Tag Archives: Suboxone detox

Is It Possible for Suboxone to Get You High?

Buprenorphine, the partial opioid in Suboxone, is a partial opioid that at one time was thought to deter addiction. For a select few people, though, a “mild euphoria” can come from the drug and thus lead to the same addiction and drug-seeking behavior that sometimes comes about with recurring use of opioids. Suboxone has two drugs in one: Naloxone and Buprenorphine. When these two drugs are combined into what is known as Suboxone, it’s the Naloxone that is there to deter abuse.

Naloxone is said to block the opioid effects of Buprenorphine, meaning that even if you take large doses of Suboxone, you’re eventually going to hit the ceiling of effect and not experience an increasing euphoria. Despite the way science says this is supposed to work, some people do become addicted to Suboxone and do experience withdrawal effects when they’re coming off of it.

The Benefits of Suboxone

When someone is addicted to opiates like heroin and fentanyl, life becomes a roller coaster ride of physical and emotional anguish. Drug-seeking behavior makes people do things they wouldn’t normally do, resulting in an increasing number of losses and even physical pain depending on how bad the addiction gets. Treatment with Suboxone works for some people. Since the non-opioid drug in the compound blocks most of the effects of the opioid, you don’t get a major high as you do with regular opiates. This can satisfy the craving for an opiate without giving you the addictive euphoria opiates normally give users.

Suboxone clinics and even psychiatrists will sometimes prescribe Suboxone as a sort of “lesser evil” to people who are badly addicted to stronger opiates like Fentanyl and heroin. And for some clients, Suboxone will work because the client won’t become addicted to it and will be able to slowly ween off of the stronger opiates. For other more unfortunate people, the Suboxone itself can become a problem.

Using Suboxone As Directed

When Suboxone is used as directed and a patient follows the directions of the doctor, the drug may be successful in treating opiate addiction in the short-term. Once the more uncomfortable withdrawal symptoms of a strong drug like heroin or Fentanyl are in the past, the patient is then slowly weaned off Suboxone and can withdrawal more comfortably than they would have been able to without the medication. Addiction only becomes a problem if you begin abusing Suboxone the way you would another opiate.

Since the non-opiate agent in Suboxone blocks most of the effects of the opiate in the medication, there is less likelihood for abuse than you would find with other opiates. That doesn’t mean that a person can’t abuse Suboxone or even become addicted to it over time if they take too much of the medication or don’t follow a doctor’s orders while undergoing Suboxone treatment. Just like any other opioid, even a partial opioid can be destructive if you don’t follow a doctor’s orders and begin to abuse the drug.

Hope For Recovery

If you’ve read about Suboxone and feel like there may be a need for it in your treatment, it’s wise to call on a counselor who is familiar with the drug and how it can help you recover. If you’re addicted to Suboxone, that same counselor can slowly begin to help you overcome your addiction and move on with your life, just like you would with an addiction to anything else. Like any medication, Suboxone works for some people but not for others. For some, it eases the symptoms of physical and emotional withdrawal from drugs and allows them to more comfortably transition to a drug-free life. For others, Suboxone itself can become an addiction.

Since Suboxone does cause some mild euphoria for some patients, it’s vital that you take it as prescribed by a doctor. Don’t take extra Suboxone under any circumstances. For some folks, this is easier said than done, and if a full-blown addiction has developed, it’s time to call a counselor for help, someone who knows about Suboxone and how to deal with any dependence you might have developed on it. When you trust your recovery to a good counselor, miracles can happen, whether you’re coming off of heroin or Suboxone, and even if you’re coming off of Suboxone itself. There is always hope for a brighter tomorrow when you reach out for help.

If you’re ready to learn more or get help, our counselors are available 24 hours a day to answer your questions. Call 800-737-0933.

How Long Does a Dose of Suboxone Work?

What is Suboxone?

Buprenorphine/Naloxone, also known as Suboxone, is an opioid medication used for assisting people who have an addiction to opioids. Brand names of Suboxone also include Bunavial, Zubsolv, and Cassipa. Suboxone uses a blend of buprenorphine and naloxone to assist people in drug withdrawal. When combined with treatment and therapy, Suboxone works well to help addicts get off opioids.

How long does a dose of Suboxone work?

Suboxone begins working soon after it dissolves under a person’s tongue or on their cheek. Most people take one dose of Suboxone as a film dissolved on the tongue. One does get taken every day as directed by a person’s physician.

What does Suboxone do to treat people?

Buprenorphine/naloxone works in the brain to get people addicted to opioids off these drugs. Some of the medicines that Suboxone substitutes for include:

• Heroin.
• Fentanyl.
• Hydrocodone.
• Oxycodone.
• Morphine.

Buprenorphine partially works like an opioid because it is a partial opioid antagonist. It works weaker than full antagonists like methadone and heroin. The opioid effects level off even when dosages increase, reducing the risk of side effects, dependency, and misuse. Suboxone lowers the full impact of opioids, so it helps people addicted to opioids abstain from taking an excess of opioid drugs.

Naloxone, another component in Suboxone, blocks opioid effects when it gets dissolved in a person’s mouth. If naloxone gets injected instead of taken orally, the person taking the drug becomes very ill when they experience withdrawal symptoms. This detail discourages individuals from injecting Suboxone. Suboxone works best, along with counseling and other types of rehabilitation support.

What are the symptoms of opioid dependence?

• Some of the signs of opioid addiction might include:
• An inability to stop using opioids even though they cause relationship and health problems.
• Needing to take more opioids to get the same effect.
• Having withdrawal symptoms when you can’t get the opioids.
• Giving up previously enjoyable activities to use the drug.
• Spending a lot of time finding a way to use drugs.

Signs of withdrawal from opioids include:
• Runny nose.
• Sweating.
• Shaking.
• Nausea and vomiting.
• Diarrhea.
• Achy body.
• Irritability.
• Irritability.

What shouldn’t you do when you take Suboxone?

Don’t start taking Suboxone early. Wait to take it until your doctor instructs you to, or you may have withdrawal symptoms. If you’re pregnant or if there’s a chance you’re pregnant, tell your doctor before you start Suboxone therapy. Continue taking Suboxone for the entire time that your doctor instructs. Follow all instructions about reducing Suboxone levels when it becomes time to stop taking the drug. Don’t miss doses, as this action might cause you to relapse. Suddenly stopping Suboxone for any reason might cause unpleasant withdrawal symptoms. Some antibiotics don’t work well with Suboxone, so let your health care provider know that you’re taking this medication. Take this medication following the instructions provided for you. Don’t take any other drugs with Suboxone unless you have your doctor’s permission.
Can I become addicted to Suboxone?
Yes, addiction remains a possibility when taking this drug. As long as you follow medication instructions, you should be gradually weaned from Suboxone over time.

When Suboxone is used as prescribed and under a doctor’s supervision, the medication works well to help people safely get off opioids. You must follow the doctor’s instructions to achieve the desired effects without addiction, however. If you suddenly stop taking Suboxone, you will have withdrawal symptoms. So please consult your doctor before you quit taking Suboxone.

This prescription is a controlled substance (CIII) and is regulated by the government. Some individuals who use street drugs or who abuse prescription drugs might want your drugs. Selling or giving Suboxone to someone else remains against the law. Using Suboxone in ways other than prescribed can cause addiction. Taking this medication via injection increases your chances of addiction.

Taking Suboxone might get you off opioids for good. But for them to work correctly, you have to follow the instructions to get the right benefits. If you find that you can’t get off Suboxone when it comes time to start tapering off the drug, you need to ask for help. We can help you stay off opioids and Suboxone, too. Please contact our office right away at 1-234-456-7890 for more information and a consultation with our specialists.