Will Rehab Centers Have Support Resources for Families of Drug Addicts?

Seeking help is incredibly difficult for those who are struggling with addiction. The first step is always the hardest. That's because no one wants to admit that they have a problem and are spiraling out of control. If you're struggling with addiction, however, the most important thing you can do is accept that you're not okay and that you need outside help.

Family, friends, and loved ones are great resources to lean on while you begin your journey to recovery. Remember that this isn't just something that's hard on you, it's hard on them as well. They want what is best for you and they want to see you succeed. That's why it's important to choose rehab centers that also have support resources for families of drug addicts.

Family Participation is Crucial to Recovery

Sure an addict can recover on their own but it's much easier with the support of the family. A family is those individuals who will stick with you through thick and thin. No matter what wrongs you've done your family, they ultimately still want to support you. Sometimes, it takes building that trust back up. If you've lied, stolen, or harmed your family in any way then it may take a little longer for them to forgive.

A family is crucial though because they're those people who have open arms and open ears. Many rehab facilities will give families the resources needed to mend broken relationships. A family needs to understand that it's not the person who did all these terrible things, it's the drug that took hold of their life. By eliminating the drug, an addict can get on the path to recovery and the path to building a healthy relationship.

Drug Addiction Affects the Whole Family

When an addict uses a drug, they're not just harming themselves. They're harming every single relationship that they have. Drugs turn a person into someone unrecognizable. It can make an addict moody, emotional, angry, destructive, and many other things. If this happens to you, relationships will be strained and the following things may happen:

  • Family may kick you out
  • Significant others may leave you
  • Children could be taken from your custody

Not all hope is lost. Rehab centers will help an addict learn how to mend those broken relationships. They will show them that with recovery, family members can come back around. It's not just difficult for the addict, it's difficult for the family to come to terms with what has happened as well. Both need to work together to truly help an addict heal and recover.

Resources Readily Available to Help Family Members

When a family member first learns that someone they love is dealing with addiction, they can become lost and overwhelmed. That's because it's a very scary thing to come to terms with. When an addict decides they want to get clean, they need their family for support. It will be rough but the family is the ones who will be able to push them through the darkest of days.

If an addict is attending an outpatient rehab facility, then family support is especially important. Family members will need to be involved in the following ways:

  • Offering rides to rehab
  • Giving moral support
  • Reminding a recovering addict of their worth
  • Setting ground rules regarding drug use

In an inpatient rehab facility, family members are sometimes allowed to visit. Their continued support may be what the addict needs to stay on the path to recovery. The family will also learn what signs of drug use to look out for, how to help, and when to intervene.

Fighting drug addiction is a hard battle for one person to face alone. That's why the support of the family is so important. They show the addict that they're not fighting alone. It also shows the addict that what they're fighting for is beyond them and that they have people cheering for them. Admitting you have a problem is the first step to recovery. You don't have to fight alone. If you are ready to get started, Call us today at 800-737-0933.

Going to Drug Rehab with Your Spouse

Getting help for your addiction might be easier if both you and your spouse attend drug rehab together. One of the hardest parts of going into rehab is leaving your family. If you both decide to go, you'll be in this together and have many opportunities to spend time with each other.

Going into drug rehab can make your relationship stronger. Drugs and alcohol have probably damaged your marriage. It may be hard to know which of your problems are drug-related and which ones are related to your relationship. Recovery gives you a chance to improve your lives and improve your marriage.

Can Married Couples Go to Drug Rehab Together?

Not all facilities take couples into treatment, but many of them do. You can even find treatment centers that cater exclusively to couples. At these centers, you'll find a therapy that focuses on treating the addiction within the marriage.

Some inpatient facilities allow married couples to share a room. Others do not, but allow the spouses to spend time together. If it's important that you share a room, let the treatment center you're considering know that.

Married couples can also attend luxury treatment centers together if you have the financial capability or the insurance coverage to pay for it.

If you're going to outpatient treatment rather than inpatient drug rehab, you will either continue living at home or move to a sober living home.

Will You See Your Spouse Often If You Both Go to Couples Drug Rehab?

You and your spouse will have many opportunities to spend time together if you're both at the same drug rehab center.

  • In some facilities, you'll share a room together.
  • As a couple, you will participate in marriage counseling in addition to addiction treatment.
  • You can spend time together at mealtimes.
  • You'll enjoy social and recreational activities together.
  • You may be in the same support group or 12-step meetings.

Is Going to Drug Rehab Together a Good Idea for Married Couples?

Couples who share an addiction have a high rate of relapse. This is why some couples separate if one of them is determined to stay sober. If you want to save your marriage while you achieve sobriety, going into it together can be an excellent idea.

  • You won't have to separate from an important source of love and support in your life.
  • You can go through recovery without the fear that you'll be living with an active addict when you get home. Living with someone who's still using almost guarantees that you will relapse. It could also cause your marriage to fall apart.
  • Staying sober requires long-term changes to your way of living. If you are both working toward that goal, you can help each other when the going gets rough.
  • Going through drug rehab together will help you bond as a couple.

What Kind of Treatment Will We Receive as a Couple?

  • You will both go to medical detox separately. Each of you will be able to withdraw under medical supervision, with no withdrawal symptoms.
  • You will each receive an individualized treatment plan that focuses on your specific needs and challenges.
  • You'll have individual counseling in addition to couples counseling.
  • You'll receive couple-specific training on living a sober life after treatment.
  • Each of you will have your own primary counselor.
  • You might attend 12-step meetings together, but some addiction experts believe it's better to attend them separately. There are recovery support groups for couples that you may want to look into when you finish treatment.

What Happens After We Complete Drug Rehab?

If you are both committed to staying sober, you can find resources both individually and as a couple. There are a few sober living homes that permit married couples to move in. You might want to live there for a short time as a transition into regular life.

The couples drug rehab you attend can recommend follow-up solutions for you. Relapse rates among addicted couples are high, so it's especially important to establish your aftercare plans.

Succeed in Sobriety Together

By attending couples drug rehab, you can help each other get through the challenges of recovery. By making a commitment to sobriety and to your marriage, you can strengthen your bond and preserve your family. Get started now by calling our counselors anytime at 800-737-0933.

Should Suboxone Be Taken Forever or Just During Detox?

Given its effectiveness, Suboxone is one of the most commonly prescribed medications for those looking to overcome an opiate addiction. It's easy to understand why in light of the medication's capacity to ease withdrawal symptoms while also producing a less intense "high." Suboxone is comprised of two separate medications, Naloxone and Buprenorphine, which offer unique benefits when it comes to helping individuals break free of their addiction. As such, it is not surprising to find that many people want to continue using the Suboxone long-term. In this article, we will take a look at the consequences of long-term use and why it should be avoided.

WHAT IS SUBOXONE?

Although we touched in this briefly in the preface of the article, contains Naloxone, which is highly effective in easing the excruciating pain symptoms associated with opioid withdrawal. The medication can also be used to reverse an opioid overdose. Basically, the drug acts as an antagonist by binding to opioid receptors and blocking the transmission of opioids to the brain. Also, it prevents agonist, the chemical compound that elicits a physiological response when combined with brain receptors.

Now that we have a general understanding of the role of Naloxone, let's focus our attention on Buprenorphine. Unlike naloxone, buprenorphine works by attaching to opioid receptors and stimulating them, which makes it possible to soothe withdrawal symptoms without eliciting the same feelings of euphoria and sedation typical of other opioids.

WHAT ARE THE EFFECTS OF LONG-TERM SUBOXONE USE?

In short, long-term Suboxone usage increases the likelihood of addiction; in fact, according to a report published by SAMHSA (Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration), the misuse of Suboxone resulted in 3,000 emergency room visits in 2005 and exceeded 30,000 in 2010. Although the inclusion of Naloxone as a deterrent to abuse is effective, some individuals have found ways of bypassing this safeguard.

That said, some people have been known to vacillate between Suboxone and their primary drug of choice. Needless to say, such actions can quickly result in relapse. So why are so many people interested in long-term use even after they have undergone detox? Most likely it is for the high that is derived from the medication and to resolve any residual symptoms they may be experiencing, physical or psychological.

HOW TO TAKE SUBOXONE PROPERLY

Suboxone can be taken in a variety of ways; however, patients who undergo treatment are usually prescribed sublingual tablets, which can be dissolved under the tongue before being absorbed by the body. In addition, the medication is also available as a sublingual film; in this case, the film is placed against the interior cheek wall where it will dissolve before being absorbed by the body. That said, both variations work by releasing small doses of Suboxone over a 10-minute time frame.

Although the medication can be administered in a variety of ways, the pill form of Suboxone is a preferred choice when it comes to short-term treatment. As far as dosage is concerned, most patients will be started on a very low dose of Suboxone, usually 6 to 8 mg. This low dose allows physicians to gauge the effectiveness of the medication as well as patient tolerance. That aside, if patients abuse or abruptly stop taking Suboxone, they are usually presented with the following symptoms:

  • Muscle aches
  • Diarrhea
  • Vomiting
  • Insomnia
  • Agitation
  • Anxiety

Obviously, this is not an entire list of symptoms; however, it is a list of the ones commonly reported by current and former patients.

CONCLUSION

In summation, opioid addiction is one of the most challenging addictions for anyone to overcome. After all, the substances are highly addictive, easily accessible, and provides a feeling of euphoria that some find insatiable. While Suboxone can be helpful during the detox, long-term use should be avoided in light of the possibility of abuse, addiction, and relapse.

A more plausible alternative would be to combine short-term Suboxone use with counseling, which can include learning to cope with stress and avoiding triggers that can lead to relapse, for example. Also, it worth noting that many find the support of friends and family invaluable while they are their journey towards breaking their addiction. Call one of our counselors today at 800-737-0933.

What are some factors that make up the best rehab in Florida?

Florida is the sunshine capital of United States. Besides overall warm weather, it also enjoys beautiful coastlines. As a result, many rehabilitation centers are based in Florida. This is because it has natural factors such as good weather and a great community. All these factors come naturally to make Florida the best for drug abuse rehabilitation.

Despite having many rehab centers, some centers are more outstanding as compared to others. Adequate facilities, good location, experience, and expertise of staff are some of the factors that define the best rehab facilities in Florida.

Although almost all rehabilitation centers essentially operate the same way, some differentiate themselves by using distinct tools and methods of treatment. The best centers in Florida, for instance, use a holistic healing approach. In the holistic approach, the center ensures that they take care of the physical, emotional, and spiritual needs of their clients.

Taking care of all these aspects helps to ensure that all the avenues that contribute to the well being of the person are well taken care of. The following are some of the factors that make up for the best rehab in Florida.

Environmental conditions

Florida has a long coastline; any location is typically a few miles drive to the beach. The process of moving from drug dependency to a sober life is not an easy one. A cool beach breeze and a long sandy coastline, however, will help to relax the mind, which means that the patients can focus on their healing journey. Centers that are in prime spots, therefore, are more likely to have a better success rate because the clients are more relaxed.

Great exposure to the sun

While in Florida, you have to apply your sunscreen. This is because Florida receives a higher exposure to the sun as compared to the cooler states. Sufficient exposure to the sun helps in the absorption of vitamin D.

Vitamin D helps in the strengthening of the bones as well as in mood stabilization. People who enroll in a rehab center that gets adequate sunshine are more likely to be happy and nourished, thus increasing their chances of success. The vitamin D that the patients absorb helps to create more serotonin in the body. The serotonin helps to stabilize the patient's mood and increase clarity and open-mindedness both of which are critical during the recovery period.

Dedicated and compassionate staff

Addiction is a disease, which means that most of the people who suffer from it require a lot of support. As a result, rehab staff should be entirely dedicated to helping their clients to make their lives better. A dedicated staff is one of the factors that contribute to the success rate of a drug abuse treatment center.

If a center has a dedicated team that helps and supports the clients, it is much more likely that the clients will absorb the techniques and tools available to them. If the clients absorb and practice the techniques, they are more likely to succeed and enjoy a happy life free of substance abuse.

Good culture and lifestyle to support a life change

Florida can be defined best as a tropical paradise. It has a vibrant tropical culture that is synonymous with welcoming guests. This means that it is a perfect place for patients to turn their life around and reintegrate into a supportive community.

One of the things that a drug user needs after treatment is reintegrating back to the society. As a result, rehab centers that are located near communities can enjoy their support through Florida's culture. Such centers, therefore, have better success rates because the community is supportive and capable of accommodating the visitors. People who enroll in such centers, therefore, are likely to feel like they are a part of the communities.

Florida is the ground zero of recovering communities

Florida is renowned as the recovery center of the world. Over the decades, there has been an upcoming movement of recovery communities. These communities are put up to help former drug users to support each other and have easy access to high-quality inpatient and outpatient's treatment for drug abuse. Treatment centers that are in these communities are the best because they enjoy the support and availability of resources.

If you or your loved one is suffering from addiction problems, we can help. Just call 800-737-0933; our counselors are available to help at any time of day or night.

Can You Get Drug Treatment in Florida if You Have Relapsed in the Past?

If you've been through treatment for your drug addiction and managed to stay sober for a short time before relapsing, you might think that you failed at recovery. The truth is that relapse is part of the recovery process. If you're willing to make another effort, you can go back to a drug rehabilitation center in Florida for more treatment. You can return to a rehabilitation center that you went to in the past, or you can find a new one.

Relapse rates are high for both alcoholics and drug addicts. That's why treatment centers emphasize the use of good aftercare once you've completed rehab. You might find that even with ongoing support, your addiction came back and claimed you again. That doesn't mean you have to let your addiction win. Deciding to go back for more help is not an admission of failure. It's a sign that you refuse to give up on your recovery.

Will Florida Drug Rehabilitation Centers Still Treat You If You've Relapsed in the Past?

Any drug rehabilitation will welcome you, no matter how many times you have relapsed. You'll find that you start to feel more hopeful as soon as you tell the counselors that you relapsed but you're not giving up. They are there to help, They understand that relapses are common among drug addicts.

Going back to a drug rehabilitation center is the best way to deal with a relapse.

  • You get away from the drugs and other drug users and go back to a safe space.
  • If you feel ashamed or guilty about your relapse, the addictions counselors at a rehab center can help you. Many of them are also addicts in recovery who have experience dealing with relapses.
  • You'll get more support to help you stay on track.
  • Going back to rehab is an acknowledgment that you need help. It shows that you understand the ups and downs of recovery and are still committed to your own success.
  • You won't be judged or criticized. Addiction treatment centers have seen it all before. You'll be praised for making the choice to keep yourself safe.

Going back to a Florida drug rehab center is a courageous step. You're admitting that you need more help and you're not ashamed to ask for it. You're showing that your life matters to you. Some addicts have to return to treatment several times. They're not failures. They're people who refuse to give up on themselves.

Recovery is a Bumpy Road

Addiction experts are fond of noting that recovery is a journey. You might think that it's more of a bumpy road. You get yourself clean, sober and happy and you live that way for a while. One day, it all changes in a flash and you're back using again. What happened?

You hit a bump in the road. It's a bump that every addict has stumbled over. You may have spent many years abusing drugs. You spent a long time living as a full-fledged addict. It would be nice to think that you could shake all that off in just a few months, and for some people that work, but for many people, it isn't that simple.

Why Are Relapse Rates So High?

Addiction is a powerful force. It involves physical, physiological and emotional dependence. If it were easy to get sober, there would be no drug addicts or alcoholics. Who would willingly choose to live life as an addict?

Drug treatment can get you sober and healthy for the first time in many years. Once you get clean and get out of treatment, you're surrounded by triggers. You start experiencing the stress of daily life and you start to miss the way drugs could take you away from all that. That makes it easy to have a slip that turns into a full-blown relapse.

Correct a Relapse by Getting Back into a Florida Drug Rehabilitation Center

A relapse is not the end of the road. It's just a wrong turn. You can get back on track and give yourself a better chance at recovery. You can go back to a drug rehab center in Florida whenever you need to, whether you were treated for your addiction 10 years ago or 10 days ago. If you're ready to continue your journey, call our counselors at 800-737-0933.

Is an Opiate Detox in Florida Ever Dangerous?

Trying to withdraw from opiates on your own can be a dangerous and potentially life-threatening move. Considering the risk to health and life, an opiate detox at a Florida rehab is perhaps the safest way to end your addiction to opiates.

Professional treatment at an accredited rehab is not only safe, but it also offers an opportunity to uncover underlying reasons for your addiction. It allows you to get treatment for mental health disorders linked to drug abuse. It caters to family members and loved ones by involving them in specialized family therapy sessions. And, it equips you with tools and skills to manage drug use triggers to reduce the chance of relapse during and after rehab.

Tapering Off Opiates With Medically-Assisted Detox

Opiates, also called opioids, are drugs made from the opium poppy plant. They are commonly prescribed for treating chronic pain. Codeine, Oxycodone, Fentanyl, Morphine, and Hydrocodone are some examples of prescription opioids. However, opiates are used illicitly in a more raw and potent form and are called "street drugs."

Heroin is a widely abused "street" drug. It is highly addictive and is the reason why many individuals between the ages of 18-30 undergo opiate detox in Florida. They know that quitting opiates "cold turkey" and going through detox on their own increases the risk of relapse or overdose.

Tapering off the substance is the best way to gradually remove it from the body and allow the body and brain to slowly return to a state of "normalcy." Medication may be administered to you during detox by a trained professional to assist in managing severe withdrawal symptoms.

Opiate Withdrawal Symptoms

Opiate withdrawal symptoms may begin within 6-30 hours after the last dose. Factors such as how severe the addiction is and what type of drug is involved will determine when symptoms begin. Short-acting opiates produce symptoms within 6-12 hours while long-acting opiates do so around 30 hours following the last use. One or more of these symptoms could develop and may vary in severity from person to person:

  • Strong cravings
  • Runny nose or teary eyes
  • Nausea, vomiting, or diarrhea
  • Excessive sweating
  • Irritability
  • Restlessness
  • Insomnia
  • Persistent yawning
  • Aggressing
  • Anxiety
  • Muscle aches or stomach cramps
  • Mood swings
  • Increased heart rate or blood pressure

Opiate Withdrawal Timeline

Opiate withdrawal can be done at an inpatient or outpatient program. Inpatient rehabs allow you to live-in for the duration of treatment while outpatient centers offer you the opportunity to continue to live at home, work, and care for family members. Nevertheless, both programs have proven to provide effective detox services and therapy.

However, each person's detox experience is unique. Withdrawal symptoms and the length of time it takes to completely withdraw depend on the level of addiction, the type of drug abused, dosage, and how the brain reacts to the removal of the drug from the body. Days 1-7 is reportedly the most difficult stage. The entire detox process may last several weeks to several months.

The following is a general withdrawal timeline that may be helpful in letting you know what to expect:

Days 1-7: The first and second day is marked by symptoms such as strong cravings, compulsive drug-seeking, restlessness, sweating, trouble sleeping, and muscle aches. Other symptoms may develop around days 3-5 and may include nausea, vomiting, tremors, dilated pupil, increased heart rate, high blood pressure, and stomach ache. Some individuals experience diarrhea, chills, and abdominal cramps.

Day 7 and onwards: Around the end of the first week, there is usually a marked improvement in physical symptoms. At the same time, psychological symptoms start to kick in. Anxiety, depression, insomnia, irritability, emotional outbursts, remorse, and impulsive behaviors are common. By now, the desire to use drugs is not as strong as the first week. Once you're stabilized, you may transition into therapy to begin the second stage of addiction treatment.

Finding a Detox Center Near You

Finding the right detox center may pose a bit of challenge since you may prefer to connect with one that can provide the services to match your needs. If you live in South Florida, you can locate a treatment center and give them a call to find out what types of programs they offer and how to get admitted.

During the evaluation, the medical team will recommend either outpatient or residential treatment depending on your recovery needs. Addiction treatment programs are usually comprehensive and include referral to behavioral therapy to help reduce the risk of relapse after formal treatment ends.

Just remember that sobriety involves a desire to overcome drug addiction, a positive mindset towards treatment, and a commitment to staying sober. Call one of our counselors today at 800-737-0933.

What Payment Plans Are Available for Alcohol Treatment in Florida?

Alcoholism affects millions of individuals and families alike in the US each year. Approximately 88,000 individuals die each year from alcohol-related deaths in the United States alone, making it one of the most deadly addictions to face and overcome.

Addiction to alcohol is not only psychological but also physical after long-term heavy use. As alcohol forms a physical addiction in the body, it becomes increasingly difficult to quick drinking and to stop seeking alcohol altogether. When you want to make a change for the better in your life but you are unsure of how to pay for the program you require, learn more about the alcohol treatment solutions and facilities that are right for you.

Alcohol Treatment Programs in Florida

Because alcoholism affects individuals in many different ways, there are various programs available to choose from when undergoing rehabilitation treatment. The most common types of treatment programs for those addicted to alcohol in Florida include inpatient rehabilitation facilities, outpatient solutions and meetings, and IOP (Intensive Outpatient Programs). Before determining which solution is right for you it is important to assess your addiction along with the type of care and support you require to steer clear from the temptation to use alcohol again.

Health Insurance

Many alcohol treatment programs and rehabilitation centers accept a range of health insurance providers to cover a portion or all of the treatment you require. If you currently pay for private health insurance or if you are receiving health insurance through your employer, research mental health and addiction services that are covered with your plan. If you are still unsure about your potential coverage, reach out to a counselor or representative at an alcohol treatment center to learn more about your qualifications and coverage options.

Private Payment Methods

If you do not have insurance or if you prefer to pay for the treatment you require upfront, private payment methods are also accepted at most alcohol treatment centers and facilities. Private payments are possible using credit cards, debit cards, and checks. Most alcohol treatment facilities provide complete privacy protection for those who are looking to pay upfront for the services they require.

Payment Plans

Whether your health insurance does not cover all of the treatment you require or if you are simply interested in paying for services on your own but do not have all of the funds readily available, consider a payment plan. Work together with an alcohol treatment inpatient facility or outpatient support program to set up a payment program that works for you financially based on the services you need and your current financial status.

Choosing the Right Alcohol Treatment Center for You

Inpatient alcohol addiction facilities are optimal for those who have struggled with alcoholism for years or even decades and for those who have an extremely high tolerance for alcohol. Because alcohol has the ability to cause adverse effects on the body, it is highly recommended to seek out an inpatient alcohol facility if you believe you are at risk. Alcohol withdrawals can range from nausea and vomiting to tremors, seizures, heart failure, heart attacks, coma, and death. Inpatient rehab facilities provide medically-monitored detox solutions to ensure your health and safety while eliminating the substance from your body.

Outpatient programs along with IOP (Intensive Outpatient Programs) are viable treatment solutions for those who have emotional and moral support outside of the program itself. Outpatient programs do not require you to relocate, miss work, or miss out on your everyday life. Attend outpatient meetings, group sessions, and individual counseling appointments to gain valuable insight into addiction and how to overcome it with the right support. Outpatient programs are optimal if you have the willpower to avoid temptation and want to move forward with your life without the need for intensive inpatient care and monitoring.

While paying for alcohol treatment in the State of Florida may feel daunting or overwhelming, it does not have to feel impossible. Overcoming an addiction to alcohol is never easy, but it is possible with an alcohol treatment center or program that works to fit your needs. With the right assistance and guidance, discover an inpatient or outpatient alcohol treatment program that works for you and provides you with the necessary support to make long-term changes to your life.

Our counselors are available 24 hours a day. Call 800-737-0933 to learn more about the alcohol treatment centers near you in the State of Florida and to discover which program is right for you today.

What to Expect During Intake at a Florida Detox Center

You're tired of living with addiction. You're ready to change things and have decided to start the process by going to a Florida detox center. Now you have a whole new set of questions. What should you bring? What is the first day of intake like? Learning these details now will make the transition to life in treatment easier.

Most detox centers in Florida follow a similar process when you check in. You'll be calmer if you know what to expect on that first day. Always remind yourself that recovery is a gift you're giving yourself.

What Is Intake Like at a Detox Center in Florida?

Every detox center is different, but the majority follow a similar procedure to get you checked in and settled. Before you head out, keep these pointers in mind.

  • Medically-supervised detox is a safe, comfortable way to withdraw from drugs or alcohol. You won't get sick or have to endure any withdrawal symptoms.
  • Getting drugs or alcohol out of your system is the first step to your new, sober life.
  • The counselors are there to help you. When you start to feel nervous or shaky, talk to them. They've walked many an addict and alcoholic through their first-day fears.

What to Expect on Your First Day

When you first show up at the center, you'll be greeted and welcomed. An intake counselor will go over your paperwork to make sure that everything is in place.

You should have:

  • Your insurance card and related paperwork.
  • Your driver's license or other identification.
  • A list of medications that are currently prescribed to you by a doctor.
  • Paperwork regarding any grants or government assistance you're receiving.
  • Copy of any payment plan agreement that you signed.
  • Credit or debit card.

If you're going into inpatient rehab, you'll be shown to your room, where a counselor unpacks your bags to make sure you haven't carried in any alcohol, drugs or other prohibited items. You probably received a list of items that you can't bring to the detox center. This includes:

  • Drugs or alcohol, including alcohol in personal care products.
  • Pornography or other offensive materials.
  • Playing cards or items related to gambling.
  • Clothing or other items that promote drinking or drug use.
  • Medications or supplements that are not in sealed bottles.

During the first day, you'll also meet with the medical staff. They'll check you for any medical problems that need immediate attention. If you are undergoing medically-supervised detox or have been referred for medical treatment, you'll be given a day and time for that.

Other Types of Intake

If you're checking into a sober living home or halfway house, the intake process is similar. Your bags will be checked for prohibited substances. You'll meet with an addictions counselor to go over your goals and expectations. You'll also be given the house rules and your schedule of required meetings.

If you're attending outpatient treatment, you obviously won't have any bags to check. Remember that during outpatient treatment, just as in inpatient rehab, you will have regular, random drug tests. You'll also have a set schedule of meetings and sessions that you're required to attend.

What Type of Schedule Will You Have?

Typically, your daily schedule at an inpatient rehab, outpatient center or sober living home will include the following:

  • Individual and group counseling sessions.
  • Attendance at 12-step meetings.
  • Support group meetings.
  • Recreational and social activities.
  • Mealtimes.
  • Visiting hours.

What is Medical Detox Like?

In many rehab centers, the first part of your treatment is medical detox.

Be prepared to spend the might at the detox clinic. The time required to detox depends on several factors including the type of substance you're addicted to and the amount in your system.

  • Medical detox allows your body to get rid of drugs and alcohol without the agony of withdrawal.
  • Detox will make you feel calm and comfortable.
  • Your detox is done in a private room in a medical setting.
  • Your withdrawal is monitored by specially-trained doctors and nurses.

Find the Right Detox Center in Florida

Going into a Florida detox is the best decision you can make for yourself and your family. If you're ready to build a new life free from addiction, get started by calling our counselors anytime at 800-737-0933.

Does Suboxone Work – How Does Suboxone Work? What Happens in the Body When You Use Suboxone to Treat Opiate Dependence

It is hard to turn on the news without hearing stories of lives damaged by opiate addiction or ended by overdose. Many people are looking for help with this chronic condition. In recent years, Suboxone has become an important tool in the treatment of narcotic addiction. This article will explore how Suboxone works and what happens in the body when it is used as a treatment for opiate dependence.

What is Suboxone

Suboxone is a prescription treatment for opiate addiction. This medicine is a combination of two compounds, Buprenorphine and Naloxone. It is normally taken daily, either as a pill which dissolves under the tongue or as a dissolving film.

The two substances that are combined in Suboxone play different roles. Buprenorphine, itself a milder opiate, is the main active ingredient. In the brain, it attaches to the same receptors as stronger opiates, reducing cravings for the patient.

Naloxone is a compound that blocks the effects of opiates. Its primary role in Suboxone is to prevent abuse. When taken orally as directed, the drug is effective. If someone tries to take Suboxone by injection, the Naloxone will prevent the opiate from providing a high.

What does Suboxone do to your body

Suboxone acts as a treatment to step down from stronger opiates. The symptoms of withdrawal are one of the major concerns for addicts trying to quit. If someone has become physically dependent on opiates, quitting can be both a painful and anxious time. Strong cravings for another dose become all-consuming. Because Suboxone mimics the action of stronger opiates, cravings are not as strong and withdrawal not as difficult.

Suboxone contains a milder opiate, and some patients report a slight high when first taking the drug. However, because the effects are milder, and the cravings reduced, you can live a much more normal life while undergoing Suboxone treatment. In conjunction with other behavioral therapies, Suboxone can help you establish new, positive habits and get your life back together.

Are there other effects of Suboxone?

The Buprenorphine in Suboxone is a milder opiate. As such, it does have side effects similar to other opioid substances. Some reported side effects of Suboxone are

  • Constipation
  • Headache
  • Muscle ache
  • Insomnia

Another important concern with Suboxone is withdrawal. Suboxone is intended as a long-term treatment, a milder opiate taken intentionally to avoid stronger opiates, such as heroin. However, even though it is milder, there will still be a physical dependence on the drug. If you stop taking Suboxone suddenly, especially early on in the recovery process, you may experience withdrawal symptoms. For this reason, it is important to take Suboxone only under medical supervision. Over time, as the dosage lowers, you will become less dependent on the drug, perhaps one day being free of opiates altogether.

Support on a Challenging Path

Ending an opiate dependence is a difficult journey. It will take time to get clean. It will take time for your brain to reset itself. Recovery will be a great challenge, but you do not need to do it alone. Treatments like Suboxone can be a big help in getting started and continuing on the path. If you are ready to take the first step, call us at 800-737-0933.

Karen’s Kula February 2019

Hi Everyone,
As many of you know Genesis offers a Monthly Alumni gathering and I had the awesome pleasure of attending Saturday January 26th's event! I absolutely loved, loved, loved every minute! Seeing familiar faces, meeting new friends and Yes the blessing of meeting one of our alumni's parents! This is exactly what I believe deep in my heart will make a difference - staying connected! Lifting up one another, sharing what is working and what is challenging. NOT feeling alone. For a few of our present clients that attended this event, it gave them the opportunity to sit in a familiar, comfy, safe, welcoming circle and hear how life is for alumni one week after leaving Genesis, almost 2 years after leaving Genesis and others with many more years of successful sobriety. Our circle of chairs were filled, our hearts were over flowing and I know it will grow and grow and grow. Thank you, Skyler for all your effort, love and support to create such a wonderful event - hope to see more of you next month!!!!!!
 
January ...... a recap for those of you who have been practicing Planting the Seeds of our Desires this month - 
 
New Years Day we kicked off our first practice of the year and month with Be at Ease, Be Gentle, Breathe in Ease and let it go. Plant seeds and let them go, love and nourish yourself, and they will grow! When we release things that no longer are working we learn that Letting Go is teaching me that I'm not loosing but receiving. I'm gaining knowledge, resilience and room in my heart for something greater!
 
Next we added Curiosity - What does today hold for me? No matter what shows up today off my mat, in my life.... How will I respond to it? 
 
We sprinkled in the idea of Awakening - as we plant the seeds of our desires we become more curious about what we want now, how we show up each day, and then we awaken from the pain and the illusion that we were broken, to the understanding that we were cracked open so our light can come thru. Here I am! All of me! All my yesterdays - completely Me!!!! We are forever growing, learning, changing with each breath and every life experience!!!!!!
 
As we awaken we realize Kindness Matters! "There is no way to give kindness to another without knowing it in ourselves (especially on our tough days when we are feeling the most hurt or irritated): Is this the kindest thought I could have? Is this the kindest thing I could say? Is this the kindest action I could take in this situation? To achieve a kinder world, we must approach kindness with ambition and dedication. We must practice it in every moment of our lives. Kindness is that important." Heart Talk by Cleo Wade
 
Practice - Yoga is a practice. Being Me is a practice. I will end this months recap with a prayer I read in class 
 
"Honoring Practice
Thank you for this day of ritual devotion.
 
Guide me to the mat, the trail, the teapot, the canvas and the confrontation table today, so that I may test my flexibility and stay true to my form all the way to my edge. Be my mirror, my educator in matters of discipline and rhythm. Open the shelter of my mind to constructive, caring feedback.
 
Let all that comes to me be my teachers. Move my form and feelings with dedicated habit. Help me to rehearse for growing stronger and more resilient. Stand me up like a mountain: spread my arms wide, expanding and clearing the valves of my heart to help me to move from it. Point my fingers skyward and widen my stance. Wrap enormous wings around my legs to strengthen my rooted position.
 
Train me for the battle which takes place within me in the form of fear and resistance. Help me to create spaciousness inside of my container to make steady progress with my breath, my invocations, and the attitudes that initiate my day. Lead air into my lungs which comforts the grief held there. Enhance my supportive routines with the golden light of your encouragement which shines through repetition. Let my body be a living ceremony.
 
Bring me back to presence when I wander. Help me to refocus without shame when I lose my way. Make me brave to notice where my balance falters and I compromise my integrity. Rededicate me when I discover what I'm holding and protecting. Get me back on conscious feet when I fall.  Let my wingspan be the bridge between my spirit and my body. Ignite the fire of my willingness during times of challenge and overcoming obstacles.
 
Put in front of me those who will help me persevere in my attempts to effectively resolve inner and outer conflict. Remind me of my tools for perceiving what prevents my flow. Help me be attentive to my part of maintaining the quality of relationship I am called to cultivate. Help me pussle together my healing form with the help of Earth's electricity moving upward through the soles of my feet.
 
Let me know I am not alone, and that I never need to do it perfectly."
-Prayers of Honoring Voice by Pixie Lighthorse
 
 
Genesis House Yoga Instructor
-Karen Vanneck