How Can the Marchman Act Help Me Get Treatment for My Loved One?

Far too many people know how painful it is to watch a loved one struggle with an addiction to drugs or alcohol. For some friends and family members, the pain is very personal because they have suffered collateral damage at the hands of their loved one's addiction. The problem is it's difficult for family members to exert any influence over a loved one who is unwilling to admit they are dealing with the cycle of addiction. Family members can only hope there will come a time when their addicted loved one comes to the realization there's a problem. At that point, there's hope the addiction sufferer will finally reach out for help. Short of that happening, the only other recourse family and friends might have is an intervention. Sometimes interventions work and sometimes they don't. If an intervention fails, loved ones don't have the option of putting a gun to their addicted loved one's head to drag them into rehab. With all that said, there is a law in Florida that empowers family members to force a loved one into rehab if they can establish the loved one's addiction makes the loved one danger to themselves or to others. The name of that law is the "Marchman Act." FYI: The Marchman Act is officially listed as the "Hal S. Marchman Alcohol and Other Drug Services Act of 1993". At this point, we would like to engage in further discussion about the Marchman Act and how it works.

Using the Marchman Act to Get a Loved One Into Rehab

Before we begin this discussion, it seems prudent to point out something that should be evident. Contrary to some people's beliefs, using the Matchman to have a loved one involuntarily placed in an addiction treatment facility is not an adversarial action. In many cases, it is being done out of legitimate love and concern for the addicted family member. Think about it for a moment. An individual is trying to survive life caught up in a substantial addiction to drugs or alcohol. Their life is crumbling before their very eyes. Maybe they are homeless or dealing with financial, health and relationship problems. They won't seek help because they either don't want help, don't believe they have an addiction or have given up hope. Left to their own devices, there's real potential these kinds of addiction sufferers are headed down the road towards prison, insanity or even death. What kind of a relative or friend would just stand by and let that happen? The Marchman Act exists for this very reason. It's not a blanket option for family members to exercise in order to remove an unwanted nuisance from their own lives. Like any other restrictive law on the books, a family member has to show just cause that their addicted loved one poses a real danger to themselves or others. Making that claim has to be adjudicated in a court of law.

Reasons Marchman Act Can Be Exercised

Remember, a family member has to show just cause as to why their loved one should be involuntarily subjected to addiction treatment. The first qualification is the addiction sufferer must show a high level of impairment whether sober or not. If they are impaired, it becomes reasonable to assume they don't have the capacity for taking proper care of themselves or making good judgments. They have basically lost the ability to control their lives. The other reason why the courts might exercise the Marchman act is if the family member can show that their loved one has made threats or is a danger to others. Under the influence of a substance, any signs of aggression should be given extra scrutiny. The Process If a family member makes the decision to attempt to have the courts invoke the Marchman Act on their loved one, there's a very specific process the family member must follow. Here are the steps in order:
  • Petition the court with a sworn affidavit
  • A court hearing is held for involuntary assessment
  • The defendant is held for up to five days for medical and mental health evaluation
  • If found impaired, the court will issue order for involuntary treatment of up to 60 days
  • If the defendant refuses, they are held in civil contempt of court
If you have concerns about the welfare of an addicted loved one living in Florida, we would like to offer our addiction treatment services. If you need help with the process, you can contact us at 800-737-0933.

What Are the Similarities and Differences Between Different Opioid Drugs?

Opioid is the general term for a narcotic derived, ultimately, from the opium poppy. Opiates are natural opioids. Some of these drugs are prescribed to control pain while others, such as heroin, are illegal. All of them are similar in that they lock into receptors in the central nervous system, which is made up of the brain and the spinal cord. Opioids can be problematic because along with pain relief many of them cause an intense euphoria when they are taken. This can lead to dependence and addiction. People can overdose on opioids, though the symptoms can be reversed by taking an opioid antagonist called naloxone. Naloxone also locks into opioid receptors, but it doesn’t produce the euphoria associated with opioids such as heroin. Here are some opioids:

Heroin

Heroin or diamorphine is a synthetic opioid made from morphine, which is an opiate. Though it was created as a pain reliever by the same people who developed aspirin, heroin is now illegal. When it is pure, it is a white powder, though as a street drug it is rarely used in its pure form. It is snorted, smoked or injected. A type of heroin called black tar resembles asphalt and gets its color from the impurities that remain after it’s been processed. The drug can easily pass through the blood-brain barrier, a physiological system that usually protects the brain from toxins. Once there, the body converts heroin into morphine, which then binds to mu-opioid receptors. The person feels a rush that can be very intense and may be accompanied by nausea and vomiting. After the rush, the person grows drowsy and “nods off.” Other initial effects of heroin are: • Reduced mental function • Slowed heart rate • Slowed breathing • Constipation These symptoms appear because heroin, like all opioids, is a central nervous system depressant. A person who takes too much heroin can die if their breathing and heart rate are drastically slowed down by the drug.

Fentanyl

Unlike heroin, fentanyl is legal but strictly controlled. Like other opioids, it is prescribed for pain. It is also 80 to 100 times stronger than morphine. An analog of fentanyl, carfentanil, is 100 times stronger than fentanyl. Both are used to ease the pain of end-stage cancer. Like heroin, dependency can develop with fentanyl, especially if the person takes it for a long time. Unlike heroin, it is not injected or snorted, but comes in the form of a tablet placed under the tongue, a film placed on the skin, a lozenge meant to dissolve slowly between the patient's gum and cheek or a lollipop. A patient who is taking fentanyl must be monitored by and work closely with their doctor. A person who is on fentanyl should not drink grapefruit juice or eat grapefruit. This is true if the patient is using any type of opioid, because grapefruit has a chemical that stops the body from metabolizing opioids. This intensifies the effect of the drug and can lead to sudden death even if the fruit or the juice is taken hours after the person has taken their opioid drug.

Methadone

Methadone is also a legal opioid, but it is different from the others in that it is used to wean a patient from their dependency on another opioid. It can only be prescribed through an opioid treatment program, or OTP that is certified by the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration. Methadone is also used to treat pain, including the pain of withdrawal from other opioids such as heroin. It is taken once a day as a pill, a liquid or a wafer under a doctor’s supervision and at a dosage that is tailored to the needs of the patient. Many patients need to go to a clinic to take their dose of methadone if they are using it to quit another opioid. When they are seen to be reliable and stable, they can take the drug home with them. Like other opioids, a person can become addicted to methadone, so it is crucial that they take it exactly as their doctor prescribed. This is especially true of patients who can take the drug home with them. There are many other types of opioids, including hydromorphone, hydrocodone, oxymorphone and codeine. They are powerful, pain-killing drugs that have made the lives of many patients bearable, but the risk of abusing and even dying from these drugs is considerable if they are misused. If you feel you have a problem with opioids, don’t hesitate to call us today. Our counselors are available 24 hours a day, seven days a week. Call us at 123-456-7890.

What Are the Most Important Things to Know About Drug Detoxing?

What are some of the most significant facts to know about going through drug detox? You already know you've got a lot of work ahead of you. But what can you expect to happen during the detox process?

How long will drug detox take?

The amount of time it takes to drug detox depends totally on the drugs you've been using and the length of time you used them. In general, however, drug detox takes somewhere from seven days to two weeks. Some drugs take longer. Getting off drugs remains a challenge for everyone who does it. Staying off drugs for the long term also includes a lot of hard work. Ask your medical professional for more information on detoxing from a specific drug or alcohol.

How does drug detox feel?

You need professional and emotional support to get through the drug or alcohol detox process. This support helps keep people withdrawing from drugs to stay clean and sober and to prevent a relapse. When detoxing, many individuals become nauseated and vomit. You need help keeping hydrated, and anti-nausea medications assist in relieving vomiting. Exercise and hydration both work well to combat some of the physical and emotional symptoms of withdrawal that you might feel. Anti-diarrhea medications also assist people with stomach upset due to withdrawal. Some medicines work well to less severe withdrawal symptoms if you stop taking heroin or opiates. Suboxone is a legal medication that works as a replacement for these two drugs. Once the opioids leave your system, you can gradually reduce the amount of the substitute medication you take. Many recovering addicts experience sleep problems and hypersensitivities during withdrawal from substances such as benzodiazepines. Detoxing at a medically staffed detox center allows you to have medical help with severe withdrawal symptoms so that you won't experience as much discomfort. Also, addicts sometimes start taking drugs to self-medicate mental health issues such as depression or bipolar disorder. If you become depressed or experience emotional problems during withdrawal, a health care provider can prescribe you drugs to ease these problems, too.

Should I drug detox at home?

No, you shouldn't drug detox at home, especially by yourself. If it were easy to detox using will power, you would have been clean and sober by now. But, drug and alcohol withdrawal is serious business. Tempting as it might appear, drug detox needs to be left to the experts. Some people who go through drug detox become violently ill. People sometimes die during the process of detoxing. You require a trained staff to help you get off your drugs of choice and reliable folks to keep you safe while you go through withdrawal. Most people become very ill while they detox. You might also have seizures, hallucinations, and experience a wide variety of distressing side effects from not using your drug of choice. When you detox in a medical facility, you don't only gain a better chance at completing the detox process, but you might also qualify for medications to reduce your uncomfortable drug withdrawal symptoms. Other severe physical and mental problems that might occur during detox include: • Delirium tremens. • Grand mal seizures. • Intense cravings for the missing drug or alcohol. These fierce cravings might bring about an overdose. • Extreme nausea and vomiting, leading to dehydration and malnutrition. • Low blood pressure.] • Kidney failure. • A chance of choking on your vomit. • Coma. • Death.

Can I successfully drug detox? Or am I hooked for life?

You can successfully detox from drugs and alcohol. If you quit taking your medication of choice or stop drinking, your body can begin to heal itself. Once your body releases all of the addictive toxins from it, you do need to find out why you started to use in the first place. To accomplish this task, you need to go to a reputable rehab program. Most rehabs offer individual and group therapy, training, and education about why you might have started using. Medical help remains available to keep you off your previous drug or alcohol addiction. You might receive family therapy and get to participate in a sober living program. Sober living enables you to live in a home-like setting and gradually work your way back into interacting with the world outside your treatment placement. Please make the call and contact us for more detox information and a new start in life without drugs and addiction.

Will an Alcohol Rehab in West Palm Beach Help You Keep Your Job?

Current data shows that Florida has a significant problem when it comes to substance abuse. To help put this into context, the National Institute on Drug abuse (NIDDA) reports that there were over 3,000 overdose deaths in the sunshine state in 2016. It is important to note that the city of West Palm Beach has seen its fair share of drug-related deaths stemming from synthetic opioids, which accounted for nearly 2,000 deaths in 2016. Also worth noting, underage drinking is 4 percent higher than the national average in Palm Beach County. Lastly, more than 4,000 DUI arrests are made in the county every year. Given these statistics, it is not unreasonable to conclude that alcoholism is just as big a problem in Palm Beach County as drug abuse. While many people have decided to seek help for their addiction to alcohol, some are still reluctant to get the help that they need and have cited fear of losing their job as the primary reason. In this article, we will take a look at the federal laws that are designed to protect not only your privacy but also your job while you work toward overcoming your addiction to alcohol.

WHY YOU SHOULD DISCLOSE YOUR PROBLEM WITH ALCOHOL TO YOUR EMPLOYER

While the fear of losing your job as a result of opening up about your addiction is understandable, not taking steps to conquer your addiction could lead to subpar work performance, which could potentially lead to termination anyway. Once you have made up your mind to seek help for your addiction, most rehab programs will advise you of your rights under the Family and Medical Leave Act (FMLA) and also the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA). These federal laws are in place to protect your job should you need a leave of absence due to health reasons. And yes, substance abuse qualifies as a serious health condition under FMLA. The Americans with Disabilities Act provides you with some recourse in the event that you're terminated while seeking help for your addiction. For example, if your termination was based on your decision to seek help for an addiction, you can file a lawsuit against your employer for discrimination under the ADA.

HOW CAN A ALCOHOL REHAB PROGRAM HELP YOU KEEP YOUR JOB?

Most alcohol and drug treatment programs can assist you in gathering any information that you will need relative to your treatment that you can then give to your employer. They may also be able to help with your Return-to-Work Agreement (RTWA) after you have completed your treatment. These agreements outline what employers will be expecting from an employee once he or she returns to work following the completion of an alcohol rehab program. However, this is usually the end of their involvement. Generally speaking, it is a good idea to work with your employer's human resources department to confirm that they are required to follow FMLA guidelines as smaller companies with fewer than 15 employees are not required to do so. The same also applies to ADA as well.

WHAT YOU SHOULD KNOW BEFORE SEEKING TREATMENT FOR ALCOHOL ABUSE

Assuming your employer is required to follow ADA and FMLA guidelines based on their employee count and other criteria, you will want to familiarize yourself with your company's policies as they relate to drug and alcohol abuse. For example, if you have an accident at work while under the influence, FMLA and ADA may not apply. In most cases, you will also need to have a letter from a licensed physician stating that your addiction constitutes a serious health condition under FMLA. While this may all seem daunting, taking these steps will ensure you can keep your job while getting the help that you need to overcome your addiction. Furthermore, these procedures are also in place to help employers as well. According to drugabuse.gov, substance abuse costs the U.S. more than $700 billion in lost revenue each year, most of which is attributed to a loss of productivity, healthcare costs, and injuries in the workplace.

WILL YOUR EMPLOYER PROTECT YOUR PRIVACY?

One of the biggest concerns that most people have when it comes to opening up about their addiction is that their struggles will become the subject of gossip in the workplace. Assuming that your employer is required to follow FMLA and ADA guidelines, your privacy will be protected. However, most employers already have policies in place that are designed to protect sensitive employee information. That said, if you're ready to overcome your addiction to alcohol, consider speaking with one of our friendly and knowledgeable representatives today at 800-737-0933.

Are You Allowed to Leave Long Term Treatment Programs for a Night?

If you are thinking about a rehab program for yourself or someone close to you, there is a lot that comes to mind. The majority of the people wonder: what a rehab program involves? How long the treatment period takes? What are the regulations of the addiction treatment center? Well, you need to know that a rehab program varies from one person to the next depending on the severity of drug and alcohol abuse. There is inpatient treatment and outpatient treatment. The former mostly applies to individuals that are severely affected, and it entails long term treatment programs to attain sobriety.

How does a rehab program take?

Normally, a rehab program lasts between 30 and 90 days. Short treatment programs take about 30 days, while, long-term treatment programs can take between 60 and 90 days. There are programs that provide you with a standardized program that requires you to stay in the facility for a short period. And there are rehab programs that give you an individualized approach to establish your level of addiction, plus your mental and physical state to determine how long you should stay in the facility.

How does a rehab program work?

Whether you're under outpatient or inpatient treatment, there is a series of steps that a rehab center follows to ensure that you achieve full recovery after the program. Individuals also need to understand that addiction is not something that people wish upon themselves. It is a disease. Therefore, you should not shy to check yourself or a loved one into a rehab facility. Here's how the program works.

I. Assessment

When you check into a rehab facility, the first step is assessment. Here, a dual diagnosis has to be conducted to establish if you have any underlying mental issue. During the assessment, a specialist will also ask a couple of questions to determine the drug or alcohol you're addicted to, plus the duration.

II. Detox

Detox is a critical phase because it's where substance or alcohol user stops using. During this stage is when relapsing occurs, and that's why specialized care is recommended during detoxification. It is also during this phase that withdrawal symptoms occur, and they are the major cause of relapsing. Some of the symptoms include:
  • Agitation
  • Excess sweating at night
  • Shakiness
  • Vomiting
  • Nausea
  • Irritability

III. Rehabilitation

The next step is rehabilitation. The step involves both physical and emotional help, and there are stipulated rules that you have to follow. A client attends a couple of counseling sessions, which helps him or her to regain self-esteem. During this phase, you get to see the positivity of a sober life and the negativity of addiction. You will also receive group therapy sessions and recovery meetings. At this stage, you are given time to partake in other activities such as exercising, taking trips to the beach, watching movies, and family members can also visit.

Incentives

After you have undergone the rehabilitation process, a rehab facility can offer you privileges once you show that you have advanced through the program positively. However, before any incentive, you have to have remained sober and followed through the treatment program goals. The rewards come after a significant amount of time during the process, whereby you're let to go for unsupervised trips or even given weekend passes. Such privileges serve as a motivation for you to continue pursuing sobriety, plus you also act as an ideal example to other clients within the rehab program.

IV. Aftercare

The last step involved in a rehab program is aftercare. It is a critical step because addiction is a chronic disease that has no definite cure. This step helps you to manage your addiction throughout your life. You can get help from self-help groups within your community. Alumni groups also come in handy in helping you avoid drug and alcohol abuse. During this stage, you learn how to interact with the community around you when sober.

Conclusion

Addiction is a chronic disease that affects a good number of people. It is not voluntary, and that is why you should be confident to seek help from a rehab facility if you or a family member is struggling with addiction. Sticking to your treatment plan and maintaining sobriety can see you get privileges from the rehab center, which prompts you to pursue sobriety. Are you struggling with addiction? Would you like to pursue sober living? Well, contact us today at 800-737-0933 to get the help you need.

What Can You Bring to Residential Drug Rehab Facility

Now that you've decided to go to rehab, you don't need to stress out about what to pack and what to leave behind. This is because we got that covered for you. Our aim is to ensure the safety of our esteemed clients, their loved ones, and our staff. As a result, all our rehabilitation centers have a checklist of what you can bring to residential drug and another one of the prohibited items. This checklist is created following strict policies set for the purpose of ensuring the efficiency of rehab services while also helping the clients work towards their goal. Upon admission, our staff will check your bag against these lists and catalog the things you come with to ensure you take with you all your belongings when leaving. Before we tell you what you can bring, however, how about starting with what is prohibited:
  • Electronics- Although there is internet access in rehabs, it is best to keep you from distractions like smartphones, laptops, or tablets and any device that could record videos or play games. If you must bring your alarm clock, it should not have a music player. The idea is to invite a therapeutic atmosphere to improve the efficiency and effectiveness of rehab strategies.
  • Revealing clothes- Avoid packing clothes that can be described as sexy or simply anything revealing. Your mind should be on ensuring you successfully recover from drug addiction and not getting into relationships or indulging in sexual activities.
  • Valuable- When going to rehab, only bring jewelry that you must wear like a wedding ring or watch. You, however, could consult the rehab institution you're joining to determine whether they have safe boxes for the valuables that you can't leave behind.
  • Questionable items- Alcohol, cigarettes, perfumes, sex-related books, aerosol cans, knives, guns, non-prescription drugs, and outside foods should also not be brought to residential drug recovery centers.

Things you can bring to rehab

Different rehab facilities have varying rules that dictate what you can bring while participating in residential drug recovery programs. Some of the facilities are obviously stricter than others. Nonetheless, it is recommended that you come with the names, contacts, and addresses of the family, friend, or professional experts involved in your recovery process. You should also provide information on 12 step sponsors who will help you continue a healthy lifestyle during and after rehab. If you have any prescription drugs, you should bring them in their original package and ensure the product label is still on. If the medication is in syrup form, the package should be sealed and brand new. Since you will find vending machines in rehab institutions, you might need some money in small bills. This should also come in handy when making store runs during your stay. Bring with you your credit or debit card, checkbook, or other financial tools that you'll use to pay for your medication while in rehab. You can also bring a notebook, a journal, stamps & envelops, and pictures of any loved one in the wallet or room.

Clothes you can bring

As a rehab facility, we are quite strict on the dress code of our patients. For instance, you will need to stay away from revealing or somewhat sexy clothes. You could opt for layering options depending on the weather like t-shirts, jackets, sweaters, pajamas, or cardigans. To avoid over-packing since the space available for you in the rehab facility may be limited, get some comfortable shoes, pants, socks, bathrobe, belt, slippers, undergarments, and something dressy for when you have special events like family night. Since you will engage in certain outdoor activities, consider bringing some sneakers or tennis shoes along. Some workout clothes would also come in handy in case you have to go to the gym or take part in sporting activities. Since there might be a pool in the institution, you could also bring a one-piece swimsuit for ladies and a trunk for men.

Personal Effects

Although your comfort during treatment in a rehab center is paramount, we are recovery professionals who specialize in creating a facility that best meets your needs. As such, if you must pack some toiletries, personal hygiene or beauty products, they must be alcohol-free and there shouldn't be any aerosols. Consider checking with the rehab institution you're going to about the items they allow and the quantity. The personal products should be enough for a whole month and they can include deodorant, toothbrush & toothpaste, hair care products (shampoo, conditioner, and a pump hair spray, a comb/brush, shaving cream), a lotion, sunscreen, and limited makeup. So, are you ready to begin your recovery process with us? If you are, get in touch with us at 800-737-0933. Our services are available 24/7/365.

Will 28 Days in Rehab Be Enough?

Everyone has to follow their own path to sobriety, and knowing how long to stay in rehab is an important decision along the journey. Depending on the severity of your addiction, a traditional 28 or 30-day program may not be enough to give you the skills and confidence you need to stay clean and avoid a relapse. Ultimately, the decision of how long to stay in rehab will rest on you. It's not about how long someone thinks you should go. It's about how long you know you need to be there.

What to Expect from 28-Day Rehab Programs?

A 28-day program is the standard recommendation for people who do not have prior experience with addiction treatment. The 28-day program is broken into four blocks, each lasting for a total of seven days - in other words, a month of treatment. The substance abuse treatment techniques used in 28-day programs focus heavily on psychotherapy and cognitive therapy. Support groups, one-on-one counseling, and skill-building courses will be heavily implemented throughout the duration of treatment. Each week builds off the last, helping you undo your addiction from the inside out and developing the coping strategies and healthy habits you need to live a successful, sober life.

Do I Need Inpatient or Outpatient Rehab?

Inpatient addiction treatment offers a greater level of control over your own recovery. You get to remove yourself from your current environment, avoiding any triggers and resources that will make it easy to continue using. Many inpatient programs start at 30 days, but there are many programs that last 60 or even 90 days. Speaking with the staff at rehab and a substance abuse counselor will help you make the best choice for you. It's important to understand that no rehab is a cure-all for addiction. You have to be committed to your recovery and willing to extend an olive branch to the staff and counselors trying to help. Someone who is determined to get clean and stay sober will have a better outcome after 28 days of treatment than a half-hearted person who spends 90 days in rehab. While it's natural to be fearful treatment won't work or hesitant to new ideas, you must commit yourself to be fully present during treatment. This is the only way you'll experience the greatest impact.

What if I Can't Afford a 30-day Treatment Program?

Although there are many financing options available, some people simply cannot attend residential rehab, but that doesn't mean they're out of luck. Outpatient therapy can be an effective addiction treatment too, and Intensive Outpatient Programs (IOPs) can be just as effective as inpatient treatment programs for many people.

How Long Should I Go to Rehab?

You should, first and foremost, get as much help as you can afford and access. Any treatment is better than none. If you can only attend one addiction meeting per week at a local facility, by all means, go. Even if you're trying to save up for a longer stay at a 28-day facility, you should never forego treatment entirely because you can't access everything you need right away. There may be cases where 28-days or even 90 days aren't enough. In this case, extended programs are available that can last anywhere from six months to a year, and they are designed to help a person fully integrate themselves into a new life with guidance, assistance, and counseling. Many substance use disorders are tied to mental illness, and the first-time diagnosis in rehab isn't uncommon. You may require a greater length of treatment if you are tackling addiction alongside a mental health condition such as depression, anxiety, bipolar disorder or schizophrenia. These guidelines are mere opportunities for people who are looking to get treatment. Rehab comes in many different forms, and there is always a way to get help regardless of your financial status, family obligations and housing arrangements. Are you ready to take the next step? Call us today at 800-737-0933 and speak to one of our trained representatives. We can help you come up with the perfect treatment plan for you and connect you with the rehab you've been waiting for.

How Can a Christian Track Help in Recovery?

If you or a family member is affected by addiction or substance use disorders, searching for a reputable, effective recovery program that will provide lasting results is a key step towards recovery and healing. A Christian track can help in the recovery process. When considering the recovery options available to you, choosing a Christian track provides additional benefits over the standard programs. You or your loved one will receive counseling and support based on well-researched, evidence-based treatment techniques while also applying biblical principles that can provide lasting change. What can a Christian track to recovery provide?

A Compassionate Community

Many people may find choosing a faith-based recovery program reassuring. In a Christian recovery track, you will be surrounded by a compassionate community of people who are attentive to not only your physical and emotional needs but also your spiritual needs. Christ reached out with love and compassion to the broken and the hurting. When the clinicians and staff of a recovery program are acting out of His example of mercy and grace, they can offer a level of support that is not easily found in other programs. You will feel the kind of love and acceptance that can only be found in Christ.

Support on the Spiritual Journey

Recovery is not just a physical and emotional process. It is a spiritual process as well. A Christian recovery track can provide the support you need on your spiritual journey. This support is available in areas such as:
  • Prayer. While you are struggling with an addiction, prayer can be difficult. Your clinicians will be able to encourage you in your prayer life, and they will be ready to pray for you when you need it.
  • Biblical Advice. God’s Word provides deep insights that guide our daily lives. Our clinicians can help you unpack and understand how biblical principles can help you on your journey to recovery.
  • Spiritual Perspective. Many of the issues we face have a spiritual aspect to them. A Christian recovery track can help you interpret the spiritual aspect of addiction and healing, guiding you in the application of spiritual solutions.

Hope and Forgiveness

God can provide lasting healing to individuals and families. Two of the chief messages of the Bible are hope and forgiveness. Both of these ideas can be hard to grasp if you are struggling with substance abuse. A Christian track to recovery can help you see that Christ offers hope. A Christian clinician can show you that you have the tools, ability, and support you need to find healing. They can also guide you in finding forgiveness — both God’s forgiveness and self-forgiveness. You do not have to stay stuck in addiction and substance abuse. Our counselors are available 24 hours a day. Give us a call now at 800-737-0933.

How Do You Know What Drug Treatment Center in Florida Is Right for You?

While living your life as a victim of drug or alcohol addiction, you might feel the choices in life have been removed from your control. Sure, addiction has likely taken control of your life, leaving you at the mercy of your substance(s) of choice. What you are really experiencing is a problem with perception. In fact, there is one very important decision you could choose to make at any time. That decision would be whether or not to stop abusing drugs and get help. Most of the time, people who successfully arrest their addiction and maintain a long-term recovery are the ones who sought treatment pretty much on their own. The act of coming to grips with addiction and the willingness to ask for help tends to help people commit to treatment. If you can do that, you will have a real chance of getting back to living a normal life without having to battle an addiction. Once you make that decision, it will become easier to make the next important decision, where to get treatment. Understandably, your first instinct will be to contact a drug and addiction center in your local community. Caution is warranted. That's not always the best choice. Home may be where the heart is, but it's also where your addiction took root. Your neighborhood is filled with the people, places, and things that drove you to seek refuge in substance abuse. If money is a serious issue, perhaps a local treatment facility is the only logical choice. Otherwise, we recommend you give serious consideration to the option of getting help in Florida.

How Do You Know What Drug Treatment Center in Florida Is Right for You?

If you are surprised that someone would recommend you relocate to Florida for treatment, don't be. As one of the top addiction treatment centers in the state, we have a vested interest in informing you that Florida has a reputation as the "addiction treatment capital of the world." Let that sink in. Millions of people from all over the world have gotten treatment from a top facility in Florida, especially South Florida. We care about your situation, and we most definitely care about helping you get into treatment. If you are concerned about choosing the addiction treatment center in Florida that is best for you, we might be able to help you. Here are four things you'll want to consider:
  • Does the facility offer in-house detox or refer out?
  • Does the treatment facility employ top professional addiction treatment personnel?
  • Are there treatment options that give you a sense of security?
  • What amenities are in the offering?

In-House or Outsourced Detox

Some clients prefer to go through the detox process in a full-service addiction treatment center. It could be a matter of convenience or a preference for continuity of treatment. Other clients are more than willing to go through a detox program with a facility that specializes in providing said services. Neither choice is the wrong choice as long as you are comfortable the choice you make.

Level of Professionalism of Personnel

Many of the top rehab centers in Florida have no trouble attracting the top treatment professionals from within the addiction treatment community. With that said, you'll likely be satisfied with the level of care you receive no matter where you receive it in Florida. However, it's possible you might be swayed by the gender mix of counselors, areas of training and the reputation of some individuals.

The Treatment Options

Some Florida facilities focus on standard treatment programs while other facilities might focus on evidence-based modalities like Cognitive Behavioral Therapy and Dialectical Behavioral Therapy. A facility that uses a holistic approach to treatment might also warrant consideration. It's up to you to do a little research and figure out what treatment options will best meet your needs and expectations.

Amenities

The amenities an addiction treatment has to offer are important. If you going to reside in an inpatient facility, you won't be spending all day in therapy. If a facility offers amenities like access to water sports, horseback riding or access to luxury living, you can decide what's important to you. If it's time for you to get treatment, it's time for you to consider visiting us in Florida. No matter what, our primary objective will be getting you back on track with normal living. If you will let us help you, you can call us at 800-737-0933.

What Life Skills Can You Learn in Heroin Rehab?

Have you ever wondered why some people have no issue getting through addiction treatment and staying sober for the rest of their lives while others live a life with chronic relapses and distress? Both groups cease to amaze us in the addiction treatment community. As for the way, there are actually several potential explanations. For a lot of people who constantly relapse, it's sometimes never getting to the bottom of the root cause of their addiction that cause the problems. Other people just have difficulty sticking with a program. On the other side of the coin, it's possible they entered rehab with a moderate addiction or perhaps, they have tremendous support from family and friends, both things making them strong enough to survive. If it was possible to identify one particular reason for the variance, it would likely have something to do with the coping and life skills someone is able to develop during treatment. For the remaining portion of this document, we are going to discuss the importance of life skill and which life skills seem to make the biggest difference.

What Life Skills Can You Learn in Heroin Rehab?

Before we discuss specific life skills, a little bit of information about what we mean about life skills and its importance seems in order. Life skills are the tools people use to manage their everyday lives. In a normal person, there are the skills that come into play to cover every aspect of an individual's life. Most people live regulars lives. When stress and frustration come calling, they are able to use the life skills they learned as kids and teenagers to deal with what's in front of them. It doesn't mean they don't struggle and have problems, it just means their problems never seem to get bad enough to lead them into danger. The folks who end up caught in the cycle of addiction don't always have the right coping and life skills. When unable to properly manage their lives, they become vulnerable to outside influences like drugs and alcohol. The big attraction of substance abuse is it gives the user a way out. It gives them a way to medicate away the pain, stress, and frustration of everyday life. What little bit they had of life skills before they started using dissipates into nothing, leaving them to be like a lake without water in it. In addiction therapy, the focus is put on isolating the real issues. Once the real issues can be identified, the client, working with a counselor, can begin to develop better life skills. Let's discuss some specific life skills which might prove effective.

Managing Finances

Money issues create a lot of financial problems and stress in our lives. They are also the easiest issues to rectify with the proper training. In rehab, counselors teach their clients how to create a budget and live within the confines of that budget. Organized finances is always a good way to prevent money issues.

Learning to Communicate

Addiction sufferers tend to break away from family and friends in an attempt to isolate themselves. Somewhere along the line they completely lose whatever ability they had to communicate in the first place. Being able to communicate feelings and emotions to friends and relatives while in recovery is absolutely necessary. The addiction sufferer needs the ability to speak up when they are bothered and perhaps on the verge of a relapse. Communication skills are a very important part of recovery.

Leadership Skills

Success in life is an important part of keeping us all happy and satisfied with our lives. Addiction sufferers typically have a breakdown in the ways they interact with people. They tend to withdraw or simply go with the flow. By motivating and teaching them to be leaders of their own lives and perhaps in their careers, that sense of control will often inspire them to keep things moving in a positive direction.

Living Healthy Lives

When people look good on the outside and feel good physically on the inside, it diminishes their desire to punish themselves with drugs or alcohol. In treatment, there's always some focus put on nutrition and getting proper exercise. The routine of exercising and eating well creates certain stability within a person's life. If your addiction is causing you hardship, you need help. We would be happy to help you with everything from detox to learning better coping and life skills. For more information about our services, we want you to call one of our representatives at 800-737-0933.