Tag Archives: suboxone

Is Suboxone Only Used During Detox?

Suboxone is a medication that is prescribed to treat opioid use disorder. It is a combination of buprenorphine and naloxone. Suboxone is used to decrease the appearance of opioid withdrawal symptoms. It is a long-acting medication and lasts for approximately 24 hours. Suboxone is a film that is placed in the cheek or under the tongue when administered. The side effects of suboxone can include constricted pupils, low blood pressure, lethargy, and respiratory depression. The risk of overdosing on suboxone is drastically lower than overdosing on another opioid like heroin. Suboxone was approved for use in the United States for medical purposes in 2002.

The long-term outcomes of suboxone as a treatment for opioid use disorder are better than quitting opioid use overall. Cravings for opioids are decreased when using suboxone, which prevents individuals from seeking out other opioids to use. Suboxone is a first-line treatment for opioid use disorder and has been shown as effective in the treatment and long-term recovery for individuals who were dependent on opioids in the past. Suboxone is typically prescribed during detox and in doctors offices. Individuals are given their prescription and they do not have to be monitored, unlike individuals who must go into a clinic each day to receive their dose of methadone.

Individuals who are stable and are not able to visit a clinic each day to receive medication may prescribed suboxone. Further, individuals who have other medical conditions that visit their doctor regularly may be prescribed suboxone. Other individuals who may be prescribed suboxone include those who have jobs that require them to remain alert and are not able to be under a sedating medication like methadone. Suboxone is also recommended to treat individuals who may be affected negatively by methadone use. These populations include individuals who abuse alcohol, the elderly, individuals who take large doses of benzodiazepines, and individuals with a low level of tolerance to opioids. Further, suboxone is prescribed to individuals who are engaging in therapy and counseling in order to treat their opioid use disorder. The use of suboxone in combination with therapy is more successful in treating opioid use disorder than treating it with suboxone alone.

If you would like more information regarding suboxone therapy or treatment for opioid use disorder, call us today at 800-737-0933.

Does Suboxone Cause or Affect Mood Swings?

Suboxone is a medication that is prescribed to treat opiate addiction. Suboxone contains a combination of buprenorphine and naloxone. Buprenorphine is a medication containing opioids and naloxone is a substance that blocks the effects of opioid medication (e.g., pain relief and feelings of well-being) that often lead individuals to seek out opioids after recovery. Suboxone has several side effects and may cause issues with mental health and mood swings.

Suboxone as a TreatmentThis medication is prescribed in several different types of situations. Doctors may prescribe Suboxone in order to aid the process of withdrawal and detoxification. Doctors also prescribe Suboxone as a long term maintenance medication for opiate addiction. Individuals who meet certain criteria may be able to continue to take Suboxone for an extended period of time in order to control cravings and allow their brain to heal and begin to block the cravings for opioid use. Suboxone has also been prescribed to individuals who suffer from chronic pain as an alternative to traditional narcotic pain relievers.

There are several pros and cons related to Suboxone use. It helps control cravings, has anti-depressant qualities, and blocks the effects of narcotic opioids. As for the cons of Suboxone, it is an extremely powerful synthetic opioid, it may cause constipation, there is a period of withdrawal after quitting Suboxone, and it may induce depression and other issues related to mental health. Suboxone also has a high risk of abuse.

Side Effects of Suboxone UseSuboxone works in such a way that it binds to the opioid receptors located in the brain, which causes changes in the user's mental state and behaviors. Changes in behavior related to Suboxone use can include:

  • Lethargy
  • Cravings
  • Distress
  • Fear
  • Anxiety
  • Agitation
  • Mood Swings
  • Impaired memory

Suboxone also causes physical side effects. Physical side effects of Suboxone use may include:

  • Headaches
  • Changes in appetite
  • Stomach pain
  • Dependency
  • Issues with coordination
  • Insomnia
  • Cramps
  • Muscle Aches
  • Reduced breathing
  • Liver damage
  • Withdrawal symptoms (e.g., joint pain and excessive sweating)

Does Suboxone Cause or Affect Mood Swings? Due to the fact that Suboxone is an extremely powerful mind-altering drug, it may cause mood swings, depression, agitation, and may make people taking it to act out of character and engage in violent behavior. Suboxone alters the brain chemistry of its users and may affect their behavior, specifically if they quit taking the medication abruptly. As stated before, the side effects of Suboxone can include depression, anxiety, mood swings, and insomnia.

Long-term use of Suboxone can cause many issues. Long-term Suboxone users have reported that quitting Suboxone is more difficult than quitting heroin or Oxycontin. This is due to the long-half life Suboxone. It is able to stay in the user's system for approximately eight to nine days. This makes the detoxification process from Suboxone last for weeks to months. This long detoxification process includes uncomfortable side effects that are both physical and mental in nature. This includes mood swings and depression.

If you or a loved one is having difficulty with Suboxone use, please contact us today at 800-737-0933. Our counselors are available 24 hours a day and are ready to assist you and consult with you regarding your specific needs.

Should Suboxone Be Taken Forever or Just During Detox?

Given its effectiveness, Suboxone is one of the most commonly prescribed medications for those looking to overcome an opiate addiction. It's easy to understand why in light of the medication's capacity to ease withdrawal symptoms while also producing a less intense "high." Suboxone is comprised of two separate medications, Naloxone and Buprenorphine, which offer unique benefits when it comes to helping individuals break free of their addiction. As such, it is not surprising to find that many people want to continue using the Suboxone long-term. In this article, we will take a look at the consequences of long-term use and why it should be avoided.

WHAT IS SUBOXONE?

Although we touched in this briefly in the preface of the article, contains Naloxone, which is highly effective in easing the excruciating pain symptoms associated with opioid withdrawal. The medication can also be used to reverse an opioid overdose. Basically, the drug acts as an antagonist by binding to opioid receptors and blocking the transmission of opioids to the brain. Also, it prevents agonist, the chemical compound that elicits a physiological response when combined with brain receptors.

Now that we have a general understanding of the role of Naloxone, let's focus our attention on Buprenorphine. Unlike naloxone, buprenorphine works by attaching to opioid receptors and stimulating them, which makes it possible to soothe withdrawal symptoms without eliciting the same feelings of euphoria and sedation typical of other opioids.

WHAT ARE THE EFFECTS OF LONG-TERM SUBOXONE USE?

In short, long-term Suboxone usage increases the likelihood of addiction; in fact, according to a report published by SAMHSA (Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration), the misuse of Suboxone resulted in 3,000 emergency room visits in 2005 and exceeded 30,000 in 2010. Although the inclusion of Naloxone as a deterrent to abuse is effective, some individuals have found ways of bypassing this safeguard.

That said, some people have been known to vacillate between Suboxone and their primary drug of choice. Needless to say, such actions can quickly result in relapse. So why are so many people interested in long-term use even after they have undergone detox? Most likely it is for the high that is derived from the medication and to resolve any residual symptoms they may be experiencing, physical or psychological.

HOW TO TAKE SUBOXONE PROPERLY

Suboxone can be taken in a variety of ways; however, patients who undergo treatment are usually prescribed sublingual tablets, which can be dissolved under the tongue before being absorbed by the body. In addition, the medication is also available as a sublingual film; in this case, the film is placed against the interior cheek wall where it will dissolve before being absorbed by the body. That said, both variations work by releasing small doses of Suboxone over a 10-minute time frame.

Although the medication can be administered in a variety of ways, the pill form of Suboxone is a preferred choice when it comes to short-term treatment. As far as dosage is concerned, most patients will be started on a very low dose of Suboxone, usually 6 to 8 mg. This low dose allows physicians to gauge the effectiveness of the medication as well as patient tolerance. That aside, if patients abuse or abruptly stop taking Suboxone, they are usually presented with the following symptoms:

  • Muscle aches
  • Diarrhea
  • Vomiting
  • Insomnia
  • Agitation
  • Anxiety

Obviously, this is not an entire list of symptoms; however, it is a list of the ones commonly reported by current and former patients.

CONCLUSION

In summation, opioid addiction is one of the most challenging addictions for anyone to overcome. After all, the substances are highly addictive, easily accessible, and provides a feeling of euphoria that some find insatiable. While Suboxone can be helpful during the detox, long-term use should be avoided in light of the possibility of abuse, addiction, and relapse.

A more plausible alternative would be to combine short-term Suboxone use with counseling, which can include learning to cope with stress and avoiding triggers that can lead to relapse, for example. Also, it worth noting that many find the support of friends and family invaluable while they are their journey towards breaking their addiction. Call one of our counselors today at 800-737-0933.

Does Suboxone Work – How Does Suboxone Work? What Happens in the Body When You Use Suboxone to Treat Opiate Dependence

It is hard to turn on the news without hearing stories of lives damaged by opiate addiction or ended by overdose. Many people are looking for help with this chronic condition. In recent years, Suboxone has become an important tool in the treatment of narcotic addiction. This article will explore how Suboxone works and what happens in the body when it is used as a treatment for opiate dependence.

What is Suboxone

Suboxone is a prescription treatment for opiate addiction. This medicine is a combination of two compounds, Buprenorphine and Naloxone. It is normally taken daily, either as a pill which dissolves under the tongue or as a dissolving film.

The two substances that are combined in Suboxone play different roles. Buprenorphine, itself a milder opiate, is the main active ingredient. In the brain, it attaches to the same receptors as stronger opiates, reducing cravings for the patient.

Naloxone is a compound that blocks the effects of opiates. Its primary role in Suboxone is to prevent abuse. When taken orally as directed, the drug is effective. If someone tries to take Suboxone by injection, the Naloxone will prevent the opiate from providing a high.

What does Suboxone do to your body

Suboxone acts as a treatment to step down from stronger opiates. The symptoms of withdrawal are one of the major concerns for addicts trying to quit. If someone has become physically dependent on opiates, quitting can be both a painful and anxious time. Strong cravings for another dose become all-consuming. Because Suboxone mimics the action of stronger opiates, cravings are not as strong and withdrawal not as difficult.

Suboxone contains a milder opiate, and some patients report a slight high when first taking the drug. However, because the effects are milder, and the cravings reduced, you can live a much more normal life while undergoing Suboxone treatment. In conjunction with other behavioral therapies, Suboxone can help you establish new, positive habits and get your life back together.

Are there other effects of Suboxone?

The Buprenorphine in Suboxone is a milder opiate. As such, it does have side effects similar to other opioid substances. Some reported side effects of Suboxone are

  • Constipation
  • Headache
  • Muscle ache
  • Insomnia

Another important concern with Suboxone is withdrawal. Suboxone is intended as a long-term treatment, a milder opiate taken intentionally to avoid stronger opiates, such as heroin. However, even though it is milder, there will still be a physical dependence on the drug. If you stop taking Suboxone suddenly, especially early on in the recovery process, you may experience withdrawal symptoms. For this reason, it is important to take Suboxone only under medical supervision. Over time, as the dosage lowers, you will become less dependent on the drug, perhaps one day being free of opiates altogether.

Support on a Challenging Path

Ending an opiate dependence is a difficult journey. It will take time to get clean. It will take time for your brain to reset itself. Recovery will be a great challenge, but you do not need to do it alone. Treatments like Suboxone can be a big help in getting started and continuing on the path. If you are ready to take the first step, call us at 800-737-0933.

How Drug Detox Centers in South Florida Handle Opiate Withdrawal

You probably already know that feeling you get when you have not used opiates when you typically do. You start feeling like the flu because you start having body aches, vomiting, diarrhea, shakes, etc. Not feeling sick is the reason that you keep using opiates despite the repercussions. You want to be free from your addiction, but having to go through withdrawal scares you. Detox centers in South Florida are trained to make withdrawal as safe and comfortable as possible for you.

Drug detox centers in South Florida Handle Opiate Withdrawal by:

Medication

Detox centers will give you medication to treat your symptoms (e.g. rapid heart rate, hypertension, pain, etc.). In addition, they also understand the importance of having to have your body come down off the drugs slowly; therefore, they may give you opiate replacements (e.g. suboxone) to slowly bring your body back down to a normal internal state.

Monitoring Vitals

The medical staff will be monitoring your vitals constantly. They will make note of every change, regardless of how minor they are. Some withdrawal symptoms can be fatal if not treated. You may even be woken up in the middle of the night to have your vitals checked.

Therapies

In addition to basic medical care, these centers will also use holistic therapies (e.g. healthy diet, chiropractic care, acupressure, bio sound therapy, etc.) to make withdrawal faster and more comfortable.

The Importance of Drug Detox

Addictions to drug and alcohol is physiological almost always physiological. The repeated use of the substance makes your body feel like you need use the substance in order to survive. When you do not use drugs or alcohol, you start feeling sick because your body is not receiving what it thinks it needs. Your body lets you know when it is in trouble. Drug detox is necessary because you cannot go from one extreme to the other. You need to slowly come down off the addictive substance. Withdrawal can be physically and emotionally trying if you do not go through it under proper medical supervision. In some cases, withdrawal symptoms can be deadly. Alcohol withdrawal is the only withdrawal than can definitely kill you; however, that does not mean withdrawal symptoms from other drugs can kill you as well, especially opiates because they are similar to alcohol.

Genesis House is a detox program that is located in Lake Worth, Florida. We are committed to helping you the genesis of your new life. Call us today at 800-737-0933

Do Any Detox Programs in South Florida Use Alternative Medications Like Buprenorphine?

If you live in southern Florida, and you're considering entering a drug treatment program for opioid addiction, you're probably wondering what the detox procedure will be like. You probably already know that opioid withdrawal is painful. It's only natural to wonder what types of medications are used to ease the opioid withdrawal process. Do any southern Florida rehab facilities use buprenorphine for opioid withdrawal?

The answer is, yes, many of them do. But what is buprenorphine? What benefits does it have?

Buprenorphine is a synthetic opioid. It's most commonly combined with another medication called naloxone. This combination medication is known by its brand name, Suboxone. Naloxone is actually a drug used to reverse opioid overdoses. It's widely known as Narcan. It's included in the Suboxone formulation to discourage intravenous abuse of the buprenorphine. When taken by mouth as directed, the naloxone in Suboxone will have little to no effect. However, if the Suboxone is injected, the naloxone will act to block any euphoric effects from the buprenorphine. Similarly, buprenorphine produces little to no euphoria when taken orally.

How Buprenorphine Works

Buprenorphine eases opioid withdrawal symptoms by occupying certain opioid brain receptors. It has a high receptor affinity. This is a fancy way of saying that buprenorphine will block the euphoric effects of any other opioids which may be taken concurrently. Buprenorphine also has a very long half-life. This means that a single dose can last for a full 24 hours.

Buprenorphine can be used as both a detoxification agent and as a maintenance drug. When given in decreasing doses over a period of time, the drug can greatly ease withdrawal symptoms. Many South Florida rehab facilities use buprenorphine to gradually and comfortably wean their clients off of their opioid drug of choice. It can also be used as a take-home opioid maintenance drug. It must be prescribed by a specially licensed Suboxone physician, but it can be filled at any pharmacy. The patient then takes their daily dose in the privacy of their own home. Although addictive in itself, buprenorphine is certainly better than injecting illicit opioids such as heroin. It allows many former users to live a normal life once again.

If you Need Help with Opiates

Now that you know that buprenorphine therapy is available to you, it's time to give us a call. A lot of South Florida rehab facilities use buprenorphine as part of their treatment plan for their clients. Let us help you find the right rehab for you. Call us at 800-737-0933 at any time of the day or night. You will find reassurance and guidance. We look forward to your call.

Why Outpatient Detox Should Be Coupled With Ongoing Treatment

Drug and alcohol addiction is a serious disease. It affects nearly every aspect of your life including your job, your relationships with family and friends, and your health. In order for you to resume a normal life free from drugs and alcohol, the treatment must be taken as seriously as the disease. Recovery is a process that not only includes removing drugs and alcohol from your body but also learning how to cope with life without using them.

Detoxing from drugs and alcohol is the first step towards a sober life. During outpatient detox, you may go through some uncomfortable withdrawal symptoms. This initial detox may seem like the hardest part to go through, but recovery needs to include ongoing treatment in order to prevent relapse and be successful.

When you are addicted to drugs or alcohol, they become your first priority. Everything else in your life gets pushed to the side in order to satisfy the addiction. Now that you are determined to end your addiction, you need to learn how to live life again without being under the influence.

Types of Ongoing Treatment

You may have been experiencing underlying mental health issues and chose to self-medicate with drugs and alcohol. Unfortunately, now that the drugs and alcohol are gone, the mental health issue you were experiencing before will most likely return. One on one counseling can help you manage any mental health issues that may be present during your recovery treatment. Counseling can help you learn effective coping strategies to deal with life stressors and triggers that may give you cravings for your drug of choice. Therapy can help you define goals you would like to set for yourself both during and after your treatment.

Group therapy is helpful for patients starting out in recovery. Attending group therapy sessions gives you an opportunity to share your own experiences, what is working for you in recovery and what you need to work on. It is also helpful to hear about other recovering addicts’ similar experiences and what challenges they may be facing.

Twelve-step support groups like alcoholics anonymous and narcotics anonymous have proven to be incredibly helpful for recovering addicts. Like group therapy, this is a way to hear about others’ experiences and what they have learned from them. It is a good way to learn how others cope with cravings or how they manage their daily lives without drugs or alcohol.

The initial detox period needs to be incorporated with ongoing treatment in order to be successful. A serious illness like addiction needs to be treated seriously so that you can live a healthy, sober life. Our counselors are available twenty-four hours a day to help you begin your new sober life. Call today 800-737-0933

How Long Should I Be On Suboxone To Get Completely Clean?

Heroin is a dangerous drug derived from the opium poppy. It is illegal in the United States. Heroin is highly addictive. Drug rehab centers often use another drug, Suboxone, to help people break their heroin addictions. Read on for more information on Suboxone and its use in treating heroin addiction.

When you abuse a drug like heroin, your body develops a tolerance for it. This means that you must take increasing dosages of heroin in order to get the same high. When you attempt to quit using heroin, you experience withdrawal symptoms, including the following:

  • Feeling jittery
  • Vomiting
  • Getting chills
  • Muscle aches and pains

Suboxone is a drug that contains buprenorphine. Buprenorphine is used to treat not only heroin addiction but other opioid addictions, too. Buprenorphine, a partial agonist to opioids, produces a mild form of the effects of opioids. It basically fools the brain into thinking your opioid craving has been met, though it does not produce the same high. However, because Buprenorphine and Suboxone do not create the same high as opioids, Suboxone and Buprenorphine are difficult to form an addiction to. Naloxone, another component of Suboxone, works as an antagonist to opioids.

Length of Use for Suboxone

Suboxone is a drug that must usually be taken for a long time to promote opioid recovery. Because Suboxone is a partial agonist, it still allows people to form some opioid dependence. When addicts attempt to stop taking Suboxone, they need to taper their dosage under the care of a medical professional.

People who take Suboxone for a short period, such as a month, usually end up relapsing and returning to opioid abuse. Thus, Suboxone should be taken for an extended period. Taking it for six months to one year is the norm, and many people take it for even longer. However, every patient is different. A medical professional can monitor the patient's progress and advise on how long each patient should take Suboxone.

Suboxone should be used only under the guidance provided in a professional treatment program or under the care of a healthcare professional. Rehab clinicians can administer the correct dosage, and Suboxone can also be prescribed by a doctor. By pairing Suboxone with other therapies, clinicians and physicians can help addicts fight their addictions. Call us today for help 800-737-0933

OxyContin

How Suboxone is Helping Heroin Addicts Detox in Palm Beach County

Heroin has taken the United States by storm. Many heroin users start out by naively trying or being prescribed prescription opioid painkillers, of which the United States consumes more per capita than any other country. Opioid users switch to heroin because the drug is more cost-effective than prescription opioids. Tragically, heroin is deadlier than prescription opioids because, unlike prescription medications, the drug varies wildly in potency and sometimes contains ultra-powerful synthetic opioids like Fentanyl.

As many Floridians already know, Palm Beach County leads the Sunshine State in Fentanyl-related deaths. Upon ceasing use of fentanyl or heroin, painful physical withdrawal from the drug kicks in within hours, which makes getting clean difficult.

Who is most often afflicted by opioid addiction?

Younger demographics ranging from 18, or younger, to 25 years of age abuse heroin more than any other group of people. White, middle- to upper-class people and those who live in rural areas are being hit hardest by the opioid epidemic, although heroin abuse is wide-ranging and can affect users of all age, income, sex, and race.

Parents are increasingly forced to deal with heroin-addled, 18- to 25-year-old children who became opioid addicts after trying them just once. Many parents have tried before to enter their precious offspring into rehabs or quitting cold turkey. Unfortunately, these treatment avenues aren't often effective, but starting a Suboxone regimen often does work well.

What is Suboxone?

There are prescription opioids designed specifically to help opioid-dependent persons get clean. Suboxone is one of these miracle drugs that allow opioid users to live better lives. A combination of buprenorphine and naloxone comprises Suboxone sublingual films and tablets. Buprenorphine is an opioid agonist that mimics the chemical effects of opioids while effectively blocking out opioids like heroin. Naloxone is an opioid agonist, as well, that discourages users from otherwise abusing Suboxone.

How do addicts seeking help obtain Suboxone?

Prescribing Suboxone requires physicians to obtain buprenorphine training conducted by SAMHSA, or the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services of America, requiring Several physicians in Palm Beach County are licensed to prescribe Suboxone to opioid addicts seeking help.

Parents can contact us to quickly locate physicians authorized to prescribe the wonder-drug Suboxone. The buprenorphine/naloxone mixture of Suboxone sublingual films and tablets have helped many addicts in Palm Beach County clean, and they just may help your child, too.

Call Us Today 800-737-0933