Tag Archives: substance abuse

What Are the Pain Medications that Most Often Form Habits?

Chronic pain can be quite distressing. Many people go to the doctor’s office to get help for their ongoing struggle. One of the best ways to combat discomfort is with opioid pain-relieving medications. Unfortunately, these medications are very addictive and can easily be misused. It’s important to know what drugs to use and which ones to avoid should you ever be faced with agonizing pain that won’t go away.

How Do Pain Relievers Becoming Habit-Forming?

While pain can ruin your life, taking a drug that you can become addicted to will do the same. Even if you take a medication as it’s prescribed, you can still quickly develop a habit. When the medications enter the bloodstream, they block pain receptors. Not only does the discomfort subside, but many get a euphoric feeling too. It’s that sensation that people want to experience again and again.

Many are shocked to discover that the misuse of pain medications is the number one form of drug abuse in America. It can happen because a doctor prescribed something too strong, prescribed too much, or prescribed them for too long of a period. Another common factor is that the person had a predisposition to addiction, and they didn’t know the drug would affect them this way.

The Opioid Crisis Intensifies

The number of people addicted to opioids continues to rise. When the doctors stop prescribing, and the supply runs dry, then people turn to the black market to find a compatible solution.

Shockingly, as many as eight out of 12 people that are prescribed an opioid pain reliever will become addicted, and four of those 12 people will use heroin as their drug of choice. Is it any wonder that more than 115 people die each day in this country from drugs? While efforts are in place to reduce the number of opioid prescriptions, the problem has become so out of control that it has little effect.

The Most Addictive Painkillers

As your body adjusts to the medication, you will need more to get the same effects. What was once therapeutic has crossed the lines into an addiction. Many painkillers can become addictive, but here are the top ten:

•OxyContin
•Oxymorphone
•Demerol
•Fentanyl
•Dilaudid
•Hydrocodone
•Percocet
•Codeine
•Morphine
•Methadone

Signs of Addiction

Though these medicines are prescribed for legitimate reasons, they should be used with caution. How do you know if being properly medicated is turning into an addiction, well it can start as simple as not feeling the same benefits from the smaller dose, so you adjust the amount you take to enhance your experience.

If you are taking more than prescribed, then it’s is a significant warning sign. Another thing you may notice is that you feel like you always need to have the drug with you. It becomes a safety net, and you can’t live without it.

You may find yourself calling the doctor’s office asking for more medication because you’ve used more than the allotted amount. Medical centers are very wise to drug-seeking behaviors, and they will stop giving these medications to anyone displaying concerning signs. If you have asked friends or family if they had any opioid prescriptions, or have turned to the black market, then you know the problem is getting out of control.

How long it takes to become addicted to a pain killer? The answer varies depending on the person, the amount their taking, and other genetic factors. However, you can build a tolerance to the drug in as little as eight days. The longer you take the medication and the higher the amount you take can all impact these timelines.

Some folks say they develop an addiction after the first dose, and others can take them for a month or more without issue.

Knowing When To Get Help

If you’ve seen any of these signs, and you use prescription opioids, then you need to get help. You cannot simply stop taking these medications safely. You need the help and support of a medical rehabilitation center that is trained in the detox process from these harsh drugs.

South Florida is the perfect area to get clean. You are surrounded by Mother Nature and the loving care of a staff that knows what you’re going through. Each team member is strategically placed to enhance your visit and help you get better. If you realize that you have an addiction to opioids, and you’re ready to get help, then call today at 800-737-0933. Our support staff is standing by 24/7 waiting for you!

Is It Possible for Suboxone to Get You High?

Buprenorphine, the partial opioid in Suboxone, is a partial opioid that at one time was thought to deter addiction. For a select few people, though, a “mild euphoria” can come from the drug and thus lead to the same addiction and drug-seeking behavior that sometimes comes about with recurring use of opioids. Suboxone has two drugs in one: Naloxone and Buprenorphine. When these two drugs are combined into what is known as Suboxone, it’s the Naloxone that is there to deter abuse.

Naloxone is said to block the opioid effects of Buprenorphine, meaning that even if you take large doses of Suboxone, you’re eventually going to hit the ceiling of effect and not experience an increasing euphoria. Despite the way science says this is supposed to work, some people do become addicted to Suboxone and do experience withdrawal effects when they’re coming off of it.

The Benefits of Suboxone

When someone is addicted to opiates like heroin and fentanyl, life becomes a roller coaster ride of physical and emotional anguish. Drug-seeking behavior makes people do things they wouldn’t normally do, resulting in an increasing number of losses and even physical pain depending on how bad the addiction gets. Treatment with Suboxone works for some people. Since the non-opioid drug in the compound blocks most of the effects of the opioid, you don’t get a major high as you do with regular opiates. This can satisfy the craving for an opiate without giving you the addictive euphoria opiates normally give users.

Suboxone clinics and even psychiatrists will sometimes prescribe Suboxone as a sort of “lesser evil” to people who are badly addicted to stronger opiates like Fentanyl and heroin. And for some clients, Suboxone will work because the client won’t become addicted to it and will be able to slowly ween off of the stronger opiates. For other more unfortunate people, the Suboxone itself can become a problem.

Using Suboxone As Directed

When Suboxone is used as directed and a patient follows the directions of the doctor, the drug may be successful in treating opiate addiction in the short-term. Once the more uncomfortable withdrawal symptoms of a strong drug like heroin or Fentanyl are in the past, the patient is then slowly weaned off Suboxone and can withdrawal more comfortably than they would have been able to without the medication. Addiction only becomes a problem if you begin abusing Suboxone the way you would another opiate.

Since the non-opiate agent in Suboxone blocks most of the effects of the opiate in the medication, there is less likelihood for abuse than you would find with other opiates. That doesn’t mean that a person can’t abuse Suboxone or even become addicted to it over time if they take too much of the medication or don’t follow a doctor’s orders while undergoing Suboxone treatment. Just like any other opioid, even a partial opioid can be destructive if you don’t follow a doctor’s orders and begin to abuse the drug.

Hope For Recovery

If you’ve read about Suboxone and feel like there may be a need for it in your treatment, it’s wise to call on a counselor who is familiar with the drug and how it can help you recover. If you’re addicted to Suboxone, that same counselor can slowly begin to help you overcome your addiction and move on with your life, just like you would with an addiction to anything else. Like any medication, Suboxone works for some people but not for others. For some, it eases the symptoms of physical and emotional withdrawal from drugs and allows them to more comfortably transition to a drug-free life. For others, Suboxone itself can become an addiction.

Since Suboxone does cause some mild euphoria for some patients, it’s vital that you take it as prescribed by a doctor. Don’t take extra Suboxone under any circumstances. For some folks, this is easier said than done, and if a full-blown addiction has developed, it’s time to call a counselor for help, someone who knows about Suboxone and how to deal with any dependence you might have developed on it. When you trust your recovery to a good counselor, miracles can happen, whether you’re coming off of heroin or Suboxone, and even if you’re coming off of Suboxone itself. There is always hope for a brighter tomorrow when you reach out for help.

If you’re ready to learn more or get help, our counselors are available 24 hours a day to answer your questions. Call 800-737-0933.

Will an Alcohol Rehab in West Palm Beach Help You Keep Your Job?

Current data shows that Florida has a significant problem when it comes to substance abuse. To help put this into context, the National Institute on Drug abuse (NIDDA) reports that there were over 3,000 overdose deaths in the sunshine state in 2016. It is important to note that the city of West Palm Beach has seen its fair share of drug-related deaths stemming from synthetic opioids, which accounted for nearly 2,000 deaths in 2016. Also worth noting, underage drinking is 4 percent higher than the national average in Palm Beach County. Lastly, more than 4,000 DUI arrests are made in the county every year.

Given these statistics, it is not unreasonable to conclude that alcoholism is just as big a problem in Palm Beach County as drug abuse. While many people have decided to seek help for their addiction to alcohol, some are still reluctant to get the help that they need and have cited fear of losing their job as the primary reason. In this article, we will take a look at the federal laws that are designed to protect not only your privacy but also your job while you work toward overcoming your addiction to alcohol.

WHY YOU SHOULD DISCLOSE YOUR PROBLEM WITH ALCOHOL TO YOUR EMPLOYER

While the fear of losing your job as a result of opening up about your addiction is understandable, not taking steps to conquer your addiction could lead to subpar work performance, which could potentially lead to termination anyway. Once you have made up your mind to seek help for your addiction, most rehab programs will advise you of your rights under the Family and Medical Leave Act (FMLA) and also the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA).

These federal laws are in place to protect your job should you need a leave of absence due to health reasons. And yes, substance abuse qualifies as a serious health condition under FMLA. The Americans with Disabilities Act provides you with some recourse in the event that you’re terminated while seeking help for your addiction. For example, if your termination was based on your decision to seek help for an addiction, you can file a lawsuit against your employer for discrimination under the ADA.

HOW CAN A ALCOHOL REHAB PROGRAM HELP YOU KEEP YOUR JOB?

Most alcohol and drug treatment programs can assist you in gathering any information that you will need relative to your treatment that you can then give to your employer. They may also be able to help with your Return-to-Work Agreement (RTWA) after you have completed your treatment. These agreements outline what employers will be expecting from an employee once he or she returns to work following the completion of an alcohol rehab program. However, this is usually the end of their involvement. Generally speaking, it is a good idea to work with your employer’s human resources department to confirm that they are required to follow FMLA guidelines as smaller companies with fewer than 15 employees are not required to do so. The same also applies to ADA as well.

WHAT YOU SHOULD KNOW BEFORE SEEKING TREATMENT FOR ALCOHOL ABUSE

Assuming your employer is required to follow ADA and FMLA guidelines based on their employee count and other criteria, you will want to familiarize yourself with your company’s policies as they relate to drug and alcohol abuse. For example, if you have an accident at work while under the influence, FMLA and ADA may not apply. In most cases, you will also need to have a letter from a licensed physician stating that your addiction constitutes a serious health condition under FMLA. While this may all seem daunting, taking these steps will ensure you can keep your job while getting the help that you need to overcome your addiction. Furthermore, these procedures are also in place to help employers as well. According to drugabuse.gov, substance abuse costs the U.S. more than $700 billion in lost revenue each year, most of which is attributed to a loss of productivity, healthcare costs, and injuries in the workplace.

WILL YOUR EMPLOYER PROTECT YOUR PRIVACY?

One of the biggest concerns that most people have when it comes to opening up about their addiction is that their struggles will become the subject of gossip in the workplace. Assuming that your employer is required to follow FMLA and ADA guidelines, your privacy will be protected. However, most employers already have policies in place that are designed to protect sensitive employee information. That said, if you’re ready to overcome your addiction to alcohol, consider speaking with one of our friendly and knowledgeable representatives today at 800-737-0933.

What Services Will You Get at a Medical Detox Center That You Wouldn’t Get Elsewhere?

One of the first steps in the process of beating addiction, after admitting that there is an existing problem and accepting help, is detoxification. This is the process in which all the toxins from drugs and/or alcohol are cleansed from the body. The thought of detox is overwhelming for many. Detox centers decrease the levels of dread and stress because they offer professional support throughout the entire process.

Types of Detox Centers

There are two main types of detox centers. These are medical detox centers and social detox centers. Medical detox includes:

– medical doctors
– detox medications
– supportive medications

Detox medications can include Methadone for those addicted to opiates and supportive medications include Ativan for alcoholics. Methadone is commonly used for pain management and to block the effects of opiates during detox. Ativan is used to help reduce the symptoms of Alcohol Withdrawal Syndrom when detoxing from alcohol.

On the other hand, social detox only includes social and psychological support during the detox process. Should medical issues arise, the client is transferred to a medical facility equipped to handle the issue. Social detox is not normally recommended to those battling with alcohol, sedatives, or opiates.

Stages of Detox

There are often three stages of detox. They are:

– Evaluation
– Stabilization
– Building acceptance of the necessity of future help

During the evaluation stage, tests are performed for drugs and alcohol and prior medical history is discussed. Then, the plan of action is devised. Stabilization often makes up the largest part of detox. Medical and psychological assistance are both provided, as needed, during this stage. The final stage of detox is building acceptance of the necessity of professional help beyond detox. Future help increases the chances of sustaining sobriety.

How Long Does Detox Take?

According to the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Association (SAMHSA), it takes an average of 8 days to detox. However, this time frame varies due to several different factors. Some of these factors include:

– Drug of choice
– Frequency of use
– Detox Setting

For some, the process could be over in hours, but others it could take weeks. It depends on each person’s individual circumstances.

Detoxification is usually a scary thought to those seeking to recover. However, fear should never be a deterrent. Professional detox makes the process bearable for a lot of people who are battling substance abuse or addiction. If you are you ready to start your journey, call us today at 800-737-0933.

Are Treatments for Drug Addicts and Alcoholics Different?

People are often curious if treatments for drug addicts and alcoholics are different or if they’re the same. The answer isn’t quite as straightforward as you might think. There are ways in which they’re the same and there are ways in which they’re not. Drug addictions are characterized by a person’s obsession with a certain type of drug or group of drugs. Addicts typically will spend a lot of money to get the drug from a dealer and sometimes will steal from others to get the money to access the object of their addiction. Addicts will use a drug for the specific effects they get from it. For example, someone who is a heroin addict is drawn to the feeling of euphoria it gives some people. To get rid of an addiction, the person must pass through a cleansing stage of ridding their system of that drug.

Alcohol addiction is much like drug addiction, except the object of their obsession is, of course, alcohol and not a specific drug. Alcohol provides some of the same effects a drug addict seeks. It offers a person brief relief from the pain they’re experiencing, whether it be physical or mental. It gives them moments of happiness where they feel they lack it in their sober state. With treatment, it’s important that the person goes through a detox, of sorts, to get it out of their system so that counseling and therapy can work their magic to help them get through the addiction.

Treatments for Drug Addicts and Alcoholics

Each type of addiction offers pretty much the same kind of treatment. However, each one will have varying parts based on an individual’s needs. With both types of addiction, you’ll find the following programs:

  • Inpatient Treatment
  • Outpatient Treatment
  • Detox Program

The treatment facility will evaluate your situation and choosing the right treatment for your needs. They will determine what needs you have to beat your addiction, and what services best suit your situation. They will even consider whether you need to work while you go through treatment or if you have a family to support.

Inpatient Treatment for Drug Addicts and Alcoholics

For those with severe addictions, an inpatient program is best. It offers around the clock care to observe your physical and mental health while you go through the detox stage. Medical staff monitors the detox drug use, if needed, to be sure an individual isn’t abusing the treatments.

Inpatient services allow an individual to stay at a residential facility, 24-hours a day for a length of time. During their stay, they will receive counseling and therapy to help them beat their addiction mentally and will have medical services for withdrawal symptoms that ultimately surface during detox

Outpatient Treatment for Drug Addicts and Alcoholics

Outpatient treatment is generally for those who have been through detox and need the long-term care of support services. Sometimes, you may have an intensive outpatient treatment program that enables you to get monitored closely, but still gives you time to go to work and time to spend with your family.

The outpatient part means you go to the center after work, or before, depending on your work schedule. Once you’ve spent your predetermined amount of time there, you go home to sleep in your own bed. Then return on the next scheduled treatment day.

Detox for Drug Addicts and Alcoholics

The treatment used for drug detox and alcohol detox differ due to the differences each one has. Both need intensive monitoring, though, to ensure everything goes well. Once the drug or the alcohol is out of your system, you’re taught coping skills to take with you when you go home and try to live your life free of addiction.

Detox for drugs will also differ with the type of drug that one has an addiction for. Also, it depends on the severity of the addiction as well. Sometimes one will need medication-assistance to get over the addiction and other times, counselors may suggest you do it without medication. Each situation is different in how it’s handled. Counselors determine the best course of action when they evaluate your situation.

So, treatments for drug and alcohol addiction are alike in many ways, but how each type is handled is somewhat different. It’s more about the severity of the addiction and what’s needed to beat it more than it is about the addiction someone suffers from. If you would like more information about drug or alcohol addiction treatments, call us at 800-737-0933.

Learning the Difference Between Helping and Enabling Substance Abuse

If you, or one of your loved ones, are struggling with a drug or alcohol addiction, this can be an extremely difficult obstacle to overcome. Often, there are underlying issues that have lead to the substance abuse, which need to be addressed. Once you have identified the underlying issues, you should begin thinking of ways to address these issues and create clearly defined steps to dealing with them. While many emotional and mental issues may be long term, they can still be improved. With time and effort, most issues can be worked through and their overall impact can be lessened. Dedication, productive activities, and positive behaviors will go a long way in helping to ease the issues and will eventually lead to a better mind set.

Differentiating Between Helping and Enabling

When attempting to overcome a substance abuse addiction, it is important to recognize the difference between trying to help someone and enabling them. Often, individuals with substance abuse issues may need financial assistance to fund their addiction. When they are unable to obtain drugs or alcohol they can experience server withdrawal symptoms or mental anguish. Of course, friends and loved ones do not want to see them struggle, so they often give in to their demands. This is a difficult issue to navigate. Withdrawals can be dangerous and life-threatening. Therefore, if their dependency is severe, it may be time for them to seek medical help. Addicts can also be enabled in other ways, such as loved ones ignoring their problem or normalizing it. It is important that you make sure the person knows that you care for them but you don’t approve of the damage they are causing to themselves.

Trying to help someone who is addicted to drugs or alcohol can be a daunting task. Sometimes they will insist they don’t have a problem or they will try to conceal their substance abuse. Other times, they can push people away who want to help them because they aren’t ready to change. The most important thing you can do for this person is let them know that you deeply care for them and that you want to be a source of emotional support for them during this difficult period in their lives. You should avoid arguing with them or putting them down because this can cause them to sink into a deeper depression. If you are experiencing difficulty convincing the individual that they are valuable and it’s time to change, you may want to consult a health care professional for advice on how to successfully help the individual overcome their issues. If you or your loved one are ready to get help, counselors are available 24/7 at 800-737-0933

What If I Don’t Need Detox But Still Want To Go To Rehab?

The most common route to recovery is going to detox first, which is then succeeded by going to rehab. However, not everyone needs to go to detox as a prerequisite to going to rehab. Rehabs do not require you to go to a detox facility or go through their detox program before proceeding to rehab if you do not need detox.

There are several reasons why you may not need detox before going to rehab:

• Your addiction has not progressed to the physiological point, which is where you need to use the substance to feel normal; it is only psychological.
• You have already gone through detox in a hospital, jail, or at home.
• You are not addicted to a substance; you are addicted to a compulsive behavior (e.g. gambling, internet, sex, self-harm, shopping, eating, etc.)

The Purpose of Detox Before Rehab

Addiction is both a physiological and psychological disease. Detox mostly addresses the physiological component, and rehab mostly addresses the psychological component. Addiction is a physiological disease because the repeated use of the substance results in the body developing a new homeostasis. Homeostasis is the body’s regular internal state. The addicted body’s homeostasis is having the addictive substance in its system. If it does not receive the addictive substance, it reacts by going into fatal, violent withdrawal. People who are progressed in their addictions cannot quit cold turkey; they need to go through withdrawal under medical supervision. Otherwise, they can die or develop long-term complications (e.g. seizures). Withdrawal also includes psychological symptoms (e.g. depression, anxiety, insomnia, etc.). Psychological support is also available at most detox programs. However, the major psychological work is done at rehab through a variety of therapies.

Genesis House is located in Lake Worth, Florida. We offer a variety of programs, including a detox program. All clients are evaluated by the medical team at the detox center upon arrival. If it’s ruled out that you do not need detox, you will not be forced to go through the detox program. However, if it is determined that you do need detox, the length of time you will spend in detox can range from a few days to two weeks. The length of time it will take for you to detox depends on your age, health, addictive substances, and longevity of your addiction.

If you or your loved is interested in Genesis House or have general questions about addiction, detox, and/or recovery, call us today at 800-737-0933

Questions You Should Be Asking Every Addiction Treatment Center in Florida That You Talk To

In Florida alone, there are hundreds of addiction treatment centers, so finding one that is the right match for you or a loved one may seem like a daunting task. Although you may be constrained by factors outside of your control, like location or price, it’s still important to do your research on the treatment centers you are considering.

To help you with this process, here are some crucial questions you should be asking each and every treatment center you have contact with.

What is your success rate for treating addiction?

Addiction treatment centers may utilize a number of groundbreaking or out-of-the-box rehabilitation techniques that sound great on paper, but if they don’t have the results to confirm their effectiveness, those efforts may be in vain. So, always be sure to ask a potential treatment center to point you towards any studies or research that can confirm that their methods work.

However, you need to keep in mind that even the best rehabilitation techniques are not going to have a 100% success rate—so be sure to keep your expectations realistic. That being said, if an organization is reluctant or unable to provide you with the information you’re asking for, that should be a major red flag.

What is the ratio of patients to counselors?

Treating addiction requires a high level of personalized care, and if counselors are stretched too thin with too many patients to look after, the level of care that they can provide often suffers.

As with asking about success rates, it’s important to keep a realistic mindset about the patient-to-counselor ratio. It’s also important to remember that some individuals may thrive in a more group-oriented treatment facility. But if you’re worried at all that your loved one won’t receive the level of individual attention they need for recovery, that may be sign you need to look for a different rehabilitation provider.

What role does medical detoxification play in the rehabilitation process?

Most substances that require inpatient treatment are extremely physically addictive, which means that quitting process can pose health risks to the patients. Because of this, it’s important that any addiction treatment center you’re considering has a qualified medical staff to help your loved one through the initial withdrawal stages of rehab.

So, to recap, these are the three most important areas of treatment you should be asking about when considering a treatment center:

  • Proven success rates
  • Level of personalized care
  • Presence of a medical staff

If you’re interested in learning more about what our treatment center can offer you and your loved one, please get in contact by calling at 800-737-0933. Our counselors are available 24 hours a day.

The Benefits Of Going To Rehab in Lake Worth Florida

Addiction to intoxicants like prescription drugs or alcohol is a huge problem in our society, and today the problem is becoming a major health care crisis. For a person dealing with a serious addiction, the need to get help through a reputable rehab center is serious indeed. No, getting to a place where it’s possible to be honest and face the need for help isn’t easy, but it’s crucial to face the problem of addiction and seek help from a high quality rehab center staffed by experienced professionals. There are quality centers available now in Lake Worth Florida, run by caring professionals who are ready and willing to help, so its wise to seek help in this community.

The True Benefits of Getting Rehab in Lake Worth, Florida

Private Rooms – Privacy is very meaningful to those who are going through rehab, and the good news is that there are treatment centers in Lake Worth that have private rooms for every client.

An Individualized Treatment Plan – Every client who seeks help can receive an individualized assessment from an experienced healthcare professional. From this assessment, an individualized treatment plan can be created that addresses the client’s specific needs for achieving sobriety. A mental health workup can be part of this assessment as well, as many clients are also dealing with mental health issues, and may be using prescribed medications along with intoxicants. This issue must be looked at as the client enters the detox and withdrawal process.

Luxurious FeaturesAddiction Treatment in Lake Worth offers a range of special features designed to make the challenging experience of rehab more comfortable and engaging for the clients here. Classes and therapies are available that will help to engage and revitalize clients as they get more in touch with themselves during recovery. Yoga classes, acupuncture, massage sessions, and delicious meals cooked by chefs are just some of the special features offered in Lake Worth.

When it’s time to finally commit to a treatment process that will help you achieve sobriety for the long term, consider all that Lake Worth has to offer. The journey is a challenging one, but it’s a worthwhile one. Contact Genesis House in Lake Worth and arrange for a consultation for treatment today. Help is out there, call us today 800-737-0933

If I Have HIV, Can I Still Get Into Drug Rehab?

Almost everybody who struggles with substance abuse has other underlying issues that need to be addressed. Sometimes these are emotional problems that drive people to experiment with drugs and alcohol, and in other situations there are physical issues at play. Any successful drug treatment program needs to address all of the issues that affect a person’s health, and that includes HIV and AIDS.

Even though HIV is often thought of as a sexually transmitted infection, it often goes hand-in-hand with drug abuse. This is why it is not uncommon for someone with a substance abuse problem to be HIV-positive. It can also make treatment more complicated for a number of reasons. First of all, HIV and AIDS obviously compromises a person’s health and immune system, which can make any kind of medical treatment that much more difficult. Many people who are addicted to drugs and alcohol are also much less likely to remain compliant with other medications that they need to take to be healthy. For someone living with HIV or AIDS, that can be deadly.

Of course, there’s also the stigma surrounding HIV and AIDS. It’s not nearly as severe as it once was when the AIDS epidemic was at its worst, but it’s still there, and it can make one hesitant to seek treatment for their substance abuse problems. While it’s totally understandable why you would keep quiet about being HIV-positive, you can still seek treatment at a drug rehab center. It’s still an important step that you need to take to be healthy and reclaim your life, but you shouuld seek out a program that is geared toward those who are living with HIV or AIDS. Fortunately, programs such as these are more common than you might think; all you need to do is seek them out.

If you live with both HIV and drug addiction, there is always help available to you. We at Genesis House have safe and nurturing drug rehabilitation programs available for anybody who wants to be free of their addictions. Visit us online to learn more about our many treatment programs and how they can help you. If you need immediate help for yourself or a loved one, don’t hesitate to call us at 800-737-0933. No matter who you are, always remember that there is help available to you, even when things seem hopeless.