Tag Archives: opioids

What Are the Pain Medications that Most Often Form Habits?

Chronic pain can be quite distressing. Many people go to the doctor’s office to get help for their ongoing struggle. One of the best ways to combat discomfort is with opioid pain-relieving medications. Unfortunately, these medications are very addictive and can easily be misused. It’s important to know what drugs to use and which ones to avoid should you ever be faced with agonizing pain that won’t go away.

How Do Pain Relievers Becoming Habit-Forming?

While pain can ruin your life, taking a drug that you can become addicted to will do the same. Even if you take a medication as it’s prescribed, you can still quickly develop a habit. When the medications enter the bloodstream, they block pain receptors. Not only does the discomfort subside, but many get a euphoric feeling too. It’s that sensation that people want to experience again and again.

Many are shocked to discover that the misuse of pain medications is the number one form of drug abuse in America. It can happen because a doctor prescribed something too strong, prescribed too much, or prescribed them for too long of a period. Another common factor is that the person had a predisposition to addiction, and they didn’t know the drug would affect them this way.

The Opioid Crisis Intensifies

The number of people addicted to opioids continues to rise. When the doctors stop prescribing, and the supply runs dry, then people turn to the black market to find a compatible solution.

Shockingly, as many as eight out of 12 people that are prescribed an opioid pain reliever will become addicted, and four of those 12 people will use heroin as their drug of choice. Is it any wonder that more than 115 people die each day in this country from drugs? While efforts are in place to reduce the number of opioid prescriptions, the problem has become so out of control that it has little effect.

The Most Addictive Painkillers

As your body adjusts to the medication, you will need more to get the same effects. What was once therapeutic has crossed the lines into an addiction. Many painkillers can become addictive, but here are the top ten:

•OxyContin
•Oxymorphone
•Demerol
•Fentanyl
•Dilaudid
•Hydrocodone
•Percocet
•Codeine
•Morphine
•Methadone

Signs of Addiction

Though these medicines are prescribed for legitimate reasons, they should be used with caution. How do you know if being properly medicated is turning into an addiction, well it can start as simple as not feeling the same benefits from the smaller dose, so you adjust the amount you take to enhance your experience.

If you are taking more than prescribed, then it’s is a significant warning sign. Another thing you may notice is that you feel like you always need to have the drug with you. It becomes a safety net, and you can’t live without it.

You may find yourself calling the doctor’s office asking for more medication because you’ve used more than the allotted amount. Medical centers are very wise to drug-seeking behaviors, and they will stop giving these medications to anyone displaying concerning signs. If you have asked friends or family if they had any opioid prescriptions, or have turned to the black market, then you know the problem is getting out of control.

How long it takes to become addicted to a pain killer? The answer varies depending on the person, the amount their taking, and other genetic factors. However, you can build a tolerance to the drug in as little as eight days. The longer you take the medication and the higher the amount you take can all impact these timelines.

Some folks say they develop an addiction after the first dose, and others can take them for a month or more without issue.

Knowing When To Get Help

If you’ve seen any of these signs, and you use prescription opioids, then you need to get help. You cannot simply stop taking these medications safely. You need the help and support of a medical rehabilitation center that is trained in the detox process from these harsh drugs.

South Florida is the perfect area to get clean. You are surrounded by Mother Nature and the loving care of a staff that knows what you’re going through. Each team member is strategically placed to enhance your visit and help you get better. If you realize that you have an addiction to opioids, and you’re ready to get help, then call today at 800-737-0933. Our support staff is standing by 24/7 waiting for you!

Can a Detox Center Help if I’m Afraid of Pain from Detoxing from Drugs and Alcohol?

There are hundreds of reasons that people become addicted to drugs. For many, experiencing chronic pain caused by medical conditions can create the need for pain relief that fuels addiction. While addiction can actually make the pain worsen, it won’t go away once you get clean in a detox center. You will still have that underlying pain and that’s one reason many people are reluctant to seek help in getting clean. If you are afraid of how you will deal with the pain, you should be aware that medication isn’t the only way to manage your pain.

As you begin a detoxing from drugs, you may feel alone, but your caregivers in the facility will be there to help you. In addition to helping you flush the drugs out of your system, they will also help you to address the causes of your addiction. For those suffering from chronic pain, this means helping you find healthier ways of coping with your pain. This doesn’t always mean you won’t be given medication, but you will also be encouraged to look for other methods for managing your pain.

Beginning Detox as a Chronic Pain Sufferer

Once you decide to participate in a medically supervised detox, there is a procedure you must follow. You won’t just jump into treatment without preparation. Instead, an intake procedure will allow your caregivers to evaluate your condition. While one focus of this process is to determine the type and severity of your addiction, the intake will also be used to evaluate your health status. This means evaluating any mental illnesses that may be affecting you, as well as determining what physical medical conditions you may be experiencing.

This examination will also help them determine how much pain you typically experience. In addition to conducting a physical examination, they will also ask you questions about your medical conditions and your pain levels. Through this process, they can determine how best to address your pain issues as you detox from drugs or alcohol. While you may think your caregivers don’t understand, they are experienced in dealing with chronic pain patients and it’s important for you to trust them.

No Painkillers Doesn’t Always Mean No Drugs

Typically, doctors prescribe opioid painkillers to help patients manage chronic pain. While these medications are effective in managing pain, they’re also highly addictive and today’s doctors are looking for alternative methods of managing pain. In the detox center, your caregivers may find that your pain level is severe enough that you do need some type of medication, though they will not continue feeding your addiction with opioid-based painkillers. Instead, they may prescribe non-addictive painkillers, such as those used to treat depression and epileptic seizures. Sometimes, methadone or buprenorphine may be prescribed as a replacement drug, but these drugs will be administered at low, controlled dosages.

You may also begin attending therapy sessions in the detox center. These sessions will provide psychological counseling that will help you address the causes of your addiction. As such, you’ll receive therapy designed to teach you healthier coping mechanisms for your pain. Your therapist will likely begin behavioral modification therapy to help you manage how you react to pain.

Exploring Other Alternatives to Painkillers

While you may not believe it, there are actually many natural ways for dealing with pain and some maybe even more effective than the painkillers you were taking. Since these are natural treatments and therapies, you won’t experience the negative side effects that the drugs caused. Each facility will offer different resources, so it may be helpful to discuss the pain management options in advance. If you can find a detox center that offers the pain management options that you find interesting, you may be more open to benefit from those types of treatment.

By way of an example, acupuncture and chiropractic care have been found to be very effective in helping to treat pain caused by a variety of chronic medical conditions. You may also benefit from massage therapy. Your caregivers may also encourage you to begin working out and using weights. In addition to benefiting your overall health, regular physical exercise will help you strengthen your bones, muscles, and tissue, which will reduce the inflammation that causes pain.

The first step to recovering from your addiction is getting clean, but you don’t have to take on that challenge without help. To learn more about the detox process, call our counselors at 800-737-0933. We can answer your questions and help you get started in the recovery process.

How Does Hydrocodone Dependence Work?

Not all addictions begin because of intentional behavior. There is a time when people are using legitimate medications, make a few judgment errors, and end up with a full-blown addiction to the drug in question.

Yes, there’s an opioid addiction epidemic in the United States. It was created from a mixed bag of causes with one of the primary culprits being prescription painkillers. Among that group of substances is a painkiller that goes by the generic name hydrocodone. For anyone out there reading this information, the drug’s brand name is Vicodin. Clearly, that’s a well-known name among people in the medical community and on the streets.

When used as directed by a physician, hydrocodone is very good at doing what it is intended to do. It provides relief from severe pain issues. Unfortunately and not surprisingly, it’s highly addictive. If someone sticks to their prescription, they shouldn’t have any problems. However, making the decision to increase doses or frequency without a doctor’s guidance is like playing with fire. Opioids are notorious for creating dependence, which is only a small step away from a full-blown addiction.

In the section below, we want to discuss how dependence works. That includes how it begins and how quickly it can turn into an addiction.

About Hydrocodone Dependence

Before the discussion begins, there’s a very important distinction between dependence and addiction that needs to be clarified. Dependence occurs when the body and mind have a strong craving for a substance. It becomes an addiction when the body goes through withdrawal symptoms when it’s denied the substance it craves. Simply put, the possibility of withdrawal symptoms is the fine line between dependence and addiction.

The truth about hydrocodone dependence is it usually starts innocently enough. A person has pain issues, their doctor prescribes Vicodin, and the patient starts taking the drug as the doctor prescribed. The problem is people usually enter this “contract” with unreasonable expectations. The reality is the pain relief is never quite as fulfilling as the individual expected it to be.

Their solution? They start taking the drug in higher doses or more frequently. As the amount of drugs builds up in their system, the body begins to develop an expectation that the drugs will always be there. What the body wants and needs is relayed to the brain, and the brain tells its owner, hey, we need more Vicodin. That’s the essence of dependence.

The Signs of Hydrocodone Addiction

As dependence progresses and the individual acts to fulfill their cravings, addiction stands in the wings waiting. FYI: Here’s a few signs of hydrocodone addiction:

  • Withdrawal from personal relationships
  • Unkempt personal hygiene
  • Obsession with pursuing drugs or money for drugs
  • Escalating need to take larger doses more often
  • Destructive and criminal behavior
  • Inability to handle personal responsibilities

Treating Hydrocodone Addiction

If an addiction to hydrocodone does form, the addiction sufferer only has one viable option for recovery: They have to submit themselves to an addiction treatment program with a reputable addiction treatment center like ours.

With an addiction to an opioid substance, the incoming client should expect to have to spend time in a detox program. The withdrawal symptoms associated with an addiction to said substances are quite dangerous. It just makes more sense to participate in a medically-monitored detox program where medical staffers are monitoring client progress and making sure they are safe during the detox process.

After successfully clearing withdrawal and any residual cravings for their drug of choice, the client should be ready for counseling. During counseling, they will get the opportunity to work with a counselor on their issues. During the process, they will hopefully learn a lot about their addiction. That should include the driving forces behind it. At the end of the day, the goal of counseling is to identify the root causes of addiction and subsequently provide the client with the life and coping skills they will need to get around temptation and their personal triggers. That stands as the key to making sure there are no relapses in the future.

We can sympathize with the bad things you are experiencing from your addiction to hydrocodone (Vicodin). With that said, we can help you get past your addiction on the way to leading a better life. If you would like more information about our services and facility, you can contact one of our administrators at 800-737-0933.

prescription drugs for older adults

I Need My Pain Medications, But I Want To Get Off of Them and Be Free But How?

When you have been in chronic pain, it can severely impact all aspects of your life. Trauma and injuries often necessitate pain medication. Any surgeries you may have had might have led you to need pain medication as well. Over time, pain medications, particularly opioid based medications, can lead to dependence.

When you become dependent on pain medication, if you stop taking the medication you will experience symptoms of withdrawal. This can happen to anyone who has relied on pain medication in order to relieve debilitating symptoms. Unfortunately, in addition to withdrawal symptoms, you may also experience a rebound of intense pain while you are detoxing from the pain medication. This can make it almost impossible to stop using on your own.

If you have found yourself experiencing withdrawal symptoms and rebound pain, you will need professional help from addiction specialists in order to recover from your dependence. The first step in your recovery will involve detoxing from the medication. During this period of time, you will need to be supervised so that the symptoms of withdrawal are minimized. Our addiction professionals will be able to provide supportive care during detox so that your concerns are heard and your needs are met.

How Can You Avoid Relapsing?

After your initial detox period, a longer stay in one of our facilities may be necessary. The longer you allow yourself to remain in treatment, the better your chances are for long term recovery. If you are experiencing a return of pain because you have stopped your medication, we will need to come up with a plan to manage your symptoms so that you will not relapse.

During your stay in one of our facilities, you will have opportunities for various therapies. Individual counseling can help you learn how to cope with stresses and triggers in your daily life without the use of addictive medications. You will be able to talk about your experiences and feelings which can help in your recovery. Group therapy may be helpful as well. It can be extremely empowering to know that you are not the only person who has struggled with addiction issues. You can also learn from others who may be further into their recovery about what is working for them, what they have learned, and what kinds of things have caused problems during their recovery.

If you or a loved one is currently struggling with an addiction to pain medication, call our addiction counselors today to learn about what we can do to help. We are here for you 800-737-0933

Does Naltrexone Actually Help Curb Addiction Cravings?

When fighting diseases of addiction it is necessary to use every tool available in order to prevent relapses from occurring. Traditional methods of recovery like individual counseling and group therapy will always be necessary in order to teach individuals how to live a life free of drugs and alcohol. In addition to these traditional methods, there are medications available to help curb cravings and enable recovery.

Can Naltrexone Help Me?

Naltrexone is a once-daily medication that is used to curb opiate and alcohol cravings and prevent relapse. It is an opioid antagonist which means it binds to opiate receptors in the. This blocks opiate-based drugs like heroin or oxycontin from producing its euphoric effects when taken. In alcohol addicts, it has been used to counteract cravings for alcohol and can also block its effects if alcohol is ingested. It is thought that naltrexone inhibits the release of endorphins when alcohol is consumed.

Individuals in a recovery program who take naltrexone have an increased chance of long-term recovery. Opiate addicts know that if they take naltrexone, even if they leave the facility to take drugs, they will not get the high they were used to. This can prevent relapse in patients and lead them to stay in treatment longer. The longer a person remains in an inpatient treatment facility the greater their odds of being successful. The naltrexone gives the patient time to learn about their addiction, what types of stressors and triggers they should avoid, and what kinds of coping strategies they can use in order to remain in recovery.

Naltrexone is effective but it does have drawbacks. Individuals taking naltrexone will not be able to feel the effects of opiate-based pain medication which can be problematic in the event of an accident or traumatic injury. However, the effect of naltrexone gradually wears off within a twenty-four hour period.

Opiate addicts who take naltrexone and then decide to stop may have increased sensitivity for a period of time to opiates. If the person relapses, this can lead to a much lower tolerance to opiates and cause a fatal overdose. However, this is the case when tolerance is lowered among recovering addicts who have not taken naltrexone as well.

Other opiate addiction recovery medications like methadone and suboxone, are replacements for illicit opiates like heroin. However, these replacement medications are opiates themselves and users can develop an addiction to them as well. Naltrexone is not an opiate and is nonaddictive. It can be stopped at any time without worrying about the effects of withdrawal.

Naltrexone will never replace the need for other therapies, but it is an effective weapon in treating addictions. If you or someone you know could benefit from taking naltrexone, call our counselors today to ask about its benefits. Call today 800-737-0933

What You Should Know About Pain Pill Addiction- It Is Not Uncommon as You May Think

Pain pills or painkillers refer to a wide variety of drugs; however, the ones that are highly abused are opioids, sedatives, and stimulants. Hydrocodone, oxycodone, xanax, valium, and dexedrine are among the highly abused prescription pills. The effectiveness of these drugs makes them addictive. These pain pills work on the opioid receptors of your brain to numb pain and create an addictive high.

One of the tell-tale signs that you have a pain pill addiction is when your mind is focused on when you will take your next dose and whether your supply is sufficient. Pre-occupation with your pain medication may later cause you to exceed the doctor’s recommended dose. Eventually, you begin going to more than one doctor for the same subscription or going to other sources to replenish your medication supply. Afterwards, you will realize that your pain, the reason you were on the prescription pills, subsided a long time ago but you are still on pain meds. Before you know it, you are having problems with your personal relationships and your daily routine activities.

 

How Pain Pill Addiction Can Affect Your Body

Pain killer abuse is likely to affect different parts of your body. Opiates suppress your body’s capacity to breathe and interrupt the normal functioning of your lungs. Medical research has determined that opiate abuse is likely to cause pneumonia.

Pain pill addiction is also associated with constipation. Abusing pain killers will mean that one may need to use laxatives to facilitate bowel movement and this is likely to damage the sphincter or anus.

Prescription drug abuse can also affect your liver. Every drug you take is broken down and processed by your liver. Therefore, the liver can store toxins after the breakdown process. The most notable cause of liver damage is acetaminophen, a component in many prescription formulas. Drugs such as Lortab, Vicodin, and Percocet have high levels of acetaminophen.

Another devastating effect of addiction to prescription pills is rhabdomyolysis and kidney failure. Rhabdomyolysis occurs when a person lies completely immobilized after abusing pain killers to the point of becoming comatose. The addict’s tissues start to disintegrate and the chemicals produced during this breakdown pour into their blood stream and begin damaging other organs. This is one of the main causes of kidney failure. Damage of the heart may also occur, including heart attack.

Many people manage chronic pain using prescription medication. A high percentage of these people unknowingly slide into pain pill addiction. If you experience any of the above tell-tale signs of addiction to prescription medication, you need to consult a doctor before your problem becomes a tragedy. If you are ready to put your addiction problem behind you, call Genesis House at 800-737-0933 and trust us to get your life back on track.

Does Vivitrol Really Work for Opioid Dependency?

Vivitrol, a form of naltrexone, is an opiate/opioid antagonist. This means that it works on opioid brain receptors in a manner opposite that of opioids. In other words, when a person takes an opioid medication, the molecules of that medication “fit” into receptor sites in the brain, very similar to the way a key fits into a lock. This causes the opioid effects such as pain relief and euphoria. Opioids can also cause unpleasant effects like nausea, and if enough is taken, can even cause life-threatening suppression of the brain’s breathing center. Opioid antagonists like naltrexone work to reverse these effects and/or prevent them from occurring.

Is Vivitrol Safe? Is it Effective?

Vivitrol is safe as long as you are not allergic to it. It must be used with counseling, and the patient cannot be actively dependent upon opioids when they begin therapy. Vivitrol is given only once a month. It’s a long-acting injection. As long as the patient stays compliant and keeps their injection appointment, Vivitrol is extremely effective. This is because the antagonistic effects of naltrexone in the brain totally prevent any “high” from opioids. Even if the patient weakens and takes them, they will feel nothing because the brain’s opioid receptors are blocked. Only one molecule can occupy a receptor at a time, and naltrexone has a higher affinity, or priority, for the brain’s opioid receptors.

 

Benefits of Vivitrol Therapy:

It’s Not Addictive

Vivitrol works by blocking opioid receptors, not by stimulating them. There is no danger of addiction to Vivitrol.

Helps Patients Break Their Addiction

Recovering addicts can focus on rebuilding their lives, knowing that “giving in to temptation” won’t have the desired effect. They know they can’t get high so they think about other things.

Steady, Automatic Dosing

Because Vivitrol is an extended-release injection, there is no need to take a pill or go to a clinic every day. It provides 24-hour blockage and therefore protection against any opioid-induced “high” for a full month.

Some Possible Disadvantages

Like any other medical therapy, Vivitrol isn’t perfect. For example, if the patient actually needed pain relief, say, due to an accident, because their receptors are blocked, they would not experience the pain relief normally provided by opioids. Also the success of Vivitrol depends upon the patient continuing to show up for their injections on time.

Looking for opiate addiction treatment? Call Genesis House today 800-737-0933

I Have Chronic Pain and Need Painkillers To Help Ease The Pain. How Do I Keep From Becoming Addicted?

The use of opioids in the treatment of chronic pain is very controversial. Possible addiction is one of the main reasons for this. Is the relief of chronic pain worth the potential for addiction? The consensus is yes. The fact is, most patients treated for chronic pain by a health professional qualified to do so will not become addicted to their opioid medications.

Addiction is Not the Same as Dependence

Anyone who takes opioid medication for any length of time, say, more than a few weeks, will become physically dependent upon their medication. This is a consequence of the actions of opioids on the body. They cause physical changes to take place in the brain which result in a physical dependence. This is not the same as addiction, which is generally defined as compulsive, uncontrollable use of a substance even when the negative consequences are obvious. Addicted patients often increase their use of medication without their physician’s knowledge or approval, which only makes their addiction even worse. They hide their drug use from friends, family, and employers. They become devious.

In contrast, those taking opioids as directed by their physicians rarely experience addiction. They are simply taking a drug, under medical supervision, that they need to control their chronic pain. There is no emotional dependence on the drug, no compulsion to use it beyond what is needed for pain control, and the patient remains in full compliance, taking the drug only as directed.

  • An addicted patient will often run out of medication early
  • An addicted patient will show signs of drug-seeking behavior, such as repeated requests for more pills and escalating doses when such is not medically indicated
  • Those addicted are likely to withdraw from friends and family as the drug takes over more and more of their lives

In contrast, a patient who is merely physically dependent, which is not their fault anyway, continues to live their lives normally. Their basic behavior doesn’t change and they feel no compulsion to take more and more medication. They just enjoy the relief and quality of life provided by responsible use of opioid medications.

For most people, the risk of true addiction to prescription opioids is low. In fact, the negative effects and stress of living in constant, untreated pain are more of a real concern than addiction.

Call us today 800-737-0933

Why Do They Still Prescribe Opiates If They Cause Addiction?

The United States is currently facing an opiate addiction epidemic, with opiate-related deaths quadrupling since 1999. There were approximately 19,000 deaths linked to opiates in 2014 alone, and it is estimated that up to 36 million people abuse these substances worldwide. Despite these numbers and all the problems that opiate addiction can cause, many of them are still being prescribed by doctors across the country. Some would argue that prescriptions for medications such as OxyContin, Percocet, and Vicodin should be taken off the market, while others believe that these drugs are helpful as long as they aren’t abused.

Opiates are often prescribed to help patients deal with pain after suffering an injury or while they recover from a major surgical procedure. They have also proven useful for those living with chronic conditions such as fibromyalgia, endrometriosis, and Ehlers-Danlos syndrome. These are all painful chronic conditions, and many people who live with them need some kind of medication just to maintain a good quality of life. Should they be expected to go without medicine that they arguably need because so many people abuse their prescriptions?

The Dangers of Opiates

The thing that makes opiates so dangerous is that they produce an intense high that makes them very addictive. The short-term effects of these drugs include pain relief and a feeling of euphoria. The relief from pain is attractive to anybody living with chronic pain or even acute pain from an injury, while euphoria is a common desired effect of many drugs. Abuse of opiates can also cause people to become addicted in as little as three days. Some of the side effects of opiate abuse include:

  • Drowsiness
  • Paranoia
  • Nausea
  • A depressed respiratory system

Long-term opiate use can cause problems such as chronic constipation, liver damage, and brain damage resulting from a depressed respiratory system.

With as dangerous and readily available as opiates are, should doctors stop prescribing them? Many people say yes, and the government has even encouraged doctors to avoid prescribing them. On the other hand, they do have their uses as long as they are taken as prescribed. Short-term opiate use can help people recover from injury and illness, but doctors need to make it clear that these drugs should only be used in the short-term.

If you believe that you are developing a dependence on opiates or you have struggled with substance abuse, there is help available. Contact us today to learn how you can recover from opiate addiction. Call Now 800-737-0933

Why Do Opiates Cause Constipation?

Constipation is having hard stools, excessive strains when passing bowels, infrequent stools, partial bowel evacuation, unsuccessful defecation, or spending too much time passing stool. Constipation has two common classifications:

  • Primary constipation, which results from natural anorectal function or colon defects
  • Secondary constipation that occurs because of pathologic changes, for instance, intestinal obstruction and medications such as opioids

 

Low fiber intake, inadequate body fluids, physical inactivity, spinal cord compression, high calcium levels, kidney problems, or diabetes can lead to bowel dysfunction too.

Constipation can arise because of pharmacologically-based reasons including taking opioids. Opioids are analgesics used for pain relief. Unfortunately, opioids cause hard stools. 81% of patients on opioids to reduce chronic pain end up having opioid-induced constipation (OIC) or opioid-induced bowel dysfunction (OBD), says Salix Pharmaceuticals.

How Opiates Cause Constipation

Opiates include prescriptions medicines for pain, methadone or suboxone, morphine, illicit opiate heroin, which doctors say leads to an opioid epidemic in the United States. Opiates change the way the gastrointestinal tract functions. The pain relievers prolong the time the stool takes to move through the human gastric system.

A person on the pain reduction drugs will have increased non-propulsive contractions across the jejunum or the small intestines midpoint. Consequently, the longitudinal propulsive muscle contractions can slow down affecting how food travels through the intestines.

Food that does not normally move through the digestive tract causes partial stomach paralysis or gastroparesis. Food will remain within the digestive organ for far too long. Further, the opioids cause the reduction of digestive secretions making the patient not have the desire to defecate.

The side effects of illicit opiates abuse begin in the brain with the victim experiencing hallucinations and later digestive issues such as hard stools. The Federal Drug Administration (FDA)-approved medication methylnaltrexone bromide -Relistor or naloxegol-Movantik can treat OIC. The two medicines reduce constipation arising from opioids without affecting the patient’s brain opioid receptors.

Other reliable IOC treatment methods include the use of stool softeners, usually the docusate sodium (Colace). Increasing fiber intake, eating more fruits, whole grains, and vegetables help a great deal. Also, request a doctor if you can use daily stool softeners or stimulant laxatives.

When the stool overstays in the intestines, the body will absorb all the water in it, making the stool too hard and unable to move.

We have helped thousands of people detox and recover from Opiate addiction.  Call us today to learn more 800-737-0933