Tag Archives: suboxone

Do Any Detox Programs in South Florida Use Alternative Medications Like Buprenorphine?

If you live in southern Florida, and you’re considering entering a drug treatment program for opioid addiction, you’re probably wondering what the detox procedure will be like. You probably already know that opioid withdrawal is painful. It’s only natural to wonder what types of medications are used to ease the opioid withdrawal process. Do any southern Florida rehab facilities use buprenorphine for opioid withdrawal?

The answer is, yes, many of them do. But what is buprenorphine? What benefits does it have?

Buprenorphine is a synthetic opioid. It’s most commonly combined with another medication called naloxone. This combination medication is known by its brand name, Suboxone. Naloxone is actually a drug used to reverse opioid overdoses. It’s widely known as Narcan. It’s included in the Suboxone formulation to discourage intravenous abuse of the buprenorphine. When taken by mouth as directed, the naloxone in Suboxone will have little to no effect. However, if the Suboxone is injected, the naloxone will act to block any euphoric effects from the buprenorphine. Similarly, buprenorphine produces little to no euphoria when taken orally.

How Buprenorphine Works

Buprenorphine eases opioid withdrawal symptoms by occupying certain opioid brain receptors. It has a high receptor affinity. This is a fancy way of saying that buprenorphine will block the euphoric effects of any other opioids which may be taken concurrently. Buprenorphine also has a very long half-life. This means that a single dose can last for a full 24 hours.

Buprenorphine can be used as both a detoxification agent and as a maintenance drug. When given in decreasing doses over a period of time, the drug can greatly ease withdrawal symptoms. Many South Florida rehab facilities use buprenorphine to gradually and comfortably wean their clients off of their opioid drug of choice. It can also be used as a take-home opioid maintenance drug. It must be prescribed by a specially licensed Suboxone physician, but it can be filled at any pharmacy. The patient then takes their daily dose in the privacy of their own home. Although addictive in itself, buprenorphine is certainly better than injecting illicit opioids such as heroin. It allows many former users to live a normal life once again.

If you Need Help with Opiates

Now that you know that buprenorphine therapy is available to you, it’s time to give us a call. A lot of South Florida rehab facilities use buprenorphine as part of their treatment plan for their clients. Let us help you find the right rehab for you. Call us at 800-737-0933 at any time of the day or night. You will find reassurance and guidance. We look forward to your call.

Why Outpatient Detox Should Be Coupled With Ongoing Treatment

Drug and alcohol addiction is a serious disease. It affects nearly every aspect of your life including your job, your relationships with family and friends, and your health. In order for you to resume a normal life free from drugs and alcohol, the treatment must be taken as seriously as the disease. Recovery is a process that not only includes removing drugs and alcohol from your body but also learning how to cope with life without using them.

Detoxing from drugs and alcohol is the first step towards a sober life. During outpatient detox, you may go through some uncomfortable withdrawal symptoms. This initial detox may seem like the hardest part to go through, but recovery needs to include ongoing treatment in order to prevent relapse and be successful.

When you are addicted to drugs or alcohol, they become your first priority. Everything else in your life gets pushed to the side in order to satisfy the addiction. Now that you are determined to end your addiction, you need to learn how to live life again without being under the influence.

Types of Ongoing Treatment

You may have been experiencing underlying mental health issues and chose to self-medicate with drugs and alcohol. Unfortunately, now that the drugs and alcohol are gone, the mental health issue you were experiencing before will most likely return. One on one counseling can help you manage any mental health issues that may be present during your recovery treatment. Counseling can help you learn effective coping strategies to deal with life stressors and triggers that may give you cravings for your drug of choice. Therapy can help you define goals you would like to set for yourself both during and after your treatment.

Group therapy is helpful for patients starting out in recovery. Attending group therapy sessions gives you an opportunity to share your own experiences, what is working for you in recovery and what you need to work on. It is also helpful to hear about other recovering addicts’ similar experiences and what challenges they may be facing.

Twelve-step support groups like alcoholics anonymous and narcotics anonymous have proven to be incredibly helpful for recovering addicts. Like group therapy, this is a way to hear about others’ experiences and what they have learned from them. It is a good way to learn how others cope with cravings or how they manage their daily lives without drugs or alcohol.

The initial detox period needs to be incorporated with ongoing treatment in order to be successful. A serious illness like addiction needs to be treated seriously so that you can live a healthy, sober life. Our counselors are available twenty-four hours a day to help you begin your new sober life. Call today 800-737-0933

How Long Should I Be On Suboxone To Get Completely Clean?

Heroin is a dangerous drug derived from the opium poppy. It is illegal in the United States. Heroin is highly addictive. Drug rehab centers often use another drug, Suboxone, to help people break their heroin addictions. Read on for more information on Suboxone and its use in treating heroin addiction.

When you abuse a drug like heroin, your body develops a tolerance for it. This means that you must take increasing dosages of heroin in order to get the same high. When you attempt to quit using heroin, you experience withdrawal symptoms, including the following:

  • Feeling jittery
  • Vomiting
  • Getting chills
  • Muscle aches and pains

Suboxone is a drug that contains buprenorphine. Buprenorphine is used to treat not only heroin addiction but other opioid addictions, too. Buprenorphine, a partial agonist to opioids, produces a mild form of the effects of opioids. It basically fools the brain into thinking your opioid craving has been met, though it does not produce the same high. However, because Buprenorphine and Suboxone do not create the same high as opioids, Suboxone and Buprenorphine are difficult to form an addiction to. Naloxone, another component of Suboxone, works as an antagonist to opioids.

Length of Use for Suboxone

Suboxone is a drug that must usually be taken for a long time to promote opioid recovery. Because Suboxone is a partial agonist, it still allows people to form some opioid dependence. When addicts attempt to stop taking Suboxone, they need to taper their dosage under the care of a medical professional.

People who take Suboxone for a short period, such as a month, usually end up relapsing and returning to opioid abuse. Thus, Suboxone should be taken for an extended period. Taking it for six months to one year is the norm, and many people take it for even longer. However, every patient is different. A medical professional can monitor the patient’s progress and advise on how long each patient should take Suboxone.

Suboxone should be used only under the guidance provided in a professional treatment program or under the care of a healthcare professional. Rehab clinicians can administer the correct dosage, and Suboxone can also be prescribed by a doctor. By pairing Suboxone with other therapies, clinicians and physicians can help addicts fight their addictions. Call us today for help 800-737-0933


How Suboxone is Helping Heroin Addicts Detox in Palm Beach County

Heroin has taken the United States by storm. Many heroin users start out by naively trying or being prescribed prescription opioid painkillers, of which the United States consumes more per capita than any other country. Opioid users switch to heroin because the drug is more cost-effective than prescription opioids. Tragically, heroin is deadlier than prescription opioids because, unlike prescription medications, the drug varies wildly in potency and sometimes contains ultra-powerful synthetic opioids like Fentanyl.

As many Floridians already know, Palm Beach County leads the Sunshine State in Fentanyl-related deaths. Upon ceasing use of fentanyl or heroin, painful physical withdrawal from the drug kicks in within hours, which makes getting clean difficult.

Who is most often afflicted by opioid addiction?

Younger demographics ranging from 18, or younger, to 25 years of age abuse heroin more than any other group of people. White, middle- to upper-class people and those who live in rural areas are being hit hardest by the opioid epidemic, although heroin abuse is wide-ranging and can affect users of all age, income, sex, and race.

Parents are increasingly forced to deal with heroin-addled, 18- to 25-year-old children who became opioid addicts after trying them just once. Many parents have tried before to enter their precious offspring into rehabs or quitting cold turkey. Unfortunately, these treatment avenues aren’t often effective, but starting a Suboxone regimen often does work well.

What is Suboxone?

There are prescription opioids designed specifically to help opioid-dependent persons get clean. Suboxone is one of these miracle drugs that allow opioid users to live better lives. A combination of buprenorphine and naloxone comprises Suboxone sublingual films and tablets. Buprenorphine is an opioid agonist that mimics the chemical effects of opioids while effectively blocking out opioids like heroin. Naloxone is an opioid agonist, as well, that discourages users from otherwise abusing Suboxone.

How do addicts seeking help obtain Suboxone?

Prescribing Suboxone requires physicians to obtain buprenorphine training conducted by SAMHSA, or the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services of America, requiring Several physicians in Palm Beach County are licensed to prescribe Suboxone to opioid addicts seeking help.

Parents can contact us to quickly locate physicians authorized to prescribe the wonder-drug Suboxone. The buprenorphine/naloxone mixture of Suboxone sublingual films and tablets have helped many addicts in Palm Beach County clean, and they just may help your child, too.

Call Us Today 800-737-0933