Tag Archives: relapse

Will A Rehab In Florida Admit Me If I’ve Relapsed Before?

Reclaiming your life from drug or alcohol addiction can be a very complex and challenging process. In fact, many people try and fail in recovery multiple times before finally achieving sobriety. This is why relapse is considered a common and ultimately normal part of the recovery process. Although caving to stress, temptation, and cravings can leave you feeling like you’re incapable of getting well, it can actually mean that you’re on the path to getting better and that you just have more to learn and experience throughout treatment than you’d originally expected. Your willingness to rise above relapse and strive for sobriety again is a very positive sign. To ensure your success, you need to look for a rehab in Florida that’s capable of meeting your unique range of needs.

Each time that you try and fail in recovery, you become more knowledgeable of the different triggers and environments that have the ability to best your willpower. You also gain a better understanding of the best treatment types for your circumstances. For instance, if your first effort in recovery took place in a large outpatient program, it may be time to consider your options in long-term, inpatient treatment. With several months away from the relationships, stressors, and triggers of your current life and lifestyle, you’ll have ample time to:

  • Learn new and better coping strategies
  • Identify and address any co-occurring disorders
  • Establish long-term plans for keeping your health and sobriety on the right track

Relapse is also something that you can discuss at length with counselors, peers, and others who are present within the treatment environment. What many patients find is that each relapse is incredibly humbling. It reminds them that seeking ongoing help and support, particularly post-rehab, can be necessary for avoiding past mistakes and for maintaining the right life habits and relationships after formal treatment has ended.

You’ll Be Surrounded By Like-Minded People In Florida Rehab

One of the major benefits of enrolling in a Florida rehab post-relapse is being surrounded by people with similar goals, similar life experiences, and similar histories with relapse. Group therapy is a large part of the drug and alcohol treatment process as it teaches patients proper socialization skills, boundary setting, and strategies for safely and successfully besting cravings. You can share your relapse experiences during group therapy sessions to help others overcome the shame and self-doubt that they’re experiencing. You will also have the opportunity to glean valuable information from the experiences of those around you.

Success In Rehab After Relapse

Countless recovered drug and alcohol users have relapsed before. In fact, many of these individuals have multiple tales of relapse. It can take a while to find out which treatment style is right for you, and which treatment environments will be most conducive to your success. More importantly, for some people, it can also take several tries to fully commit to getting well. Relapsing, however, never means that you’re incapable of succeeding. It is instead an opportunity to learn, further your growth, refine your recovery plan, and build your resolve. Florida rehab centers understand that all of these things can be a normal part of the recovery process.

Inpatient treatment centers strive to provide all of their patients with safe, secure environments. With little to no cell phone use, carefully monitored facilities, and limited access to the outside world, clients have the opportunity to focus completely on getting well. These centers effectively remove drug and alcohol users from unhealthy relationships, circumstances, and other triggers that are impeding their progress. With individual and group therapy, access to treatment for co-morbidity, and many other treatments and support services, Florida rehabs are equipped to provide all that people need for successfully dealing with substance use disorder.

Identifying Needs That May Have Been Overlooked

Some people relapse simply because they aren’t ready for the rigors of recovery. Others relapse because critical needs weren’t met. For instance, if you believe that you are suffering from co-morbidity or a co-occurring disorder, dual diagnosis treatment could be an essential part of your recovery plan. This will address both substance use disorder and any chronic anxiety, chronic depression, or other mental health issues that exist. Dual diagnosis treatments eliminate the need for patients to self-medicate their pain with harmful drugs or alcohol, by treating their discomfort at its actual source.

Your Journey To Good Health Can Start Today

Relapsing shouldn’t prevent you from pursuing happiness, wholeness, and good health. All of the benefits of recovery are still await. You simply need to secure the right support services and help. From intensive, inpatient programs to flexible outpatient plans, there are many different options in Florida rehab available. If you want to find the perfect treatment center for your needs, we can help. Call us today at 800-737-0933.

What Programs Do Alcohol Treatment Centers Offer People with a History of Relapse?

If you have been struggling with chronic addiction relapse issues, the first thing you need to do is stop beating on yourself. The reality is relapsed happen far more often than anyone could imagine. That means you are in a normal class of addiction sufferers.

What you have to remember is addictions are diseases. Even worse, they are diseases for which there is no known cure. As you went through treatment, there was no chance you were going to completely rid yourself of the desire to keep using drugs or alcohol. Instead, your efforts were being pointed towards arresting your addiction and positioning yourself to better cope with the things that cause you to self-medicate. Meanwhile, your addiction was supposed to be rendered dormant. It’s unfortunate if no one ever explained this to you.

Going forward, you still have this chronic relapse issue you have to address. It’s clearly a tall order, but there are ways drug and alcohol addiction treatment centers like ours can help you continue the battle towards a lasting recovery. The key to success is you not giving up hope. As long as you are willing to keep reporting back to rehab for help, rehab facilities will keep helping you find the right solution.

What Programs Do Alcohol Treatment Centers Offer People with a History of Relapse?

If your next stint in rehab is not your first or your second, you would be well within your rights to try a different rehab facility. Like anything else, each facility does things a little different. Your lack of success at maintaining a lasting recovery might be as a result of you not getting access to the right treatment personnel.

If you have already been through several treatment facilities, it’s likely the problem lies within yourself. Taking that position, the rehab you feel most comfortable with is where you want to head to for additional treatment.

Most likely, there are three reasons why you are encountering continuing problems with your addiction. They include:

  • You haven’t spent enough time in treatment
  • You haven’t been given access to the right treatment options
  • Your living environment is so toxic, you can’t break the chains that bind you

There’s very little rehab facility that can do about the last problem on this list. That’s something you need to address on your own. It’s the responsibility of your therapists to arm you with the coping skills to make better decisions. The good news is the first two problems are things a rehab facility can likely do something about. Let’s discuss further.

You Haven’t Spent Enough Time in Treatment

There’s a good chance you have been in and out of rehab while going through standard one to two-month treatment programs each time. Clearly, that’s not working. What you will likely need to do is go through what the addiction treatment community refers to as extended treatment.

It’s really a matter a keeping you isolated away from your drug of choice long enough to beat back that incessant drive you have to keep using it. That might require as long as 180 consecutive days or more of therapy. It might sound drastic, but drastic situations demand drastic measures. During your time in an extended addiction treatment program, you would continue working on isolating problems and developing the coping skills you will need to deal with temptation and your triggers.

At some point, you have to stay in rehab as long as it takes to firm up your recovery. Have faith. There is a point for pretty much everyone when treatment finally takes hold.

You Haven’t Been Given Access to the Right Treatment Options

In this modern age of addiction treatment, therapists have access to literally dozens of different treatment options. It’s quite possible you haven’t yet encountered the treatment option that flips the recovery switch in your mind and body.

This is something your therapists need to address. They need to think about what hasn’t worked and started offering new options into the mix. One reason why trying a new rehab is a good idea is because you might get access to more treatment options. To prompt your therapists, you might mention terms of evidenced-based therapies and holistic treatment.

We feel for anyone who is battling chronic relapses. That’s why we feel compelled to work hard to help people like you. If you want more information about how we might go about helping you finally find sobriety, you can call one of our representatives at 800-737-0933

Will Inpatient Drug Rehab Centers Help Keep Me From Relapsing?

You’ll be sober in rehab, but what comes after? Leaving the structure of a treatment program can put you right back into the same environment that made addiction so accessible before. Old friends who use drugs, environments, and emotions that trigger your desire to use the very substance you sought to rid from your life will return, and you’ll need to have the skills necessary to avoid cravings, cope with triggers and stay sober.

Relapse Prevention Programs

Part of a quality drug treatment program is relapse prevention and aftercare. Rather than just focusing on detox and the early stages of recovery, rehabs with relapse prevention programs make sure that people are equipped to handle the stressors of sobriety.

Chances are that you will want to use again, especially when you’re exposed to triggers and temptations that you didn’t have to confront in rehab. Relapse prevention programs teach different strategies to cope with cravings, what to do if you do use again and how to get help ASAP so you don’t spiral back into addiction.

Relapse Prevention Skills

People all have their own ways of dealing with substance abuse recovery; developing the ability to cope with uncomfortable emotions, mental illness symptoms and stress from work and relationships will help you be able to stay afloat and avoid returning to your old ways.

Some of the skills that can help prevent relapse include:

– Self-care.
– Time management.
– Mindfulness awareness.
– Grounding techniques.
– Imagining the scenario, often called the “play the tape through” technique.

The most important factor in your recovery is you. While group therapy, support groups and sobriety coaches can help you stay on track, no one is going to keep you sober. The only person on the planet who has the ability to stop you from using drugs again is you.

But does this mean you have to face all the challenges of sobriety alone? Not at all. Rehab will teach you that being vulnerable is a strength, not a weakness. Sharing your feelings with people you trust can help you get the support you need at any time; all you have to do is reach out.

How Friends and Family Can Help

Your loved ones will serve an important role in your recovery. Many rehabs and drug centers offer family therapy programs as well as support groups for spouses, parents and friends of addicts.

These groups are led by licensed counselors and may include guest speakers such as doctors, psychologists or even people who have been sober for long periods of time. Doing so helps people understand the complexity of addiction and serve as a better support system for their loved one.

Make sure that you let your loved ones know that you are committed to your sobriety. Tell them that it would be helpful if they did not drink alcohol or do drugs around you. Ask them to not discuss any triggering topics or take you anywhere that may be too tempting.

You may want to ask them to accompany you to a support group meeting, which will allow them to get an inside look at your recovery and learn alongside you. The most important thing is to set boundaries and enforce them kindly.

You are not obligated to associate with anyone who encourages you to do drugs again or does not respect your recovery. It doesn’t matter how close you were or what their relationship to you is. Staying sober and leading a healthy life for yourself is always the top priority.

How Rehab Can Help

With a good rehab, you’ll never feel alone, even after you’ve completed your treatment program. Most inpatient drug rehabs see their patients for three to six months, and over that time, they get to know their unique personalities, strengths and challenges. To make sure that you feel ready to leave rehab, the staff will get you connected with local support groups in your area. They can also recommend substance abuse counselors to continue individual therapy.

If you’ve already completed rehab, you may still be able to sign up for relapse prevention training at a local outpatient drug center. Contact us today at 800-737-0933 to explore all of your treatment options. We’ll come up with some goals together and find a rehab that offers everything you’re looking for.

Will the Staff at a Drug Treatment Center Judge Me if I’ve Relapsed Before?

Judgment is something that most people have faced before when they struggle with addiction. In the past, you may have felt judged by your family and friends. You might have even picked up on the judgment of strangers when you were obviously inebriated in public or showed other signs of your addiction such as missing too many days of work. While the tendency for people to judge others can help to keep you in line, the truth is that it often just leads to shame. In fact, you might even be able to say that you are your harshest critic, and the thought of having to tell someone else that you relapsed makes you fear what they will say.

The good news is that a drug treatment center is the one place where you don’t have to worry about having someone make judgments about your recovery. In fact, the staff at your rehab only cares that you made it back and that you are ready to begin working on the next phase of ending your addiction. Making the decision to face your fears and accept the non-judgmental support of the staff at rehab allows you to begin taking these actions that help you move past your relapse.

Recovering in a Supportive Environment

Every member of the staff in a drug treatment center is familiar with the nature of addiction. Your professional counselors have all undergone vast amounts of training that help them to empathize when your situation. They know that relapse can happen to anyone, and they also understand that falling back on your promise to stay sober is not a sign of weakness. Instead, your ability to recognize that you need help after a relapse is a sign of strength.

The support that you receive in a drug treatment center also expands to include the other residents. From the moment that you start the program, you benefit from meeting others who have gone through similar struggles. While people on the outside may not always understand that this is not just a matter of willpower, those inside the treatment center will know what you mean when you talk about how hard it is to stay sober. Being open about your challenges is the first step toward finding solutions that help you feel stronger in your sobriety.

Identifying the Reasons for Your Relapse

One of the reasons why you can trust that the staff at your rehab will not judge you is that they have all studied the many different reasons why relapse happens. You may have fallen for temptation for one or more of the following reasons.

  • Difficulty coping with a major life change such as divorce
  • Being unable to attend aftercare programs
  • Developing a new mental health condition
  • Running into old friends or a triggering location
  • Thinking that you were okay to just have one drink or hit

Addiction is a challenging thing to overcome, and the right process for recovery is different for everyone. Some people experience a relapse because they get bored with sobriety and don’t have enough supports in place to keep them straight. Others experience a tremendous hardship that causes them to turn to drugs or alcohol again as a coping mechanism. During your time in treatment, the staff will focus on helping you figure out why you relapsed so that you can address each reason.

Making a Plan for Continued Sobriety

If you talk to enough people, you’ll find out that relapses are fairly common. It does not mean that you didn’t get good enough treatment the first time. It also doesn’t mean that you are a failure personally. Instead, professional counselors will urge you to view this as a sign that something has changed in your life that causes you to need a new relapse prevention plan.

So what does a new relapse prevention plan look like? You’ll find that yours may look different from other people’s. However, most plans begin by going through another round of treatment. This round of professional addiction care is designed to address the issues that are occurring in your life right now along with anything that you anticipate for the future. It may also include things such as getting help finding gainful employment and the importance of attending outpatient counseling sessions. Your plan for continued sobriety will be personalized so that it is easy for you to follow, and it will help you feel confident that you can avoid another relapse.

Are you ready to begin recovering from your relapse in the relaxed atmosphere of Palm Beach, Florida? Our team promises to never judge you for the past when you have so much hope for a better future. Give us a call today at 800-737-0933 to begin your recovery!

Does a Florida Alcohol Rehab Reduce My Chances of Relapse?

Many individuals that are in the process of making the decision to go to a Florida Alcohol Rehab wonder about the effectiveness of the treatment. As clients of these treatment facilities, these individuals undergo customized programs to help them reach sobriety. While sobriety is a lifelong journey, these treatment facilities can play a significant role in preventing relapse.

Individuals that seek treatment from a Florida alcohol rehab will be equipped with the tools necessary to unlearn habits of alcohol addiction. Moreover, these individuals are provided with multiple support systems and resources to help them overcome temptation when faced with the threat of relapse.

 Reducing the Chances of Relapse with Alcohol Rehab

While rehab won’t completely eliminate the chance of someone relapsing, it does help to reduce it. According to statistics, between 40 – 60% of those going through recovery will experience a relapse. This is because there are many physical and psychological factors that trigger cravings and the desire to use substances after becoming sober.

Though all individuals that overcome past substance abuse will have to work through these triggers, undergoing treatment at a rehab center will help to reduce the likelihood of relapse. When in a Florida treatment center, team members like doctors and therapists provide their clients with the tools to maintain their sobriety after they leave rehab.

During treatment, clients will undergo detox to target the physical triggers that tie them to substance abuse. As relapse also has behavioral and emotional triggers, these treatment centers also use specific treatments to target these triggers. Treatment like Cognitive Behavioral Therapy will help to reduce the chance of relapse. CBT helps an individual explore how their thoughts relate to their actions. Additionally, this therapy helps clients modify their negative thought patterns, which will positively affect their behavior overall.

Preventing Relapse

Though the potential for relapse exists for individuals in recovery, there are several ways to prevent relapse. Relapse often occurs when old memories trigger cravings for substance abuse. Similarly, during particularly stressful situations, others may believe turning to substance use will help relieve this stress.

The following strategies will help an individual prevent relapse

  • Move to a sober living environment
  • Take each day as it comes
  • Join support groups
  • Create a schedule and stay busy
  • Remain accountable to loved ones, mentors, and support group

Experts agree that one will be more likely to prevent relapse if they are able to develop effective coping behaviors, avoid risk factors, and create a strong support system. One will be at greater risk of relapse if they consistently miss support group meetings, believe their substance use is uncontrollable, or discontinue their coping behaviors.

To better prevent relapse, it’s also helpful to create relapse prevention plans. This plan should be referred to whenever an individual is tempted to go back to substance use. Relapse prevention plans should include the following information:

  • Someone to call
  • Safe places to go
  • A list of reasons to stay sober
  • Stress-relief strategies
  • Schedules for local AA meetings and similar support group meetings
  • Telephone numbers for crisis lines
  • Addresses for emergency services

Steps to Take If Relapse Occurs

When an individual relapses, this doesn’t mean that they’ve failed. This is an opportunity for one to become sober again and keep practicing sobriety.

The first few moments after a relapse are critical. After recognizing that they have relapsed, an individual needs to find safety. If it is likely that an overdose has occurred, 911 should be called immediately. In other situations, calling a sponsor loved one, or therapist is the right step to take after overdosing.

After the risk of overdose has passed, it’s essential to go to a safe environment without any access to substances, as this type of environment will be free of negative influences that will trigger one’s desire to use again. In the event of a substance abuse relapse, this individual needs to enter into recovery again, whether it is through inpatient treatment, outpatient therapy, or through the help of a support group.

After a severe relapse, it’s necessary to undergo a supervised detox to ensure that the individual overcomes dependence safely.

There is no clear-cut path to sobriety. If you have any questions regarding substance abuse and relapse, please contact us at 800-737-0933. Our counselors are available 24 hours a day to speak with you.

Can You Do an Outpatient Detox if You Can’t Miss Work?

It is not always such an easy matter to obtain treatment for drug abuse. There is no shortage of addiction treatment centers and programs around Florida and the country. Yet despite this, there are a variety of considerations that can make it harder to access such treatment than it should ideally be. Among the most common complaints of individuals struggling with an addiction is that their medical professional will likely recommend inpatient detox and other rehab treatment when they have to be at their daily jobs.

The problem for most working professionals is that they can not simply disappear from their workplace for a few weeks of intensive inpatient treatment. It is not so well known that the overwhelming majority of people struggling with addiction have jobs and keep up mostly normal lives. The SAMHSA Substance Abuse & Mental Health Services Administration reports that a stunning 76 percent of individuals who struggle with drug and alcohol abuse have jobs. There are far too many individuals who worry that stepping forward to get help will be a blow to their jobs or careers, potentially costing them their positions. The good news is that the government has enacted several laws to protect individuals who suffer from addiction disorders. These safeguard them from discrimination in the workplace and especially from losing their jobs for addiction that is now treated as a legitimate mental illness.

Inpatient Rehab Is Not the Only Addiction Treatment OptionThe important thing to keep in mind is that this inpatient rehab is not the only means of getting help for such addictions. It is especially helpful for those people who have a more serious addiction who believe that they will not resist future relapse temptations or those who have already suffered one or more relapses in their past. The fact is that living in such a facility literally 24 hours each day over a period of weeks will not be optional for all people. The alternative outpatient rehab permits those individuals who need to keep up with their everyday lives to do so. They will attend the treatment center and program several times each week for medical supervision and treatment, support group meetings, counseling, and drug tests.

Government Laws Protect Your Rehab Program RightsTwo major pieces of legislation protect American workers and their jobs when you seek out rehab program treatment for drug addiction. This is the ADA Americans With Disabilities Act as well as the FMLA Family & Medical Leave Act. These ensure that those with addictions will not be discriminated against so that they can take advantage of the help that they require in treatment without being fired from their essential jobs.

The fact is that after entering one of the rehab programs, you become completely protected by the ADA. You can not be fired for addiction-related reasons or for inconveniences caused by the treatment requirements, regardless of whether or not you miss work as a result of such treatment. In the event that you are fired, you are able to file charges for discrimination versus your employer. This is true for all government employers (including local and state government) and private firms who have at least 15 employees.

You Are Entitled to 12 Weeks of Medical Leave for Addiction Disorder TreatmentThe FMLA allows for qualified employees to take advantage of 12 weeks of medical leave surrounding addiction treatment and disorders every year. The law can not make employers pay you for that time, but they are required to make it available it to you. If you are a contract or part-time employee, it may not be an available option.

The law also enables you to apply for disability benefits during your treatment so that you do not have to do without compensation for weeks of work missed. This is an option for many people who find that they need inpatient detox to have effective drug addiction treatment. The caveat is that this proves to be a complex and somewhat difficult process to successfully complete. You must demonstrate that you do not earn more than the present income limit in order to become qualified for such disability. The other restrictions are as follows:

  • Not earning more than $1,000 each month
  • The disability cannot exceed a year
  • The addiction issue is significantly affecting your working capabilities

It is still an option and worth looking into if your job will not pay you for the missed weeks of work should you find it necessary to become an inpatient at a drug rehab facility. This is especially the case if this addiction disorder is more severe and has been ongoing. If you are ready to seek out help, our counselors are here for you now. Please contact us today at 800-737-0933 to speak with one of our assistants 24 hours per day.

What Florida Support Groups Are There to Prevent Relapse After Release From Addiction Treatment?

It takes a lot of hard work for someone to get past an addiction to drugs and alcohol. This is especially true for anyone who has been dealing with an addiction for a significant amount of time. The good news is once someone gets through rehab, they will have an opportunity to walk the straight and narrow road of recovery.

For a moment, let’s consider all the hard work that goes into getting through treatment. Upon entering rehab, the drug addict faces a stint in detox. Most reputable drug rehabs in South Florida provide patients with access to a drug detox program. Depending on the depth of the patient’s addiction, a medically-monitored detox program could be necessary to prevent possible health issues related to withdrawal symptoms. As an example, the possible withdrawal symptoms from a opiate addiction might include:

  • Severe muscle cramping throughout the body
  • Convulsions and tremors
  • Psychological issues related to anxiety, depression and anger
  • Hallucinations and disturbing dreams
  • Breathing problems
  • Heart-rate and blood pressure problems
  • Sleep issues – insomnia

Any one of these symptoms could escalate into serious health issues. In a medically-monitored detox program, medical professionals will monitor each patient’s progress. If a patient begins showing signs of distress, the protocol would dictate those patients be given some type of medication to ease their issues.

Once a patient gets past their withdrawal symptoms and cravings for drugs, they head off for therapy and counseling. The goal of therapy and counseling is to help the patient understand the dangers of continued substance abuse. The patient will also get an opportunity to better understand the circumstances that may have caused them to seek refuge from a needle, pill or bottle of booze.

Along with learning the truth about causation, the patient will also get an opportunity to build better coping skills to get through life. When coping skills can be directed at specific triggers and temptations, the patient is going to increase their chances of avoiding future relapse.

The Aftermath – Support Groups for Relapse Prevention

After doing all the hard work needed to get clean, most recovering addicts want to keep it that way. However, not every patient leaves rehab filled with confidence. It’s for that reason many top rehabs encourage departing patients to seek out support group resources. For the most, there’s three primary resources available to recovering addicts. That would include:

  • Outpatient Group Therapy
  • 12-Step Meetings
  • Sober Living

Let’s take an in-depth look at these options.

Outpatient Group Therapy

While taking part in a residential treatment program, patients are taught the importance of participating is group therapy sessions. They learn they are not alone in their battle with drugs or alcohol. They also learn about how other people deal with recovery and living life on life’s terms. During the group therapy process, a lot of patients come to the realization they will need support groups on the outside. That’s why many rehab centers allow recovering patients to continue participating in group sessions on an outpatient basis.

12-Step Meetings

Most of us have at least heard of Alcoholics Anonymous and Narcotics Anonymous. 12-Step meetings are available almost anywhere in the world. As a member, each recovering addict gets an opportunity to build relationships with people who have one important common goal, staying clean. With the help of a sponsor, members work through the actual 12 steps, which form a stairway to permanent sobriety. There’s nothing more powerful than one addict helping another.

Sober Living

For the recovering addict who just isn’t ready to face all their responsibilities right off the bat, a sober living home is a great place to land. Most sober living homes focus one accountability and sobriety while allowing the residents to pick up responsibilities as they gain strength. Step-by-step, residents build each day until they feel empowered to test their sober wings. The great thing about sober living is it’s always available to anyone wanting to stay sober but feeling shaky. In some ways, the support groups from sober living become family.

If you need help with your addiction, we have just what the doctor ordered. To get started, you can contact one of our staff members at 800-737-0933. We hope you will always remember that no one expects you to fight your addiction on your own. Help is always available when you need it.

Why Drug Addicts Get Into Relationships Immediately After Going To Rehab

You may be familiar with the old recovery cliche, “getting sober is easy; staying sober is hard.” Navigating your new life alone can seem like a daunting prospect. And now that you have given up on “people, places, and things,” it is natural to desire the closeness of another person. Many addicts new to recovery jump into relationships to avoid feeling alone. The sense of possibility that recovery brings you may make you feel ready for a new relationship. But most experts suggest waiting a year before diving into romance.

Early recovery is a time to work on yourself. It is a time to work on existing relationships still strained from your active addiction. One of the hardest things you will do in your recovery is facing your past mistakes to make amends. Romantic relationships are an easy way to avoid keeping the focus on you. But keeping the focus on you is crucial in the early months of recovery. Right now your recovery is so fresh that you may not be in the best mindset to pick the right romantic partner. Recovering drug addicts often attract other drug addicts. Two vulnerable people make for a problematic pairing in sobriety.

The Dangers of Dating

You may not realize it, but dating in early recovery poses a danger to your long-term sobriety. There are many reasons why:

  • Dating is a “high” like drugs and alcohol. Emotions you feel at the beginning of a new relationship are natural and healthy. The neurochemistry behind those feelings is like the effects of drugs and alcohol. You may be replacing one high for another.
  • Break-ups trigger relapses. Ending a relationship is tough for anyone. The pain is especially hard when you are learning to cope without illicit substances. A relationship that ends too soon may cause you to seek solace again with your drug of choice.
  • You open yourself up to vulnerability. As a newly recovering addict be wary of people looking to prey upon your vulnerable state. Watch out for addicts with years of sobriety who you may listen to as a mentor or sponsor. Keep the relationship professional.

Spend the first year of your sobriety focusing on you. Once you begin to know yourself, then love will follow. If you are ready to start your journey towards recovery, please feel free to contact us 24 hours a day at 800-737-0933

Detox Again? He Just Got Out Of Rehab in Florida!

It is hard to understand addiction sometimes. Some believe the problem can be dealt with will power while others think it’s a disease that can be cured. Having your loved one go through detox in Florida to see him go back might be disheartening, but there is more to it than you might imagine.

Addiction is Back?

Your loved one’s addiction never really left. One major goal of a good rehab center is to find a way to repress addiction or make it dormant. Your loved one is given the tools to continue to repress the addiction so that he can go back to his life as expected.

You should know that addiction is a deep rooted issue. Your loved one’s brain structure has been shifted through abuse, which makes it a lot easier for him to fall back into the addiction.

Did Detox Fail?

First of, the detox program did not fail as it did what it was supposed to do, which was to remove all toxic substances from your loved one’s body. This is merely the first step in a rehabilitation program and gives your loved one the opportunity to overcome this addiction.

In essence, a detox helps relieve the hold that these substances have on your loved one’s body. Detox centers are not meant to cure the disease, as mentioned earlier, so it did not really fail.

Should he Try Again?

Yes, what your loved one is going through is sometimes called a relapse. Something must have triggered his drug use, and he needs help to gain composure. Your loved one is equipped with the tools and will go to the rehabilitation center for additional help to fortify his ability to fight off triggers and urges.

The professionals at the rehabilitation center are likely going to try to focus on the trigger that caused the relapse. Perhaps this trigger was not discussed or your loved one needs more help understanding why he is having trouble fighting off the trigger. You and other people in his support system are now aware of the trigger’s power on your loved one, which should help protect him from another relapse.

There is no doubt that overcoming addiction is going to be hard. There may be setbacks like this one, but that does not mean you or your loved one should give up. This is an opportunity to learn and get better at suppressing the addiction. You know that he is willing because he already went to rehab once, so do not give up on him.

Relapse ends here – Call now 800-737-0933

My Son Has Been To Drug Rehab in Florida Several Times. Why Isn’t It Working?

Why Is Rehab Sometimes Unsuccessful

While drug rehab can be effective, it isn’t effective 100% of the time. Relapses are common. Here are some reasons why drug rehab can fail:

The Attendance Of Rehab Wasn’t The Person’s Own Choice:

Many people who attend rehab didn’t go entirely by their own choosing. These individuals are exceptionally prone to relapse. In some cases, the individual is heavily encouraged into rehab again after the relapse. However, these efforts are rarely successful until the individual makes their own personal decision to seek treatment.

Court ordered rehab is especially likely to be unsuccessful. In fact, some individuals who attend court ordered rehab have no intention of quitting drugs.

Lack Of Insight Into The Problems That Drugs Have Caused:

In some cases, an individual may attend drug rehab in Florida before they have been able to see the problems in their life that are caused by drugs. This may cause them to lack the commitment to permanently give up drugs. The point at which an individual sees the harm the drug has caused to them is often referred to as rock bottom. After an individual reaches this point, rehab is typically highly successful.

Disappointment With Sobriety:

On occasion, an individual who is addicted to drugs believes that quitting drugs will allow their life to become easy. This may temporarily cause them to be very excited about their recovery efforts. Unfortunately, if this is not the case, they may lose their willpower to continue with their recovery.

Lack Of Self Esteem:

In some cases, drug abuse is closely tied to negative views about oneself. An individual who is dependent on drugs may underestimate their positive attributes. There are even cases when an individual might unconsciously feel that they don’t deserve a different life. Furthermore, those with negative self esteem may underestimate their ability to quit drugs and/or alcohol due to not being able to see the level of willpower that they have.

Associations With Individuals Who Use Drugs:

If an individual who has had a problem with drugs or alcohol continues to associate with people who use their drug of choice or abuse alcohol, this can have an exceptionally powerful influence on them. This is true even if their friends are not saying or doing things that create overt peer pressure. For many individuals with a substance abuse problem, being around the drug could be enough to trigger a relapse.

Let Genesis House show you how we can stop the cycle of relapse.  Call now 800-737-0933