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How Long Does it Take to Detox From Suboxone?

How Long Does it Take to Detox From Suboxone?

Suboxone is a medication-assisted therapy used to assist in recovery from heroin and other opioid addictions. It is a combination of two medications: naproxen and buprenorphine. Buprenorphine is a low dose opioid that allows those detoxing from opioids to taper off the drug, rather than doing so abruptly, which can cause a wide range of physical symptoms and ailments, while naproxen binds to the opioid receptors in the brain blocking the high an individual would receive from the low dose of opioids in the buprenorphine.

Suboxone is typically taken for at least 90 days and, if needed, longer. Because Suboxone is an opioid itself, there can be withdrawal symptoms if the medication is stopped abruptly. If you or your loved one has taken the medication, you may be wondering, how long does it take to detox from Suboxone and what withdrawal symptoms to expect. Here is a quick guide.

What Are The Symptoms of Suboxone Withdrawal?

The symptoms of Suboxone withdrawal are very similar to those of heroin and other opioids. These symptoms can vary from person to person but typically include:

  • Difficulty concentrating
  • Headache
  • Fever/Chills
  • Depression
  • Anxiety
  • Muscle and body aches
  • Difficulty concentrating
  • Nausea and/or vomiting
  • Cravings

The severity of withdrawal typically depends on the method used to cease the medication. Abrupt cessation or “quitting cold turkey” is not encouraged as it does not give the body a chance to adjust to not having the medication. To increase the manageability of withdrawal symptoms, tapering is encouraged.

How Long Does It Take to Detox From Suboxone?

While each individual is different, it generally takes about 30 days for physical withdrawal symptoms to be alleviated. Physical withdrawal symptoms are typically at their worst during the first three days of stopping the medication and slowly start to subside after that. During the first week or two, you or your loved one may also experience insomnia or mood swings, but those too will start to dissipate with some time and should not be a problem once you hit week three or four.

It is very important to note that you or your loved one may experience intense cravings after the 30-day mark. It is especially important to remain vigilant and keep in contact with a counselor or other support system during this time due to the fact that the potential for relapse increases during this time.

How Can I or My Loved One Make Detox From Suboxone Easier?

The best thing you or your loved one can do to make detoxing from Suboxone a bit easier, both mentally and physically, is to gradually decrease the intake of the medication. Abruptly stopping Suboxone increases the risk for more severe symptoms throughout the detox. Also, making sure to be in contact with a treatment specialist and/or support group throughout the detox process will also make Suboxone detox more manageable and decrease the chance for relapse.

Detoxing from Suboxone can be difficult. The physical symptoms can wreak havoc on the body and the cravings carry the risk of relapse. Having a good detox plan in place prior to stopping Suboxone increases the likelihood of success for you or your loved one. Do you know someone who would like to quit Suboxone or would you like to quit yourself? We are here to help. Our caring and compassionate counselors are available 24/7. Give us a call at 800-737-0933.

Is Detoxing from Drugs and Alcohol Always Painful?

The fact that you’re beginning to consider rehabilitation for drug or alcohol addiction is a commendable situation. Taking this step means that you’ll be on your way to a brighter life. However, as you’re navigating the process, you likely have an array of concerns and questions, and some of those inquiries may very well pertain to whether or not detoxing from drugs and alcohol is always painful.

Detox and Pain

As you may know, the detox stage is an important part of recovery from an addiction to drugs or alcohol. Without going through this stage, your recovery efforts are likely to suffer, which is an important element to consider. Even though you may experience some pain during the detox process, understand that fighting through it is so important. To have a true answer to your question about pain and detox, you have to understand a few important elements:

  • understanding detox and pain
  • individual factors
  • trained professionals
  • necessary component
  • accomplishment
  • companionship and understanding

Understanding Detox and Pain

You may wonder why the pain would even play a role in detox at all. Keep in mind that your body has become addicted to a certain substance. Without that substance, you may start to go through withdrawal. Withdrawal can have a variety of effects on your body, and levels of pain could come into fruition. What you should recognize though is that the pain may or may not be severe. Also, rehabilitation centers typically offer medically supervised detox. During this stage, you are under the care of medical professionals who can attend to your needs and foster a safe and healthy detox process.

Individual Factors

Whether or not detox will hurt, and the extent to which this process will cause pain is going to depend upon individual factors as well. If you have been using a hard drug for a long time, then the pain may very well be worse than it would be in other cases. For example, if you have recently started having problems with alcohol, the detox process may cause minimal physical pain to your body if it causes any at all. You should also take your individual threshold for pain into account. Some people simply do not feel pain as badly as others do.

Trained Professionals

Choosing the right rehabilitation center can also help you to better manage the pain that may come along with detox. In other words, you should look for a center that has staff members who are open and honest with you about what to expect during the process. Furthermore, the professionals should also speak with you about methods to reduce the pain and encourage you to continue through detox as it is a vital component of the process.

Necessary Component

The answer is clearly that detox does not always cause pain. However, it can. Knowing that pain can play a role in this early step might scare you away from pursuing a treatment program. In the long run, opting for detox is a less painful and jarring option than remaining addicted to drugs or alcohol. What you can do is remind yourself that going through detox isn’t optional when you want to heal from your addiction. Understanding that detox is a necessary part of the process can help you to feel a sense of empowerment.

Accomplishment

You can also think about detox in a positive light. Instead of focusing on the pain, shift your attention to the fact that after you go through detox, you have completed one part of the process. You still have a number of stages to go through, but you should feel accomplished in getting through detox. In fact, the accomplishment that you feel after your detox can provide motivation and encouragement for you as you continue on your journey to recovery.

Companionship and Understanding

Knowing that you aren’t alone can also act as a source of inspiration. Other people are going through detox as well. Even though you may not see them right now, they are there. You are all on your way toward an incredible journey that will allow you to have a new life. Also, once you are finished with this stage of the program, you can join with others who understand.

As you can see, your detox stage might be painful, and it might not be. Fortunately, you can call 800-737-0933 to discuss a specific plan of treatment with trusted professionals.

Is It Possible for Suboxone to Get You High?

Buprenorphine, the partial opioid in Suboxone, is a partial opioid that at one time was thought to deter addiction. For a select few people, though, a “mild euphoria” can come from the drug and thus lead to the same addiction and drug-seeking behavior that sometimes comes about with recurring use of opioids. Suboxone has two drugs in one: Naloxone and Buprenorphine. When these two drugs are combined into what is known as Suboxone, it’s the Naloxone that is there to deter abuse.

Naloxone is said to block the opioid effects of Buprenorphine, meaning that even if you take large doses of Suboxone, you’re eventually going to hit the ceiling of effect and not experience an increasing euphoria. Despite the way science says this is supposed to work, some people do become addicted to Suboxone and do experience withdrawal effects when they’re coming off of it.

The Benefits of Suboxone

When someone is addicted to opiates like heroin and fentanyl, life becomes a roller coaster ride of physical and emotional anguish. Drug-seeking behavior makes people do things they wouldn’t normally do, resulting in an increasing number of losses and even physical pain depending on how bad the addiction gets. Treatment with Suboxone works for some people. Since the non-opioid drug in the compound blocks most of the effects of the opioid, you don’t get a major high as you do with regular opiates. This can satisfy the craving for an opiate without giving you the addictive euphoria opiates normally give users.

Suboxone clinics and even psychiatrists will sometimes prescribe Suboxone as a sort of “lesser evil” to people who are badly addicted to stronger opiates like Fentanyl and heroin. And for some clients, Suboxone will work because the client won’t become addicted to it and will be able to slowly ween off of the stronger opiates. For other more unfortunate people, the Suboxone itself can become a problem.

Using Suboxone As Directed

When Suboxone is used as directed and a patient follows the directions of the doctor, the drug may be successful in treating opiate addiction in the short-term. Once the more uncomfortable withdrawal symptoms of a strong drug like heroin or Fentanyl are in the past, the patient is then slowly weaned off Suboxone and can withdrawal more comfortably than they would have been able to without the medication. Addiction only becomes a problem if you begin abusing Suboxone the way you would another opiate.

Since the non-opiate agent in Suboxone blocks most of the effects of the opiate in the medication, there is less likelihood for abuse than you would find with other opiates. That doesn’t mean that a person can’t abuse Suboxone or even become addicted to it over time if they take too much of the medication or don’t follow a doctor’s orders while undergoing Suboxone treatment. Just like any other opioid, even a partial opioid can be destructive if you don’t follow a doctor’s orders and begin to abuse the drug.

Hope For Recovery

If you’ve read about Suboxone and feel like there may be a need for it in your treatment, it’s wise to call on a counselor who is familiar with the drug and how it can help you recover. If you’re addicted to Suboxone, that same counselor can slowly begin to help you overcome your addiction and move on with your life, just like you would with an addiction to anything else. Like any medication, Suboxone works for some people but not for others. For some, it eases the symptoms of physical and emotional withdrawal from drugs and allows them to more comfortably transition to a drug-free life. For others, Suboxone itself can become an addiction.

Since Suboxone does cause some mild euphoria for some patients, it’s vital that you take it as prescribed by a doctor. Don’t take extra Suboxone under any circumstances. For some folks, this is easier said than done, and if a full-blown addiction has developed, it’s time to call a counselor for help, someone who knows about Suboxone and how to deal with any dependence you might have developed on it. When you trust your recovery to a good counselor, miracles can happen, whether you’re coming off of heroin or Suboxone, and even if you’re coming off of Suboxone itself. There is always hope for a brighter tomorrow when you reach out for help.

If you’re ready to learn more or get help, our counselors are available 24 hours a day to answer your questions. Call 800-737-0933.

How Long Can You Be Prescribed Suboxone?

Suboxone is a combination of two drugs: Buprenorphine and Naloxone. It is considered a partial opioid and will sometimes produce mild euphoria in the patients who use it to more comfortably withdrawal from stronger opiates. This medication has done an enormous amount of good for some opiate addicts who felt they were at the end of the line and had no hope. If you believe Suboxone might help you, one of the first questions you might want to ask if how long you can be prescribed Suboxone for your withdrawal issues.

Suboxone is prescribed, usually, for between 6 months and one year, but there are some opiate addicts who will need to take it for a longer length of time. The normal length of therapy will Suboxone generally lasts for that year, but it’s a flexible drug and some doctors realize that treating addiction is a long-term goal, and keeping a patient off heroin or stronger opiates sometimes necessitate a longer stint of Suboxone therapy.

How Suboxone Works

Buprenorphine is the opioid in Suboxone, while Naloxone blocks the majority of the opiate’s effect. Suboxone works because while your body believes it is receiving an opiate, you’re not getting the addictive euphoria you would get with a drug like heroin or Fentanyl. The result is that you don’t experience opiate withdrawal as strongly as you would if you came off a drug like heroin or Fentanyl without Suboxone. And since the euphoria is mild or non-existent altogether, you’re able to stop craving the “high” of opiates while still foregoing the uncomfortable withdrawal.

For someone who has a heavy addiction to fentanyl or heroin, things don’t automatically go back to normal once you start Suboxone therapy. Many opiate addicts have legal problems, family problems, and even occupational problems, so it’s not a miracle drug. What it does do is give you one of your best chances to safely and comfortably cease using drugs like heroin and Fentanyl so that you can begin your journey to recovery. Physical withdrawal is only one component to your recovery, and Suboxone can make physical withdrawal much more bearable. Suboxone works because of it:

  • Decreases the severity of physical withdrawal
  • Works on opiate receptors to help you think more clearly during withdrawal
  • Is relatively safe compared to strong opiates

Forms of Suboxone

Suboxone comes in many forms. One is a sublingual film. Another form is the dissolvable tablet form that many addicts choose to take. Which kind works best for you can be discussed with your treatment center or doctor. The medication also comes in patch form that can be stuck on an arm and used over the course of a couple of days. Suboxone has a long half-life – 24 to 72 hours – so it’s a convenient medication in that you don’t have to remember to take a pill all the time.

For addicts who’ve discovered Suboxone works for them, it’s a truly relieving feeling to know that there is something out there that will allow you to think clearly and skip agonizing withdrawal while still working on other parts of recovery. Physical withdrawal is one of the most powerful reasons that addicts don’t get help sooner, and sadly, if an addict waits too long to get help, it can be too late. Thanks to formulas like Suboxone, more addicts than ever before have the confidence to get the help they need.

Seeking Help

Addicts have a serious problem. Believe it or not, most addicts realize that the problem exists. They’re just too scared of going through the physical and emotional pain that sometimes comes with opiate withdrawal. Drugs like Suboxone enable more addicts to confidently and fearlessly face their addiction without the intense withdrawal effects that sometimes come with opiate addiction. It’s definitely a drug that has a place in some people’s line of defense against relapse.

Most people will take Suboxone for 6 months to a year, but if it’s prescribed for longer, don’t be surprised. Depending on the severity of the addiction, it can be a couple of years before you’re ready to tackle the world without Suboxone. And that’s okay. The important thing is that you’re doing what your doctors and counselors say you need to do in order to stay well, and Suboxone can be an important part of your treatment plan for as long as they believe it’s necessary. During Suboxone treatment, counseling services and group meetings will also help to increase the quality of recovery and life you have after drug and alcohol addiction.

When you’re ready to take the first step and get help, our counselors are available 24 hours a day. Call 800-737-0933.

How Long Does a Dose of Suboxone Work?

What is Suboxone?

Buprenorphine/Naloxone, also known as Suboxone, is an opioid medication used for assisting people who have an addiction to opioids. Brand names of Suboxone also include Bunavial, Zubsolv, and Cassipa. Suboxone uses a blend of buprenorphine and naloxone to assist people in drug withdrawal. When combined with treatment and therapy, Suboxone works well to help addicts get off opioids.

How long does a dose of Suboxone work?

Suboxone begins working soon after it dissolves under a person’s tongue or on their cheek. Most people take one dose of Suboxone as a film dissolved on the tongue. One does get taken every day as directed by a person’s physician.

What does Suboxone do to treat people?

Buprenorphine/naloxone works in the brain to get people addicted to opioids off these drugs. Some of the medicines that Suboxone substitutes for include:

• Heroin.
• Fentanyl.
• Hydrocodone.
• Oxycodone.
• Morphine.

Buprenorphine partially works like an opioid because it is a partial opioid antagonist. It works weaker than full antagonists like methadone and heroin. The opioid effects level off even when dosages increase, reducing the risk of side effects, dependency, and misuse. Suboxone lowers the full impact of opioids, so it helps people addicted to opioids abstain from taking an excess of opioid drugs.

Naloxone, another component in Suboxone, blocks opioid effects when it gets dissolved in a person’s mouth. If naloxone gets injected instead of taken orally, the person taking the drug becomes very ill when they experience withdrawal symptoms. This detail discourages individuals from injecting Suboxone. Suboxone works best, along with counseling and other types of rehabilitation support.

What are the symptoms of opioid dependence?

• Some of the signs of opioid addiction might include:
• An inability to stop using opioids even though they cause relationship and health problems.
• Needing to take more opioids to get the same effect.
• Having withdrawal symptoms when you can’t get the opioids.
• Giving up previously enjoyable activities to use the drug.
• Spending a lot of time finding a way to use drugs.

Signs of withdrawal from opioids include:
• Runny nose.
• Sweating.
• Shaking.
• Nausea and vomiting.
• Diarrhea.
• Achy body.
• Irritability.
• Irritability.

What shouldn’t you do when you take Suboxone?

Don’t start taking Suboxone early. Wait to take it until your doctor instructs you to, or you may have withdrawal symptoms. If you’re pregnant or if there’s a chance you’re pregnant, tell your doctor before you start Suboxone therapy. Continue taking Suboxone for the entire time that your doctor instructs. Follow all instructions about reducing Suboxone levels when it becomes time to stop taking the drug. Don’t miss doses, as this action might cause you to relapse. Suddenly stopping Suboxone for any reason might cause unpleasant withdrawal symptoms. Some antibiotics don’t work well with Suboxone, so let your health care provider know that you’re taking this medication. Take this medication following the instructions provided for you. Don’t take any other drugs with Suboxone unless you have your doctor’s permission.
Can I become addicted to Suboxone?
Yes, addiction remains a possibility when taking this drug. As long as you follow medication instructions, you should be gradually weaned from Suboxone over time.

When Suboxone is used as prescribed and under a doctor’s supervision, the medication works well to help people safely get off opioids. You must follow the doctor’s instructions to achieve the desired effects without addiction, however. If you suddenly stop taking Suboxone, you will have withdrawal symptoms. So please consult your doctor before you quit taking Suboxone.

This prescription is a controlled substance (CIII) and is regulated by the government. Some individuals who use street drugs or who abuse prescription drugs might want your drugs. Selling or giving Suboxone to someone else remains against the law. Using Suboxone in ways other than prescribed can cause addiction. Taking this medication via injection increases your chances of addiction.

Taking Suboxone might get you off opioids for good. But for them to work correctly, you have to follow the instructions to get the right benefits. If you find that you can’t get off Suboxone when it comes time to start tapering off the drug, you need to ask for help. We can help you stay off opioids and Suboxone, too. Please contact our office right away at 1-234-456-7890 for more information and a consultation with our specialists.

Is Suboxone Only Used During Detox?

Suboxone is a medication that is prescribed to treat opioid use disorder. It is a combination of buprenorphine and naloxone. Suboxone is used to decrease the appearance of opioid withdrawal symptoms. It is a long-acting medication and lasts for approximately 24 hours. Suboxone is a film that is placed in the cheek or under the tongue when administered. The side effects of suboxone can include constricted pupils, low blood pressure, lethargy, and respiratory depression. The risk of overdosing on suboxone is drastically lower than overdosing on another opioid like heroin. Suboxone was approved for use in the United States for medical purposes in 2002.

The long-term outcomes of suboxone as a treatment for opioid use disorder are better than quitting opioid use overall. Cravings for opioids are decreased when using suboxone, which prevents individuals from seeking out other opioids to use. Suboxone is a first-line treatment for opioid use disorder and has been shown as effective in the treatment and long-term recovery for individuals who were dependent on opioids in the past. Suboxone is typically prescribed during detox and in doctors offices. Individuals are given their prescription and they do not have to be monitored, unlike individuals who must go into a clinic each day to receive their dose of methadone.

Individuals who are stable and are not able to visit a clinic each day to receive medication may prescribed suboxone. Further, individuals who have other medical conditions that visit their doctor regularly may be prescribed suboxone. Other individuals who may be prescribed suboxone include those who have jobs that require them to remain alert and are not able to be under a sedating medication like methadone. Suboxone is also recommended to treat individuals who may be affected negatively by methadone use. These populations include individuals who abuse alcohol, the elderly, individuals who take large doses of benzodiazepines, and individuals with a low level of tolerance to opioids. Further, suboxone is prescribed to individuals who are engaging in therapy and counseling in order to treat their opioid use disorder. The use of suboxone in combination with therapy is more successful in treating opioid use disorder than treating it with suboxone alone.

If you would like more information regarding suboxone therapy or treatment for opioid use disorder, call us today at 800-737-0933.

Does Suboxone Cause or Affect Mood Swings?

Suboxone is a medication that is prescribed to treat opiate addiction. Suboxone contains a combination of buprenorphine and naloxone. Buprenorphine is a medication containing opioids and naloxone is a substance that blocks the effects of opioid medication (e.g., pain relief and feelings of well-being) that often lead individuals to seek out opioids after recovery. Suboxone has several side effects and may cause issues with mental health and mood swings.

Suboxone as a TreatmentThis medication is prescribed in several different types of situations. Doctors may prescribe Suboxone in order to aid the process of withdrawal and detoxification. Doctors also prescribe Suboxone as a long term maintenance medication for opiate addiction. Individuals who meet certain criteria may be able to continue to take Suboxone for an extended period of time in order to control cravings and allow their brain to heal and begin to block the cravings for opioid use. Suboxone has also been prescribed to individuals who suffer from chronic pain as an alternative to traditional narcotic pain relievers.

There are several pros and cons related to Suboxone use. It helps control cravings, has anti-depressant qualities, and blocks the effects of narcotic opioids. As for the cons of Suboxone, it is an extremely powerful synthetic opioid, it may cause constipation, there is a period of withdrawal after quitting Suboxone, and it may induce depression and other issues related to mental health. Suboxone also has a high risk of abuse.

Side Effects of Suboxone UseSuboxone works in such a way that it binds to the opioid receptors located in the brain, which causes changes in the user’s mental state and behaviors. Changes in behavior related to Suboxone use can include:

  • Lethargy
  • Cravings
  • Distress
  • Fear
  • Anxiety
  • Agitation
  • Mood Swings
  • Impaired memory

Suboxone also causes physical side effects. Physical side effects of Suboxone use may include:

  • Headaches
  • Changes in appetite
  • Stomach pain
  • Dependency
  • Issues with coordination
  • Insomnia
  • Cramps
  • Muscle Aches
  • Reduced breathing
  • Liver damage
  • Withdrawal symptoms (e.g., joint pain and excessive sweating)

Does Suboxone Cause or Affect Mood Swings? Due to the fact that Suboxone is an extremely powerful mind-altering drug, it may cause mood swings, depression, agitation, and may make people taking it to act out of character and engage in violent behavior. Suboxone alters the brain chemistry of its users and may affect their behavior, specifically if they quit taking the medication abruptly. As stated before, the side effects of Suboxone can include depression, anxiety, mood swings, and insomnia.

Long-term use of Suboxone can cause many issues. Long-term Suboxone users have reported that quitting Suboxone is more difficult than quitting heroin or Oxycontin. This is due to the long-half life Suboxone. It is able to stay in the user’s system for approximately eight to nine days. This makes the detoxification process from Suboxone last for weeks to months. This long detoxification process includes uncomfortable side effects that are both physical and mental in nature. This includes mood swings and depression.

If you or a loved one is having difficulty with Suboxone use, please contact us today at 800-737-0933. Our counselors are available 24 hours a day and are ready to assist you and consult with you regarding your specific needs.

Should Suboxone Be Taken Forever or Just During Detox?

Given its effectiveness, Suboxone is one of the most commonly prescribed medications for those looking to overcome an opiate addiction. It’s easy to understand why in light of the medication’s capacity to ease withdrawal symptoms while also producing a less intense “high.” Suboxone is comprised of two separate medications, Naloxone and Buprenorphine, which offer unique benefits when it comes to helping individuals break free of their addiction. As such, it is not surprising to find that many people want to continue using the Suboxone long-term. In this article, we will take a look at the consequences of long-term use and why it should be avoided.

WHAT IS SUBOXONE?

Although we touched in this briefly in the preface of the article, contains Naloxone, which is highly effective in easing the excruciating pain symptoms associated with opioid withdrawal. The medication can also be used to reverse an opioid overdose. Basically, the drug acts as an antagonist by binding to opioid receptors and blocking the transmission of opioids to the brain. Also, it prevents agonist, the chemical compound that elicits a physiological response when combined with brain receptors.

Now that we have a general understanding of the role of Naloxone, let’s focus our attention on Buprenorphine. Unlike naloxone, buprenorphine works by attaching to opioid receptors and stimulating them, which makes it possible to soothe withdrawal symptoms without eliciting the same feelings of euphoria and sedation typical of other opioids.

WHAT ARE THE EFFECTS OF LONG-TERM SUBOXONE USE?

In short, long-term Suboxone usage increases the likelihood of addiction; in fact, according to a report published by SAMHSA (Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration), the misuse of Suboxone resulted in 3,000 emergency room visits in 2005 and exceeded 30,000 in 2010. Although the inclusion of Naloxone as a deterrent to abuse is effective, some individuals have found ways of bypassing this safeguard.

That said, some people have been known to vacillate between Suboxone and their primary drug of choice. Needless to say, such actions can quickly result in relapse. So why are so many people interested in long-term use even after they have undergone detox? Most likely it is for the high that is derived from the medication and to resolve any residual symptoms they may be experiencing, physical or psychological.

HOW TO TAKE SUBOXONE PROPERLY

Suboxone can be taken in a variety of ways; however, patients who undergo treatment are usually prescribed sublingual tablets, which can be dissolved under the tongue before being absorbed by the body. In addition, the medication is also available as a sublingual film; in this case, the film is placed against the interior cheek wall where it will dissolve before being absorbed by the body. That said, both variations work by releasing small doses of Suboxone over a 10-minute time frame.

Although the medication can be administered in a variety of ways, the pill form of Suboxone is a preferred choice when it comes to short-term treatment. As far as dosage is concerned, most patients will be started on a very low dose of Suboxone, usually 6 to 8 mg. This low dose allows physicians to gauge the effectiveness of the medication as well as patient tolerance. That aside, if patients abuse or abruptly stop taking Suboxone, they are usually presented with the following symptoms:

  • Muscle aches
  • Diarrhea
  • Vomiting
  • Insomnia
  • Agitation
  • Anxiety

Obviously, this is not an entire list of symptoms; however, it is a list of the ones commonly reported by current and former patients.

CONCLUSION

In summation, opioid addiction is one of the most challenging addictions for anyone to overcome. After all, the substances are highly addictive, easily accessible, and provides a feeling of euphoria that some find insatiable. While Suboxone can be helpful during the detox, long-term use should be avoided in light of the possibility of abuse, addiction, and relapse.

A more plausible alternative would be to combine short-term Suboxone use with counseling, which can include learning to cope with stress and avoiding triggers that can lead to relapse, for example. Also, it worth noting that many find the support of friends and family invaluable while they are their journey towards breaking their addiction. Call one of our counselors today at 800-737-0933.

Does Suboxone Work – How Does Suboxone Work? What Happens in the Body When You Use Suboxone to Treat Opiate Dependence

It is hard to turn on the news without hearing stories of lives damaged by opiate addiction or ended by overdose. Many people are looking for help with this chronic condition. In recent years, Suboxone has become an important tool in the treatment of narcotic addiction. This article will explore how Suboxone works and what happens in the body when it is used as a treatment for opiate dependence.

What is Suboxone

Suboxone is a prescription treatment for opiate addiction. This medicine is a combination of two compounds, Buprenorphine and Naloxone. It is normally taken daily, either as a pill which dissolves under the tongue or as a dissolving film.

The two substances that are combined in Suboxone play different roles. Buprenorphine, itself a milder opiate, is the main active ingredient. In the brain, it attaches to the same receptors as stronger opiates, reducing cravings for the patient.

Naloxone is a compound that blocks the effects of opiates. Its primary role in Suboxone is to prevent abuse. When taken orally as directed, the drug is effective. If someone tries to take Suboxone by injection, the Naloxone will prevent the opiate from providing a high.

What does Suboxone do to your body

Suboxone acts as a treatment to step down from stronger opiates. The symptoms of withdrawal are one of the major concerns for addicts trying to quit. If someone has become physically dependent on opiates, quitting can be both a painful and anxious time. Strong cravings for another dose become all-consuming. Because Suboxone mimics the action of stronger opiates, cravings are not as strong and withdrawal not as difficult.

Suboxone contains a milder opiate, and some patients report a slight high when first taking the drug. However, because the effects are milder, and the cravings reduced, you can live a much more normal life while undergoing Suboxone treatment. In conjunction with other behavioral therapies, Suboxone can help you establish new, positive habits and get your life back together.

Are there other effects of Suboxone?

The Buprenorphine in Suboxone is a milder opiate. As such, it does have side effects similar to other opioid substances. Some reported side effects of Suboxone are

  • Constipation
  • Headache
  • Muscle ache
  • Insomnia

Another important concern with Suboxone is withdrawal. Suboxone is intended as a long-term treatment, a milder opiate taken intentionally to avoid stronger opiates, such as heroin. However, even though it is milder, there will still be a physical dependence on the drug. If you stop taking Suboxone suddenly, especially early on in the recovery process, you may experience withdrawal symptoms. For this reason, it is important to take Suboxone only under medical supervision. Over time, as the dosage lowers, you will become less dependent on the drug, perhaps one day being free of opiates altogether.

Support on a Challenging Path

Ending an opiate dependence is a difficult journey. It will take time to get clean. It will take time for your brain to reset itself. Recovery will be a great challenge, but you do not need to do it alone. Treatments like Suboxone can be a big help in getting started and continuing on the path. If you are ready to take the first step, call us at 800-737-0933.

How Drug Detox Centers in South Florida Handle Opiate Withdrawal

You probably already know that feeling you get when you have not used opiates when you typically do. You start feeling like the flu because you start having body aches, vomiting, diarrhea, shakes, etc. Not feeling sick is the reason that you keep using opiates despite the repercussions. You want to be free from your addiction, but having to go through withdrawal scares you. Detox centers in South Florida are trained to make withdrawal as safe and comfortable as possible for you.

Drug detox centers in South Florida Handle Opiate Withdrawal by:

Medication

Detox centers will give you medication to treat your symptoms (e.g. rapid heart rate, hypertension, pain, etc.). In addition, they also understand the importance of having to have your body come down off the drugs slowly; therefore, they may give you opiate replacements (e.g. suboxone) to slowly bring your body back down to a normal internal state.

Monitoring Vitals

The medical staff will be monitoring your vitals constantly. They will make note of every change, regardless of how minor they are. Some withdrawal symptoms can be fatal if not treated. You may even be woken up in the middle of the night to have your vitals checked.

Therapies

In addition to basic medical care, these centers will also use holistic therapies (e.g. healthy diet, chiropractic care, acupressure, bio sound therapy, etc.) to make withdrawal faster and more comfortable.

The Importance of Drug Detox

Addictions to drug and alcohol is physiological almost always physiological. The repeated use of the substance makes your body feel like you need use the substance in order to survive. When you do not use drugs or alcohol, you start feeling sick because your body is not receiving what it thinks it needs. Your body lets you know when it is in trouble. Drug detox is necessary because you cannot go from one extreme to the other. You need to slowly come down off the addictive substance. Withdrawal can be physically and emotionally trying if you do not go through it under proper medical supervision. In some cases, withdrawal symptoms can be deadly. Alcohol withdrawal is the only withdrawal than can definitely kill you; however, that does not mean withdrawal symptoms from other drugs can kill you as well, especially opiates because they are similar to alcohol.

Genesis House is a detox program that is located in Lake Worth, Florida. We are committed to helping you the genesis of your new life. Call us today at 800-737-0933