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Does a Treatment Center in Florida Help All Kinds of Mental Health Issues?

Addiction is heavily linked to mental health issues such as anxiety and severe depression. Unfortunately, mental health issues such as anxiety and depression also cause individuals to turn to drugs, alcohol, and even prescription medications to cope with the mental and emotional turmoil they are enduring. With such a vicious cycle, seeking help from a treatment center is essential for a full recovery. However, it is important to note that not all treatment centers provide assistance for mental health issues. Whenever you are faced with an addiction and a mental health affliction, finding the right treatment center is a top priority.

Why Don’t All Treatment Centers Offer Mental Health Support?

Unfortunately, not all rehabilitation treatment centers offer the same types of mental health support services. Traditional outpatient programs typically do not provide dual diagnosis services, as they do not require you to live within a facility or center while you are in the process of your recovery. However, many inpatient rehab centers do offer a dual diagnosis in addition to a medically-monitored detoxing program. If the mental health issues you struggle with interfere with everyday life and are a top priority for you, choosing an inpatient rehab center or treatment facility is ideal.

Why Do Dual Diagnosis Solutions Matter?

When an individual is suffering from a mental health issue or disorder, they often require specialized and individualized treatment for the best outcome possible. Dual diagnosis solutions ensure that all individuals in need of help are treated not only for their addictions but also for the mental health issues they struggle with each day.

What are the Benefits of an Inpatient Rehab Center or Facility?

An inpatient rehab facility not only requires you to live within the center itself throughout your rehabilitation program, but it also provides an array of resources not available anywhere else (such as traditional outpatient meetings). Some of the benefits of inpatient rehab centers for those suffering from mental illnesses include:

  • Individualized Care: Be assessed individually by professionals who will work to craft a treatment plan that is right for you based on your mental illnesses as well as the severity of your current addiction.
  • Dual Diagnosis: Dual diagnosis is essential before creating a treatment plan. Dual diagnosis helps determine which medical doctors and medical professionals are best for you throughout the duration of your rehab program.
  • Individual Counseling: Meet regularly with a counselor to discuss your feelings, emotions, and current mental state of being. Learn how to express yourself without feeling judgment, shame, and guilt, which often leads individuals back to their addictions.
  • Group Therapy: Group therapy sessions are not only beneficial for the recovery process, but they are also therapeutic for those who are willing to open up. Meet with others who are also struggling with addiction and mental health afflictions. Learn how to openly communicate your struggles and the challenges you face each day. Spend time listening to the stories of others to feel less alone in your fight for a life without the use of drugs and alcohol.
  • Aftercare Resources: Inpatient rehab centers and programs are not just for 30, 60, or 90 days. In fact, most inpatient rehabilitation centers and facilities also provide a plethora of aftercare resources. Aftercare resources are extremely important, even if you have completed a lengthy stay in an inpatient rehab center already. With the right aftercare support, ensure you do not fall for the temptation of using drugs and alcohol again. Before choosing an inpatient rehabilitation center or facility that is right for you, be sure to inquire about aftercare options. While most inpatient facilities do provide aftercare resources, it is not guaranteed that all centers have access to the resources you require for a full and ongoing recovery.

Whether you are suffering from anxiety, depression, or another diagnosed (or undiagnosed) mental health condition, there is help for you in Florida. While not all Florida treatment centers provide assistance with mental health issues and dual diagnosis solutions, there are many inpatient treatment facilities that do. With the right rehab center or program, ensure your mental health is monitored as you relearn how to live a happy and fulfilling life of sobriety.

Are you looking to find a treatment center in Florida that also focuses on mental health and dual diagnosis solutions? Our counselors are available 24 hours a day and can help you right now. Call 800-737-0933 to speak with one and to find a Florida treatment center that is right for you today.

Is an Opiate Detox in Florida Ever Dangerous?

Trying to withdraw from opiates on your own can be a dangerous and potentially life-threatening move. Considering the risk to health and life, an opiate detox at a Florida rehab is perhaps the safest way to end your addiction to opiates.

Professional treatment at an accredited rehab is not only safe, but it also offers an opportunity to uncover underlying reasons for your addiction. It allows you to get treatment for mental health disorders linked to drug abuse. It caters to family members and loved ones by involving them in specialized family therapy sessions. And, it equips you with tools and skills to manage drug use triggers to reduce the chance of relapse during and after rehab.

Tapering Off Opiates With Medically-Assisted Detox

Opiates, also called opioids, are drugs made from the opium poppy plant. They are commonly prescribed for treating chronic pain. Codeine, Oxycodone, Fentanyl, Morphine, and Hydrocodone are some examples of prescription opioids. However, opiates are used illicitly in a more raw and potent form and are called “street drugs.”

Heroin is a widely abused “street” drug. It is highly addictive and is the reason why many individuals between the ages of 18-30 undergo opiate detox in Florida. They know that quitting opiates “cold turkey” and going through detox on their own increases the risk of relapse or overdose.

Tapering off the substance is the best way to gradually remove it from the body and allow the body and brain to slowly return to a state of “normalcy.” Medication may be administered to you during detox by a trained professional to assist in managing severe withdrawal symptoms.

Opiate Withdrawal Symptoms

Opiate withdrawal symptoms may begin within 6-30 hours after the last dose. Factors such as how severe the addiction is and what type of drug is involved will determine when symptoms begin. Short-acting opiates produce symptoms within 6-12 hours while long-acting opiates do so around 30 hours following the last use. One or more of these symptoms could develop and may vary in severity from person to person:

  • Strong cravings
  • Runny nose or teary eyes
  • Nausea, vomiting, or diarrhea
  • Excessive sweating
  • Irritability
  • Restlessness
  • Insomnia
  • Persistent yawning
  • Aggressing
  • Anxiety
  • Muscle aches or stomach cramps
  • Mood swings
  • Increased heart rate or blood pressure

Opiate Withdrawal Timeline

Opiate withdrawal can be done at an inpatient or outpatient program. Inpatient rehabs allow you to live-in for the duration of treatment while outpatient centers offer you the opportunity to continue to live at home, work, and care for family members. Nevertheless, both programs have proven to provide effective detox services and therapy.

However, each person’s detox experience is unique. Withdrawal symptoms and the length of time it takes to completely withdraw depend on the level of addiction, the type of drug abused, dosage, and how the brain reacts to the removal of the drug from the body. Days 1-7 is reportedly the most difficult stage. The entire detox process may last several weeks to several months.

The following is a general withdrawal timeline that may be helpful in letting you know what to expect:

Days 1-7: The first and second day is marked by symptoms such as strong cravings, compulsive drug-seeking, restlessness, sweating, trouble sleeping, and muscle aches. Other symptoms may develop around days 3-5 and may include nausea, vomiting, tremors, dilated pupil, increased heart rate, high blood pressure, and stomach ache. Some individuals experience diarrhea, chills, and abdominal cramps.

Day 7 and onwards: Around the end of the first week, there is usually a marked improvement in physical symptoms. At the same time, psychological symptoms start to kick in. Anxiety, depression, insomnia, irritability, emotional outbursts, remorse, and impulsive behaviors are common. By now, the desire to use drugs is not as strong as the first week. Once you’re stabilized, you may transition into therapy to begin the second stage of addiction treatment.

Finding a Detox Center Near You

Finding the right detox center may pose a bit of challenge since you may prefer to connect with one that can provide the services to match your needs. If you live in South Florida, you can locate a treatment center and give them a call to find out what types of programs they offer and how to get admitted.

During the evaluation, the medical team will recommend either outpatient or residential treatment depending on your recovery needs. Addiction treatment programs are usually comprehensive and include referral to behavioral therapy to help reduce the risk of relapse after formal treatment ends.

Just remember that sobriety involves a desire to overcome drug addiction, a positive mindset towards treatment, and a commitment to staying sober. Call one of our counselors today at 800-737-0933.

What Resources Can You Use to Help Heroin Addicts?

It seems 10 lifetimes that America has been dealing with a heroin abuse epidemic. The drug became popular and a problem in the 1960’s and remains a menace today. One would think the country would have perfected ways to treat heroin addicts, but the reality is it hasn’t. So what exactly can you do to help a heroin addict?

What we know is there really is only one viable method of treatment for heroin addiction. Folks often try conventional counseling with a therapist, but it hardly makes a dent. The Internet is full of home remedies and self-help methods of treatment and again, it hardly makes a dent. What these option have in common is they fail to address both the addiction and the causes of the addiction.

That really leaves the addict with one choice, getting treatment from a reputable drug and alcohol treatment facility. For your part, you can be a good friend or loved one. You can look out for them in anticipation of a crisis that almost always comes. When that crisis does come, it will be time for you to tap into the resources at your disposal.

What Resources You Have to Help a Heroin Addict

While it may not be your responsibility, you still have an obligation to look after your loved ones. If someone you care about is addicted to heroin, it’s going to be tough watching them struggle and simply do nothing. Unfortunately, doing nothing equates to enabling, and that’s the last thing you want to do. With that in mind, here’s a few resources you can use to help your loved one get the help they need.

Educate Yourself

Unless you understand the nuances of heroin addiction, you’ll find there’s much for you to learn. The Internet is filled with information about heroin addiction. It might be worthwhile to contact your own physician and ask them to help educate you. Of course, a reputable drug addiction treatment center is going to be willing to sit down with you and offer up information.

Intervention

Armed with some knowledge about heroin addiction, you might want to consider putting on an intervention. This would give you a great opportunity to get other people involved in the process. Remember, the goal of an intervention is to motivate the heroin addict to seek help. Here’s a few dos and don’ts to consider when running an intervention.

  • Be prepared and rehearse what is going to be discussed
  • Try to keep things positive by having each person mention how much they care
  • Don’t make accusations
  • Don’t let the subject of the intervention take over the proceedings
  • Discuss possible treatment options and offer to be supportive

You can anticipate your loved one being a bit overwhelmed. They might need a little time to let the intervention process sink in. You should give them that time. By not pressing and keeping things positive, there’s an excellent chance they will agree to get help. If not, don’t panic. You can stay diligent and hopefully they will come around.

Help With the Treatment Facility Selection Process

When your loved one is ready to accept they have an illness and get help, it would be an excellent idea for you to be prepared to offer assistance with the rehab selection process. The first thing you can help with is finding out how much of the treatment process you loved one’s healthcare insurance provider is willing to cover. For any shortage, you could help locate other financial resources.

From there, you can help your loved one find the right treatment facility. There has been a dramatic transformation in the addiction treatment industry over the last few years. They place much more emphasis on providing custom treatment programs that fit a patient’s needs and circumstances. With this in mind, you might want to discuss your loved one’s situation with multiple treatment facilities. Eventually, you will find one that has exactly what you and your loved one are needing.

While your loved on is in treatment, you could actually start the process of locating aftercare resources. This might include a sober living home, 12-Step meetings and counseling resources.

We hope the information we have provided above will help you save your loved one. When your loved one is ready to admit defeat and ask for help, we encourage you to pick up the phone and call one of our professional counselors at 800-737-0933.

Are Treatments for Drug Addicts and Alcoholics Different?

People are often curious if treatments for drug addicts and alcoholics are different or if they’re the same. The answer isn’t quite as straightforward as you might think. There are ways in which they’re the same and there are ways in which they’re not. Drug addictions are characterized by a person’s obsession with a certain type of drug or group of drugs. Addicts typically will spend a lot of money to get the drug from a dealer and sometimes will steal from others to get the money to access the object of their addiction. Addicts will use a drug for the specific effects they get from it. For example, someone who is a heroin addict is drawn to the feeling of euphoria it gives some people. To get rid of an addiction, the person must pass through a cleansing stage of ridding their system of that drug.

Alcohol addiction is much like drug addiction, except the object of their obsession is, of course, alcohol and not a specific drug. Alcohol provides some of the same effects a drug addict seeks. It offers a person brief relief from the pain they’re experiencing, whether it be physical or mental. It gives them moments of happiness where they feel they lack it in their sober state. With treatment, it’s important that the person goes through a detox, of sorts, to get it out of their system so that counseling and therapy can work their magic to help them get through the addiction.

Treatments for Drug Addicts and Alcoholics

Each type of addiction offers pretty much the same kind of treatment. However, each one will have varying parts based on an individual’s needs. With both types of addiction, you’ll find the following programs:

  • Inpatient Treatment
  • Outpatient Treatment
  • Detox Program

The treatment facility will evaluate your situation and choosing the right treatment for your needs. They will determine what needs you have to beat your addiction, and what services best suit your situation. They will even consider whether you need to work while you go through treatment or if you have a family to support.

Inpatient Treatment for Drug Addicts and Alcoholics

For those with severe addictions, an inpatient program is best. It offers around the clock care to observe your physical and mental health while you go through the detox stage. Medical staff monitors the detox drug use, if needed, to be sure an individual isn’t abusing the treatments.

Inpatient services allow an individual to stay at a residential facility, 24-hours a day for a length of time. During their stay, they will receive counseling and therapy to help them beat their addiction mentally and will have medical services for withdrawal symptoms that ultimately surface during detox

Outpatient Treatment for Drug Addicts and Alcoholics

Outpatient treatment is generally for those who have been through detox and need the long-term care of support services. Sometimes, you may have an intensive outpatient treatment program that enables you to get monitored closely, but still gives you time to go to work and time to spend with your family.

The outpatient part means you go to the center after work, or before, depending on your work schedule. Once you’ve spent your predetermined amount of time there, you go home to sleep in your own bed. Then return on the next scheduled treatment day.

Detox for Drug Addicts and Alcoholics

The treatment used for drug detox and alcohol detox differ due to the differences each one has. Both need intensive monitoring, though, to ensure everything goes well. Once the drug or the alcohol is out of your system, you’re taught coping skills to take with you when you go home and try to live your life free of addiction.

Detox for drugs will also differ with the type of drug that one has an addiction for. Also, it depends on the severity of the addiction as well. Sometimes one will need medication-assistance to get over the addiction and other times, counselors may suggest you do it without medication. Each situation is different in how it’s handled. Counselors determine the best course of action when they evaluate your situation.

So, treatments for drug and alcohol addiction are alike in many ways, but how each type is handled is somewhat different. It’s more about the severity of the addiction and what’s needed to beat it more than it is about the addiction someone suffers from. If you would like more information about drug or alcohol addiction treatments, call us at 800-737-0933.

How Long Should I Be On Suboxone To Get Completely Clean?

Heroin is a dangerous drug derived from the opium poppy. It is illegal in the United States. Heroin is highly addictive. Drug rehab centers often use another drug, Suboxone, to help people break their heroin addictions. Read on for more information on Suboxone and its use in treating heroin addiction.

When you abuse a drug like heroin, your body develops a tolerance for it. This means that you must take increasing dosages of heroin in order to get the same high. When you attempt to quit using heroin, you experience withdrawal symptoms, including the following:

  • Feeling jittery
  • Vomiting
  • Getting chills
  • Muscle aches and pains

Suboxone is a drug that contains buprenorphine. Buprenorphine is used to treat not only heroin addiction but other opioid addictions, too. Buprenorphine, a partial agonist to opioids, produces a mild form of the effects of opioids. It basically fools the brain into thinking your opioid craving has been met, though it does not produce the same high. However, because Buprenorphine and Suboxone do not create the same high as opioids, Suboxone and Buprenorphine are difficult to form an addiction to. Naloxone, another component of Suboxone, works as an antagonist to opioids.

Length of Use for Suboxone

Suboxone is a drug that must usually be taken for a long time to promote opioid recovery. Because Suboxone is a partial agonist, it still allows people to form some opioid dependence. When addicts attempt to stop taking Suboxone, they need to taper their dosage under the care of a medical professional.

People who take Suboxone for a short period, such as a month, usually end up relapsing and returning to opioid abuse. Thus, Suboxone should be taken for an extended period. Taking it for six months to one year is the norm, and many people take it for even longer. However, every patient is different. A medical professional can monitor the patient’s progress and advise on how long each patient should take Suboxone.

Suboxone should be used only under the guidance provided in a professional treatment program or under the care of a healthcare professional. Rehab clinicians can administer the correct dosage, and Suboxone can also be prescribed by a doctor. By pairing Suboxone with other therapies, clinicians and physicians can help addicts fight their addictions. Call us today for help 800-737-0933

Opiate Dependence Versus Opiate Maintenance

Opiate dependence versus opiate maintenance, is there a difference? A lot of people wonder if it is possible to be addicted to a drug such as Oxycontin or Oxycodone form simply taking a drug as directed. The answer to this question is “yes”, however, the answer is much more complicated in reality.

Addiction is usually physical, mental and behavioral in nature. One symptom is being physically dependent on the drug and using more and more of it to get high — also known as building a tolerance. Regular use will cause this tolerance even if you don’t abuse it, so this isn’t the only factor. Opiate dependence means that a person is addicted – which means they’re using it to get high, and they are using it to function normally. For the sake of this article, opiate dependence and opiate addiction will be used interchangeably.

Here are some questions to ask yourself if you’re worried about opiate addiction:

  • Are you using opiates to get “high”, rather than for pain? If you’re using opiates to get high, that’s abuse and you’re a candidate for addiction.
  • Do you need more and more of the drug to get the same “high”?
  • Have you tried doctor shopping or illicit means to get more of your pills so you don’t run out? Do you run out of your prescriptions early?
  • Have you avoided certain people, places or activities because you would rather be somewhere that you can be high without scrutiny?
  • Has your family or your doctor expressed worry about your pill use?

Addiction is a disease that is progressive in nature. A person with a substance abuse disorder will start to display drug seeking behaviors when they are running out of their drug and choice. As withdrawal — which is quite physically uncomfortable and sometimes painful — sets in, an addicted person may become desperate. They may feel the need to doctor shop, purchase drugs on the street or steal leftover pills from family members to get their “fix”.

Do You Have a Problem with Opiates?

Addiction can affect anyone from any walk of life, even when there is no history in a family. There are many signs and symptoms of addiction that can and should raise red flags for addicted persons and their loved ones.

If you or somebody you love is suffering from the disease of addiction and needs rehab, there IS a way out. Recovery is not only possible, it’s amazing!

We can help you reclaim your life and put the pain of addiction behind you. All calls are 100% confidential, please call us today at 800-737-0933

Are There Any LGBT Specific Substance Abuse Treatment Centers in Florida?

While the disease of addiction is equally devastating for all sufferers and their loved ones, seeking a specific type of addiction treatment may be more beneficial for you or your loved one. The common specific types of addiction treatment are gender-specific treatment, faith-specific treatment, and even LGBT-specific treatment. There are certain issues that are specific to certain groups of sufferers of addiction, and LGBT-specific treatment will address issues that are specific to you or your loved one as a LGBT individual.

Florida is the epitome of a recovery environment because of the warm climate and beach scenery, which makes it a desirable healing environment. It is the recovery capital of the United States because of its plethora of addiction treatment centers and massive recovery community. Since Florida has a plethora of treatment centers, there is a wide variety of treatment centers to choose from in Florida.

There are many inpatient and outpatient LGBT specific substance abuse treatment centers throughout Florida. The majority of them are in the central region and southern region of Florida.

There are also several in the northern region of Florida. In addition to substance abuse treatment centers, there are also community centers where the LGBT recovery community can congregate.

 

The Benefits of Choosing an LGBT Specific Substance Abuse Treatment Center

If you or your loved one is suffering from addiction and identifies as LGBT, there will be certain LGBT specific underlying issues that will need to be addressed in the recovery process such as bullying, family misunderstanding, intimacy issues, etc. It is most beneficial for you or your loved one to start the recovery process in an environment that is fully devoted to the LGBT community. Along with a focus on LGBT specific issues, there are also several benefits to choosing an LGBT specific substance abuse treatment center.Non-Biased Counselors and Staff

At an LGBT specific treatment center, you or your loved one will not have to worry about having to deal with counselors and staff who are biased against or do not understand LGBT people. All of the staff at an LGBT treatment center will be objectively focused on helping you or your loved one without LGBT being an issue.

Judgement-free Environment

All of the other clients at an LGBT treatment center will also be LGBT, so you or your loved one will not have to worry about dealing with judgement and mistreatment from other clients in the treatment center.

Connecting with Recovering Peers

Community is a significant part of recovery. People tend to connect best with those who relate to them. Being in an LGBT Treatment Center will provide you or your loved one with a strong sense of community because the others in the treatment center can easily relate to you or your loved one.

If you or your loved one identify as LGBT and are suffering from addiction, Genesis House is a treatment center in Lake Worth Florida is a great option. Call today at 800-737-0933 

How do I Know if I Need an Outpatient or Inpatient Rehab Program?

Coming to the realization that you have a serious drug addiction problem can be absolutely daunting. At the same time, it is also an eye-opening experience and a positive step forward because you may also acknowledge that you need help. Once you decide enough is enough and that you’re ready to get help for your substance abuse disorder, you can find a drug rehabilitation facility to enter a treatment program.

Generally, there are two options available to you, outpatient and inpatient rehab programs. How do you know which is better for you? It’s worth learning about each of these treatment options and their similarities and differences to determine the answer.

With outpatient addiction treatment:

  • You are allowed to return home each night while attending your rehab program during the day
  • You are required to attend therapy sessions each week
  • You may be prescribed maintenance medication by a psychiatrist to manage your withdrawal symptoms

Outpatient treatment typically takes place in a setting that is less intensive than that of inpatient.

Overall, outpatient treatment is better suited for individuals who have more of a short-term or milder addiction. The typical client at an outpatient facility also has various responsibilities at home that they need to attend to, such as caring for their children or an elderly parent, as well as work. It works well for allowing you to take care of your everyday responsibilities while getting the help you need to overcome your substance abuse problem.

 

When You Should Choose Inpatient Treatment Over Outpatient

If you have a more severe drug addiction problem and have been battling it for years, inpatient addiction treatment is the better option for you. Inpatient rehab:

  • Is more comprehensive
  • Is situated in a hospital or residential facility that is outside of a hospital setting
  • Offers more access to medical services and clients receive around-the-clock supervision from healthcare professionals or staff personnel

With inpatient treatment, you can expect to be in a rehab program for anywhere from 28 to 90 days depending on the severity of your addiction, the drug to which you are dependent and other factors, such as if a dual diagnosis exists. Dual diagnosis is also known as a coexisting medical or psychiatric condition that may be present in addition to the addiction.

Inpatient treatment also involves detox, which involves removing all traces of drugs from the person’s system. While undergoing this period of your recovery, you will be carefully monitored while you go through the withdrawal process.

Therapy is a huge component of both outpatient and inpatient addiction treatment. Whichever type of rehab you ultimately choose, it’s important to take part in counseling sessions, whether you do individual, group or family therapy and to continue doing so well after your treatment ends. It will help to avoid a relapse and give you a better chance of retaining your sobriety.

Our counselors are available 24 hours per day. If you are ready to enter a treatment program for your substance abuse problem, contact us immediately at 800-737-0933