How Long Does It Take To Get Into a Detox Center in Florida?

Recovery is a process that takes place in several stages. The most challenging stages are at the beginning of the process, and each stages becomes easier. Detox is the first stage in the process, and it is the most challenging stage.

Withdrawal refers to the physical pain and sickness you will feel as your body is acclimating itself to function without drugs and/or alcohol for the first time in a while.  You should always go through withdrawal, especially alcohol withdrawal, under the supervision of medical professionals because of the risks that are associated with it. Going through withdrawal under the supervision of medical professionals and other addiction counselors is typically done in a detox center.

There are several different types of detox programs.

  • Inpatient
  • Outpatient
  • Three-Day Programs
  • Five-Day Programs
  • Seven-Day Programs

Many Americans who have recovered from addiction have gone to Florida because of the state’s ideal healing environment. If you plan on going to Florida to start your recovery, your first stop will most likely be a detox center. The detox center may in the same facility as your rehabilitation facility or it may be a separate facility.

The Length of Time it Takes to Be Admitted to a Detox Center in Florida

If you are willing to be admitted to a detox center in Florida, you have overcome the first hurdle in the recovery processes. At this point, it is important for you be admitted into a detox center as soon as possible to avoid second guessing yourself or any other complications that may prevent you from going to detox. Because Florida is the recovery capital of the country, it is well-experienced in helping individuals achieve successful addiction recovery; therefore, the detox centers and rehab centers understand the importance of you getting into a detox center as soon as possible.

Most detox centers can admit you the same day as you call. It is almost definite that you will admitted the same day if you are under certain circumstances such as

  • Having had an Overdose
  • Experiencing Psychiatric Issues
  • Experiencing Some other Medical Emergency Related to Drug Use
  • Have a Prolonged History of a Severe Addiction
  • Your Family is Concerned that You Will Change Your Mind if You are Forced to Wait Several days.

If same-day admittance is not possible by the detox center you have reached out to, it is most likely due to that center not having a bed for you. Since detox center programs are typically no longer than a week, you should be able to get into the detox center within several days. However, you should call around to several detox centers because there is bound to be a center that can admit you the same day. If you are waiting to get into a rehab center that has a detox program within in their center, you may have to wait up to three weeks. Community drug treatment programs have the longest waits because you have to wait for social services to confirm a place for you and approve the funding for your stay. The longer wait times of rehab centers and community drug programs are why individual detox centers are strongly recommended. Though recovery is a challenging journey, it possesses rich rewards for all who travel it. If you are sick and tired of being sick and tired, call our detox center today to start your journey on the road to recovery. Call 800-737-0933