Tag Archives: withdrawal

When Can Alcohol Withdrawal Effects Be Fatal?

Alcohol addiction is a significant problem in the United States. Statistics recently complied by the National Survey on Drug Use and Health, sometimes abbreviated as NSDUH, found that more than 15 million American age 12 and older were addicted to this substance. Many have tried to beat this dependency. However, alcohol is one of the hardest addictions to conquer.

 The Reasons Alcohol Is So Addictive

Arguably, what makes alcohol so easy to become dependent on is the impact said substance has on the nervous system. When people consume alcoholic beverages, their brains release mood-elevating hormones, such as endorphins and dopamine. That said, in some people, alcohol consumption precipitates the release of even more mood-enhancing chemicals, further stimulating their dependence.

As the habit progresses, the brain releases an increasingly greater concentration of mood chemicals. Eventually, the brain and body develop a greater dependency on the release of these chemicals to function. Ergo, a significantly greater quantity of alcohol are needed to complete that process. In fact, alcohol can alter brain chemistry to the point that pertinent actions like decision making and impulse control can be compromised.

Additionally, the availability of alcohol makes it easier to obtain. To those over 21 years of age, the substance can be purchased legally. Moreover, said the chemical is far less expensive than most other drugs and does not have to purchase in the corner of a dark alley.

 The Alcohol Withdrawal Process

Addiction experts opine that alcohol withdrawal is amongst the most difficult and serious. Withdrawal occurs in stages. The first stage typically begins within eight hours of the dependent’s last drink and might precipitate manifestations like nausea, vomiting, stomach discomfort and shakiness. During the second stage, which sets in roughly one to three days after the subject last consumed alcohol, might consist of cardiovascular symptoms like an increased pulse rate and elevated blood pressure and general manifestations like a decreased body temperature and mental problems like confusion. The last and final stage, commencing anywhere from two to four days after the consumer’s last drink, might comprise symptoms like uncontrollable tremors, hallucinations, raised body temperature and convulsions.

 Alcohol Withdrawal Can Be Fatal

Moderate to severe alcohol withdrawal processes almost always present discernible dangers and, if not properly managed, could prove fatal. There are several circumstances in which alcohol withdrawal could cost the dependent subject their life including:

When The Person Is Severely Dependent

Individuals who have consumed significant quantities of alcohol for prolonged periods stand at an increased risk of experiencing more trying withdrawal processes and potentially fatal complications.

If The Addict Possesses Any Mental Illnesses

Individuals with mental illness might not be able to bear the psychological strain associated with alcohol withdrawal.

When Co-Morbidities Exist

Chronic alcohol usage can precipitate a host of serious physical illnesses. Any of these maladies can weaken a dependent’s body to such a marked extent that they might not be able to tolerate the physical demands of withdrawal.

When The Most Serious Symptoms Manifest

End stage alcohol withdrawal symptoms can result in occurrences like uncontrollable convulsions and delirium tremens, which sends the addict into an ultra hyperactive state where they experience intense confusion and uncontrollable shaking that could quickly proceed to cardiovascular and respiratory collapse if immediate medical attention is not employed. Few people, regardless of how mentally or physically strong they are, can survive this without help.

<strong>Managing Alcohol Withdrawal</strong>

Most cases of alcohol withdrawal should be supervised through a process known as medical detoxification. During said procedure, which can take place inside a healthcare facility like a hospital or inside the confines of an in-patient rehabilitation facility, the addict is gradually weaned off alcohol in a controlled, medically monitored setting. If need be, the patient is administered medications to control burgeoning withdrawal manifestations.

Though both hospital and in-patient detoxification programs often prove effective in eliminating the alcohol from the dependent’s body, in-patient detoxification might yield better results over the long haul. This is because in-patient detox is typically followed by an extended stay inside a treatment facility in which recovering addicts are provided instruction on how to overcome the psychological factors that led to their addiction.

Contacting Us

Individuals who are tired of living an alcohol-dependent life are encouraged to contact us. Though we are located in Palm Beach County, Florida, our team of experienced staff members have helped people from across the United States conquer their alcohol addictions in a safe, comfortable atmosphere. Call us at 800-737-0933.

What Are Some Ways to Weather the 48 to 72 Hour Period of Alcohol Withdrawal?

Making the decision to check into a rehab center is one you will be grateful for the rest of your life. Whether you are addicted to alcohol or some type of substance, you’ll find the help that you need from reputable rehab personnel who only have your best interests in mind. You’ll be given personalized, one-on-one treatment that will help you get through your addiction while you move on to a better you, one step at a time.

However, you may be worried about what will happen if you go into rehab when you are addicted to alcohol. Alcohol withdrawal can be difficult, if not fatal, if you are not under the care of a professional doctor while you are going through it. Read on to learn some important ways you can weather the 48 to 72 hour period of alcohol withdrawal so that you can go on to learn how to lead a sober and fulfilling life.

Symptoms of Alcohol Withdrawal

First, you will want to understand what symptoms you may experience so that you know what to expect once you stop drinking. If you have been drinking alcohol heavily for even just a few weeks, you could experience physical problems when you decide to stop. This is known as alcohol withdrawal, and the symptoms can easily range from very mild to very serious. The symptoms you experience will depend on the amount of alcohol you have indulged in, for how long, and your level of health.

After six hours of not drinking, you may experience anxiety, nausea, insomnia, vertigo, headaches, vomiting, shaky hands, irritability, anger, sweating, and more. More serious side effects can include mild hallucinations. About 5% of men and women who experience alcohol withdrawal will have delirium tremors, or “DTs”. The DTs are serious symptoms that include very vivid hallucinations and seizures. They can also cause a fever, high blood pressure, intense sweating, confusion, and a racing heart.

Getting Through Alcohol Withdrawal

Alcohol withdrawal may be easier or harder than you think. It takes time and patience to allow the alcohol to completely disappear from your body. However, you can expect the first 24 to 48 hours to be the hardest. Read on for some tips that will help you get through the worst of your alcohol withdrawal symptoms.

Take a cold shower- Taking a cold shower can help clear your mind of your racing thoughts and the urge to drink. It can also help if you are sweating and uncomfortable. Plus, a cold shower has many other health benefits!

Avoid anyone who drinks- You must always stay away from the people or even places that will cause you to want to pick up a drink. Stay far away from anyone who will enable you during this period of withdrawal. You may even want to announce a break from people over social media so that you have a reason to ignore calls and messages from those who do not have your best interests at heart.

Eat healthy- It’s easy to go for junk food when you are in withdrawal because your body will be craving the sugar it used to get from alcohol. Balance out the sugar levels by consuming lots of healthy fruits and vegetables during the first few days of withdrawal while leaving the sugary snacks behind.

Drink plenty of water- Alcohol quickly causes dehydration to occur. During withdrawal you may feel nauseated, so make sure you are drinking plenty of fluids. While water is important, you should also drink fluids that contain plenty of electrolytes, such as sports drinks.

Exercise when you can- We know that you won’t feel like it during withdrawal, but we can assure you that exercise will help. Even a small amount of exercise will release the endorphins in your brain that create the happy and content feelings we are all chasing. You’ll also have a sense of accomplishment when you exercise- a big deal when you are struggling with addiction.

Ride out your cravings- Don’t fool yourself into thinking your cravings will immediately disappear- they won’t. You’ll think about drinking alcohol many times during the withdrawal period. Just remember, the cravings WILL go away. The first 48 hours are the hardest part of alcohol withdrawal, so keep reminding yourself that you are getting through the worst and that it will get better.

We Can Help

Remember, you never have to go through alcohol withdrawal alone. When you are ready to get started on the path to sobriety, let us pave the way. Give us a call at 800-737-0933 to learn more.

What’s the Typical Percocet Withdrawal Length Before Physical Symptoms Subside?

The length and physical symptoms of withdrawal from Percocet are influenced by many factors. These influences can be environmental, physical, and psychological. Understanding the properties of Percocet, along with its intended use, will help in gaining an understanding of the withdrawal process and with the highly addictive potential of using this pain medication.

Percocet is a prescription pain medication in the opioid family; it is a combination of oxycodone and acetaminophen, both powerful pain medications that complement each other. This opioid is recommended for use by patients affected with moderate to severe pain; because of its physical dependence and addictive qualities, it should only be used for short amounts of time.

Percocet Withdrawal

Percocet withdrawal includes several uncomfortable symptoms. These symptoms present themselves in three stages after discontinuing the use of Percocet; these stages include the early withdrawal stage, the peak withdrawal stage, and the late withdrawal stage. The amount and severity of symptoms depend on the severity of physical dependence and/or addiction to the medication. Seeking medical advice, and finding specialists to help with this process, is strongly suggested.

Stage 1 of Withdrawal

In this stage of early withdrawal, symptoms start to appear at about 24 to 30 hours after the last dose of Percocet. The severity of symptoms during this stage continues to get worse over the next couple of days. These symptoms include:

• Body Aches
• Sweats
• Insomnia
• Loss of Appetite
• Racing Heart
• Increased Blood Pressure
• Fever

Stage 2 of Withdrawal

This is the peak stage of withdrawal; this is when withdrawal symptoms are at their worse and this stage starts about 72 hours after the last dose of Percocet was ingested. Symptoms accompanying this stage of withdrawal can remain relentless for up to 5 days, some have reported up to 10 days, and can include the following symptoms:

• Diarrhea
• Stomach Cramps
• Nausea and Vomiting
• Goosebumps
• Chills
• Depression
• Intense Drug Cravings

Stage 3 of Withdrawal

This stage of late withdrawal is when physical symptoms and intense psychological symptoms start to decrease. During this time, it is important to have a lot of support because this is a critical time for starting the journey of abstaining from the use of Percocet. It is also a time to discover other ways to manage the causes for becoming dependent on this opioid medication including both physical and psychological disorders.

Percocet Addiction

Pain medications like Percocet, and other drugs in the opioid family, have proven to be highly addictive. After becoming physically dependent on Percocet, the withdrawal process can be almost impossible to endure without seeking medical advice and having the support of specialists. Continuing the use of Percocet after the recommended time, or manner it was prescribed, can trigger addiction, lead to the use of other illegal opioids, and overdose resulting in death.

Opioids react with transmitters in the brain that activate the reward system. These transmitters are known as endorphins and can decrease the feeling of pain while giving a boost to feelings of well-being and pleasure within the body. After a while, these pleasurable feelings become something you can’t live without and constantly seek. The amount of the drug it takes to reach these feelings increase as the structure of the brain changes and requires more opioids to engage this feeling.

Warning Signs of Addiction

The warning signs of addiction to Percocet and other opioids include physical signs of withdrawal along with behavioral deviations. These changes can include:

• Different friends and groups of friends
• Avoiding friends and family; spending time alone
• Losing interest in regular activities
• Not caring about personal hygiene
• Change in eating habits
• Excessively energetic
• Irritable
• Quick changes in mood
• Abnormal sleeping pattern
• Missing appointments and financial hardships
• Getting in trouble with the law
• Erratic daily schedule

Conclusion

The withdrawal process from any opioid, including Percocet, can be extremely complicated. Seeking the advice, support, and help, of specialists, will make the withdrawal process more tolerable and successful; it will also assist with the decisions on how to handle problems associated with addiction and what proper supports should be put into place. Now is the time to ask for help from people who understand and care, please call 800-737-0933, we are standing by for your call.

How Will Drug Detoxing Affect My Life Once Withdrawal Is Over?

Detox is an incredibly challenging part of the recovery process. It is also the first and most important step to getting well. This is the time during which people abstain from drugs entirely. It gives their bodies the opportunity to rid themselves of dangerous, illicit substances and all the harmful residues they entail. It additionally shows people how their bodies feel without using. The longer that people go without illicit substances; the more that their bodies are able to relearn normal functioning. Due to these and many other reasons, drug detoxing is not generally something that people are encouraged to do at home on their own.

The length of a person’s detox period is determined by the type or types of substances he or she has been using, the length of drug use, and the amount of drugs and their potency among other factors. After one to two weeks of abstinence, however, most people will find that their systems are clean, and that their minds are ready to start tackling the challenges of long-term sobriety. Although drug detoxing is an absolutely essential part of recovery, however, there are many other steps that people will need to take to ensure lasting success.

Detoxing Opens The Door To Mental And Emotional Clarity

Many drug rehab patients are astounded by just how differently they think and feel after detoxing. The effects of drugs on your mind and emotions cannot be fully known until you have taken a sufficient amount of time away from them. One thing that’s common after detoxing, however, is a significant increase in willpower and personal resolve. Saying no to unhealthy habits and behaviors invariably becomes easier when the body is no longer physically dependent upon drugs. Moreover, rehab patients have the clarity of mind post-detox to truly benefit from individual and group counseling sessions that are aimed at revealing the underlying causes of their addictions.

Once you have broken you physical dependency on drugs, you can learn more about the different lifestyle factors and life events that have contributed to your emotional dependency. For instance, some people find that they are using drugs to help numb the trauma of past events. Others discover that early behavioral conditioning and low self-esteem are both contributors to their drug use. There are even people who learn that co-occurring disorders such as chronic anxiety or chronic depression have led them to use drugs to obtain relief. Knowing the source of addictive behaviors makes it easier for people to overcome them. This, however, is knowledge that can only be gained after a successful detox.

Drug Detoxing Is A Key Step In Reclaiming Your Freedom

After breaking their physical dependencies, patients can enjoy a renewed sense of personal freedom. If you are someone who is constantly thinking about drugs, where your next fix will come from, or how you’re going to continue hiding and justifying your addictive behaviors, this freedom will provide tremendous relief. You will be able to start pursuing and living a lifestyle that you can be proud of, mending damaged relationships, and rebuilding your personal and professional reputations. Detox can be the launching point into a whole new life entirely.

One reason why people are discouraged from detoxing on their own is the fact that this step is but one of many on the road to recovery. A lot of drug users find that they still crave drugs quite strongly for several weeks or months after detox. Rehab is a multi-pronged effort at educating people and building healthy coping skills so that temptation and other triggers for relapse can be successfully overcome.

The Benefits Of Supervised Drug Detoxing

It is also important to note that detox isn’t always medically safe to do alone. Certain substances can result in severe physical dependency that causes dangerous side effects when use is stopped suddenly. Sometimes the symptoms of withdrawal can be so severe as to affect a person’s general physical functioning. When you detox in a medically supervised environment, however, the risks of getting clean drop dramatically. More importantly, all of the professionals who work in detox facilities can use various strategies and tools to make your detox a safe and comfortable one. Understanding that this is an incredibly challenging process, detox centers work hard to make it as easy and pleasant for patients as possible.

The first step to getting well is always withdrawing from the very substances that lie at the heart of your addiction. Rehab centers are excellent places for the withdrawal process as they set the stage for lasting success in recovery. If you want to regain your freedom and reclaim control of your life, we are here to help. Get in touch with us today by calling 800-737-0933.

Who Will Benefit Most from Long Term Treatment Centers for Drug Addiction?

With addiction a difficult disease to break, more and more sufferers are losing hope for being cured of their addiction to drugs. Yet that doesn’t need to be the case. Whether you have been a long-time user of drugs or you have only dabbled, you can find help with a long-term treatment center for drug addiction. It isn’t just the addicted individual who suffers when addicted. It impacts everyone in their circle. When choosing to undergo treatment for drug addiction long-term, many people will benefit. This article will discuss who can benefit the most as well as how it can benefit everyone else.

Who Will It Benefit The Most?

Perhaps the person that long-term treatment at a drug addiction center will benefit the most is the actual addict. Perhaps for years, you’ve been suffering from this disease. Addiction hijacks the brain. It makes you dependent on the drug to feel good let alone functional. Without it, you can feel as though you’re never going to be happy again. In some cases, it might even feel like you’re dying.

Long-term treatment at a center for drug addiction can help you find peace. These centers provide a safe environment for you to go through withdrawal. With medical staff on hand, they can even provide relief to make the withdrawal process a bit easier.

Once the withdrawal has finished and the toxins have been purged from your body, you can then receive care and resources to help ensure you don’t relapse once you leave the center. This is where a treatment center can truly help addicts. They don’t seek to give addicts just a safe place to purge themselves for a time. They genuinely wish to help the sufferer learn new habits and understand triggers that can keep them from abusing drugs in the future.

This is done through various forms of therapy. Which therapy you are assigned to largely depends on what your personal therapist thinks can benefit you the most. In some cases, you may only need to attend private therapy. Behavioral therapy is the most popularly used in treatment centers. It’s used to identify certain triggers and situations that can lead you to use drugs.

By identifying them, you can then be trained to seek other habits to do instead of drugs when dealing with those triggers. Or, if your environment is unstable, then the therapy can help you recognize signs of an unstable environment. You’ll be able to leave that situation instead of remaining and succumbing to the need to use drugs.

A long-term treatment center gives you the time that you need to better yourself. Short-term treatment centers, while sometimes effective, may not provide you with the lasting support that you need to enter the world again without the possibility of relapsing.

Sometimes, long-term treatment centers also can help you find resources outside of the center that you can use to remain on your path of sobriety. There are a ton of different benefits that long-term treatment centers provide. The biggest is that it can help you manage your addiction and make you feel like you have control again.

By benefiting you, those around you can benefit, too.

The Others Who Benefit

While you certainly benefit the most from attending a long-term treatment center for drug addiction, you’re not the only one. Your family and friends also can benefit. For one, they receive the old you that they remember and treasure. No longer are you controlled by drugs. No longer do you have to miss personal engagements with your family because you needed a hit of your drug.

Your family benefits because they have you back. You’re able to return to work and keep the job because you’re no longer using drugs. Financially, they’re supported once more. Emotionally, they’re supported, too. Children receive their parent back. They no longer feel as though they’re intruding into your life of drugs. You’re able to be present with them and give them the attention and support that they deserve.

Besides your family, your friends also benefit. They get back their friend. You’re able to hang out with them and have the same fun and memorable adventures that you used to experience together.

Because you received help, you and everyone around you can benefit.

Begin Today

No matter what kind of drug addict you are, you can benefit from long-term treatment. Change your world and the world of your family and friends by calling us today at 800-737-0933.

Is a Heroin Rehab Center Able to Treat Low-Income Patients?

The devastating impact of the American Opioid Epidemic has left millions of people struggling with addiction they don’t know how to treat. Those from low-income neighborhoods are more likely to suffer from addiction, but they are also less likely to reach out for treatment because they do not believe they can afford it.

Heroin addiction is a serious substance use disorder that requires professional rehab. The good news is that even if you are unemployed or work a low-income job, you can still receive quality rehabilitation and escape the self-destructing cycle of heroin addiction.

What Are the Treatment Options for Heroin?

Most cases of heroin addiction are severe, meaning they require residential or intensive, all-day treatment programs instead of weekly meetings. There are some forms of long-term residential treatment that last six months to a year; this type of treatment is ideal for people with severe, enduring addictions who also have co-occurring mental health problems. There is an extreme, intense emphasis placed on the self and tackling addiction from the inside out.

Long-term treatment might be effective, but it isn’t an option for many. Instead, short-term programs offer inpatient treatment for 30 to 90 days. As heroin detox typically takes anywhere from two weeks to a month, it’s recommended that clients stay in treatment for at least 60 days. There are some 12-step residential programs that are even shorter and last around six weeks.

If you cannot take off work or afford a residential program, outpatient heroin treatment is also available. Because heroin is so addictive, intensive outpatient programs (IOPs) are the best treatment option. These programs typically last 30 days, but some will last six to eight weeks. Some people may continue their addiction treatment after a residential program by attending an outpatient program.

Forms of Heroin Treatment

Both psychotherapy and medication can be used to help you overcome heroin addiction. Methadone is a common medication prescribed to help treat heroin dependency; avoiding withdrawal and slowly coming off heroin is much easier on the mind and body than abruptly stopping. In fact, quitting heroin entirely right away can be life-threatening and is never recommended.

Therapy such as Cognitive Behavioral Therapy (CBT) is a major element in many addiction treatment models; this form of therapy focuses on helping clients identify their irrational beliefs and negative thinking patterns that contribute to addiction. Self-acceptance, self-esteem building and trauma recovery can also serve major roles during the heroin treatment period.

Group therapy is also implemented in most programs. Support from others who are also going through addiction can be helpful in overcoming the feelings of loneliness, isolation, and hopelessness many people encounter as they let go of drugs and begin to work toward a sober future.

What’s most important to remember is that there is no “one size fits all” treatment for heroin addiction or any substance use disorder, for that matter. You have a unique experience and addiction that is influenced by your upbringing, life experiences and personality. The best rehab will embrace your uniqueness and help you identify the core strengths you possess and help you apply them as you take ownership of your recovery.

Paying for Heroin Treatment

Living in poverty, struggling with low-income or being unemployed can be a major stressor that causes you to rely on heroin as an escape. Your escape ultimately becomes your biggest problem and barrier in life; in order to overcome it, you’ll have to push beyond the ease of using money as an excuse and reach out to rehabs capable of helping you regardless of your annual salary.

Even those who are currently homeless can find treatment. Help is, naturally, easier to acquire if you have large sums of money and can finance a long stay at a luxury rehab, but there are many organizations and rehabs that want to make treatment accessible and affordable to everyone.

Financing plans are available at many residential and outpatient rehabs. With these options, you can enter treatment and even have the cost deferred until you have a stable income can make payments without jeopardizing your welfare.

To learn more about what type of rehab is available near you, contact us today at 800-737-0933. We help people from all walks of life get connected to the treatment programs that help them overcome addiction for good.

OTC Medication Used for Opiate Withdrawal Found Deadly

emergmedjournIt is a very common thing among addicts to share things with each other revolving around getting high. However, unless it is something like food or a place to get help, most of the information and resources turn out to be harmful. For example, sharing needles causes the spread of infections and diseases.

In other cases they pass along “tips” about how to either alter an experience, sustain a high or reduce discomfort in some way. One of these things recently examined was the use of an over-the-counter drug called loperamide. It is most commonly found in the anti-diarrhea drug Imodium, but in this case is taken in larger doses to lessen the severity of withdrawal symptoms or even abused to get high.

A new study published in the Annals of Emergency Medicine found that loperamide abuse can actually be very deadly. It is a drug that agonizes opioid receptors but doesn’t generate a high in the small recommended dosages. However, in much larger doses it can generate euphoric effects, but also causes irregular heartbeats and even death.

Apparently a growing number of opiate addicts have been taking Imodium and other OTC medications containing loperamide to cut down on their withdrawal symptoms or they abuse it in place of other opioids.

“Because of its low cost, ease of accessibility and legal status, it’s a drug that is very, very ripe for abuse,” said the study’s lead author William Eggleston, a doctor of pharmacy and fellow in clinical toxicology at the Upstate New York Poison Center. “At [our center], we have had a sevenfold increase in calls related to loperamide use and misuse over the last four years.”

Eggleston and his colleagues urge officials to be more aware of this drug and its abuse, and recommend placing more restrictions on it, similar to what was done with pseudoephedrine several years ago.

Alcohol Withdrawal

Alcohol withdrawal syndrome is a very dangerous condition that can occur when an individual ceases heavy or long-term alcohol consumption. If alcohol has been consumed constantly over an extended periods the onset of withdrawal symptoms can be rapid. Alcohol withdrawal symptoms include shakiness, confusion, agitation, irritability, sweating and possibly seizures. If left untreated these symptoms can be potentially life threatening. The onset of these symptoms often cause the alcoholic to return to drinking to mitigate these feelings of sickness, leaving them right where they started. Professional help is need to guide the alcoholic through the difficult and dangerous withdrawal process and into a clean and sober life.

Genesis House provides experienced and attentive care during this difficult withdrawal period. Genesis House’s Alcohol Withdrawal Detoxification Program will help mitigate immediate withdrawal symptoms and insure no complications arise over the course of the detoxification.

Alcoholism effects millions of people in the United States everyday. Families and marriages can be torn apart by alcoholics whom need professional help. Withdrawal symptoms resulting from the cessation of alcohol consumption can be very physically dangerous. Proven detoxification and residential treatment at Genesis House can the alcoholic reclaim their lives.

Genesis House has been successfully treating the disease of Alcoholism for over 20 years and our staff Psychiatrist, Dr. Thomas Jordan, works closely with our clients insure a comfortable detoxification from the symptoms of alcohol Withdrawal. Once detoxification is complete Genesis House’s experienced clinical staff will help our clients understand the disease of addiction and guide them into a clean and sober life.

If someone you or someone you love is struggling with the disease of addiction or experiencing the dangers of alcohol withdrawal, Genesis House is here to help 24 hours a day. Make the call that could save a life before its too late: toll-free 24/7/365 1-800-737-0933

Heroin Withdrawal

Heroin Withdrawal Syndrome is a very dangerous condition that can occur when an individual ceases heavy or long-term heroin use. Heroin is a highly addictive opiate drug which can resemble white power or a brown tar-like substance. It can be injected, used nasally or smoked and produces a pleasurable feeling in the user. This pleasurable feeling becomes more difficult to attain as the user develops a tolerance to the drug. Heroin is incredibly dangerous and prolonged use can expose the heroin addict to infections resulting from IV drug use including HIV, liver diseases such as Hepatitis C and potentially lethal heroin overdose. If heroin has been used constantly over an extended period, the onset of withdrawal symptoms can be rapid. Heroin withdrawal symptoms include mood changes, aches and pains, agitation, irritability, nausea, and flu like symptoms. If left untreated, these symptoms can be potentially life threatening.

Genesis House provides experienced and attentive care during this difficult withdrawal period. Genesis House’s Heroin Withdrawal Detoxification Program will help mitigate immediate withdrawal symptoms and insure no complications arise over the course of the detoxification.

Genesis House has successfully treated the disease of Heroin addiction for the past 20 years. Our staff psychiatrist, Dr. Thomas Jordan, works closely with our clients to insure a comfortable detoxification from the symptoms of Heroin Withdrawal. Once detoxification is complete, Genesis House’s experienced clinical staff will help our clients understand the disease of addiction and guide them into a clean and sober life.

If someone you know or someone you love is struggling with the disease of addiction or experiencing the dangers of Heroin withdrawal, Genesis House is here to help 24 hours a day. Make the call that could save a life before it’s too late: toll-free 24/7/365 1-800-737-0933.