Who Is At Risk of Abusing Opioid Medications?

America finds itself caught in an opioid addiction epidemic. Prescription painkillers, heroin and the ever-dangerous fentanyl are dominating the headlines for all the wrong reasons. If you are suffering from an addiction to any kind of opioid, you’re facing some very serious long-term repercussions if you don’t get help. We hope you realize that, which is why you are looking for information.

With your need for information in mind, we want to encourage you to get help now. To help motivate you, we want to tell you about the treatment process. Hopefully, this will put your mind at ease and let you know what to expect. Much of our focus is going to be placed on the detox process and the use of detox medications.

When you locate the right treatment facility based on your needs, you’ll likely go through an intake interview. The facility’s clinician is simply gathering information about your addiction profile. From this profile, they should be able to determine the proper course of treatment.

Tapering Detox Programs – The Risk of Abuse

While therapy and aftercare are important aspects of treatment, it’s all predicated on the addiction sufferer successfully getting past withdrawal and their cravings. It would be a mistake to underestimate the importance of a detox program, especially for someone with an addiction to opioids. Remember, the withdrawal symptoms associated with opioid addiction can be quite dangerous. We are talking about symptoms such as:

  • Respiratory and circulatory issues
  • Severe muscle spasms in the stomach and extremity regions
  • Psychological issues such as anxiety and depression
  • Nausea, vomiting and diarrhea
  • Sleeping issues

The point of a detox program is to help clients get through these withdrawal symptoms with a minimum of discomfort. If the client does encounter discomfort, the detox facility’s medical staff has the option to prescribe certain medications for relief.

That brings us to a very serious discussion. There are times when a client enters rehab with a very significant addiction to an opioid substance. If the addiction is deep-rooted enough, a standard detox program might not suffice as far as keeping the client safe. That’s when a tapering program becomes the best solution. In a tapering program, a doctor will prescribe medications like Suboxone or Methadone to help ease the client away from their addiction. The process could take weeks instead of months, but it’s necessary for the welfare of the client.

Unfortunately, tapering medications are derivatives of the substances being treated. That makes them addictive. That raises an important question: “Who Is At Risk of Abusing Opioid Medications?” The short answer is anyone who misuses the prescribed medications.

Given the fact these drugs are addictive unto themselves, they must be taken as the doctor prescribes. The doctor’s job is to monitor the client’s progress to assure everything is going as the doctor planned. If the client takes larger doses or takes a tapering drug more often than prescribed, it’s substance abuse. As you can imagine, substituting one addiction for another is not good. The client is obligated to follow the doctor’s instructions or risk further problems.

After going through a detox program, the client should be ready for the rest of the treatment process.

Addiction Therapy

Therapy is the meat and potatoes of addiction treatment. This is the opportunity for the client to identify the personal issues that are driving their desire to hide behind a harmful substance. To get to that point, the client has to be willing to speak openly and honestly with the therapist. With the therapist’s direction, the real issues should become apparent.

After identifying the issues at hand, the client has the opportunity to develop very specific coping skills they can use to combat their problems. With the right coping skills, relapses can be avoided.

Aftercare Programs

After the client has completed treatment, they have to leave rehab and begin living life on life’s terms. The good news is they don’t have to do that alone. The rehab facility should be able to offer them access to aftercare programs the client can use as support resources. The best support resources include outpatient counseling, sober living options and 12-Step meetings.

If you have an addiction to opioids, you have to be cautious. Your overall well-being is at risk. We would like to recommend you let us help you arrest your addiction and reclaim your life. If you are ready to start treatment, please call us at 123-456-7890.