Tag Archives: methadone

How Lethal Is a Methadone and Xanax Combination?

It might surprise some people to find out that prescription medications are often used to treat people with addictions to drugs. If that sounds counterproductive or dangerous, you shouldn’t be too concerned given that the prescription drugs will be administered by a medical professional who works for the rehab center.

If you are wondering what kinds of prescription medication is being prescribed, there are some very important medications that doctors will prescribe to help clients go through detox. While some of these medications are intended to help clients deal with pain and sleeping issues, there are other medications that are used to help them safely wean clients off very dangerous illicit substances like heroin and fentanyl. One such medication is called methadone. Methadone is an opiate that’s used to help opioid addiction sufferers taper away from other opiates.

In rehab, clients might also have to continue taking medications they need to help them deal with psychological or mental disorders. A good example of such a medication would be a drug like Xanax. Xanax is a benzodiazepine used mainly for the treatment of anxiety.

Moving forward, the discussion is going to center on both methadone and Xanax and the dangers of using these two medications at the same. This discussion is relative because of the likelihood it could occur in rehab and does occur sometimes on the streets.

How Lethal Is a Methadone and Xanax Combination?

Before starting this discussion, it’s important to note that at no time should someone take multiple drugs without first consulting with a doctor. There are significant risks associated with combining substances without a clear understanding of how the substances are going to interact with one another. The combination of methadone and Xanax is a clear example of how dangerous combing substances can be.

To be very clear, no one should combine methadone and Xanax without a prescription from a doctor. Furthermore, it’s vitally important that the client strictly follow the doctor’s prescription as written. The following information will clarify why that’s so important.

The first area of concern in regards to the combination of these two substances is the effect the combination will have on the individual’s respiratory system. You see, both methadone and Xanax have properties than tend to suppress a person’s respiratory system. If someone were to take both medications at the same time, it would have the effect of doubling up on those the properties that suppress respiration. Even the slightest error in dosage could lead the client to have great difficulty breathing. Effectively, it could lead to the individual dying of an opioid overdose.

Both methadone and Xanax acts as sedatives. That would make sense given methadone is an opioid and Xanax is used to treat anxiety disorders. Again, taking both substances at the same time would have the effect of doubling up on the sedation. While that unto itself is not terribly dangerous, the sedative effect combined with any interruption in breathing could be lethal.

Alternative Solution

In an addiction treatment setting, doctors would be leery about allowing clients to keep taking Xanax while using methadone to wean off opiates. Does that leave the client exposed to issues with their anxiety disorder? Yes, it probably does. However, there are other medications the rehab facility’s doctor could prescribe as an alternative to Xanax. It could be a medication that significantly cuts down the risk of harm when combined with methadone. The solution would be temporary given the likelihood the client could resume taking Xanax once they have completed their methadone treatment program.

Dealing with poly-substance Abuse

Both methadone and Xanax are high on the list of medications that get abused. They are both also high on the list of substances that have addictive properties. When someone enters rehab with an addiction to multiple substances, they are said to be victims of poly-substance abuse. Rehabs have programs to deal with such addictions, but the process is obviously complicated by the fact doctors and therapists have more issues they have to consider during treatment.

As stated above, you would be taking a terrible risk if you decided to start abusing Xanax and any type of opiate substance at the same time. If you find yourself addicted to either or both of these types of substances, you need to contact us as soon as possible about coming in for treatment. You can reach us 24/7 by dialing 800-737-0933. Given the risks you are facing with addiction, now is the time to call.

Reasons To Avoid Opiate Addiction Doctor And Work Towards Complete Detox

People who have undergone substance abuse know that it is really simple for others to advise that they just quit at once. The process of letting go of addictive substances is just that — a process.

Getting started on the process of overcoming addiction can be the toughest part that many find hard to overcome on their own. Withdrawal symptoms of different substances can range in strength and nature. These include:

  • Shaking and tremors
  • Chills/Fever
  • Sleep Pattern Change
  • Pain
  • Sweating
  • Anxiety, depression, and other uncomfortable emotional/mental reactions
  • Appetite fluctuations

To avoid these symptoms and stop taking addictive stubstances, many go to their doctor to prescribe them an opioid medication. The substnces in these medications bind to the same receptors that the abusive substance does. This temporarily fulfills the craving and before one knows it, they are addicted to something else.

Why Choose Detox Over Medication

The alternative to taking addictive opioid medications is going for detox therapy. Detox therapy is the first part of healing and curing addictions. The detox aims to clean out all of the addictive substances and toxins out of your body. These substances in the blood are precisely what causes the withdrawal symptoms.

Detox helps you transition safely from the state of addiction towards therapy so that you can concentrate on the protocol of the therapy instead of fighting with yourself over the cravings.

There is a great comfort in knowing that there is someone who knows what they are doing when you are experiencing a withdrawal crisis. You don’t have to do it on your own. In the cases of alcohol and benzodiazepine addictions, the symptoms can be potentially dangerous, and when under supervision, medication can be administered to help you overcome it safe and sound.

Even if you do not require medical interventions, you can still benefit from a detox. The clearing of the addictive substances from your body will help carry you through in your decision to stop for good. The confidence of making it through something that you didn’t think you could earlier will give you the motivation for further therapy.

Detox and therapy are a healing process that has a goal of curing your life at the root and the things that triggered your addiction in the first place. You can receive help along this healing journey for a new life. Call us today 800-737-0933

Detox during pregnancy

Is Detoxing While Pregnant Safe?

Continued use of drugs and alcohol puts your unborn baby at serious risk. Congenital disabilities, miscarriage, and stillbirth are all possibilities if your addiction continues untreated. Detoxing is the safest way to ensure the health of your baby. High-risk situations need a medical detox under the supervision of a doctor. Addiction to drugs and alcohol affects over five percent of all pregnant women. The first step is to speak with a doctor about the safest treatment for both you and your baby.

Different drugs have different withdrawal symptoms when you stop using them. Some drugs such as heroin create severe physical withdrawal. Others, such as methamphetamines can cause extreme psychological cravings. Alcohol and benzodiazepine withdrawal can result in death without doctor supervision. Due to these concerns, it is necessary that you do not stop “cold turkey.” Aside from your drug of choice other factors can affect the withdrawal process. These include your method of use such as smoking, snorting, or injecting. Length of use and environmental factors will also determine the severity of withdrawal. Make sure adequately trained professionals monitor your detox as withdrawal is harmful to the fetus.

 

Detoxing from Opiates while Pregnant

You may be wondering about detoxing from opiates while pregnant. The opioid epidemic has medical professionals rethinking what was once conventional wisdom. It was before thought that detoxing from opiates is too risky for pregnant women. Pregnant women now have some options:

  • Methadone is a safe choice for your fetus. You should be aware of its association with Neonatal Abstinence Syndrome (NAS). Your baby could become addicted in the womb and experience withdrawal once born. You must visit a clinic once a day to receive your methadone dose.
  • Buprenorphine is weaker than methadone. It has less physical dependence and fewer withdrawal symptoms. Unlike methadone doctors prescribe buprenorphine for use at home.
  • Counseling is an essential part of your detox with medically assisted treatment (MAT). Once you have completed detox, you will need to explore the causes of your addiction.

Detoxing from drugs while pregnant is essential for your health and the health of your baby. You do not want to wait until your baby is born before asking for help. If you are ready to start your journey towards recovery, please feel free to contact us 24 hours a day at 800-737-0933

 

Why Proven On Site Detox is Better Than Outpatient

When you have a substance abuse disorder and decide it’s time to seek treatment, you have several options. No matter what you decide, you must undergo the detoxification process, which involves eliminating all traces of the drug from your system. You can do that with inpatient or outpatient treatment, but in general, inpatient is the better choice because it is done under medical supervision. Here are the benefits of proven on-site detox versus outpatient detox.

Access to Experienced Medical Staff

The detox process is one that normally involves being given maintenance medication because it curbs the effects of withdrawal you can experience. This is a normal side effect of detox that can range from mild to severe in nature and can leave you experiencing pain, anxiety, excessive sweating, nausea and vomiting. Because there are trained and experienced medical staff on hand on a 24/7 basis with inpatient treatment, they are able to provide you relief by administering certain medications, such as methadone, buprenorphine, benzodiazepines or barbiturates. These medications can help to ease the symptoms you may experience while going through withdrawal.

Medical and Psychiatric Monitoring

Many people with substance abuse problems also have a co-occurring mental or physical health disorder. With proven rehab in an inpatient treatment program, you can get all the medical and psychiatric monitoring you need to ensure that you have the best odds of getting clean and sober. Additionally, your mental or physical health disorder can also be better managed when you have experienced medical and psychiatric staff on hand at the rehab facility.

Clean, Safe and Supportive Environment

Proven inpatient detox offers all the privacy and dignity that you need when you are going through some of the most physically and emotionally challenging points in your life. This makes your experience a lot easier both physically and emotionally.

Reduced Risk of Relapse

Entering proven detox at an inpatient facility reduces your risk of a relapse. This is because there is a strict rule that the facilities must remain substance free and there is dedicated supervision available around the clock.

Intensive Therapy Sessions

Another advantage that inpatient treatment with medical supervision has over outpatient treatment is that you have access to intensive individual and group therapy sessions whenever you need them. You and other individuals can also get a sense of empowerment when you offer each other support as you understand that you are going through the same situation together, which can help in your journey toward sobriety.

These are some of the best reasons why proven on-site detox is better than outpatient treatment. It may take longer than outpatient, but it will be worth it when you regain your sobriety.

Call us today 800-737-0933