Tag Archives: rehab

Questions You Should Be Asking Every Addiction Treatment Center in Florida That You Talk To

In Florida alone, there are hundreds of addiction treatment centers, so finding one that is the right match for you or a loved one may seem like a daunting task. Although you may be constrained by factors outside of your control, like location or price, it’s still important to do your research on the treatment centers you are considering.

To help you with this process, here are some crucial questions you should be asking each and every treatment center you have contact with.

What is your success rate for treating addiction?

Addiction treatment centers may utilize a number of groundbreaking or out-of-the-box rehabilitation techniques that sound great on paper, but if they don’t have the results to confirm their effectiveness, those efforts may be in vain. So, always be sure to ask a potential treatment center to point you towards any studies or research that can confirm that their methods work.

However, you need to keep in mind that even the best rehabilitation techniques are not going to have a 100% success rate—so be sure to keep your expectations realistic. That being said, if an organization is reluctant or unable to provide you with the information you’re asking for, that should be a major red flag.

What is the ratio of patients to counselors?

Treating addiction requires a high level of personalized care, and if counselors are stretched too thin with too many patients to look after, the level of care that they can provide often suffers.

As with asking about success rates, it’s important to keep a realistic mindset about the patient-to-counselor ratio. It’s also important to remember that some individuals may thrive in a more group-oriented treatment facility. But if you’re worried at all that your loved one won’t receive the level of individual attention they need for recovery, that may be sign you need to look for a different rehabilitation provider.

What role does medical detoxification play in the rehabilitation process?

Most substances that require inpatient treatment are extremely physically addictive, which means that quitting process can pose health risks to the patients. Because of this, it’s important that any addiction treatment center you’re considering has a qualified medical staff to help your loved one through the initial withdrawal stages of rehab.

So, to recap, these are the three most important areas of treatment you should be asking about when considering a treatment center:

  • Proven success rates
  • Level of personalized care
  • Presence of a medical staff

If you’re interested in learning more about what our treatment center can offer you and your loved one, please get in contact by calling at 800-737-0933. Our counselors are available 24 hours a day.

Reasons Why You Should Try Going To a Drug Treatment Center in Florida

Drug treatment centers are often ideal solutions for those who have faced long-term addictions to prescription medications as well as illegal street drugs. Opting to enter a drug treatment center in Florida has a variety of benefits that are essential when maintaining a clean life on your journey to sobriety. Knowing just a few of the reasons why a drug treatment center is an optimal solution to an addiction is a way for you to find a location that offers rehabilitation programs that are truly right for you.

There are both inpatient and outpatient drug rehabilitation centers available throughout the state of Florida, fitting individuals based on their needs. Inpatient rehab and drug treatment centers require you to remain on the premises of the treatment center itself throughout the entirety of the duration of your program. Outpatient services, however, do not require you to stay in a sober center which may lead to relapsing depending on the support system you have in place while abstaining from the use of any drugs or illegal substances.

Benefits of a Drug Treatment Center in Florida

Drug treatment centers offer a number of benefits and help to keep individuals on track when seeking long-term sobriety. One of the biggest perks of a drug treatment center is the ability to find joy in hobbies and activities while sober again. Drug treatment centers provide a zero-tolerance atmosphere to keep individuals from feeling tempted or swayed by the presence of any alcohol, tobacco, or other substances.

A treatment center also often provides both individual counseling or therapy in addition to group therapy sessions. Talking with other individuals in group settings is a way to feel less judgment, shame, or guilt that is commonly associated with drug addictions. When you have the ability to express yourself and lean on others for support it is much easier to stick to your goals of remaining sober and abstaining from the use of alcohol altogether.

Seeking out a drug treatment center in Florida is ideal whether you have recently developed an addiction to drugs or if you have been battling addiction throughout most of your life. A drug treatment center is one of the most optimal solutions for anyone seeking healthy and positive changes for their future. Are you looking to get help with a drug or alcohol problem? Contact us today. Our counselors are available 24 hours a day. Call 800-737-0933

Act As If

If you are anything like this recovering addict (me), you would know that when I first started treatment, the last thing I wanted to do was identify with others. Doing so was one of the biggest suggestion our counselors gave us, but my mind was not open to the idea. I was more of the addict that liked to compare myself. In reality, I wanted to convince myself I was better than the disease of addiction.   I told myself, “I wasn’t that bad,”in order to continue my use. I thought that this rationalization may convince my family and friends, who were hoping I would “get it,” this time in rehab.  If only I was not an addict after all, I won’t have them on my back.
I did not want to hear anything about “my will”  versus “God’s will” at this point, so I was running my own program while in treatment.  Since I knew best, I was very positive this time and believed things would be different. I changed the type of pill I used and decided it was not going to bring me to my knees like before. I made a decision – if I only use these pills, and keep my use under control, I will be ok. Sadly, we know how this story ended; once I got out of treatment  the relapse came right after the plane  landed in New Jersey. This “different substance I could control,” brought me to my knees. Once again, I felt like a failure! Why couldn’t I just control it? How did it get so bad again?
I was in a dark place wanting to die because my addiction was worse than ever. I was far from having the power to stop even if I wanted to. I was terrified to ask for help so I just wanted to give up; I had lost all hope. I figured death would be the only way to solve the problem and stop hurting my family. If I was gone, they no longer had a daughter that was a failure and would not have to worry anymore. By some miracle, my higher power did not let me die, there was a bigger plan for me. My family had an intervention when I was discharged from the crisis unit, and I agreed to go to treatment. I was broken, I finally surrendered.
When I went back to treatment this time, I started to “Act as if” or “Fake it until you make it”; meaning even if I didn’t want to, I pretended until I actuality want to. Not being able to look at myself in the mirror, I was willing and open to trying anything!. When I started to compare myself or judge others I pretended I wasn’t until I truly wasn’t. When I was listening to someone struggling at a meeting I didn’t care what the person was saying- I just listened and “acted as if” until I did have empathy. The days I did not want to be sober out of jealousy of the people drinking and it looked like they were having fun, I “acted as if” I too was having fun until I was. I had way more fun than I ever had drunk! This all probably makes me sound silly, but when you start to “act as if,” it will happen before you know it.
At the end of my addiction, being so defeated by drugs, “acting as if” turned out to be the way I saved my life. It all comes down to action and faking my mind into action when I was unwilling .  This minor action became the turning point of my sobriety. I still practice this today, and I challenge you to “act as if” today and discover what actions you are capable of that you never thought you had!
We are here to help!
Always feel free to reach out to me. I would love to be there to help in your recovery journey.
Skyler Noon, Alumni Coordinator

Why Outpatient Detox Should Be Coupled With Ongoing Treatment

Drug and alcohol addiction is a serious disease. It affects nearly every aspect of your life including your job, your relationships with family and friends, and your health. In order for you to resume a normal life free from drugs and alcohol, the treatment must be taken as seriously as the disease. Recovery is a process that not only includes removing drugs and alcohol from your body but also learning how to cope with life without using them.

Detoxing from drugs and alcohol is the first step towards a sober life. During outpatient detox, you may go through some uncomfortable withdrawal symptoms. This initial detox may seem like the hardest part to go through, but recovery needs to include ongoing treatment in order to prevent relapse and be successful.

When you are addicted to drugs or alcohol, they become your first priority. Everything else in your life gets pushed to the side in order to satisfy the addiction. Now that you are determined to end your addiction, you need to learn how to live life again without being under the influence.

Types of Ongoing Treatment

You may have been experiencing underlying mental health issues and chose to self-medicate with drugs and alcohol. Unfortunately, now that the drugs and alcohol are gone, the mental health issue you were experiencing before will most likely return. One on one counseling can help you manage any mental health issues that may be present during your recovery treatment. Counseling can help you learn effective coping strategies to deal with life stressors and triggers that may give you cravings for your drug of choice. Therapy can help you define goals you would like to set for yourself both during and after your treatment.

Group therapy is helpful for patients starting out in recovery. Attending group therapy sessions gives you an opportunity to share your own experiences, what is working for you in recovery and what you need to work on. It is also helpful to hear about other recovering addicts’ similar experiences and what challenges they may be facing.

Twelve-step support groups like alcoholics anonymous and narcotics anonymous have proven to be incredibly helpful for recovering addicts. Like group therapy, this is a way to hear about others’ experiences and what they have learned from them. It is a good way to learn how others cope with cravings or how they manage their daily lives without drugs or alcohol.

The initial detox period needs to be incorporated with ongoing treatment in order to be successful. A serious illness like addiction needs to be treated seriously so that you can live a healthy, sober life. Our counselors are available twenty-four hours a day to help you begin your new sober life. Call today 800-737-0933

How Bad is The Heroin Epidemic?

Opioids are the the most prevalent cause of drug overdose in the US, and overdose rates continue to increase. From the year 1999 to the year 2008, heroin overdose rates increased by 400%, and rates have quadrupled again since 2010. Heroin overdose rates increased by over 20% from 2014 to 2015 alone. We are in the midst of a crisis, and opioids are to blame

Many heroin addictions begin with prescription opioids. In fact, three out of four new users report abusing pills first. For years, doctors prescribed them more freely. In more recent years research on their addictive properties and overdose rates has caused doctors to reduce, and sometimes cut off, prescriptions. Addicts can buy opioid pills, but they are very expensive. Heroin is less expensive and much stronger, so addicts sometimes turn to it out of desperation.

It is estimated that around 70,000 people report using heroin each year, but the number is likely much higher. Many addicts do not seek treatment on their own and would not answer questions about heroin use honestly. Demographically, the average heroin user is white, male, low-income, has abused prescription drugs in the past, and between the ages of 18 and 25.

Do you suspect that someone you care about is abusing heroine? Learn the signs.

Signs of heroin use include:

  • tiny pupils
  • appearance of sleepiness
  • flushed skin
  • paraphernalia, such as burnt spoons, baggies of a white substance or syringes
  • runny nose
  • track marks, or always covering arms
  • lack of self care, such as eating and grooming
  • nausea or vomiting
  • scratching

Health risks of heroin use include damage to the lungs, heart and kidneys, as well as severe impairment of the ability to think.

Because the potency of heroin varies and addicts often use more to achieve a stronger effect, overdose rates are very high. Often times, the difference between the amount needed for the desired effect and the amount that could cause a fatal overdose is very small. Because of this, all heroin users are at risk of overdose.

Do you or someone you care about need help overcoming addiction? We at Genesis House are here for you. You can reach us, 24 hours a day, at 800-737-0933

What is Drunk Packing?

Drunk packing has gained popularity recently, after a college student died after his friends practiced the trend. Drunk packing involves rolling a drunk person onto their stomach and placing something heavy, like a backpack, on their pack. The goal is that this will prevent them from rolling over onto their back and choking on their own vomit.

Who practices drunk packing?

You may be wondering if someone you care about could fall prey to this trend. This new practice is common on college campuses, especially among those who are afraid to call for help when a friend has alcohol poisoning. Because of this, many who use this method are underage. The intention with drunk packing is good, but misguided. You may think that someone can only choke on their vomit if they are on their back, so they are protected and can sleep safely.

The Problems with Drunk Packing

  • You can choke in any position.
  • The weight of the backpack can do more harm than good.
  • Choking is not the only danger faced by someone with alcohol poisoning.

Because young people are the ones most effected by this trend, it is important that they are educated in the matter. Drunk packing is not safe. If you or a friend has practiced this, or you suspect that someone you love is drunk packing, there are a couple important facts of which you should be aware. First, most schools have amnesty policies. This means that you will not get in trouble for calling for help. If someone is drunk enough that you are worried for their safety, it is better to be safe than sorry and seek medical help. Second, drunk packing may become a punishable offense in itself, now that someone has died after being drunk packed. It is no longer a way to stay out of trouble, because the risks have been made public.

So, what should you do about this new trend? If you believe that you or someone you care about is in danger from drunk packing and alcoholism, we at Genesis House are here to help. You can reach us 24 hours a day on our toll free number: 800-737-0933

Why Do Most Rehabs Teach The 12 Steps?

In healthcare it is generally agreed that alcoholism and addiction are a disease. While there is no outright cure, the most effective treatment modalities involve a holistic approach that targets your physical, mental and emotional health. This often includes engagement with a twelve-step program. Nearly 75 percent of drug and alcohol treatment centers teach patients these programs. Why is this and are they effective?

Alcoholics Anonymous and similar programs that engage the 12-step model are the only method that have been proven to work in promoting long-term mental health and relapse prevention. Inpatient care, medication and healthy lifestyle choices can improve your physical condition, but the twelve steps aim to provide you with the tools, community and support you need to make lasting change.

Most people have heard of such programs, but their practice is actually more complex than you might know. At first the process can seem confusing and daunting. Learning about the steps while in treatment provides a safe environment and individual attention to learn about the steps, the benefits of the program, and get you connected in the recovery community outside of treatment.

Benefits of the 12 Step Program

While the twelve steps are designed to treat alcoholism and addiction, they more broadly focus on improving your quality of life. Strong treatment programs will teach you about the twelve-step program to provide a foundation of skills and knowledge that are necessary for working the steps thoroughly, in treatment and afterwards. These are some of the benefits that come with working a twelve-step program.

  • Encourage self-esteem, self-help, and responsibility
  • Builds support network with other alcoholics and addicts
  • Simple, actionable steps reduce overwhelming problems into manageable actions
  • Promotes honest introspection and interactions with others
  • Assists in repairing relationships
  • Collective strength of shared experience, strength and hope

One of the major benefits of working a twelve-step program is the community provided by meetings. Since the founding of Alcoholics Anonymous, clinicians and alcoholic alike have stressed the importance of working with other alcoholics as an integral part of the recovery process.

Attending meetings and engaging with the community offers the opportunity to share experience, strength, and hope with others. Early in recovery, this means connecting with people who have been in your shoes, and understanding how the program has worked in their lives. Are you ready to see how it can work in yours? Call us now at 800-737-0933

If I Have HIV, Can I Still Get Into Drug Rehab?

Almost everybody who struggles with substance abuse has other underlying issues that need to be addressed. Sometimes these are emotional problems that drive people to experiment with drugs and alcohol, and in other situations there are physical issues at play. Any successful drug treatment program needs to address all of the issues that affect a person’s health, and that includes HIV and AIDS.

Even though HIV is often thought of as a sexually transmitted infection, it often goes hand-in-hand with drug abuse. This is why it is not uncommon for someone with a substance abuse problem to be HIV-positive. It can also make treatment more complicated for a number of reasons. First of all, HIV and AIDS obviously compromises a person’s health and immune system, which can make any kind of medical treatment that much more difficult. Many people who are addicted to drugs and alcohol are also much less likely to remain compliant with other medications that they need to take to be healthy. For someone living with HIV or AIDS, that can be deadly.

Of course, there’s also the stigma surrounding HIV and AIDS. It’s not nearly as severe as it once was when the AIDS epidemic was at its worst, but it’s still there, and it can make one hesitant to seek treatment for their substance abuse problems. While it’s totally understandable why you would keep quiet about being HIV-positive, you can still seek treatment at a drug rehab center. It’s still an important step that you need to take to be healthy and reclaim your life, but you shouuld seek out a program that is geared toward those who are living with HIV or AIDS. Fortunately, programs such as these are more common than you might think; all you need to do is seek them out.

If you live with both HIV and drug addiction, there is always help available to you. We at Genesis House have safe and nurturing drug rehabilitation programs available for anybody who wants to be free of their addictions. Visit us online to learn more about our many treatment programs and how they can help you. If you need immediate help for yourself or a loved one, don’t hesitate to call us at 800-737-0933. No matter who you are, always remember that there is help available to you, even when things seem hopeless.

Running Away From Addiction: Travel Out of State For Rehab

If you or a loved one are suffering from some type of addiction, you may be looking for options for treatment. Your focus is probably on treatment centers and programs close to home. While there are many good reasons to look for programs within your city, county or state, there are also some valid reasons to look beyond the borders to treatment facilities out of state.

You can easily find many programs around the country for the treatment of drug, alcohol or other addictions. Here ate a few reasons to look outside your home state for your treatment program:

  • A new setting gives you a new perspective.
  • You can get away from the negative influences in your life.
  • You may find programs with unique treatment options not offered in your area.

These are just a few of the benefits of attending a treatment center in another state. When you select this option, it can feel like a brand-new start.


How to Find an Out-of-State Rehab Program

If you’ve decided to try a rehab program in another state, you will want to do some research for the right one. You can do much of your work online. Many programs have their own websites, which will tell you about the services they offer and any special requirements.

You can also ask for a recommendation from a doctor or other professional. Their contacts often extend beyond local networks, and they can help you decide on the right program for your needs.

Look for reviews on the programs to find out from others what it’s really like. Testimonials provide a first-hand look at how it works and the pros and cons. While it should not serve as the sole basis for your decision, reviews can provide valuable information.

Contact the rehab center. Be prepared with a list of questions you may have about the facility and the programs offered. While you may not be able to tour the center in person, you should be able to talk to people and get answers to the questions you have.

Going away from home for addiction treatment can be a frightening concept. However, it can also give you a new start, which can be the incentive for you to keep going and win the battle against the addiction.

Call Genesis House Today:  800-737-0933

Why Do Some People Become Addicted to Drugs While Others Do Not?

There is not a simple answer to that question, unfortunately. Addiction is a life-long and multifaceted disease that can affect someone at any point in their life. Everyone’s brain is different and will respond differently when an addictive substance is introduced.

Furthermore, over time and continued use, the substance actually changes the brain’s chemistry and the cell structure, particularly in the regions that control learning, decision-making, stress, memory, and judgment and behavior. This is the reason someone with an addiction can’t just “give it up” like someone without. Their brain has actually changed. These changes can happen quickly and at any time, which is why someone can become addicted at any point in their lives, without even realizing it.

Having said that, there are certain factors that appear to be important to whether or not someone develops an addiction.

Factors of Addiction

  • Biology Many addictive predispositions, like gender or memory disorders are attributed to genetic components. Additionally, people with underlying psychiatric conditions are at greater risk of becoming addicted. Particularly people who are unaware of having a mental illness may begin using substances to self-medicate and alleviate their symptoms. While the offspring of people who have addiction often develop an addiction themselves, there is no one “addiction gene.”
  • Social Environment Often times, addiction may occur within family groups because they all exist within a similar social environment. This factor includes the environment at home, at school or work. It includes one’s family and friends, as well as socio-economic status and general quality of life.
  • Human Development Though people can become addicted at any age, younger people who use drugs or alcohol have a higher likelihood of developing an addiction. This is because the vulnerable parts of the brain are still developing, like those that control decision-making, judgment, and self-control.
  • Trauma Going through a traumatic experience, like abuse, neglect, or losing a loved one early in life can make one easily susceptible to addiction.

Addiction is a biological chemical reaction that a person cannot control. It is not a moral failing or a lack of desire or effort. Fortunately, addiction is absolutely treatable and can be managed with support and counseling. If you or someone you love is struggling with addiction, our counselors are available 24 hours a day to help you get treatment. Call 800-737-0933