What are Some Core Elements of an Effective Rehab Program?

Coming to the realization that you have an addiction problem can be jarring. However, it is also the first step toward getting help, going into rehab and reclaiming your sobriety. Once you have decided that you want to be free of your substance abuse disorder, you have to ensure that you ultimately choose the right rehab center. The best way to go about picking the one that is best for you is to know about the core elements that every effective rehab program include.

Individualized Treatment Plans

No two people are the same. The same thing can be said when you struggle with a drug or alcohol addiction. You may have one type of experience with your substance abuse disorder while the next person has a completely different situation with their addiction. As a result, it’s important that the rehab program offers treatment plans that are tailored toward each individual person. There is no such thing as a one size fits all treatment plan for a substance abuse problem. You are unique, so your treatment is customized in a way that will work for you. This gives you a much greater chance of success after your treatment is over.

Specialized Services

In many cases, if you struggle with a substance abuse disorder, you may also have a dual diagnosis. A dual diagnosis means that you may have another problem in addition to your addiction. Most often, the co-occurring condition is a mental health problem such as anxiety, depression or bipolar disorder. Offering specialized services for individuals who have a dual diagnosis is essential when you are looking for the right rehab program for you. Programs that incorporate this core element are far more likely to help you to reclaim your life as they can treat not only your addiction but your mental health condition as well.

Qualified Staff

Qualified staff, particularly therapists, who are thoroughly trained to bond with you through empathy and compassion are far better influencers than those who are confrontational in nature. When the staff is sensitive to your circumstances, it shows that they truly want to help you on your quest to become clean and sober so that you can live a normal, substance-free life. This is a core element that has shown people with substance abuse disorders have better success when around such staff.

Individual and Group Therapy Options

It is extremely important to be able to choose the right type of therapy for your needs. At the same time, studies have shown that if you have a substance abuse disorder and attend both individual and group therapy — and in some cases, family therapy — while in your rehab program, it helps you to get a better perspective into your problems. Individual therapy allows you to share your innermost thoughts, feelings, and fears with a counselor, while group therapy benefits you in having the opportunity to share your experiences with others who have gone through the same or similar situations. Both of these types of therapy offer you strong support and help you through your treatment process.

Aftercare Treatment

Finally, another core element of all effective rehab programs is aftercare treatment. It can be difficult to transition back into your daily life after you have completed your rehab. An aftercare treatment program can help to make things easier as you gradually return to your regular, everyday life. You may be assisted in returning to the workforce through being introduced to employment, educational or vocational training opportunities. You may also be offered additional therapy sessions to continue every day or weekly while you return your normal routine. You may find it easier to work during the day or care for your family and then return to aftercare treatment to ensure that you stay successful with your newfound sobriety.

If you are ready to get started on the road to recovery, we can help. Call us today at 800-737-0933.

Does Suboxone Cause or Affect Mood Swings?

Suboxone is a medication that is prescribed to treat opiate addiction. Suboxone contains a combination of buprenorphine and naloxone. Buprenorphine is a medication containing opioids and naloxone is a substance that blocks the effects of opioid medication (e.g., pain relief and feelings of well-being) that often lead individuals to seek out opioids after recovery. Suboxone has several side effects and may cause issues with mental health and mood swings.

Suboxone as a TreatmentThis medication is prescribed in several different types of situations. Doctors may prescribe Suboxone in order to aid the process of withdrawal and detoxification. Doctors also prescribe Suboxone as a long term maintenance medication for opiate addiction. Individuals who meet certain criteria may be able to continue to take Suboxone for an extended period of time in order to control cravings and allow their brain to heal and begin to block the cravings for opioid use. Suboxone has also been prescribed to individuals who suffer from chronic pain as an alternative to traditional narcotic pain relievers.

There are several pros and cons related to Suboxone use. It helps control cravings, has anti-depressant qualities, and blocks the effects of narcotic opioids. As for the cons of Suboxone, it is an extremely powerful synthetic opioid, it may cause constipation, there is a period of withdrawal after quitting Suboxone, and it may induce depression and other issues related to mental health. Suboxone also has a high risk of abuse.

Side Effects of Suboxone UseSuboxone works in such a way that it binds to the opioid receptors located in the brain, which causes changes in the user's mental state and behaviors. Changes in behavior related to Suboxone use can include:

  • Lethargy
  • Cravings
  • Distress
  • Fear
  • Anxiety
  • Agitation
  • Mood Swings
  • Impaired memory

Suboxone also causes physical side effects. Physical side effects of Suboxone use may include:

  • Headaches
  • Changes in appetite
  • Stomach pain
  • Dependency
  • Issues with coordination
  • Insomnia
  • Cramps
  • Muscle Aches
  • Reduced breathing
  • Liver damage
  • Withdrawal symptoms (e.g., joint pain and excessive sweating)

Does Suboxone Cause or Affect Mood Swings? Due to the fact that Suboxone is an extremely powerful mind-altering drug, it may cause mood swings, depression, agitation, and may make people taking it to act out of character and engage in violent behavior. Suboxone alters the brain chemistry of its users and may affect their behavior, specifically if they quit taking the medication abruptly. As stated before, the side effects of Suboxone can include depression, anxiety, mood swings, and insomnia.

Long-term use of Suboxone can cause many issues. Long-term Suboxone users have reported that quitting Suboxone is more difficult than quitting heroin or Oxycontin. This is due to the long-half life Suboxone. It is able to stay in the user's system for approximately eight to nine days. This makes the detoxification process from Suboxone last for weeks to months. This long detoxification process includes uncomfortable side effects that are both physical and mental in nature. This includes mood swings and depression.

If you or a loved one is having difficulty with Suboxone use, please contact us today at 800-737-0933. Our counselors are available 24 hours a day and are ready to assist you and consult with you regarding your specific needs.

What Certifications Do You Need to Work at an Alcohol Treatment Facility?

The number of professions in the addiction field is projected to grow three times than the average profession in the next decade due to the increased awareness of addiction as a disease and the use of treatment over incarceration. If you are personally in addiction recovery, you may feel compelled to work in the addiction field because you will be able to empathize with clients and help people who are struggling with the same issues that you have struggled with. However, working in the addiction field is also a great option even if you are a non-recovering person who just possesses a passion for helping people.

Positions at an alcohol treatment facility include, but are not limited to• Addictions counselor and/or marriage and family therapist• Detox Nurse or other medical staff• Receptionist or residential aid• Social worker of case managerThe education needed for these positions varies from a high school diploma to a master’s degree. You can always start in an entry-level position (e.g. receptionist) to gain experience and make connections while you are going to school to earn your degree to pursue a position that requires more education (e.g. addictions counselor).

Your Education Options for Becoming an Addictions Counselor

If you are interested in helping clients find the underlying cause for their addiction and helping them work through it, becoming an addictions counselor may be for you. Addictions counselors may also help educate their clients’ families on the disease and the resources that are available to them. There are many different education paths that can lead to becoming an addictions counselor. The licensing requirements vary by state.

An addictions counselor certification with a high school diploma, associate’s degree, or bachelor’s degree is the first step in the right direction to becoming an addictions counselor. You can receive an entry-level certification to start practicing in most states with a certificate or undergraduate degree. However, those who possess at least a bachelor’s degree will have a better chance of finding a job and making a decent salary. A master’s degree will make it the easiest to obtain a position that offers a livable salary.

Since many people who struggle with addiction also have a co-occurring disorder, being a licensed clinical social worker (LSCW) or licensed professional counselor (LPC) will give you a special advantage because you will have knowledge of mental health disorders beyond addiction. In addition to earning a degree and taking the required courses, internship hours and a licensing exam are often required. Working in any position as an alcohol treatment facility offers many personal and professional benefits. Contact a local treatment center at 800-737-0933or your state’s licensing agency to find out more.

Will You Ever Feel “Ready” for a Treatment Center in Lake Worth, FL?

If you have already tried to quit drinking or using your drug of choice, you already know that the addiction has a powerful hold over you. On top of the control your substance abuse problem has over you, you may feel uncertain about going into a Lake Worth, FL treatment center. There are a lot of rumors and myths that cause people to fear the prospect of addiction treatment, but, deep down, you know it's really your only alternative.

How do you know you're really ready to put yourself in the hands of a Lake Worth, FL treatment center? If you're thinking about it, you already know the answer, but you may be afraid to admit it to yourself. You just have to realize that addiction only ever ends in one of two ways. Either you get the help you need, or your substance abuse worsens until you suffer a fatal overdose. If you still feel unsure, or hesitant, there are some signs that you can identify within yourself that suggest it's time for addiction treatment.

Maybe My Addiction Isn't Bad Enough

In a 2012 survey, it was discovered that only 10% of people struggling with addiction ever sought treatment. When asked why they never committed to an organized addiction treatment plan, the respondents said they didn't feel their substance abuse problem was severe enough. Although there's an assumption that you have to hit rock bottom in order to benefit from treatment, this is a completely false myth. The only criteria for addiction treatment is believing that you need help to quit. Even if it's just one drink, or one dose a day, there's no shame in asking for help.

You may still want to know just how severe your addiction has become. Basically, if your substance abuse is interfering with your education or career, or if it's affecting your family and social relationships, you do have a severe addiction. In diagnosing an addiction, Lake Worth treatment center counselors use a sliding scale to determine the severity of the substance abuse problem. The factors they consider are:

  • Inability to control substance use
  • Inability to quit without help
  • Time spent trying to obtain the substance
  • Severity or frequency of cravings
  • Failing to meet responsibilities
  • Damaged relationships
  • Loss of interest in healthier activities
  • Dangerous or criminal drug-seeking behavior
  • A tolerance to the substance
  • The severity of withdrawal symptoms

My Friends Say I'm Fine

Even if you fear you may have an addiction problem, your friends may disagree and try to convince you that you don't need help. If this sounds like your situation, try to take an honest look at the substance use behaviors of those friends. If they also excessively use or like to party frequently, they may be afraid of losing your company. While that's only natural, it's not really helping you to live a better life.

Alternatively, your friends may not recognize your need for help, because they don't know the extent of your addiction. Often, people will hide their substance abuse from close friends and family members. If you have been doing this, you have to keep in mind that the opinion you're hearing is not based in fact. If you really want an honest opinion, you will have to tell your friends everything.

Your Addiction is Getting Worse

When you don't seek help when you know you need it, you're only hurting yourself. As you continue to use, you'll build up stronger and stronger tolerances, which means you'll have to keep using more of the substance to achieve the same effect. Eventually, you'll be using just to feel "normal," while the substance is damaging your mind and body.

In truth, you may never feel ready for rehab, even when your brain and body are telling you otherwise. It's far better to seek help and find out later that you didn't need it, rather than continuously risk your life on dangerous substance abuse. If you think you have a problem and you can't function without a dose or a drink, that may be all of the indications you need to know you're ready for treatment.

Even if you're still unsure, call one of our counselors at 800-737-0933 to discuss your situation. They can help you determine if addiction treatment can help you and which types of treatment plans are best for you. Depending on the severity of your addiction, you may even be able to receive treatment on an outpatient basis. Our counselors are available 24 hours a day to offer the help you need.

How Does Life in Rehab Prepare You for Life After Discharge?

Addiction recovery is filled with frightening changes that test your strength and your ability to adapt. It starts with admitting you need help and gathering the courage to ask for it. From there, you're faced with detox to help you get clean and sober, followed by a lengthy addiction treatment program. By the time you're ready to return home, you've grown so much that you're an entirely different person. This, in itself, can be a frightening prospect, because it will be the first time in months that you'll truly be on your own.

Even though you may feel alone, you haven't been abandoned by your caregivers. You will still have your group meetings and individual therapy with your counselor to help you stay mentally fit. In addition, the treatment center hasn't released you into the street with just the clothes on your back. Throughout your treatment, they have provided you with training, counseling, and resources that you can use to rebuild your life.

Learning to Live on Your Own

Many recovering addicts fear their release from rehab because they know they're leaving a safe environment. The treatment facility staff won't be looking over your shoulder to keep you from getting access to drugs or alcohol. It will be up to you to resist the temptation, but you now have the skills to make smarter choices. Rehab facilities teach patients healthier ways of coping with stress and other triggers. It still won't be easy, but those coping mechanisms will help you stay clean.

You will also leave treatment armed with the skills you need for successful independent living. Many people turn to drugs and alcohol out of a feeling of hopelessness, which is brought on by a lack of life skills. While in rehab, you'll receive training in some of the following areas:

  • Keeping a daily itinerary
  • Sticking to a healthy diet
  • Personal hygiene
  • Personal finance

Learning to Communicate with Others

Even if you don't have a co-occurring mental illness, one part of your addiction recovery program will focus on helping you deal with your emotions. Alcoholism and drug addiction affect our emotional states, making it difficult to express emotions in healthy ways. The counseling you'll receive in rehab will help you work out your feelings and express them better. You may not completely master your emotions by the time you finish the rehab program, but, at the very least, you'll have better control over them.

Learning new socialization skills is another valuable part of rehab, which will prepare you for your return to society. In the past, your addiction either caused you to destroy your existing relationships or inhibit your ability to form new friendships. Socialization training will help you learn how to communicate more effectively, so you'll be better equipped to handle social interactions. This skill is especially important for you as a recovering addict because you will have to forge new, healthier friendships.

Continue to Learn and Grow After Rehab

You may also be able to get a head start on rebuilding more practical aspects of your life. Your rehab facility may offer services and resources to help you go back to school, find a job, or rent an apartment. Your return to society will be easier if you can make arrangements for independent living upon your completion of the program. Even if you transition into a sober living home, or stay with family on a temporary basis, you'll still have the skills you need to rebuild your life.

When you consider all of this training and counseling, you begin to see that your fears of leaving the treatment facility are unfounded. You're more equipped to handle your freedom and your adult responsibilities than you may realize. When problems present themselves, you'll be able to cope with the emotions in a healthy way, while your practical training gives you the tools you need to solve the problem. When you consider the preparation you received throughout your addiction recovery treatment, you may realize you're even more prepared for life than your peers.

Recovering from any addiction is a long and difficult road, but you won't have to take that journey without help. From the moment you commit to your recovery, you will have your family and your rehab caregivers for support. If you are ready to begin the recovery process, start by calling our counselors at 800-737-0933. We can answer your questions and help you get started with your treatment.

What Are the Benefits of an Individualized Treatment Program for Addiction?

Facing and overcoming addiction requires more than the desire to live a sober and drug-free life. In addition to the desire to want to live drug-free, it is also imperative to have moral and emotional support in addition to a temptation-free living environment. Understanding the benefits of an individualized treatment program for addiction is essential when you are seeking the proper resources to begin living a substance-free life.

Types of Individualized Treatment Programs

Obtaining individualized treatment to overcome an addiction is one way to remain motivated and committed to your goals throughout the program you choose to complete. Individualized treatment is highly recommended for individuals who have relapsed in the past or for those who simply have difficulty completing traditional rehabilitation programs. With an individualized treatment program, individuals in need are provided with resources that are most relevant to their own lives and current addictions.

There are many types of individualized services available with a treatment program designed just for you while working towards overcoming addiction. From monitored detoxing to individualized therapy, creating an individualized treatment program to help overcome your addiction is highly recommended for the best possible outcome and results.

Medically-Monitored Detoxing

If you are struggling with a physical and potentially life-threatening addiction to drugs or alcohol, medically-monitored detoxing may be a service that is right for you with an inpatient drug rehabilitation program you have chosen. A medically-monitored detox ensures the health and safety of individuals who are detoxing from the use of potentially deadly drugs such as heroin, opiates, benzodiazepines, methamphetamine, cocaine, Fentanyl, and even alcohol. A medically-monitored detox ensures certified medical staff who are specially trained in addictions, overdoses, and adverse responses of withdrawal are nearby and readily available to assist an individual in need throughout the detox process.

Work Alongside Medical Professionals and Addiction Specialists

When you create an individualized treatment program to help with overcoming your addiction, work alongside professionals in the medical and addiction industries. Work with both physicians and therapists to determine the root causes and triggers of your addiction so you are able to better prevent a relapse in the future. Learn which treatments work best for you and which are more likely to lead you to give in to temptation once you have completed your rehabilitation program.

Individualized Therapy

Individualized therapy sessions are highly advisable for anyone in need of additional moral and emotional support while overcoming addiction and living a life of sobriety. Working one-on-one with a therapist is a way to learn how to better and more effectively communicate your thoughts and emotions regarding your addiction and the obstacles you face each day.

Learn to express yourself when discussing your addiction without feelings of shame or guilt. Overcome the weight and guilt of having addiction by opening up to a professional therapist who specializes in addiction treatment regularly.

Group Therapy/Counseling Sessions

Attending group therapy and group counseling sessions is another way to take advantage of an individualized treatment program that is right for you. Group therapy and counseling sessions are ideal if you are in need of additional moral and emotional support while working through obstacles and trying times as you are living a sober life. Consider the opportunity to obtain a sponsor when attending group therapy sessions to prevent a potential relapse when you are thinking of giving in to temptation or a tempting environment such as a bar, club, or nightclub.

Follow-Up/Aftercare Services

With an individualized treatment program designed for overcoming addiction, utilize follow-up resources and aftercare services that are promoted and available in your local area. Aftercare services help to keep individuals on track in their journey to a life of sobriety even after they have completed an inpatient or outpatient rehabilitation treatment program.

Understanding the benefits of an individualized treatment program for addiction is vital when you are seeking help for your own struggles or a loved one's addiction. With the right treatment program, facing and overcoming an addiction becomes much more feasible. Setting goals and attaining them while living a life of sobriety is much more likely with an individualized treatment program that is truly suitable for you.

Are you ready to move forward with an individualized treatment program that is just right for you? Our counselors are available 24 hours a day and ready to take your call. Call 800-737-0933
for more information regarding individualized treatment programs that we currently have available in your area today.

How Do Medical Professionals Handle Heroin Addiction in Comparison to Other Drug Addictions?

Heroin is one of the most dangerous and addictive street drugs in the world. It is an opiate that will rewrite the brain's perception of pleasure and reward in ways that many other substances do not, so withdrawal from the substance can be far more painful than from other drugs. This is why medical professionals have to handle heroin addiction much more delicately than addiction from other substances.

Detox

The first and perhaps most important step in treating heroin addiction is the detoxification process. This can be harrowing for patients under the most ideal circumstances, and it should never be attempted alone. Many patients need to undergo medical detox, which ensures that they are weaned off of heroin in a controlled environment instead of quitting outright. They may also be provided with medications to help them control their withdrawal symptoms, which is often a crucial part of the rehab process. This usually involves taking suboxone, a medication that can in itself be addictive and should only be taken in a clinical setting.

Counseling

Much of what makes heroin addiction treatment different from other addiction treatment is getting over the physical addiction and managing the harsh withdrawal symptoms, but it is far from the only element of treatment. Once a patient has properly detoxed and is mostly over their physical addiction, they often have to undergo counseling and treatment to address the reasons why they turned to heroin in the first place. This process can take anywhere from a few months to several years depending on the patient's situation. As we said before, heroin alters the brain's perception of pleasure and reward, and any addiction treatment will involve basically rewriting one's thought process. This cognitive therapy and counseling can be just as difficult as overcoming the physical addiction, and it should be taken very seriously.

There is no doubt that heroin is one of the most dangerous illicit drugs available today. It is part of the reason why there is such a severe opiate addiction epidemic in the United States, and it continues to claim thousands of lives every year. If you or a loved one is struggling with an addiction to heroin, know that there is hope for you. Contact our treatment center today at 800-737-0933 for more information. Our counselors are available 24 hours a day, and they will gladly help you find the treatment that you need.

Detox during pregnancy

I’m An Atheist. Is It Still Possible For Me to Go to A Christian Detox Center?

The first goal of any good rehab center is helping clients to rediscover the joys of life without the burden of addiction. This is true for treatment centers that are affiliated with religious organizations, church denominations, and scientific communities. The vast majority of clinics and addiction recovery centers are focused on helping people emerge from dependency.

The main differences in detox center programs lie in their treatment program philosophies. Mainstream centers operate on programs that are designed with scientific data as their foundation. Recovery centers that claim affiliation with a church organization incorporate certain spiritual principles. Both types have the goal of helping clients navigate through a particular struggle with dependency. Both types are successful, and they are abundant to people in most regions.

What if an Atheist Wants Help From a Religious Detox Program?

There are recovery programs that are specifically reserved for people belonging to a religious organization. In order to participate, clients must show membership in the stated organization. They must adhere to a specific set of spiritual values. These recovery programs are relatively few. They are also typically only known to people within the organization.

Other tight-knit recovery programs extend funding for treatment only to members of the organization. In these cases, access is only provided to people who match a philosophical profile. These programs are exclusive but are highly effective and attractive to people who meet organizational standards. Again, these church-based programs are rare.

The vast majority of recovery programs offered by religious organizations openly welcome clients who are struggling with spiritual issues, or who profess an atheist worldview. These programs are guided by spiritual principles, but they do not necessarily limit their outreach to those possessing a certain personal spiritual belief system.

What Should an Atheist Expect?

If an atheist chooses to take part in a program that incorporates spiritual elements, they should expect treatment that is dynamic. Recovery centers that are affiliated with a religious organization derive their treatment philosophies from scientific, sociological, and denominational studies. Every meeting and conversation will likely have elements that address medical and spiritual issues. Within the confines of these centers, every aspect of humanity is explored. They include,

* Controversial and spiritual issues.

* Morality issues in the scope of modern living.

* Establishing personal networks with diverse people.

* Reasons for choosing sobriety using varied religious and social tools.

An atheist who enrolls in a church-based recovery program should expect to interact daily with professionals who believe that a person’s spiritual condition is important in how they learn to overcome addiction issues.

In Christian addiction recovery centers, there is a strong belief that a “higher power” is influential in making changes. Christian beliefs maintain that personal transformation is only possible with the recognition that God has established rules for behavior. These rules provide a client with a way of coping with addictive personality elements. A client who develops a strong relationship with God will learn that there is an inexhaustible source of strength when it comes to dealing with addictive tendencies.

An atheist has the option of using God as a “safety,” but they are never required to do so in a Christian recovery program. The program is usually designed to provide the client with options. They can choose to explore spiritual elements, or they can focus on elements that are purely clinical. If a Christian program is chosen, an atheist should expect that God-oriented subject matters will be used in every aspect of the treatment. This is not normally an attempt to convert a person to a belief system. It is an effort to introduce a client to a value system that can be helpful in any struggle.

The Openness of Christian Recovery Programs

It is very rare for a Christian program to refuse service to a client based on the condition of claiming to be an atheist. The main mission of these organizations is to help people transition from a life of addiction. If a person is an atheist however, they should expect that their treatment will be provided through the lens of a worldview that includes a “higher power.”

Professionals who provide services at a Christian recovery center are generally aware that some clients claim no affiliation to spiritual beliefs and religious organizations. Still, they are staffed with counselors who are trained in mainstream medical and psychological sciences. Christian addiction recovery counselors are trained extremely well in addressing the needs of people with diverse backgrounds and worldviews. Often, the environment at a Christian center is superior, and more comfortable, for people seeking comprehensive treatment.

When an atheist explores recovery options including centers with religious affiliations, they should not be discouraged. Many times, these centers are the best economic choice. They can also provide the most professional care. An atheist should be aware that their treatment will likely involve talk and practical exercises that provide the option of relying on spiritual aspects for help. The aim is not to offend, but to provide the client with powerful options for full recovery. If you are an atheist, do not rule out the option for recovery treatment at a facility that incorporates religious principles. Call us at 800-737-0933 to explore all of your detox and recovery facility options.

How Can People With Chronic Pain Quit Heroin?

You can manage chronic pain and quit heroin while learning how to reduce the risk of substance abuse. Painkillers or its derivatives are adequate for most and as the pain worsens relief demands more frequent doses leading to potential drug dependency.

Too often individuals attempt to self-medicate and trigger more serious health conditions. There are effective non-opioid drugs combined with different types of therapeutic and medical procedures for treating chronic pain and addiction.

The approach is multi-disciplinary; transitioning from heroin to a non-opioid medication, treatments for pain, and the introductions of precautions to prevent drug relapse.

More Than Just Pain

A vast majority of individual’s suffering with chronic pain are unaware they have a substance abuse problem. Besides the health considerations that will worsen over time substance abuse interferes with the body’s genetic makeup and biological functions. At this point, reversing the effect is difficult without some form of professional assistance.

For most, addiction to heroin occurs with long-term use as the chemicals change how our body responds. Did you know?

  • Heroin does not heal or repair the cause of chronic pain.
  • Heroin offers only short-term intervals for relieving chronic pain.
  • Heroin can cause mild to extreme side effects that interfere with day-to-day functions.

Heroin and other painkillers belong to the same class of drugs called opioids. Opioids attach to receptors found on the nerve cells in the brain interfering with the signals that alert the body to pain. For some, it may decrease the level of pain temporarily and prompt a feeling of euphoria.

Non-Opioid Pain Treatments

Heroin isn’t the only chronic pain treatment option. Like heroin, all medications or illegal drugs have potential risk factors. Contributing to these risks are personal health status and family medical disorders.

  • Do you know if other types of substance abuse or psychiatric disorders exist?

The outcome could be affected when one or more of these factors exist. This information helps to select the combinations of medicine and therapy for the individual’s lifestyle and level of pain.

Addiction programs incorporate specialized doctors and alternative health teams to help cope with the situation. Depending on the severity of heroin use the withdrawal process can cause:

  • Cold flashes
  • Insomnia
  • Muscle or bone pain
  • Restlessness

Treating chronic pain without heroin involves physical, psychological, and occupational therapies along with a medical supervisor of nonopioid pain treatments or medicine.

Getting Rid of The Pain Without Heroin

Chronic pain is manageable with medications and alternative practices achieving fewer adverse effects on your health. Treatment starts with understanding that both the physical and mental components of one’s health are involved in recovery.

Facts of treating pain with heroin:

  • The body builds a tolerance to heroin with long-term use
  • The pain remains.
  • Opioids (heroin) are addictive, dangerous and life-threatening.

Technology and medical advances address the source of the pain collectively with non-opioid medications and therapies. Recovery centers provide a safe and caring environment.

Residential programs offer personal and group follow-up care. The goal is to help teach individuals how to live life without addiction through a continuum of care.

Managing Life One Day A Time

The good news, physical dependence on heroin is reversible. By focusing on the cause of addiction and responding to chronic pain, you can learn how to deal with it and quit heroin.

  • It’s not a process that you can maneuver alone.
  • You need the help of trained professionals.

Recovery is a long journey and treatment to the addiction is only the first phase. To quit heroin, you must continue to maintain your physical and mental health one day at a time. See your doctor regularly for the pain to prevent a relapse. More important, if you experience a relapse urge, seek support – it happens from time to time.

Dealing with chronic pain is unbearable but blocking out the pain with heroin can only cause more damage to your health. Rather than live with addiction, there’s help available to minimize the effects of withdrawal and teach you how to manage a life with chronic pain instead.

Using heroin to quite chronic pain comes with a wide range of potential risks and side effects. Call our office at 800-737-0933 if you find yourself thinking about taking higher doses or more powerful drugs for pain.

What Resources Do You Have to Quit Meth If You Don’t Have Insurance?

Taking illicit street narcotics like meth has a way of making people feel good in the beginning, only to end up ultimately causing severe problems in their lives. There's absolutely nothing good about someone having to live with an addiction to meth.

The good news is meth addiction does not have to destroy lives. If caught in time, this is one disease that can be arrested with the proper treatment. Setting aside all the crazy Internet cures for drug addiction, the best and only viable way to beat an addiction to meth or any other substance is by seeking help from a reputable addiction treatment center.

When considering where and when to get treatment, a prospective patient has a lot of choices to make. At the end of the day, paying for treatment usually presents the biggest obstacle. If the individual has a viable healthcare insurance plan, paying for treatment becomes less of a problem. Why?

When the Affordable Care Act of 2009 was signed into law, it gave insurance companies a clear directive about how to treat addiction treatment costs. Cutting to the chase, insurance companies have to cover said costs the same way as they would any other medical condition. A particular policy may only cover a portion of the costs, but the patient will know ahead of time how much their potential exposure is going to be after their insurance benefits have been applied.

With only partial coverage or no coverage at all, the patient is going to have to find other resources to pay for treatment. Before we go on to discuss possible resources, it's worth noting that outpatient care is significantly cheaper than inpatient care. It may not be the most appropriate treatment option, but it's certainly better than passing on treatment altogether. Under no circumstances should anyone allow finances to deter them from getting much-needed addiction treatment.

Let's move on and discuss possible ways to pay for rehab if healthcare insurance is not available.

Paying for Meth Addiction Treatment Without Insurance

With the right motivation, a prospective addiction treatment patient should be able to identify possible payment resources. Beating the addiction and reclaiming a better life should provide that motivation.

Given the possible payment options could be difficult to identify, we thought we could help by offering a few viable suggestions. We would suggest the following:

  • Using personal savings, even 401K retirement monies if available
  • Credit cards and personal loans
  • Scholarships and grants
  • Rehab facility financing

Let's explore these options a little closer.

Personal Savings

If you have invested in your future by setting aside money for retirement or a major asset purchase, it might be a good idea to use said funds for treatment. The truth is nothing in life is more important that your health and personal welfare. Perhaps, the best way to invest in your future is by making sure you have a future. No matter how much of your savings you use to get help with your addiction, you'll have other opportunities to replenish those funds at some point in the future.

Credit Cards and Personal Loans

Debt is a scary thing. In fact, debt can sometimes be one of the reasons why someone felt a need to escape reality through self-medication. Still, taking out a personal loan or using credit cards to pay for treatment would make sense if all other options were unavailable. Secured debt would be preferable because of the lower costs associated with borrowing. Credit cards are easy to use but come with higher borrowing costs. Either way, the borrower should treat borrowing for treatment as a necessity and repay said debt as soon as possible without stressing.

Rehab Facility Financing

Many of the nations top rehab facilities offer ways for patients to finance treatment costs in-house. With a leaning towards compassion, it's quite possible the rehab facility will offer patient-friendly terms that might include discounts. An individual's credit profile might be relevant.

Scholarships And Grants

Through endowments and donations, some rehab organization is able to offer scholarships and/or grants to help pay for addiction treatment costs. There's also a number of government agencies and independent charitable organizations that might have funds available to help members of the community get the help they need.

If you need help but aren't sure how to cover the costs, you need to give us a call at 800-737-0933. We will do everything we can to get you into treatment and help you find the resources to pay for treatment.