Tag Archives: substance abuse

What Services Will You Get at a Medical Detox Center That You Wouldn’t Get Elsewhere?

One of the first steps in the process of beating addiction, after admitting that there is an existing problem and accepting help, is detoxification. This is the process in which all the toxins from drugs and/or alcohol are cleansed from the body. The thought of detox is overwhelming for many. Detox centers decrease the levels of dread and stress because they offer professional support throughout the entire process.

Types of Detox Centers

There are two main types of detox centers. These are medical detox centers and social detox centers. Medical detox includes:

- medical doctors
- detox medications
- supportive medications

Detox medications can include Methadone for those addicted to opiates and supportive medications include Ativan for alcoholics. Methadone is commonly used for pain management and to block the effects of opiates during detox. Ativan is used to help reduce the symptoms of Alcohol Withdrawal Syndrom when detoxing from alcohol.

On the other hand, social detox only includes social and psychological support during the detox process. Should medical issues arise, the client is transferred to a medical facility equipped to handle the issue. Social detox is not normally recommended to those battling with alcohol, sedatives, or opiates.

Stages of Detox

There are often three stages of detox. They are:

- Evaluation
- Stabilization
- Building acceptance of the necessity of future help

During the evaluation stage, tests are performed for drugs and alcohol and prior medical history is discussed. Then, the plan of action is devised. Stabilization often makes up the largest part of detox. Medical and psychological assistance are both provided, as needed, during this stage. The final stage of detox is building acceptance of the necessity of professional help beyond detox. Future help increases the chances of sustaining sobriety.

How Long Does Detox Take?

According to the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Association (SAMHSA), it takes an average of 8 days to detox. However, this time frame varies due to several different factors. Some of these factors include:

- Drug of choice
- Frequency of use
- Detox Setting

For some, the process could be over in hours, but others it could take weeks. It depends on each person's individual circumstances.

Detoxification is usually a scary thought to those seeking to recover. However, fear should never be a deterrent. Professional detox makes the process bearable for a lot of people who are battling substance abuse or addiction. If you are you ready to start your journey, call us today at 800-737-0933.

Are Treatments for Drug Addicts and Alcoholics Different?

People are often curious if treatments for drug addicts and alcoholics are different or if they're the same. The answer isn't quite as straightforward as you might think. There are ways in which they're the same and there are ways in which they're not. Drug addictions are characterized by a person's obsession with a certain type of drug or group of drugs. Addicts typically will spend a lot of money to get the drug from a dealer and sometimes will steal from others to get the money to access the object of their addiction. Addicts will use a drug for the specific effects they get from it. For example, someone who is a heroin addict is drawn to the feeling of euphoria it gives some people. To get rid of an addiction, the person must pass through a cleansing stage of ridding their system of that drug.

Alcohol addiction is much like drug addiction, except the object of their obsession is, of course, alcohol and not a specific drug. Alcohol provides some of the same effects a drug addict seeks. It offers a person brief relief from the pain they're experiencing, whether it be physical or mental. It gives them moments of happiness where they feel they lack it in their sober state. With treatment, it's important that the person goes through a detox, of sorts, to get it out of their system so that counseling and therapy can work their magic to help them get through the addiction.

Treatments for Drug Addicts and Alcoholics

Each type of addiction offers pretty much the same kind of treatment. However, each one will have varying parts based on an individual's needs. With both types of addiction, you'll find the following programs:

  • Inpatient Treatment
  • Outpatient Treatment
  • Detox Program

The treatment facility will evaluate your situation and choosing the right treatment for your needs. They will determine what needs you have to beat your addiction, and what services best suit your situation. They will even consider whether you need to work while you go through treatment or if you have a family to support.

Inpatient Treatment for Drug Addicts and Alcoholics

For those with severe addictions, an inpatient program is best. It offers around the clock care to observe your physical and mental health while you go through the detox stage. Medical staff monitors the detox drug use, if needed, to be sure an individual isn't abusing the treatments.

Inpatient services allow an individual to stay at a residential facility, 24-hours a day for a length of time. During their stay, they will receive counseling and therapy to help them beat their addiction mentally and will have medical services for withdrawal symptoms that ultimately surface during detox

Outpatient Treatment for Drug Addicts and Alcoholics

Outpatient treatment is generally for those who have been through detox and need the long-term care of support services. Sometimes, you may have an intensive outpatient treatment program that enables you to get monitored closely, but still gives you time to go to work and time to spend with your family.

The outpatient part means you go to the center after work, or before, depending on your work schedule. Once you've spent your predetermined amount of time there, you go home to sleep in your own bed. Then return on the next scheduled treatment day.

Detox for Drug Addicts and Alcoholics

The treatment used for drug detox and alcohol detox differ due to the differences each one has. Both need intensive monitoring, though, to ensure everything goes well. Once the drug or the alcohol is out of your system, you're taught coping skills to take with you when you go home and try to live your life free of addiction.

Detox for drugs will also differ with the type of drug that one has an addiction for. Also, it depends on the severity of the addiction as well. Sometimes one will need medication-assistance to get over the addiction and other times, counselors may suggest you do it without medication. Each situation is different in how it's handled. Counselors determine the best course of action when they evaluate your situation.

So, treatments for drug and alcohol addiction are alike in many ways, but how each type is handled is somewhat different. It's more about the severity of the addiction and what's needed to beat it more than it is about the addiction someone suffers from. If you would like more information about drug or alcohol addiction treatments, call us at 800-737-0933.

Learning the Difference Between Helping and Enabling Substance Abuse

If you, or one of your loved ones, are struggling with a drug or alcohol addiction, this can be an extremely difficult obstacle to overcome. Often, there are underlying issues that have lead to the substance abuse, which need to be addressed. Once you have identified the underlying issues, you should begin thinking of ways to address these issues and create clearly defined steps to dealing with them. While many emotional and mental issues may be long term, they can still be improved. With time and effort, most issues can be worked through and their overall impact can be lessened. Dedication, productive activities, and positive behaviors will go a long way in helping to ease the issues and will eventually lead to a better mind set.

Differentiating Between Helping and Enabling

When attempting to overcome a substance abuse addiction, it is important to recognize the difference between trying to help someone and enabling them. Often, individuals with substance abuse issues may need financial assistance to fund their addiction. When they are unable to obtain drugs or alcohol they can experience server withdrawal symptoms or mental anguish. Of course, friends and loved ones do not want to see them struggle, so they often give in to their demands. This is a difficult issue to navigate. Withdrawals can be dangerous and life-threatening. Therefore, if their dependency is severe, it may be time for them to seek medical help. Addicts can also be enabled in other ways, such as loved ones ignoring their problem or normalizing it. It is important that you make sure the person knows that you care for them but you don't approve of the damage they are causing to themselves.

Trying to help someone who is addicted to drugs or alcohol can be a daunting task. Sometimes they will insist they don't have a problem or they will try to conceal their substance abuse. Other times, they can push people away who want to help them because they aren't ready to change. The most important thing you can do for this person is let them know that you deeply care for them and that you want to be a source of emotional support for them during this difficult period in their lives. You should avoid arguing with them or putting them down because this can cause them to sink into a deeper depression. If you are experiencing difficulty convincing the individual that they are valuable and it's time to change, you may want to consult a health care professional for advice on how to successfully help the individual overcome their issues. If you or your loved one are ready to get help, counselors are available 24/7 at 800-737-0933

What If I Don’t Need Detox But Still Want To Go To Rehab?

The most common route to recovery is going to detox first, which is then succeeded by going to rehab. However, not everyone needs to go to detox as a prerequisite to going to rehab. Rehabs do not require you to go to a detox facility or go through their detox program before proceeding to rehab if you do not need detox.

There are several reasons why you may not need detox before going to rehab:

• Your addiction has not progressed to the physiological point, which is where you need to use the substance to feel normal; it is only psychological.
• You have already gone through detox in a hospital, jail, or at home.
• You are not addicted to a substance; you are addicted to a compulsive behavior (e.g. gambling, internet, sex, self-harm, shopping, eating, etc.)

The Purpose of Detox Before Rehab

Addiction is both a physiological and psychological disease. Detox mostly addresses the physiological component, and rehab mostly addresses the psychological component. Addiction is a physiological disease because the repeated use of the substance results in the body developing a new homeostasis. Homeostasis is the body’s regular internal state. The addicted body’s homeostasis is having the addictive substance in its system. If it does not receive the addictive substance, it reacts by going into fatal, violent withdrawal. People who are progressed in their addictions cannot quit cold turkey; they need to go through withdrawal under medical supervision. Otherwise, they can die or develop long-term complications (e.g. seizures). Withdrawal also includes psychological symptoms (e.g. depression, anxiety, insomnia, etc.). Psychological support is also available at most detox programs. However, the major psychological work is done at rehab through a variety of therapies.

Genesis House is located in Lake Worth, Florida. We offer a variety of programs, including a detox program. All clients are evaluated by the medical team at the detox center upon arrival. If it's ruled out that you do not need detox, you will not be forced to go through the detox program. However, if it is determined that you do need detox, the length of time you will spend in detox can range from a few days to two weeks. The length of time it will take for you to detox depends on your age, health, addictive substances, and longevity of your addiction.

If you or your loved is interested in Genesis House or have general questions about addiction, detox, and/or recovery, call us today at 800-737-0933

Questions You Should Be Asking Every Addiction Treatment Center in Florida That You Talk To

In Florida alone, there are hundreds of addiction treatment centers, so finding one that is the right match for you or a loved one may seem like a daunting task. Although you may be constrained by factors outside of your control, like location or price, it's still important to do your research on the treatment centers you are considering.

To help you with this process, here are some crucial questions you should be asking each and every treatment center you have contact with.

What is your success rate for treating addiction?

Addiction treatment centers may utilize a number of groundbreaking or out-of-the-box rehabilitation techniques that sound great on paper, but if they don't have the results to confirm their effectiveness, those efforts may be in vain. So, always be sure to ask a potential treatment center to point you towards any studies or research that can confirm that their methods work.

However, you need to keep in mind that even the best rehabilitation techniques are not going to have a 100% success rate—so be sure to keep your expectations realistic. That being said, if an organization is reluctant or unable to provide you with the information you're asking for, that should be a major red flag.

What is the ratio of patients to counselors?

Treating addiction requires a high level of personalized care, and if counselors are stretched too thin with too many patients to look after, the level of care that they can provide often suffers.

As with asking about success rates, it's important to keep a realistic mindset about the patient-to-counselor ratio. It's also important to remember that some individuals may thrive in a more group-oriented treatment facility. But if you're worried at all that your loved one won't receive the level of individual attention they need for recovery, that may be sign you need to look for a different rehabilitation provider.

What role does medical detoxification play in the rehabilitation process?

Most substances that require inpatient treatment are extremely physically addictive, which means that quitting process can pose health risks to the patients. Because of this, it's important that any addiction treatment center you're considering has a qualified medical staff to help your loved one through the initial withdrawal stages of rehab.

So, to recap, these are the three most important areas of treatment you should be asking about when considering a treatment center:

  • Proven success rates
  • Level of personalized care
  • Presence of a medical staff

If you're interested in learning more about what our treatment center can offer you and your loved one, please get in contact by calling at 800-737-0933. Our counselors are available 24 hours a day.

The Benefits Of Going To Rehab in Lake Worth Florida

Addiction to intoxicants like prescription drugs or alcohol is a huge problem in our society, and today the problem is becoming a major health care crisis. For a person dealing with a serious addiction, the need to get help through a reputable rehab center is serious indeed. No, getting to a place where it’s possible to be honest and face the need for help isn’t easy, but it’s crucial to face the problem of addiction and seek help from a high quality rehab center staffed by experienced professionals. There are quality centers available now in Lake Worth Florida, run by caring professionals who are ready and willing to help, so its wise to seek help in this community.

The True Benefits of Getting Rehab in Lake Worth, Florida

Private Rooms - Privacy is very meaningful to those who are going through rehab, and the good news is that there are treatment centers in Lake Worth that have private rooms for every client.

An Individualized Treatment Plan - Every client who seeks help can receive an individualized assessment from an experienced healthcare professional. From this assessment, an individualized treatment plan can be created that addresses the client’s specific needs for achieving sobriety. A mental health workup can be part of this assessment as well, as many clients are also dealing with mental health issues, and may be using prescribed medications along with intoxicants. This issue must be looked at as the client enters the detox and withdrawal process.

Luxurious Features - Addiction Treatment in Lake Worth offers a range of special features designed to make the challenging experience of rehab more comfortable and engaging for the clients here. Classes and therapies are available that will help to engage and revitalize clients as they get more in touch with themselves during recovery. Yoga classes, acupuncture, massage sessions, and delicious meals cooked by chefs are just some of the special features offered in Lake Worth.

When it’s time to finally commit to a treatment process that will help you achieve sobriety for the long term, consider all that Lake Worth has to offer. The journey is a challenging one, but it’s a worthwhile one. Contact Genesis House in Lake Worth and arrange for a consultation for treatment today. Help is out there, call us today 800-737-0933

If I Have HIV, Can I Still Get Into Drug Rehab?

Almost everybody who struggles with substance abuse has other underlying issues that need to be addressed. Sometimes these are emotional problems that drive people to experiment with drugs and alcohol, and in other situations there are physical issues at play. Any successful drug treatment program needs to address all of the issues that affect a person's health, and that includes HIV and AIDS.

Even though HIV is often thought of as a sexually transmitted infection, it often goes hand-in-hand with drug abuse. This is why it is not uncommon for someone with a substance abuse problem to be HIV-positive. It can also make treatment more complicated for a number of reasons. First of all, HIV and AIDS obviously compromises a person's health and immune system, which can make any kind of medical treatment that much more difficult. Many people who are addicted to drugs and alcohol are also much less likely to remain compliant with other medications that they need to take to be healthy. For someone living with HIV or AIDS, that can be deadly.

Of course, there's also the stigma surrounding HIV and AIDS. It's not nearly as severe as it once was when the AIDS epidemic was at its worst, but it's still there, and it can make one hesitant to seek treatment for their substance abuse problems. While it's totally understandable why you would keep quiet about being HIV-positive, you can still seek treatment at a drug rehab center. It's still an important step that you need to take to be healthy and reclaim your life, but you shouuld seek out a program that is geared toward those who are living with HIV or AIDS. Fortunately, programs such as these are more common than you might think; all you need to do is seek them out.

If you live with both HIV and drug addiction, there is always help available to you. We at Genesis House have safe and nurturing drug rehabilitation programs available for anybody who wants to be free of their addictions. Visit us online to learn more about our many treatment programs and how they can help you. If you need immediate help for yourself or a loved one, don't hesitate to call us at 800-737-0933. No matter who you are, always remember that there is help available to you, even when things seem hopeless.

3 Easy Questions To Remember When Your Doctor Prescribes You Pain Pills

Pain is part of life. Everyone will experience pain at some point, whether it's minor or more severe. You may take a nasty spill, or perhaps you need surgery, or else, you're injured in a car accident. Anyone could find themselves needing the assistance of prescription pain medications to control their pain until the body heals. Pain causes stress and isn't conducive to the healing process. If you need short-term treatment of moderate to severe pain, your doctor will likely prescribe some type of narcotic medication to ease your pain.

More About Narcotic Therapy

Narcotics are prescribed for pain because they are very effective. However, they also carry the potential for addiction. Everyone has different brain chemistry and therefore will respond to narcotic pain medications differently. Some are even genetically pre-disposed to addiction and don't discover this until after they have taken a narcotic and become addicted to it. However, this is very rare. If you have a painful condition and your doctor thinks that narcotics are warranted, you should listen. If you've actually had an addiction problem before, even with a different substance, such as alcohol, you should let your doctor know. He or she will decide from there the best course of action for you.

Key Questions to Ask Your Doctor

Be proactive in your medical care. Ask questions! It's your right. Let your doctor know your concerns. It is his or her job to listen to you and take your concerns into consideration during your care. Keep these three questions in mind when your doctor thinks you need narcotic medication:

  • What are some possible side effects?

Be sure you understand the major possible side effects. Take your pain medication EXACTLY as prescribed on the bottle. If your doctor is unavailable for future questions, don't hesitate to call the pharmacy and ask to speak with a pharmacist.

  • Is there an alternative?

Depending upon your pain level, it's possible that a much weaker pain medication would work for you. There are also non-narcotic pain medicines, such as those similar to ibuprofen, that may work for some people. Keep in mind, though, that this class of drugs isn't likely to control severe pain.

  • What about the risk of addiction?

Overall, this risk is low, but it does exist. Most of the time, the pain-relieving benefits of narcotics far outweigh any risk of possible addiction. Your doctor will probably tell you this. Still, if it's a concern for you, say so.

We are always willing to help in any way we can. Call us at (800)737-0933

Why Do They Still Prescribe Opiates If They Cause Addiction?

The United States is currently facing an opiate addiction epidemic, with opiate-related deaths quadrupling since 1999. There were approximately 19,000 deaths linked to opiates in 2014 alone, and it is estimated that up to 36 million people abuse these substances worldwide. Despite these numbers and all the problems that opiate addiction can cause, many of them are still being prescribed by doctors across the country. Some would argue that prescriptions for medications such as OxyContin, Percocet, and Vicodin should be taken off the market, while others believe that these drugs are helpful as long as they aren't abused.

Opiates are often prescribed to help patients deal with pain after suffering an injury or while they recover from a major surgical procedure. They have also proven useful for those living with chronic conditions such as fibromyalgia, endrometriosis, and Ehlers-Danlos syndrome. These are all painful chronic conditions, and many people who live with them need some kind of medication just to maintain a good quality of life. Should they be expected to go without medicine that they arguably need because so many people abuse their prescriptions?

The Dangers of Opiates

The thing that makes opiates so dangerous is that they produce an intense high that makes them very addictive. The short-term effects of these drugs include pain relief and a feeling of euphoria. The relief from pain is attractive to anybody living with chronic pain or even acute pain from an injury, while euphoria is a common desired effect of many drugs. Abuse of opiates can also cause people to become addicted in as little as three days. Some of the side effects of opiate abuse include:

  • Drowsiness
  • Paranoia
  • Nausea
  • A depressed respiratory system

Long-term opiate use can cause problems such as chronic constipation, liver damage, and brain damage resulting from a depressed respiratory system.

With as dangerous and readily available as opiates are, should doctors stop prescribing them? Many people say yes, and the government has even encouraged doctors to avoid prescribing them. On the other hand, they do have their uses as long as they are taken as prescribed. Short-term opiate use can help people recover from injury and illness, but doctors need to make it clear that these drugs should only be used in the short-term.

If you believe that you are developing a dependence on opiates or you have struggled with substance abuse, there is help available. Contact us today to learn how you can recover from opiate addiction. Call Now 800-737-0933

New Synthetic Opioid “Pink” is Tied to Recent Fatalities

The Harris County Institute of Forensic Sciences has issued a warning about a new synthetic opioid. The drug has been detected in the system of three Houston people who have died recently. It is called “Pink,” “Pinky” or even “U4.”

The drug is a white powder that can be pressed into a pill form. It isn’t packaged in any type of unusual manner. Houston authorities aren’t the first law enforcement officials to encounter Pink; police in Park City, Utah, became aware of it when they were investigating the overdose deaths of two teenagers earlier in 2016.

Fatal Intoxication when Mixed with Other Substances

The chief toxicologist at the Harris County Institute for Forensic Sciences, Teresa Gray, explained that Pink is in the same class of drugs as hydrocodone, heroin and morphine. She said that it produces a feeling of euphoria among users, but can cause the person who takes it to stop breathing if the dosage is high enough. Gray said that users mix the Pink with other substances that, in combination, can cause a fatal intoxication.

Originally Created by a Pharmaceutical Company

Unlike some other street drugs which were originally cooked up in a laboratory, Pink’s origins can be traced to a more legitimate source. It was originally called U47700 and was made by Upjohn, a pharmaceutical company that was attempting to develop a new pain reliever.

The medication was never approved for use on humans or sold to the public. The patent was registered, however, and the drug’s formula found its way onto the Internet. From there, it started being produced in laboratories set up overseas.

The drug is available for sale online, and has now reached American streets. Buyers may not be aware of what they are taking or they may be buying heroin, cocaine or other drugs that have been cut with Pink. It’s a common practice for dealers to add other ingredients to street drugs, and buyers are not aware of what they may be taking along with their drug of choice.

Pink Declared a Controlled Substance

After the news of the untimely deaths attributed to Pink in 2016, the Drug Enforcement Administration (DEA) sought an emergency order in November to have Pink designated a Schedule 1 controlled substance, making it illegal to possess, manufacture or sell it. Drugs in this category have no accepted medical use and have a high potential for abuse.