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Why Do People from New York Come to South Florida for Drug Treatment?

There are drug treatment centers across the nation. Nevertheless, Florida is a popular spot for drug rehabilitation compared to other states. In particular, a large number of New York residents go down to Florida for drug treatment.

Cost of Drug Treatment in Florida

Drug treatment in New York is extremely high. Because it is such a large city, hospitals often charge excessive prices for ordinary treatments. If your case is complicated, costs can add up to an unreasonable amount. People flock to South Florida where prices are much more affordable. At local clinics, you can find treatments of nearly the same quality at lower costs. For individuals who are on a budget, this is a saving grace when it comes to drug abuse and addiction.

Rehab Facilities in South Florida

South Florida has a surprising number of clinical facilities in the area. They are located along the coast, and each one is accompanied by a recovery center. In addition, South Florida has state of the art equipment compared to the rest of the nation. Many drug treatment centers test out protocol in Florida where the weather is favorable and clients have a mixture of conditions. While New York certainly has some advanced facilities, they are typically reserved for medical students and life or death situations. Experience with addiction and recovery in South Florida are much more likely.

Addiction Specialists

There are a number of drug specialists in South Florida. If you are dealing with a severe case of anxiety or depression from drugs, experts can treat these with ease. In Cape Coral, there is a detailed list of drug specialists and where they are located. With the right contact information, you can get in touch with a doctor who fits your exact needs. This sort of availability is not possible in New York. In New York, the waiting line for a top notch physician can take weeks or even months on end. For urgent drug cases, this timeframe is simply too long. Moving across the country is well worth it for quality care.

When it comes to drug treatment, you don’t have to stay in one place. Moves such as a transition from New York to South Florida are commonplace and wise. You want the best treatment at the most affordable price, so don’t be afraid to try regions such as South Florida on a regular basis.

Call us today 855-830-7098

Detox for Heroin in Palm Beach County That Can Accept Most Insurance

If someone you care about is suffering from a heroin addiction, you might be wondering what you can do to help. It can be easy to feel powerless in this situation and to worry constantly about your loved one’s well-being. For someone who has a heroin addiction, seeking treatment at a detox and addiction recovery facility is the best option. Luckily, we can help.

The Detox Process is Important

First of all, it is important to understand the detox process. For someone who is an active heroin user, “just quitting” is often not easy at all. A lot of people do not understand this, but a detox facility does. Not to mention, in some cases, detoxing from heroin can be incredibly uncomfortable and even dangerous. It’s definitely something that should be done under the supervision of a team of professionals.

If your loved one comes to our detox in Palm Beach County, he or she can go through the detox stage in a safe and secure facility. Our team will do its best to keep your loved one comfortable and safe during this difficult time.

We Can Help with Successful Recovery

Along with helping your loved one through the detox process, we can also help with addiction treatment that can help in the long run. We will help work with your loved one to understand the underlying causes of his or her addiction, to provide a support system and to help with coping mechanisms that can help once he or she returns home.

We Accept Most Insurance

Paying for addiction treatment can be costly, but money should never get in the way of your loved one getting the help that he or she needs. The good news is that a lot of insurance policies do help cover the costs of detox. For this to work, however, you are going to need to find a facility that accepts your insurance. Here at our drug rehab facility in Florida, we accept most types of insurance. This can help eliminate the worry of how you are going to pay for rehab so that your loved one can get help.

If your loved one is an active heroin user, we can help. If you contact us today, you can find out more about our facility. 

855-830-7098

Drug Combinations can Trigger Accidental Overdose

We have seen it before in other celebrities, and now the recent autopsy report confirms that former WWE and reality TV star Chyna died from an accidental overdose involving several medications and alcohol.

The results of an autopsy have revealed that Chyna died from a combination of alcohol, pain medication and muscle relaxers. The toxicology report shows that Chyna, whose real name was Joan Marie Laurer, had taken diazepam, which is commonly called Valium and norazepam, a muscle relaxant.

The toxicological tests performed on Laurer also revealed that she had taken oxycodone, an opioid pain medication. The report also revealed the presence of oxymorphone, a synthetic opioid painkiller, in Laurer’s system. The 46-year-old had a history of drug abuse, and her mother told investigators that she was an alcoholic.

Her system also contained temazepam, a drug used to treat insomnia. It is given to patients who either have difficulty getting to sleep or staying asleep. This medication is meant to be used only for a short time and only as directed by a doctor, since it has a high probability for abuse. It also comes with a warning that it is never to be taken with alcohol, since an overdose could be fatal in those circumstances.

Laurer was found by her manager on April 20, 2016, in her Redondo Beach home. The manager, Anthony Anzaldo, hadn’t heard from her since she sent out a tweet three days before. He went to Laurer’s home to check on her and discovered her body. The autopsy report noted that Laurer was discovered in bed next to a number of items, including her cellphone, iPad, pillows and clothing.

Investigators found several bottles of prescription medicines at Laurer’s home. They also found a green plastic grinder, a small wood box, a metal pipe similar to a cigarette and a blue glass pipe on a nightstand. In the bottom drawer of the nightstand, the investigators found an envelope containing blister pack of pills. An empty pack of pills was discovered on the nightstand. Some loose pills were found on the bedroom floor and on a table in the dining room.

People who use or abuse multiple prescription drugs and drink alcohol are particularly at risk of an overdose. Many of these medications slow down breathing and other organ functions and can cause respiratory failure. This is one of the many reasons why you should never wait to get help for a loved one who is struggling with an alcohol or drug problem. Contact Genesis House today for more information and assistance.

Pennsylvania to add Centers for Excellence to Treat Opioid Addiction

One of the issues facing opioid addicts and their families is the lack of follow-up services after an initial round of addiction treatment has been completed. Drug cravings can continue to be an issue for months after a person goes through detoxification (detox). Good quality support services are imperative if a person in recovery is going to be successful at maintaining their sobriety.

Centers Offer Assessment and Referrals to Treatment

Pennsylvania is seeking to address this issue by establishing 45 Centers of Excellence. These Centers, which will be separate operations located inside existing addiction, medical and mental health facilities, will be used to assess an addict’s needs and make appropriate referrals to treatment programs and other services. The Centers can make referrals to the following types of addiction treatment options:

• Detoxification (detox)
• Residential treatment
• Outpatient treatment
• 12-step programs
• Halfway houses

Once someone has been referred to treatment, they are treated by a team of specialists. The team will help the addict access treatment for medical and mental health concerns they are experiencing.

The Center of Excellence staff’s goal is to help the addict stay in treatment long-term, as this strategy has been identified as one of the important factors for long-term sobriety success. These Centers can also help addicts with social services, such as housing and employment, which are essential to being able to rebuild a life that is free from drugs and alcohol.

Addiction Medication Available Through Centers

The Centers will also offer addiction medication to clients. These drugs, including Vivitrol and Suboxone, are used to help curb cravings for opioids. When the medication is made available to clients in recovery, along with addiction counseling and treatment, the odds of being able to remain clean and sober are greatly increased compared to simply trying to “tough it out” without these types of support.

The state has committed $20.4 million in funding to the Centers for Excellence. The federal government will contribute an additional $5.4 million.

The Centers are expected to see about 11,500 people during the first year. Most of them will be Medicaid users; however, the Centers will accept clients with private insurance as well.

Finding Treatment Options

Many people in Pennsylvania seeking help for a substance abuse problem prefer to leave the state to focus on their recovery. This is one of the reasons that they chose facilities like Genesis House in Florida. Genesis House provides a range of individualized treatment services and continues to help people take giant leaps toward their long-term recovery. Contact Genesis House now for more information and help.

New Synthetic Opioid “Pink” is Tied to Recent Fatalities

The Harris County Institute of Forensic Sciences has issued a warning about a new synthetic opioid. The drug has been detected in the system of three Houston people who have died recently. It is called “Pink,” “Pinky” or even “U4.”

The drug is a white powder that can be pressed into a pill form. It isn’t packaged in any type of unusual manner. Houston authorities aren’t the first law enforcement officials to encounter Pink; police in Park City, Utah, became aware of it when they were investigating the overdose deaths of two teenagers earlier in 2016.

Fatal Intoxication when Mixed with Other Substances

The chief toxicologist at the Harris County Institute for Forensic Sciences, Teresa Gray, explained that Pink is in the same class of drugs as hydrocodone, heroin and morphine. She said that it produces a feeling of euphoria among users, but can cause the person who takes it to stop breathing if the dosage is high enough. Gray said that users mix the Pink with other substances that, in combination, can cause a fatal intoxication.

Originally Created by a Pharmaceutical Company

Unlike some other street drugs which were originally cooked up in a laboratory, Pink’s origins can be traced to a more legitimate source. It was originally called U47700 and was made by Upjohn, a pharmaceutical company that was attempting to develop a new pain reliever.

The medication was never approved for use on humans or sold to the public. The patent was registered, however, and the drug’s formula found its way onto the Internet. From there, it started being produced in laboratories set up overseas.

The drug is available for sale online, and has now reached American streets. Buyers may not be aware of what they are taking or they may be buying heroin, cocaine or other drugs that have been cut with Pink. It’s a common practice for dealers to add other ingredients to street drugs, and buyers are not aware of what they may be taking along with their drug of choice.

Pink Declared a Controlled Substance

After the news of the untimely deaths attributed to Pink in 2016, the Drug Enforcement Administration (DEA) sought an emergency order in November to have Pink designated a Schedule 1 controlled substance, making it illegal to possess, manufacture or sell it. Drugs in this category have no accepted medical use and have a high potential for abuse.

Lawyers Often Face Substance Abuse and Mental Health Issues

The American Bar Association and Hazelden Betty Ford Foundation have partnered to look at the rates for substance abuse and mental health issues among lawyers. The results of the study were reported in the Journal of Addiction Medicine.

Researchers used self-reporting surveys to gather information from 12,825 licensed attorneys. Study participants were almost equally divided among men and women (53.4 percent vs. 46.5 percent), with 31-40 years of age being the most common age group. Most of the participants described themselves as being White (91.3 percent), and the most commonly reported career length was 10 years or fewer (34.8 percent).

Anxiety and Depression a Significant Issue

The results of the research gathered showed that a significant number of respondents experience depression, anxiety and stress. The percentages were 28 percent for mild or higher levels of depression, 19 percent for anxiety and 23 percent for stress.

Problem Drinking Scored High Among Respondents

The respondents were asked to complete an Alcohol Use Disorders Identification Test (AUDIT). More than 20 percent of them (20.6 percent) scored at a level “consistent with problematic drinking”; 25.1 percent of men surveyed drank at this consumption level compared with 15.5 percent of women.

Younger lawyers had a significantly higher level of alcohol consumption than older ones. Attorney under the age of 30 were most at risk for problematic drinking, with 31.9 percent of them engaged in this behavior. Lawyers under the age of 40 represented the next-highest risk group, with 25.1 percent.

Of the respondents who felt that drinking or use of other substances was a problem, over one-quarter (27.6 percent) said that their issue started before law school, 14.2 percent said that the problem started while attending law school and 43.7 percent said that the problem began within 15 years of completing law school. Just over 14 percent of respondents said that their problem with alcohol or substances started more than 15 years after completing law school.

Barriers to Getting Help for Substance Abuse

The survey respondents said that there were two main barriers to getting help for substance abuse: fear of others finding out they needed help and privacy concerns.

In light of these results being made public, hopefully more lawyers will realize they are not alone and feel comfortable about seeking help for substance abuse and mental health concerns. Treatment centers like Genesis House offer specialized rehabilitation programs to help professionals begin their recovery and return to work with new tools to remain sober.

Surgeon General Releases Report on Addiction

surgeon general addiction reportThe issue of addiction has touched most people’s lives in one way or another. Due to this common association, it can often be hard to discuss it without painful emotions being stirred up. However, according to the Surgeon General of the United States, these discussions not only have to be had, but the lives of millions of people are at risk if something is not done about the substance abuse problem in our country.

In his recently released report, Dr. Vivek Murthy details how many lives are being lost to addiction and how many people suffer from the disease. He also discusses possible solutions, and appropriate ways to include the illegal drug epidemic in conversation and future policies. “How we respond to this crisis is a moral test for America. Are we a nation willing to take on an epidemic that is causing great human suffering and economic loss?” questioned Dr. Murthy

Facing Addiction in America is the appropriate title of the paper issued by the Surgeon General. Readers can learn a lot about the current situation, including that every day 78 people die from opiate overdoses. This is despite increased public awareness of the dangers of prescription painkiller abuse, first responders being equipped with naloxone, a drug that reverses the effects of an overdose, and doctors decreasing the amount of prescriptions they write for painkillers. We don’t have to wait and see until the next round of statistics is released, we can continue to do more to save lives now.

Dr. Murthy explains that drug addiction is a chronic disease that is much more likely to be handled by effective treatment. Embarrassment and stigma oftentimes keeps people from seeking rehabilitation help, thus only continuing their addiction. Another common barrier between addicts and treatment has been financial resources, but more barriers have been removed through broader insurance coverage. It is uncertain if the Affordable Care Act will be repealed with a new Administration taking office in January. “We have made progress. how do we keep that progress going? A key part is making sure people have insurance coverage,” commented Murthy.

If informative papers like the Surgeon General’s do anything, hopefully they inform millions of people and motivate enough of us to do more about his problem. If not, the reality is that any one of us could be the next to lose a loved one to addiction – something which nobody should have to experience and is preventable.

If you have a friend or family member who is battling an addiction to drugs or alcohol, contact Genesis House today and find out more about how we can help.

The Economics Behind the Illicit Drug Trade

illicit drug tradeAlthough the illicit drug market has a very complex system of production and distribution, it still follows very simple economic rules of supply and demand. Regardless of where drugs come from or how much they cost, as long as people are still seeking them someone will find a way to capitalize on their plight.

The Drug Enforcement Administration’s System to Retrieve Information from Drug Evidence (STRIDE) database is a program that collects information regarding all aspects of illegal drugs. This can include market price and drug purity. These two variables help explain what is going on behind the drug dealing scenes on the streets. For instance, STRIDE has been able to show investigators that drug prices tend to decline over time. There are a few potential causes for this decline, but one interesting one has to do with substitution. When certain regulations, law enforcement changes and laws get enacted regarding a certain drug, many users will switch to something else. This means that the demand for the original drug has dropped, thereby decreasing the price. This type of information can show investigators if policy-changes are working, and what drug the addicts have shifted their attention to.

Another important factor when it comes to analyzing drug trends is purity. Purity, as it relates to illegal drugs, means how much actual drug (like pure heroin or pure cocaine) are in the drugs being sold to buyers. Most of the time when someone buys drugs off the street, they are buying very little pure drug, and a lot of additives. Investigators are able to measure the purity of confiscated drugs to determine the current purity levels of the drugs reaching customers.

When policy makers and law enforcement can look at data, like that provided by STRIDE, and see different drug trends across the country, they are better equipped to handle the problems. However, the wildcard in the illegal drug trade has been the pharmaceutical influence. Prescription drugs have become such a problem in the U.S. and are creating as much, if not more, havoc in America. This shows that whether the drug started out as something legal or not isn’t enough of a deterrent for users.

One of the arguments of harm reduction advocates is that if you legalize all drugs, then it will remove some of the value because supply will be plenty and instead more money will be available for treatment and prevention programs. We will probably never know if this would work, but we could divert more funding away from the law enforcement side of the problem and instead invest it into providing more education and rehabilitation services.

Connection Between Opioids and Marijuana Use Among Teens

prescription painkillersResearchers may have found evidence that prescription painkiller use is linked to early marijuana use. This information comes at a time when multiple states are in the process of legalizing marijuana, or considering putting the issue on the ballot for a future election. And while no state is looking to make marijuana legal for adolescents, it would seem that legalizing marijuana would make it easier for teenagers to obtain the drug, as has been demonstrated in the rising numbers in Colorado.

In a recent survey, 11,000 children and teenagers were asked a series of questions related to their drug and alcohol use. Included in these questions was whether they had used prescription opioids in the past 30 days and if they had ever used marijuana. After the data was collected, it was discovered that out of 11,000 participants, 524 had used prescription painkiller in the last month. Of those 524 children and teenagers, 80% had also used marijuana.

While this certainly does not mean that if you use marijuana you will definitely use painkillers, it does a show a link when it comes to drug experimentation (i.e. gateway drugs) and poly-drug use. There was also a correlation with alcohol and tobacco use, indicating that these substances that are becoming increasingly available to young people are contributing to further drug use.

On a policy level, our nation is continuing to send mixed messages to America’s youth. For a long time marijuana and cocaine were major focuses of prevention efforts, yet prescription drug and synthetic drug use has surged. Now we’re working to keep kids away from prescription drug abuse but telling them that smoking weed is okay when you’re old enough.

All of this seems to be missing the point of teaching kids and adults how to live without seeking out drugs for external stimulation. Without it, the patterns will continue to repeat, even though the types of drugs may change over time.

Drug Combinations Continue To Increase Risks of Use

marijuana and alcoholA new study based off of analysis of Washington residents shows that people who use marijuana and alcohol together are at a higher risk of engaging in dangerous activities. Additionally, these people are more likely than others who only smoke marijuana or only drink alcohol to engage in behavior that they later regret. Researchers are publishing these results in an attempt to educate adults on the dangers of mixing substances.

Two years after marijuana was legalized in Washington, researchers began collecting data related to marijuana use. Among the questions they were looking to answer, was how many people used marijuana while also consuming alcohol. Prior to the passing of recreational marijuana use for adults over 21, some people worried that legalization would increase the likelihood of drug mixing. So, researchers included this question in the survey they sent around to Washington residents.

The survey included 24,000 people in the state who reported drinking alcohol in the past year. Of those, 18% admitted to usually consuming alcohol and marijuana together. A closer look at that group showed that these people tended to drink more frequently and in greater amounts than those that consumed alcohol without marijuana. Researchers were able to further conclude that this group of people were four times more likely to have health issues related to the mixing of the two substances, 6.5 times more likely to drive under the influence and 6.5% more likely to have financial problems.

“People who use both [marijuana and alcohol] should probably use them separately,” cautioned Meenaksi Subbaraman, researcher and biostatistician at the Alcohol Research Group. This simple statement regarding her team’s research may be exactly what some residents need to hear. Instead of arguing belief systems or what should or shouldn’t be allowed by law, Subbaraman cautions mixing substances. We of course feel that people should abstain from both substances. Thankfully, marijuana is still illegal in Florida, but we see clients from all over the country.

Mixing any sort of drug with other drugs or alcohol increases the potential danger to the user exponentially. Now that marijuana has become legal in a few more states, it is increasingly important to remind people of the additional dangers associated with using both alcohol and marijuana.

If you have a loved one with a substance abuse problem, contact us today for more information about our programs and how we can help.