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How Alcohol Rehab Can Change Your Life In 30 Days Or Less

Can just 30 days of rehab change your life? It sounds like such a short time compared to the time that you have been struggling with your addiction to alcohol. Be encouraged — with expert care in an atmosphere of healing, you can experience an amazing transformation within a month.

For starters, you will experience living without alcohol for about a month. During 30 days of alcohol rehab, you will detox safely under medical supervision. Your body and mind will have time to begin recovery from the debilitating effects of alcohol misuse. Since you will not be able to resort to overindulging in alcohol as a coping mechanism, you will be free to face yourself and focus on cultivating positive skills and habits. At the end of your stay, you will have proven to yourself and your loved ones that you can make it without drinking for a long time — because you did.

It is extremely difficult to change unhealthy behaviors by yourself in the same environment that encourages or hides your alcohol misuse. A 30-day intensive rehab takes you away from your everyday responsibilities and routines, allowing you to focus on yourself and your journey of healing. During this time, compassionate counselors come beside you to help you discover the root of your addiction and give you tools to help you overcome it. After rehab, you are literally equipped to rebuild your life, your self-confidence and the trust of your loved ones.

Taking 30 days for rehabilitation is an immense investment in yourself. You are proving to yourself that you are worth the time and resources to make your life better. This commitment and participation in a program can help you set the stage for a future free of alcohol addiction. Always remember that recovery is a lifelong process; however, a 30-day treatment program is a powerful kick start toward a brighter direction.

Inpatient rehab has been a pivotal point of positive transformation for multitudes of former addicts from many backgrounds. These brave people have been enjoying sober lives free of addiction and all its attendant trauma, illness and tragedy. If you have tried getting clean on your own or with outpatient support with no success, now could be the time for you to check into a residential recovery program. We want to help you change your life in 30 days or less. Call us today at 800-737-0933

Why Going To A Treatment Center Is Better Than Just Going To AA

Over 2 million people seek treatment for addictions through rehabilitation centers each year. Finding the right recovery program can make the difference between gaining and maintaining sobriety or relapsing. While both inpatient and outpatient treatment programs focus on rehabilitation, each kind has unique characteristics and benefits that addicted individuals and their families need to consider.

How Inpatient and Outpatient Rehab Programs Differ

Inpatient rehab centers, also referred to as residential treatment, are in-depth residential recovery programs devised to treat severe addictions. Patients submit to a controlled setting for an extended period of time to conquer their addictions. Patients live at a clinic under 24-hour medical supervision and emotional support. In this environment, every day is meticulously scheduled. Away from distractions and discouragement, residents can focus on healing.

Outpatient rehab programs are part-time, allowing recovering users to continue with their normal daily work and activities. Recovering addicts stay at home. Outpatient treatment centers normally hold meetings early in the morning or evening to accommodate participants’ schedules. Groups such as Alcoholics Anonymous (AA) and Narcotics Anonymous (NA) are often used in conjunction with outpatient treatment. Research indicates that engaging in groups such as AA and NA helps recovering users maintain sobriety.

While an outpatient program does offer invaluable support for recovering alcoholics, it does not provide a means to break away from familiar settings where triggers and temptations lurk. A residential treatment center provides a respite from the routine that enables the misuse of alcohol. The recovering users temporarily have no access to alcohol and are under medical care as they detox. All the while, they receive professional emotional support and cultivate relationships with fellow inpatients.

Overcoming unhealthy habits often requires a reboot — an intensive purging of the old and imparting of the new. An inpatient rehab center is an ideal place to reboot yourself. Outpatient programs can serve as effective maintenance tools. Once you have completed an inpatient program, you can continue treatment with outpatient programs such as AA or NA. You will benefit from the community and accountability which will confirm the insights you gained during residential treatment.

Recovery from addiction is a lifelong journey. Rehab can equip you with the skills you need to become and stay sober. Move in and move on to a better life. Call us at 800-737-0933

Should I Get Ongoing Support After Going To Rehab?

Recovery does not end after going to rehab. The Betty Ford foundation defines recovery as a “voluntarily maintained lifestyle characterized by sobriety, personal health, and citizenship.” There is no mastery level of recovery; recovery is a lifelong process. Though the idea of recovery being a lifelong process may sound daunting to you at first, life in recovery is full of rich rewards. Recovery is not possible if citizenship is not a part of it; therefore, ongoing support is a must after going to rehab.

There are several sources of support that you can turn to after going to rehab:

Twelve Step Meetings

Twelve Step Meetings (e.g. Alcoholics’ Anonymous, Narcotics’ Anonymous, Sex Addicts Anonymous, etc.) are the oldest and most renowned form of support after going to rehab. The theory behind them is having addicts come together for mutual aid.

Outpatient Treatment

Treating the psychological component of addiction often takes longer than the length of your stay in rehab. Intensive-outpatient meets three to five times a week for three hours. The program includes counseling, group therapy, and education. Regular outpatient rehab is similar to meeting with a therapist once or twice a week for one to two hours. Group therapy and education may also be a part of outpatient rehab.

Twelve Step Alternatives

There are several alternatives to 12-Step Programs (e.g. SMART Recovery, LifeRing Secular Recovery, Women for Sobriety, etc.). There are many paths to the road to recovery. The 12-Steps are not for everybody. Research has shown 12-Step Alternatives are just as effective -if not more effective than the 12 Steps. Spiritual/religious fellowships (e.g. church) are even effective support for some people.

Why Ongoing Support After Rehab is a Must

While professionals can provide insight based on textbooks and research, the best support for a recovering addict is other recovering addicts. Other newly-recovering addicts can provide empathy that you cannot receive elsewhere. Since they are going through the same challenges and experiences as you are, you can collaborate with them on finding solutions to living a successful life in recovery. Being around healthy people is a must for successful recovery, and other recovering addicts who are actively working a program are healthy people.

Genesis House is located in Lake Worth, Florida. Our detox and residential treatment programs can help you jumpstart your new life in recovery. In addition, we provide dual diagnosis, Christian rehab, specialized rehab for uniform officers, and family programs. Most major health insurance plans are accepted.

If you are interested in Genesis House, call them today at 800-737-0933

How Effective is Substance Abuse Treatment in Florida?

Imagine if you were forced to be confined to a building for one month to several months. You are not permitted outside under any circumstances. Your bedroom during that time is a cold, sterile hospital room. Your daily activities only consist of attending monotone talk therapy and group meetings. The staff treats you like you are a combination of mentally ill and a criminal. You desperately want to be liberated from the chains of your addiction, but you despise your first glimpse of sober life.

This was addiction treatment before the Florida Model

In the 1980’s, Sid Goodman revolutionized substance abuse treatment by innovating the Florida Model. The Florida Model consisted of addiction treatment centers being laid out like a college campus. The clients would live in comfortable, homey living areas and travel to other buildings for their therapies and treatments, allowing them a plethora of outdoor time. The therapy consisted of experiential therapies that were enhanced by the Florida environment in conjunction with the traditional talk therapy and meetings.

Studies have always shown that the Florida Model produced significantly higher success rates than the traditional model. The Florida Model is now used around the world to treat addiction and other mental health disorders.

A Sunny Start to Your Recovery

Since the Florida Model is now used by treatment centers all over the world, people are drawn to Florida for recovery for different reasons.
• The year-round warm climate and proximity to the beach, which creates the ideal healing environment.
• Distancing themselves from the environment where they were active in their addiction.
• The reputable treatment centers.
• The highly-experienced treatment centers and staff.

Substance abuse treatment in Florida is highly effective because they are the experts at their own innovation. Though the Florida Model is a highly effective form of addiction treatment, it must be implemented properly to be effective, and Florida treatment centers have almost 40 years of experience and remain up-to-date on the latest addiction research treatments. In addition to contributing to the ideal healing environment, Florida’s climate enables enjoyable experiential therapies (e.g. animal therapy, nature therapy, adventure therapy, sports therapy, etc.) to be implemented year-round. Receiving experiential therapies will help you open up about your psychological issues, correct your errors in thinking, and learn how to have fun while sober. Distancing yourself from the environment where you were active in your addiction treatment will help you set a solid foundation for new beginnings and avoid relapse triggers early in your recovery.

Genesis House has been treating addiction since 1992. They are a safe, nurturing place to start your sunny start to recovery. Call them today at 800-737-0933

Why Does Heroin and Other Opiates Cause Constipation?

Opioids and opiates are drugs that depress your central nervous system. This means your breathing and other bodily systems slow down. But opioids are notorious for causing constipation. Why is this?

Your gastrointestinal system also slows down when you take opioids. Not only this, your GI tract has receptors for the opiates that you produce naturally. The opiates and opioids that you take then bind to these receptors. This causes the usual contractions in your large and small intestines to decrease. Opioids may also paralyze your stomach so that it cannot process food the way it usually does. Food not only stays in your stomach, but opioids interfere with the enzymes needed to break it down. Even if everything else was working, opiates even reduce the urge to move your bowels. When you do try to move your bowels:

  • The feces are hard, dry and painful. This is because the longer it takes for the stool to pass through your large intestine, or colon, the more water your body absorbs from them.
  • You have to strain at stool.
  • Even when you do have a bowel movement, it feels incomplete. There is actually a word for this: tenesmus.

The constipation that happens when you take opioids can occur at any time when you are taking the drug. It also doesn’t go away over time like other side effects, because you GI tract doesn’t adapt to the drug the way the rest of your body does. Indeed, the longer you take the drug, the worse your constipation gets. Moreover, the usual remedies that help normal constipation do not work well when you are constipated from opioid use.

Complications of Opiate Caused Constipation

The complications of constipation caused by opioid use is rarely life-threatening, but can be very uncomfortable, and degrade your quality of life. Common complications include:

  • Hemorrhoids, which occur when the veins in the rectum or anus dilate and fail due to straining.
  • Diverticulosis, which are tiny pouches in the wall of the large intestine. If these pouches become inflamed, it can lead to a condition called diverticulitis. Diverticulitis can be serious.
  • Fecal impaction, which happens when a large amount of hard stool simply cannot be passed. This is often accompanied by a watery discharge from the rectum, nausea and malaise.

Call Genesis House for Help

If you need detox for your opiate use and its complications, give us a call at Genesis House. Our number here is 800-737-0933

What Happens During Heroin Detox?

Heroin is one of the most addictive drugs, and the detox period can be tough. However, once you’re through the detox stage, you’ll be on the road to recovery. Although detox is slightly different for everyone, it can be helpful to have a general idea of what happens.

The severity of the withdrawal symptoms will vary depending on how dependent the brain is on the substance. Common withdrawal symptoms include:

  • Muscle pain
  • Insomnia
  • Sweating
  • Nausea and vomting

Heroin greatly increases dopamine levels in the brain. After prolonged or repeated use, the brain becomes unable to produce sufficient amounts of dopamine on its own and has to readjust to functioning without the drug. Therefore, many people also experience psychological withdrawal symptoms, like anxiety, agitation, and paranoia.

Timeline of Heroin Detox

Heroin withdrawal symptoms usually start between six and 12 hours of the last dose. The symptoms usually peak around the second day. By the third or fourth day, the symptoms typically subside a little, but the discomfort isn’t completely gone. It’s important to eat properly during this time to help your immune system. Many people experience shivers and abdominal cramping during the third, fourth, and fifth days.

Withdrawal symptoms often end after about seven days. For those who were severely addicted, the symptoms may last for 10 days, but they rarely last for longer. However, some symptoms, like trouble sleeping and loss of appetite, may persist for a few more days.

Although the acute withdrawal stage typically ends in under 10 days, the entire detox process can last for several months because the brain changes caused by heroin take a long time to reverse. This is known as PAWS, or post-acute withdrawal symptoms.

If you begin a supervised detox program, the process will typically begin with an intake and evaluation, which will let your healthcare providers determine an appropriate treatment plan. You’ll probably have a physical exam and be asked questions about mental health symptoms. Then, your medical professionals will come up with a plan for your immediate detox and long-term treatment.

Even though the effects of detox and withdrawal are rarely fatal, it’s very important to go through detox under medical supervision. This reduces the risk of relapse and provides medical care in case there are complications. If you or a loved one is struggling with a heroin addiction, call us at 800-737-0933 for the care you need.

3 Reasons You Shouldn’t Go To a Local Detox Center To Get Clean

Choosing to get into recovery from addiction is a courageous decision that is typically not easy to make. Once you make that decision, several factors must be considered to assure your optimal success such as:

  • Cost
  • How to pay for treatment
  • In-network or out-of-network providers
  • Type of treatment center such as general population, women-only, men-only, LGBT-specific, Christian, etc.
  • Location.

While each factor plays a significant role in the equation of achieving lifelong recovery, location is one of the most significant factors.

Addiction is both a physiological and psychological disease. The physiological component of the disease is always addressed first because of the detox process. The detox process consists of going through withdrawal under the supervision of medical personnel and cleansing the system of drugs and alcohol. It is imperative for you to go through detox under the supervision of medical personnel to assure safe, comfortable withdrawal. Depending on your addiction, especially alcoholism, the withdrawal symptoms may be fatal. Examples of common withdrawal symptoms are:

  • Body aches
  • High blood pressure
  • Rapid heartrate
  • Nausea
  • Vomiting
  • Tremors
  • Seizures
  • Hallucinations
  • Insomnia
  • Anxiety
  • Depression

Regardless of the detox center you choose, choosing a distant detox center, as opposed to a local detox center, will be more beneficial for your long-term success.

Three Reasons Why You Should Choose a Distant Detox Center

Despite health insurance, financial, and convenience challenges, you should make every effort to go to a detox center that is distant from your home. Numerous studies have shown that those who travel a distance from their home to go to detox and treatment have higher long-term success rates. There are several reasons why this is the case:

  • Being away from Relapse-Triggers

People, places, neighborhoods, and culture in the environment where you were active in your addiction are some examples of relapse triggers. It would be very hard to focus on your recovery and maintain sobriety when the neighborhood where you used to always go to seek drugs is merely a few miles away and the people who you have used drugs with are right outside the door of the detox facility. If you choose a local detox facility, it will be even more of a struggle to start your new life in recovery when your old life is literally right outside the door of the facility. Many recovering individuals attest to being tempted to use when they are in the same scenery where they were active in their addiction.

  • Being Distant from Distractions that May Derail Your Recovery

During the detox process, it is very common for recovering individuals to second-guess themselves. Knowing that your friends, family, and home are just a walk or ride away makes it much more easier for you to give into the temptation of giving up on the recovery process. If you were in another state and/or a plane-ride away from your friends, family, and home, it would be much more difficult for you to simply give up on the recovery process because it would be much more challenging to get to them.

Though friends and family want the best for you and may be beneficial later on in the recovery process, they tend to be more of a detriment than a benefit in the early recovery process. Being in proximity to them makes it easier for you to be entangled in their lives and issues, which would be a major distraction when you need to strictly focus on your recovery.

  • Higher-Quality Treatment is Often Found Elsewhere

Unfortunately, high-quality treatment does not exist in every area. As you may already know, Florida is the hub for high-quality addiction treatment. California and Utah are also areas renowned for high-quality addiction treatment. If you do not live in any of those areas, your local detox and rehab centers may not be as experienced as the ones in Florida, California, or Utah. The educational and experience requirements may be lower for counselors and staff, and state-funded rehab centers may have less amenities. Florida, California, and Utah are ideal healing environments because of the beautiful scenery, which does not exist in every state.

Genesis House is located in South Lake Worth, Florida. They have been providing superior detox and residential treatment for over 25 years. If you or your loved one is interested in detox and/or treatment or simply has general questions, call them today at 800-737-0933 

Opiate Dependence Versus Opiate Maintenance

Opiate dependence versus opiate maintenance, is there a difference? A lot of people wonder if it is possible to be addicted to a drug such as Oxycontin or Oxycodone form simply taking a drug as directed. The answer to this question is “yes”, however, the answer is much more complicated in reality.

Addiction is usually physical, mental and behavioral in nature. One symptom is being physically dependent on the drug and using more and more of it to get high — also known as building a tolerance. Regular use will cause this tolerance even if you don’t abuse it, so this isn’t the only factor. Opiate dependence means that a person is addicted – which means they’re using it to get high, and they are using it to function normally. For the sake of this article, opiate dependence and opiate addiction will be used interchangeably.

Here are some questions to ask yourself if you’re worried about opiate addiction:

  • Are you using opiates to get “high”, rather than for pain? If you’re using opiates to get high, that’s abuse and you’re a candidate for addiction.
  • Do you need more and more of the drug to get the same “high”?
  • Have you tried doctor shopping or illicit means to get more of your pills so you don’t run out? Do you run out of your prescriptions early?
  • Have you avoided certain people, places or activities because you would rather be somewhere that you can be high without scrutiny?
  • Has your family or your doctor expressed worry about your pill use?

Addiction is a disease that is progressive in nature. A person with a substance abuse disorder will start to display drug seeking behaviors when they are running out of their drug and choice. As withdrawal — which is quite physically uncomfortable and sometimes painful — sets in, an addicted person may become desperate. They may feel the need to doctor shop, purchase drugs on the street or steal leftover pills from family members to get their “fix”.

Do You Have a Problem with Opiates?

Addiction can affect anyone from any walk of life, even when there is no history in a family. There are many signs and symptoms of addiction that can and should raise red flags for addicted persons and their loved ones.

If you or somebody you love is suffering from the disease of addiction and needs rehab, there IS a way out. Recovery is not only possible, it’s amazing!

We can help you reclaim your life and put the pain of addiction behind you. All calls are 100% confidential, please call us today at 800-737-0933

Is Addiction Truly a Disease?

Finding the courage to get help battling addiction is difficult, especially when the addict and those around him fail to see addiction as a disease. Because many addicts made a choice at some point to drink alcohol or try a drug, people often view addiction as a choice or lack of morality and willpower. This is not the case, however. Addiction is considered a disease for several reasons. Understanding them can help both an addict and his or her loved ones come to a better understanding of addiction. These are the reasons addiction is considered to be a disease.

Biology

Studies of addiction have shown that there is a 40 to 60 percent chance that an individual may be susceptible to addiction based on genetics. Those with addicts in their family tree are more likely to become addicts themselves and are likely to become addicted to a given substance more quickly than others. Mental illness also increases the likelihood of addiction as it alters the way the brain functions.

The Brain is Hardwired for Addiction

The human brain has evolved in a way that inadvertently invites addiction. When the body does something that feels good, like eating, exercising or having sex, the brain releases dopamine to encourage the behavior. These activities are necessary for survival, so the brain rewards the body for them with a hit of dopamine and positive feelings. Drugs and alcohol can overstimulate the brain, causing it to bathe itself in a sea of excess dopamine. This makes the person feel so good that they want to repeat the experience. As drug usage continues, the brain must get used to functioning with an excess of dopamine and forgets how to work without it. Over time, drug use stops affecting only the brain’s pleasure center and begins affecting other chemicals. The result is changes in all of the following:

  • Learning
  • Judgement
  • Decision-making
  • Stress levels
  • Memory
  • Behavior

Relapse Cycles

Many diseases are manageable and treatable but not curable. In this way too, addiction is like a disease. Although addictions can be overcome and beaten, staying sober requires lifelong vigilance. Once the chemistry of the brain is altered by addiction, relapse is always possible. The body may continue to crave and desire drugs and alcohol even though an individual has not been using them. This pattern is similar to other diseases that sometimes go into remission but can become active again later.

When understood as a disease, it’s east to see why addiction requires professional treatment. No one expects a diabetic or cancer patient to get well on their own, and the same should be true of those suffering from addiction. If you or someone you love is battling this disease, get help today by calling 800-737-0933. The path to freedom from addiction starts with a simple phone call.

How do I Know if I Need an Outpatient or Inpatient Rehab Program?

Coming to the realization that you have a serious drug addiction problem can be absolutely daunting. At the same time, it is also an eye-opening experience and a positive step forward because you may also acknowledge that you need help. Once you decide enough is enough and that you’re ready to get help for your substance abuse disorder, you can find a drug rehabilitation facility to enter a treatment program.

Generally, there are two options available to you, outpatient and inpatient rehab programs. How do you know which is better for you? It’s worth learning about each of these treatment options and their similarities and differences to determine the answer.

With outpatient addiction treatment:

  • You are allowed to return home each night while attending your rehab program during the day
  • You are required to attend therapy sessions each week
  • You may be prescribed maintenance medication by a psychiatrist to manage your withdrawal symptoms

Outpatient treatment typically takes place in a setting that is less intensive than that of inpatient.

Overall, outpatient treatment is better suited for individuals who have more of a short-term or milder addiction. The typical client at an outpatient facility also has various responsibilities at home that they need to attend to, such as caring for their children or an elderly parent, as well as work. It works well for allowing you to take care of your everyday responsibilities while getting the help you need to overcome your substance abuse problem.

 

When You Should Choose Inpatient Treatment Over Outpatient

If you have a more severe drug addiction problem and have been battling it for years, inpatient addiction treatment is the better option for you. Inpatient rehab:

  • Is more comprehensive
  • Is situated in a hospital or residential facility that is outside of a hospital setting
  • Offers more access to medical services and clients receive around-the-clock supervision from healthcare professionals or staff personnel

With inpatient treatment, you can expect to be in a rehab program for anywhere from 28 to 90 days depending on the severity of your addiction, the drug to which you are dependent and other factors, such as if a dual diagnosis exists. Dual diagnosis is also known as a coexisting medical or psychiatric condition that may be present in addition to the addiction.

Inpatient treatment also involves detox, which involves removing all traces of drugs from the person’s system. While undergoing this period of your recovery, you will be carefully monitored while you go through the withdrawal process.

Therapy is a huge component of both outpatient and inpatient addiction treatment. Whichever type of rehab you ultimately choose, it’s important to take part in counseling sessions, whether you do individual, group or family therapy and to continue doing so well after your treatment ends. It will help to avoid a relapse and give you a better chance of retaining your sobriety.

Our counselors are available 24 hours per day. If you are ready to enter a treatment program for your substance abuse problem, contact us immediately at 800-737-0933