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Pointers For Staying Sober After Going Through An Opiate Detox Center

An addiction problem has been recognized. The addict has successfully undergone professional opiate detox, which is no easy feat. The drugs are now out of the addict’s system, and the addict and his/her loved ones are left to figure out how to accomplish holistic recovery and continue the prized sobriety. Here are some pointers for staying sober after going through an opiate detox center.

Go From Detox Straight Into A Rehab Program

Addiction programs vary greatly, but most include four broad key elements:

•Intake
•Detox
•Rehabilitation
•Recovery

Intake simply collects information, and it’s the point at which professionals will determine if and how you need to be detoxed. Once you’ve detoxed and your initial withdrawals from the opiates are manageable, it will be up to you, if voluntary, or the entity that’s ordered your placement in a facility, if involuntary, as to whether you continue forward to the rehabilitation phase.

It’s important to understand that physical detox is only the start of recovery. There’s a long road ahead of it still to be traversed. Some choose to try to rehab themselves. However, if available to you, a rehabilitation program can be an invaluable aspect of sobriety.

Rehabilitation treatment should be aimed at holistically addressing all areas of your life, not just your substance addiction. It will explore cognitive behavior therapies. Expect to explore areas such as:

•Mental state
•Personal history for the core of addiction behaviors
•Nutrition
•Physical health
•Family therapy
•Individual therapy
•Group therapy
•Necessary pharmaceutical treatment
•Developing long-term recovery strategies

Remember that there’s not a one-size-fits-all treatment for addiction. There’s a lot of inpatient and outpatient options available. Find a program that’s a good match for your needs and circumstances, and then be ready to commit however much time is deemed necessary to complete the program.

Take Advantage Of Follow Up Programs

Recovery can be short lived if you don’t have adequate support as you transition from the reclusiveness of rehab back to your daily life. Research aftercare and follow up programs to continue the help you need to traverse addiction.

Such programs may include a slow or plotted reintroduction to normal day-to-day life, such as through weekend reprieves at an addiction center or going from the rehab center into a sober living facility. Follow up programs have many other offerings including:

•Drug and alcohol testing
•Nicotine addiction support
•Group, individual, and family therapies
•Help forming new patterns and lifestyle choices
•Stress reduction and coping skills
•Strategies for family members to support their recovering loved ones
•Job and vocational training
•Anger management classes
•Group activities and outings with other dealing with addiction

Find Sober Friends

One of the biggest risks to a recovering addict’s sobriety is returning to socialize with those not sober. There’s tremendous self-inflicted pressure to be who you once were and do what you once did to fit in where you once fit in; there’s also a tremendous amount of peer pressure to be the “old you.” It’s painful, but the lifestyles and behaviors of others that no longer align with the sober you should be cut away. Removing this temptation from your life will make room for relationships that do support and enable you to progress along the path of recovery.

Tips for building new sober support:

•Work on reestablishing trust and honesty within healthy relationships
•Find a new circle of friends
•Join a social activity that excludes addictive substances

Abandon Old Stomping Grounds

It’s the same as with friends. You can’t hangout in the same places sober as you did not sober. Doing so brings forth memories and temptations that do nothing but eat away at your resolve, self-esteem, and goals to move forward.

Evaluate Your Total Environment

From where you live to where you work, carefully examine each facet of how you’re living to determine if it supports or detracts from your sobriety. Maybe you’re a waitress in Palm Beach serving alcohol. Maybe you live in South Florida area heavy with recreational drug users or have a roommate that throws frequent parties.

There will hopefully be a time when the actions of others and your environment plays a lesser role in your sobriety, but these changes are particularly important in the early timeframes of recovery. And, it’s okay if those changes need to be permanent. Prioritize yourself and your sobriety and work to remove anything unsupportive or not conducive.

For many, abandoning friends, lifestyles, hangouts, jobs, and/or homes all add up to questioning who they are as a person – an identity crisis. It will require focusing on the positive, not negative. A new environment gives you vast room to explore new possibilities without every single moment being something that triggers your cravings.

Focus On Mental Health

Stress, depression, anxiety, and other negative emotions can quickly and easily result in relapse. Meditation and a routine exercise program are useful tools for both your mental and physical health. These bathe your brain in feel good endorphins and chemicals and release tension held in muscles. As you see the results of routine exercise and meditation, you’ll also feel more self-confident and be refocused on your personal goals, not the history of your addition. Include a well-balanced diet that supports mental health; if you’re not participating in an after care program, then consult a nutritionist for a diet plan.

Always Be Self-Aware

Relapse most often has a personal trigger behind it. Know thy own self. Understand your vulnerabilities, weaknesses, and triggers. Capture these thoughts immediately verses letting them swirl around unaddressed until they become overwhelming. Talk with a sober friend or family member, counselor, or support group to determine the best way to address the issue.

Addicts often times have an undiagnosed co-occurring mental health issue, whether it be depression or OCD, that affects their long-term sobriety. Mental illness worsens substance abuse. Substance abuse then worsens mental illness. Worsening mental illness then increases substance abuse. It can be a vicious cycle if not addressed. Be honest in your intake and rehabilitation processes so that any mental health issues can be identified and addressed if they exist.

These seven pointers for staying sober after going through an opiate detox center can help you reach your long-term sobriety objective. Are you ready to start or continue on your road to recovery? Call us today 800-737-0933