Tag Archives: Opioid

Can I Find a Dual Diagnosis Treatment Center in Florida That Can Treat Bipolar Disorder?

Substance abuse alone is difficult to deal with, but throw in a mental illness like bipolar disorder into the mix and you have a lethal combination that needs additional treatment options. Dual diagnosis has been one of the central focuses of attention for addiction researchers in recent years, as they’ve discovered a high occurrence of mental disorders alongside addiction disorders. As many as 50% of people with a mental illness also have a co-existing mental disorder.

Dual diagnosis is the clinical term applied to people who have both substance abuse and mental disorders. Bipolar disorder is one of the most severe forms of mental illness and is caused by a chemical imbalance in the brain. Both substance abuse disorders and bipolar disorder are very serious conditions and need treatment alongside each other.

Treatment Centers and Dual Diagnosis

Today’s Florida treatment centers are highly trained in dual diagnosis. Even if you haven’t been diagnosed yet with a mental disorder, a substance abuse treatment center may be the first place that you learn about the existence of both disorders and finally get help for them. They can monitor bipolar disorder that’s already been diagnosed or evaluate for a case of suspected bipolar disorder.

When someone has bipolar disorder, they often have frequent mood swings and episodes alternating between “mania” and “depression.” During manic episodes, a patient tends to have a grandiose view of themselves and feel invisible, but this eventually swings back to periods of depression that includes loss of interest in activities or even friends. Bipolar patients tend to have chaotic lives because of the effects of their mood swings, risky behavior during manic episodes, and sometimes suicidal behavior during depressive episodes.

Many patients with undiagnosed bipolar disorder self-medicate with drugs or alcohol. Eventually the self-medicating behavior leads to progressive addiction that grows worse over time. The bipolar disorder makes the substance abuse disorder more severe, and the substance abuse disorder exacerbates the mental illness and makes it more severe, leading to sometimes dangerous, risky, or even criminal behavior. Problems with friends, family, and even the legal system might become an issue.

Finding Dual Diagnosis Treatment

Finding a dual diagnosis treatment center in Florida is easier than ever before. Because of the prevalence of dual diagnosis in substance abuse cases, almost every rehabilitation center is trained to spot these co-existing disorders and treat them simultaneously. The result is a more well-rounded approach to treatment and more effective relapse prevention plans.

When you call a Florida rehab center to inquire about treatment programs, be sure to ask if they have a team that is qualified in dual diagnosis. In other words, if they need to administer bipolar medication to a patient, are they qualified to do so? Do they have a licensed psychiatrist on hand who can treat bipolar disorder as well as the substance abuse disorder the person is seeking treatment for? If so, you’ve found a dual diagnosis center and can trust that facility to help you.

There’s Help Now

Years ago, before people knew the link between mental illness and substance abuse, it could be difficult to decipher instances where both were existing at the same time. Someone with a substance abuse disorder might have been written off as mentally ill, or someone with a serious mental illness might have been written off as just someone with a substance abuse problem. Now professionals know that there is a higher likelihood of mental illnesses in people with substance abuse disorders, and they’re trained to spot the signs and treat both at once.

It’s natural for someone with a mental illness to want to get help from a dual diagnosis facility because you have to make sure that the facility can treat all of your medical issues, not just the substance abuse disorder. Thanks to a staff of licensed psychiatrists and highly qualified counselors and caring people, we’re able to provide dual diagnosis facilities in Florida. All of our staff can evaluate and treat for mental illnesses and addictions at the same time so that you don’t have to neglect one condition in order to treat the other. All of your needs are met right here with us in our safe, well-equipped facility in Florida. It’s a great place to get help and get well.

If you have or suspect you need dual diagnosis care, we’re the people to call. Just pick up the phone when you’re ready and call us at 800-737-0933.

How Long Can You Be Prescribed Suboxone?

Suboxone is a combination of two drugs: Buprenorphine and Naloxone. It is considered a partial opioid and will sometimes produce mild euphoria in the patients who use it to more comfortably withdrawal from stronger opiates. This medication has done an enormous amount of good for some opiate addicts who felt they were at the end of the line and had no hope. If you believe Suboxone might help you, one of the first questions you might want to ask if how long you can be prescribed Suboxone for your withdrawal issues.

Suboxone is prescribed, usually, for between 6 months and one year, but there are some opiate addicts who will need to take it for a longer length of time. The normal length of therapy will Suboxone generally lasts for that year, but it’s a flexible drug and some doctors realize that treating addiction is a long-term goal, and keeping a patient off heroin or stronger opiates sometimes necessitate a longer stint of Suboxone therapy.

How Suboxone Works

Buprenorphine is the opioid in Suboxone, while Naloxone blocks the majority of the opiate’s effect. Suboxone works because while your body believes it is receiving an opiate, you’re not getting the addictive euphoria you would get with a drug like heroin or Fentanyl. The result is that you don’t experience opiate withdrawal as strongly as you would if you came off a drug like heroin or Fentanyl without Suboxone. And since the euphoria is mild or non-existent altogether, you’re able to stop craving the “high” of opiates while still foregoing the uncomfortable withdrawal.

For someone who has a heavy addiction to fentanyl or heroin, things don’t automatically go back to normal once you start Suboxone therapy. Many opiate addicts have legal problems, family problems, and even occupational problems, so it’s not a miracle drug. What it does do is give you one of your best chances to safely and comfortably cease using drugs like heroin and Fentanyl so that you can begin your journey to recovery. Physical withdrawal is only one component to your recovery, and Suboxone can make physical withdrawal much more bearable. Suboxone works because of it:

  • Decreases the severity of physical withdrawal
  • Works on opiate receptors to help you think more clearly during withdrawal
  • Is relatively safe compared to strong opiates

Forms of Suboxone

Suboxone comes in many forms. One is a sublingual film. Another form is the dissolvable tablet form that many addicts choose to take. Which kind works best for you can be discussed with your treatment center or doctor. The medication also comes in patch form that can be stuck on an arm and used over the course of a couple of days. Suboxone has a long half-life – 24 to 72 hours – so it’s a convenient medication in that you don’t have to remember to take a pill all the time.

For addicts who’ve discovered Suboxone works for them, it’s a truly relieving feeling to know that there is something out there that will allow you to think clearly and skip agonizing withdrawal while still working on other parts of recovery. Physical withdrawal is one of the most powerful reasons that addicts don’t get help sooner, and sadly, if an addict waits too long to get help, it can be too late. Thanks to formulas like Suboxone, more addicts than ever before have the confidence to get the help they need.

Seeking Help

Addicts have a serious problem. Believe it or not, most addicts realize that the problem exists. They’re just too scared of going through the physical and emotional pain that sometimes comes with opiate withdrawal. Drugs like Suboxone enable more addicts to confidently and fearlessly face their addiction without the intense withdrawal effects that sometimes come with opiate addiction. It’s definitely a drug that has a place in some people’s line of defense against relapse.

Most people will take Suboxone for 6 months to a year, but if it’s prescribed for longer, don’t be surprised. Depending on the severity of the addiction, it can be a couple of years before you’re ready to tackle the world without Suboxone. And that’s okay. The important thing is that you’re doing what your doctors and counselors say you need to do in order to stay well, and Suboxone can be an important part of your treatment plan for as long as they believe it’s necessary. During Suboxone treatment, counseling services and group meetings will also help to increase the quality of recovery and life you have after drug and alcohol addiction.

When you’re ready to take the first step and get help, our counselors are available 24 hours a day. Call 800-737-0933.

Who Is At Risk of Abusing Opioid Medications?

America finds itself caught in an opioid addiction epidemic. Prescription painkillers, heroin and the ever-dangerous fentanyl are dominating the headlines for all the wrong reasons. If you are suffering from an addiction to any kind of opioid, you’re facing some very serious long-term repercussions if you don’t get help. We hope you realize that, which is why you are looking for information.

With your need for information in mind, we want to encourage you to get help now. To help motivate you, we want to tell you about the treatment process. Hopefully, this will put your mind at ease and let you know what to expect. Much of our focus is going to be placed on the detox process and the use of detox medications.

When you locate the right treatment facility based on your needs, you’ll likely go through an intake interview. The facility’s clinician is simply gathering information about your addiction profile. From this profile, they should be able to determine the proper course of treatment.

Tapering Detox Programs – The Risk of Abuse

While therapy and aftercare are important aspects of treatment, it’s all predicated on the addiction sufferer successfully getting past withdrawal and their cravings. It would be a mistake to underestimate the importance of a detox program, especially for someone with an addiction to opioids. Remember, the withdrawal symptoms associated with opioid addiction can be quite dangerous. We are talking about symptoms such as:

  • Respiratory and circulatory issues
  • Severe muscle spasms in the stomach and extremity regions
  • Psychological issues such as anxiety and depression
  • Nausea, vomiting and diarrhea
  • Sleeping issues

The point of a detox program is to help clients get through these withdrawal symptoms with a minimum of discomfort. If the client does encounter discomfort, the detox facility’s medical staff has the option to prescribe certain medications for relief.

That brings us to a very serious discussion. There are times when a client enters rehab with a very significant addiction to an opioid substance. If the addiction is deep-rooted enough, a standard detox program might not suffice as far as keeping the client safe. That’s when a tapering program becomes the best solution. In a tapering program, a doctor will prescribe medications like Suboxone or Methadone to help ease the client away from their addiction. The process could take weeks instead of months, but it’s necessary for the welfare of the client.

Unfortunately, tapering medications are derivatives of the substances being treated. That makes them addictive. That raises an important question: “Who Is At Risk of Abusing Opioid Medications?” The short answer is anyone who misuses the prescribed medications.

Given the fact these drugs are addictive unto themselves, they must be taken as the doctor prescribes. The doctor’s job is to monitor the client’s progress to assure everything is going as the doctor planned. If the client takes larger doses or takes a tapering drug more often than prescribed, it’s substance abuse. As you can imagine, substituting one addiction for another is not good. The client is obligated to follow the doctor’s instructions or risk further problems.

After going through a detox program, the client should be ready for the rest of the treatment process.

Addiction Therapy

Therapy is the meat and potatoes of addiction treatment. This is the opportunity for the client to identify the personal issues that are driving their desire to hide behind a harmful substance. To get to that point, the client has to be willing to speak openly and honestly with the therapist. With the therapist’s direction, the real issues should become apparent.

After identifying the issues at hand, the client has the opportunity to develop very specific coping skills they can use to combat their problems. With the right coping skills, relapses can be avoided.

Aftercare Programs

After the client has completed treatment, they have to leave rehab and begin living life on life’s terms. The good news is they don’t have to do that alone. The rehab facility should be able to offer them access to aftercare programs the client can use as support resources. The best support resources include outpatient counseling, sober living options and 12-Step meetings.

If you have an addiction to opioids, you have to be cautious. Your overall well-being is at risk. We would like to recommend you let us help you arrest your addiction and reclaim your life. If you are ready to start treatment, please call us at 123-456-7890.

What Steps Should You Take to Use Opioid Medications Responsibly?

Opioid medications are commonly prescribed to manage pain caused by injuries and surgeries. These painkillers can be very effective, but they are also known for their addictive properties.

It’s important to take opioid medications responsibly to reduce the risk of dependency and addiction. Even with proper use, the potential for addiction is always present.

Fortunately, there are measures you can take to use your prescription painkillers responsibly. Responsible use is important for staying healthy and successfully relieving pain.

In this post, you’ll discover the steps to take for proper use. Read on to learn more about safely using opioid medication.

Ask Your Doctor Or Pharmacist Questions About Your Medication

It’s crucial to talk to your doctor or pharmacist about the medication prescribed to you. Opioid medications have many side effects, and they can impair physical activity.

Consider writing a list of questions ahead of time. There are no silly questions, so make sure to address any concerns you have. Here are a few common questions you may ask:

  • Should I expect any negative side effects? If so, what are they?
  • Is it better to take my medication with or without food?
  • Can I take over-the-counter medications for pain relief, too?

It’s crucial to get answers from medical professionals versus reading online or asking friends and family members. Your physician or pharmacist will give you accurate information that will help you use your medication responsibility.

Take Your Prescription Medication As Directed

Taking your opioid medication exactly as directed is a crucial part of responsible use. In many cases, you will be instructed to take a dose of medication every four to six hours.

Do not ever take your medication more frequently than prescribed. That’s the easiest yet most important tip to keep in mind. Here are some more directions and tips to follow:

  • If you aren’t in pain, you may skip a dose of painkillers.
  • Do not consume any alcohol while taking opioid medication.
  • Do not take any sedative medications unless okayed by a doctor.
  • Take your medication with meals or as otherwise directed.

Make sure you read the pamphlet that comes with your medication. If you cannot find it, call your doctor or pharmacist for a replacement.

You should also let your doctor or pharmacist know if you take any other prescription or over-the-counter medications. This will help you avoid the risk of potentially dangerous drug interactions.

Use Non-Opioid Pain Management Whenever Possible

Opioids are not the only option you have for pain management. You can limit your opioid use by trying out different pain management methods. Here are some examples to consider:

  • heating pads and ice packs for hot/cold therapy
  • over-the-counter NSAIDs
  • massage therapy
  • meditation and relaxation techniques

The exact methods you use depend on your specific situation. These options are generally considered safe, but it’s best to use caution. Make sure to consult with your physician to ensure you choose safe non-opioid alternatives.

Dispose Of Your Leftover Opioid Medication Responsibly

When your pain is better, you may have leftover opioid medication. Getting rid of your medication in a safe and responsible manner is important. Here are some options that may be available to you:

  • local law enforcement may offer a medication take-back service; they will dispose of your painkillers for you
  • permanent collection sites for taking back medication may be available at pharmacies and hospitals near you
  • remove and destroy the medication label that contains your personal information
  • crush and mix the unused medication with dirt, coffee grounds, or other substances
  • put the crushed medication mixture in a sealed plastic bag and throw it away

Following the steps above can help reduce the risk of opioid dependency. Unfortunately, it’s not always possible to completely avoid drug abuse or drug addiction.

The good news is that there is help available. You can receive honest, supportive assistance without any judgment. Our counselors are available 24 hours a day. Call 123-456-7890 to get the information you’re looking for.

What are the Signs of Hydrocodone Addiction?

What are the Signs of Hydrocodone Addiction?

Hydrocodone is a commonly prescribed opioid medication used to treat pain which has a high potential of abuse. The use of opioids, which include prescription medications such as hydrocodone and illicit drugs such as heroin, has skyrocketed in recent decades, resulting in a widespread epidemic of abuse in the United States. It is estimated that there are currently 2 million people struggling with opioid addiction and that roughly 47,450 die every year from an opioid overdose. The crisis has been covered widely in the news, putting citizens on high alert regarding potential addiction in themselves and their loved ones. Understanding the signs of a hydrocodone addiction can be a vital step to starting down a path towards recovery. Here a few things to know regarding hydrocodone addiction.

What is Hydrocodone?

As previously mentioned, hydrocodone is a prescription opioid medication used to treat pain. It is semi-synthetic, meaning it is created in a lab rather than occurring naturally like other opioids such as morphine and codeine. Hydrocodone is generally combined with other medications, such as cough syrup to aid in reducing certain symptoms in addition to minimizing pain. It works by binding to certain receptors in the brain and altering the way the body reacts to pain. Hydrocodone can be prescribed in various forms including syrups, tablet, and capsules which are either extended release or short-acting. Outside of providing pain relief, hydrocodone can induce feelings of euphoria, making it a prime medication for abuse and addiction.

What are the Signs of Hydrocodone Addiction?

In the beginning, hydrocodone use may create symptoms of slowed heart rate, anxiety, headache and difficulty breathing. Under normal use, these symptoms are quite regular and will tend to dissipate with time. However, hydrocodone addiction occurs when an individual begins to take the medication outside of the way it was intended to be used. Your loved one may tell you that they have begun taking “just a little bit more” than the doctor has prescribed because their pain is not being absolved with the prescribed dose. This is an indication that the body has built up a tolerance to the medication and is no longer producing endorphins or aiding in pain relief without the presence of the drug and is one of the first signs that an individual is dependent on hydrocodone. Other signs of hydrocodone abuse include:

  • Seizures: Seizures can occur if an individual has used hydrocodone heavily or for an extended period of time and attempts to quit without medical assistance.
  • Depression: Your loved one may withdraw from social activities or things they once loved, especially when they are prevented from using hydrocodone. They may also begin to ignore their appearance and hygiene.
  • Confusion: A person with a hydrocodone addiction may have difficulty holding conversations or thinking logically.
  • Blurred vision: Individuals may find themselves knocking things over or running into objects due to poor vision.
  • Paranoia: Your loved one may begin to feel persecuted or illogically afraid of people and things they were once comfortable with.

It is also important to understand that individuals who have regularly used hydrocodone over a long period of time or who have become accustomed to using large doses generally experience withdrawal symptoms. This occurs when there is a significant reduction in the amount of hydrocodone used, resulting in uncomfortable and sometimes severe physical and mental symptoms including, difficulty breathing, muscle weakness, difficulty breathing, clammy skin, and severe anxiety and depression.

What Should I do if My Loved One Is Addicted to Hydrocodone?

The best thing you can do for a loved one addicted to hydrocodone is to encourage them to get help. While many may believe that they can quit on their own or “cold turkey”, this method is not encouraged. Withdrawal symptoms can be quite severe for those with an even moderate addiction and enduring withdrawal without the help of a knowledgable professional can increase their risk for relapse. Thankfully there are people out there that can provide skilled and compassionate care throughout all stages of recovery. Your loved one does not have to quit on their own and there are options available to increase their chances of success. Ready to get started? Our counselors are available 24 hours a day. Give us a call at 123-456-7890.

What Are the Similarities and Differences Between Different Opioid Drugs?

Opioid is the general term for a narcotic derived, ultimately, from the opium poppy. Opiates are natural opioids. Some of these drugs are prescribed to control pain while others, such as heroin, are illegal. All of them are similar in that they lock into receptors in the central nervous system, which is made up of the brain and the spinal cord.

Opioids can be problematic because along with pain relief many of them cause an intense euphoria when they are taken. This can lead to dependence and addiction. People can overdose on opioids, though the symptoms can be reversed by taking an opioid antagonist called naloxone. Naloxone also locks into opioid receptors, but it doesn’t produce the euphoria associated with opioids such as heroin. Here are some opioids:

Heroin

Heroin or diamorphine is a synthetic opioid made from morphine, which is an opiate. Though it was created as a pain reliever by the same people who developed aspirin, heroin is now illegal. When it is pure, it is a white powder, though as a street drug it is rarely used in its pure form. It is snorted, smoked or injected. A type of heroin called black tar resembles asphalt and gets its color from the impurities that remain after it’s been processed.

The drug can easily pass through the blood-brain barrier, a physiological system that usually protects the brain from toxins. Once there, the body converts heroin into morphine, which then binds to mu-opioid receptors. The person feels a rush that can be very intense and may be accompanied by nausea and vomiting. After the rush, the person grows drowsy and “nods off.” Other initial effects of heroin are:

• Reduced mental function
• Slowed heart rate
• Slowed breathing
• Constipation

These symptoms appear because heroin, like all opioids, is a central nervous system depressant. A person who takes too much heroin can die if their breathing and heart rate are drastically slowed down by the drug.

Fentanyl

Unlike heroin, fentanyl is legal but strictly controlled. Like other opioids, it is prescribed for pain. It is also 80 to 100 times stronger than morphine. An analog of fentanyl, carfentanil, is 100 times stronger than fentanyl. Both are used to ease the pain of end-stage cancer. Like heroin, dependency can develop with fentanyl, especially if the person takes it for a long time. Unlike heroin, it is not injected or snorted, but comes in the form of a tablet placed under the tongue, a film placed on the skin, a lozenge meant to dissolve slowly between the patient’s gum and cheek or a lollipop. A patient who is taking fentanyl must be monitored by and work closely with their doctor.

A person who is on fentanyl should not drink grapefruit juice or eat grapefruit. This is true if the patient is using any type of opioid, because grapefruit has a chemical that stops the body from metabolizing opioids. This intensifies the effect of the drug and can lead to sudden death even if the fruit or the juice is taken hours after the person has taken their opioid drug.

Methadone

Methadone is also a legal opioid, but it is different from the others in that it is used to wean a patient from their dependency on another opioid. It can only be prescribed through an opioid treatment program, or OTP that is certified by the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration. Methadone is also used to treat pain, including the pain of withdrawal from other opioids such as heroin. It is taken once a day as a pill, a liquid or a wafer under a doctor’s supervision and at a dosage that is tailored to the needs of the patient. Many patients need to go to a clinic to take their dose of methadone if they are using it to quit another opioid. When they are seen to be reliable and stable, they can take the drug home with them.

Like other opioids, a person can become addicted to methadone, so it is crucial that they take it exactly as their doctor prescribed. This is especially true of patients who can take the drug home with them.

There are many other types of opioids, including hydromorphone, hydrocodone, oxymorphone and codeine. They are powerful, pain-killing drugs that have made the lives of many patients bearable, but the risk of abusing and even dying from these drugs is considerable if they are misused. If you feel you have a problem with opioids, don’t hesitate to call us today. Our counselors are available 24 hours a day, seven days a week. Call us at 123-456-7890.