How Lethal Is a Methadone and Xanax Combination?

It might surprise some people to find out that prescription medications are often used to treat people with addictions to drugs. If that sounds counterproductive or dangerous, you shouldn’t be too concerned given that the prescription drugs will be administered by a medical professional who works for the rehab center.

If you are wondering what kinds of prescription medication is being prescribed, there are some very important medications that doctors will prescribe to help clients go through detox. While some of these medications are intended to help clients deal with pain and sleeping issues, there are other medications that are used to help them safely wean clients off very dangerous illicit substances like heroin and fentanyl. One such medication is called methadone. Methadone is an opiate that’s used to help opioid addiction sufferers taper away from other opiates.

In rehab, clients might also have to continue taking medications they need to help them deal with psychological or mental disorders. A good example of such a medication would be a drug like Xanax. Xanax is a benzodiazepine used mainly for the treatment of anxiety.

Moving forward, the discussion is going to center on both methadone and Xanax and the dangers of using these two medications at the same. This discussion is relative because of the likelihood it could occur in rehab and does occur sometimes on the streets.

How Lethal Is a Methadone and Xanax Combination?

Before starting this discussion, it’s important to note that at no time should someone take multiple drugs without first consulting with a doctor. There are significant risks associated with combining substances without a clear understanding of how the substances are going to interact with one another. The combination of methadone and Xanax is a clear example of how dangerous combing substances can be.

To be very clear, no one should combine methadone and Xanax without a prescription from a doctor. Furthermore, it’s vitally important that the client strictly follow the doctor’s prescription as written. The following information will clarify why that’s so important.

The first area of concern in regards to the combination of these two substances is the effect the combination will have on the individual’s respiratory system. You see, both methadone and Xanax have properties than tend to suppress a person’s respiratory system. If someone were to take both medications at the same time, it would have the effect of doubling up on those the properties that suppress respiration. Even the slightest error in dosage could lead the client to have great difficulty breathing. Effectively, it could lead to the individual dying of an opioid overdose.

Both methadone and Xanax acts as sedatives. That would make sense given methadone is an opioid and Xanax is used to treat anxiety disorders. Again, taking both substances at the same time would have the effect of doubling up on the sedation. While that unto itself is not terribly dangerous, the sedative effect combined with any interruption in breathing could be lethal.

Alternative Solution

In an addiction treatment setting, doctors would be leery about allowing clients to keep taking Xanax while using methadone to wean off opiates. Does that leave the client exposed to issues with their anxiety disorder? Yes, it probably does. However, there are other medications the rehab facility’s doctor could prescribe as an alternative to Xanax. It could be a medication that significantly cuts down the risk of harm when combined with methadone. The solution would be temporary given the likelihood the client could resume taking Xanax once they have completed their methadone treatment program.

Dealing with poly-substance Abuse

Both methadone and Xanax are high on the list of medications that get abused. They are both also high on the list of substances that have addictive properties. When someone enters rehab with an addiction to multiple substances, they are said to be victims of poly-substance abuse. Rehabs have programs to deal with such addictions, but the process is obviously complicated by the fact doctors and therapists have more issues they have to consider during treatment.

As stated above, you would be taking a terrible risk if you decided to start abusing Xanax and any type of opiate substance at the same time. If you find yourself addicted to either or both of these types of substances, you need to contact us as soon as possible about coming in for treatment. You can reach us 24/7 by dialing 800-737-0933. Given the risks you are facing with addiction, now is the time to call.

How Can I Manage Pain Symptoms During a Hydrocodone Detox?

If you’re ready to end your relationship with hydrocodone, there are a few things that you should know. Similar to other drugs, the withdrawal symptoms that come with going through detox can be severe and, in some cases, may even lead to relapse. Some of the withdrawal symptoms commonly associated with abrupt hydrocodone cessation include nausea, vomiting, diarrhea, fatigue, anxiety, and depression. And these symptoms can last between 5 and 7 days on average. While all of these symptoms are unpleasant, most will agree that the pain associated with coming off of the powerful narcotic is by far the worse. Fortunately, many rehab facilities provide substance abuse treatments that can help ease pain and many other symptoms that make achieving sobriety difficult.

WHAT TO EXPECT WHILE DETOXING FROM HYDROCODONE

Now that we have a basic understanding of the withdrawal symptoms that one is likely to face as they work toward ending their relationship with hydrocodone, let’s take a closer look at the withdrawal timeline. According to a study published by Medical News Today, an online resource for medical news aimed at both physicians and the general public, hydrocodone withdrawal symptoms often present themselves within 6 to 12 hours following an individual’s last dose. And all of these symptoms, including pain, can vary in intensity depending on how long an individual has been using and how much of the drug they were consuming before starting their detox journey.

MANAGING PAIN WHILE DETOXING FROM HYDROCODONE

When it comes to helping individuals cope with pain symptoms associated with coming off of hydrocodone, many rehab facilities will offer medication-assisted detox, which includes the use of various prescription-based medications that have been approved by the FDA (Food and Drug Administration). Along with helping to soothe pain, many of these same medications are effective in easing many of the other symptoms that can make getting through detox challenging, such as nausea, vomiting, and diarrhea, for example. That said, some of the prescription-based medications used by most rehab facilities include

Buprenorphine – This FDA-approved medication is classified as a partial opioid agonist, which means that it blocks opioid receptors in the brain that are responsible for triggering the euphoric high that comes with abusing hydrocodone and many other opioids. It is also worth noting that buprenorphine is a long-acting partial opioid agonist that carries a low risk for abuse. Along with pain, this prescription-based medication also provides relief from several other symptoms, including anxiety, sweating, and vomiting.

Clonidine – Commonly prescribed to treat high blood pressure and ADHD (attention deficit hyperactivity disorder), clonidine is yet another FDA-approved medication that is used to treat severe withdrawal symptoms. Studies show that clonidine helps block chemicals in the brain that would otherwise lead to sympathetic nervous system activity, a condition that triggers muscle pain, anxiety, sweating, and vomiting while individuals are going through detox.

Methadone – Similar to buprenorphine, methadone is a long-acting partial opioid agonist that works by blocking opioid receptors in the brain, which, in turn, eases pain and other symptoms associated with coming off of hydrocodone. It is important to note that methadone is highly addictive. Therefore it must be taken as prescribed to avoid the risk of substituting one drug problem for another one.

NON-PRESCRIPTION PAIN MANAGEMENT TREATMENTS

Ideally, individuals who are trying to overcome an addiction to hydrocodone should seek the help of a licensed rehab facility, preferably one that offers medication-assisted detox. However, for those who are trying to quit using on their own, there are over-the-counter medications that you can take to ease severe withdrawal symptoms, including

Tylenol – For those who are struggling with minor aches and pains while going through detox, Tylenol can provide some much-needed relief. However, much like prescription-based medication, it must be taken responsibly. Therefore, you will want to follow the instructions on the packaging for safe and effective dosing.

Loperamide – Also known as Imodium, loperamide is an over-the-counter medication that can help combat diarrhea. Studies show that loperamide works by reducing movement in the gut, which can reduce bowel movements while bulking up loose stool.

Electrolytes – While detoxing from hydrocodone, it is not uncommon to experience vomiting and diarrhea, both of which can result in a loss of fluids and dehydration. The best way to combat both of these problems is by consuming sports drinks, such as Gatorade, that contain electrolytes. Staying hydrated can also help ease pain symptoms as well.

BOTTOM LINE

All in all, there are many ways to cope with pain and other symptoms associated with overcoming hydrocodone addiction. To learn more about the prescription and at-home treatments detailed in this article, consider speaking with one of our friendly addiction specialists today at 800-737-0933.

Can Opiate Detox Facilities Help Manage Withdrawal Through Medication?

When abused, opiate drugs exert a hold on the mind and body that lingers for much longer than you might expect. The longer you abuse opiates the harder it is to stop taking these drugs. For these reasons, opiate detox facilities use medication treatment for withdrawal to help patients make it through the detox stage of recovery. Keep reading to see how opiates work on the brain’s chemical processes and how medication treatment for withdrawal can help you take back your life from addiction.

Opiate Effects on the Brain

Not too many types of drugs can interfere with the brain’s chemical makeup like opiates do. Opiate-based drugs, such as Vicodin, hydrocodone, codeine and heroin have a chemical composition that closely resembles that of certain neurotransmitter chemicals in the brain. Dopamine, norepinephrine and serotonin neurotransmitters all share chemical compounds that are similar to opiates. These similarities enable opiate-based drugs to change the brain’s chemical makeup over time.

As opiates change the brain’s chemical system, the brain becomes increasingly dependent on opiates to function normally. As this takes place, the brain cells that interact with opiates become less sensitive to opiate effects over time. This means, larger doses of the drug are needed to keep the brain running as it should.

After a certain point, long-term abuse of opiates or taking large doses on a regular basis will disrupt the brain’s ability to regulate the body’s systems. Once this happens, a severe physical dependence on the drug has developed. The systems most affected by opiate dependence include:

  • The limbic system, which regulates emotions
  • Cognitive-based systems, which regulate thinking and behavior
  • Sleep cycles
  • The reward system, which regulates learning and motivation

Opiate Detox Withdrawal Effects

Opiate detox facilities focus on easing the withdrawal effects that occur when opiate use stops. Withdrawal effects reflect the state of disarray the body is in due to the chemical imbalances caused by opiate abuse. When opiate abuse stops, the brain can’t yet produce the number of neurotransmitters needed to keep the body’s systems running normally. As a result, the following withdrawal effects occur:

  • Severe depression
  • Nausea and vomiting
  • Fever and profuse sweating
  • Anxiety
  • Tremors
  • Mental fog

Opiate detox facilities use medication treatment for withdrawal to help the brain’s chemical system adjust to detox. In the absence of some form of medication support, withdrawal effects can quickly overwhelm your efforts to stop using. When this happens, the risk of relapse runs especially high.

Treating Opiate Withdrawal With Medication

While many may believe overcoming addiction is a matter of willpower, opiate addiction is a chronic physical condition, much like heart disease and diabetes. Long-term opiate abuse leaves behind long-term damage in the brain. Medications used to treat opiate withdrawal support the brain’s chemical processes so that it can function normally. The severity of your abuse problem will determine how you’ll need to keep taking medication.

Medications Used to Treat Opiate Withdrawal

Medication-based treatments for opiate withdrawal use specially formulated, opiate-derived drugs that interact with the same brain neurotransmitter processes as opiates. These medications produce controlled effects that don’t set off the abuse-addiction cycle like heroin and prescription painkillers do. In turn, these controlled effects work to wean the brain and body off addictive opiates.

Two medications -methadone and Suboxone- are commonly used in the treatment of opiate withdrawal. When ingested on a daily basis, these medications relieve the effects of withdrawal and also help reduce drug cravings. Methadone and Suboxone differ in how they accomplish these ends.

Methadone is a full opiate agonist, meaning it helps the brain produce needed levels of neurotransmitter chemicals. As a controlled substance, opiate detox facilities must distribute methadone on a daily basis. In this way, overdose risks can be prevented.

Suboxone contains two medications: buprenorphine and naloxone. Buprenorphine is a partial opioid agonist. It has a built-in ceiling effect that greatly lowers the risk for overdose. This mechanism also prevents patients from getting high on the drug.

Naloxone, the second ingredient, acts as an opioid antidote. As an opioid antidote, naloxone acts as a safety precaution by triggering severe withdrawal in cases where patients try to dissolve and inject Suboxone. Unlike methadone, Suboxone can be prescribed by a doctor so there’s no need for daily visits to a clinic facility.

If you’re considering medication treatments for opiate withdrawal or have more questions about how it all works, our addiction counselors can help. Call us today at 800-737-0933 and find out how to get started.

Can Anyone Go to Florida Drug Rehabs?

If you or a family member are struggling with an addiction, finding the right rehab center can make a huge difference on the road to recovery. While there are potentially hundreds of rehab centers across the country, the state of Florida is home to some of the best rehab centers available. The question is: Can anyone go to Florida Drug Rehabs?

Fortunately since Florida is known as one of the best states for rehab centers, not only for drug addictions, but alcohol as well, anyone can attend a drug rehab facility in Florida. Attendees do not have to be residents of Florida in order to enroll in a rehab center located within the state.

What are the benefits of an out-of-state rehab center?

You may be asking yourself why you or a loved one would be better off far away from home instead of attending a local rehab center. Many people find that attending a rehab center away from home allows them to have the mindset of a, “fresh start.” Additionally, some people find that they can focus on self care and starting over much better in a new environment. Last, but certainly not least, individuals sometimes find better success when they are away from the area that contributed to their addictions.

People who are looking for anonymity may feel that an out-of-state rehab center offers more privacy than one closer to home. As a result, you or your family member may feel more comfortable and free of judgment at a rehab center far from home where the risk of running into people you know is typically slim to none.

Another major benefit of choosing an out-of-state rehab facility is that the chances of a walkout are dramatically decreased. Unless rehab is court-mandated, you often arrive at a rehab facility voluntarily. If the rehab facility is located in your town and near home, the chances of you feeling like you can easily walk out are much higher. On the other hand, if you’re attending a rehab facility out of state and far away from your home, friends, family, and familiar areas, you’ll usually be much less likely to feel that you can walk out.

Broaden your horizons

There are many factors that go into choosing a rehab center. By expanding your search to more than just your state, you increase the chances that you’ll find the perfect rehab facility for you or your loved one. Even if a rehab facility out-of-state ends up being more expensive, the benefits often greatly outweigh the extra expense. You can choose a rehab center that offers the comforts you desperately seek.

Not only does looking out of your own state offer more options, but attending an out-of-state rehab facility also increases the chance of starting new relationships and lifestyles. Furthermore, if an addict is triggered by stresses that are in their current environment, whether it be family, friends, or stress in general, traveling far from that area can increase the chances of a smooth, effective recovery.

Why choose Florida?

Florida is frequently a popular choice for those seeking top-quality, professional rehab centers that provide the right atmosphere to get back on track. The benefits of a rehab center in Florida include, but are not limited to:

  • Pleasant climate (especially in the southern part of the state) year-round
  • The warm climate, greenery, and abundant sunshine make residents feel that they are closer to nature and can often have a calming effect
  • The excellent reputations of rehab centers in Florida make it a popular destination for residents looking to fight addiction
  • Easily accessible airports make it easy for family and friends to visit

There are major advantages to choosing an out-of-state rehab facility. Specifically, rehab facilities in Florida typically have extremely high success rates while offering residents a pleasant, encouraging atmosphere to experience a fresh start. Perhaps one of the most important parts to choosing a rehab facility is not only the atmosphere, but how comfortable you or a loved one will feel while battling their addiction. Our counselors are available 24 hours a day. Please don’t hesitate to give us a call at 800-737-0933.

If There Aren’t Many Rehab Facilities Near Me, Should I Plan to Travel?

Making the decision to go to rehab can be incredibly difficult and emotional. However, once the choice has been made, this is taking a step in the right direction. Admitting there is a problem is imperative to making things better. After choosing to get some help, you’ll then have to decide where you want to go.

Rehab centers can be found all over the country, but they aren’t all created equally. They differ in the types of treatments they offer, and you may find that one program works better for you than another. In addition, you might also find that there aren’t any rehab facilities near you, and you may be wondering: should I travel?

If you’re serious about getting help for your addiction, then traveling for rehab can be a great choice. There are many benefits to heading out of town or even out of state to a rehab facility, including those listed below.

1. It Gives You an Opportunity to Find the Right Rehab Facility

If you don’t have any rehab centers near you, then you have to look elsewhere to get the help you need. This opens up a world of possibilities and gives you more choices to find the facility that is going to help you be successful in your endeavors. When it comes to overcoming addiction, there is no one-size-fits-all solution. Thus, to get the most out of your treatment, you need a place that works with your unique situation.

2. The Chances of Leaving Rehab Early Are Reduced

Getting treatment for addiction might be an incredibly difficult time in your life, and there may be moments when you want to quit. In some cases, you might get homesick and want to see your family and friends. If you travel to go to rehab, then the chances of leaving early are reduced.

Of course, rehab isn’t a detention facility, so you have the ability to leave whenever you want. However, if you want to be successful in your treatment and finally kick your addiction, then it’s beneficial to see your treatment all the way through. When you travel to a rehab facility and it’s not easy or convenient to go home, then you are more inclined to stay and finish what you started.

3. There Is Distance Between You, Emotional Triggers and Bad Influences

One of the many reasons that people use drugs or alcohol is to deal with emotional or difficult situations. These can be triggered by many things, including family or friends. If you are around people who make you feel bad or who enable your substance abuse, including dealers, this could be an excuse for you to continue to use.

When you have to travel for rehab, this puts some distance between you, your triggers and bad influences. Since it’s more challenging to get to the rehab clinic, they may not be tempted to visit you and convince you that you shouldn’t be there. They also won’t make you feel bad, which could drive you to want to use.

Traveling for rehab gives you the opportunity to focus on what is important, and that is getting healthy. Putting distance between you and your problems is the best way to remove yourself from the vicious cycle that encourages and keeps you addicted to various substances.

4. If Offers the Opportunity to Start Over

Finding a rehab facility in a different town or state that you have to travel to gives you the chance to start over. The people there won’t know you, so they won’t be quick to pass judgment or use your past to define you. You may not be perfect, but you are at least getting the assistance you need to get healthy, and they’ll see this as a positive. This may be exactly what you need to successfully complete the treatment program and create a more optimistic view of life.

It can be scary and difficult to admit that you have an addiction problem. However, once you get over this hurdle, you can take the necessary steps to turn your life around and get clean. When it comes to finding a rehab facility if there aren’t any near you, then preparing to travel can be one of the best things you ever do for yourself.

If you’re ready to make a change, our counselors are available 24 hours a day. We’re ready to help, so give us a call at 800-737-0933.

How Will Drug Detoxing Affect My Life Once Withdrawal Is Over?

Detox is an incredibly challenging part of the recovery process. It is also the first and most important step to getting well. This is the time during which people abstain from drugs entirely. It gives their bodies the opportunity to rid themselves of dangerous, illicit substances and all the harmful residues they entail. It additionally shows people how their bodies feel without using. The longer that people go without illicit substances; the more that their bodies are able to relearn normal functioning. Due to these and many other reasons, drug detoxing is not generally something that people are encouraged to do at home on their own.

The length of a person’s detox period is determined by the type or types of substances he or she has been using, the length of drug use, and the amount of drugs and their potency among other factors. After one to two weeks of abstinence, however, most people will find that their systems are clean, and that their minds are ready to start tackling the challenges of long-term sobriety. Although drug detoxing is an absolutely essential part of recovery, however, there are many other steps that people will need to take to ensure lasting success.

Detoxing Opens The Door To Mental And Emotional Clarity

Many drug rehab patients are astounded by just how differently they think and feel after detoxing. The effects of drugs on your mind and emotions cannot be fully known until you have taken a sufficient amount of time away from them. One thing that’s common after detoxing, however, is a significant increase in willpower and personal resolve. Saying no to unhealthy habits and behaviors invariably becomes easier when the body is no longer physically dependent upon drugs. Moreover, rehab patients have the clarity of mind post-detox to truly benefit from individual and group counseling sessions that are aimed at revealing the underlying causes of their addictions.

Once you have broken you physical dependency on drugs, you can learn more about the different lifestyle factors and life events that have contributed to your emotional dependency. For instance, some people find that they are using drugs to help numb the trauma of past events. Others discover that early behavioral conditioning and low self-esteem are both contributors to their drug use. There are even people who learn that co-occurring disorders such as chronic anxiety or chronic depression have led them to use drugs to obtain relief. Knowing the source of addictive behaviors makes it easier for people to overcome them. This, however, is knowledge that can only be gained after a successful detox.

Drug Detoxing Is A Key Step In Reclaiming Your Freedom

After breaking their physical dependencies, patients can enjoy a renewed sense of personal freedom. If you are someone who is constantly thinking about drugs, where your next fix will come from, or how you’re going to continue hiding and justifying your addictive behaviors, this freedom will provide tremendous relief. You will be able to start pursuing and living a lifestyle that you can be proud of, mending damaged relationships, and rebuilding your personal and professional reputations. Detox can be the launching point into a whole new life entirely.

One reason why people are discouraged from detoxing on their own is the fact that this step is but one of many on the road to recovery. A lot of drug users find that they still crave drugs quite strongly for several weeks or months after detox. Rehab is a multi-pronged effort at educating people and building healthy coping skills so that temptation and other triggers for relapse can be successfully overcome.

The Benefits Of Supervised Drug Detoxing

It is also important to note that detox isn’t always medically safe to do alone. Certain substances can result in severe physical dependency that causes dangerous side effects when use is stopped suddenly. Sometimes the symptoms of withdrawal can be so severe as to affect a person’s general physical functioning. When you detox in a medically supervised environment, however, the risks of getting clean drop dramatically. More importantly, all of the professionals who work in detox facilities can use various strategies and tools to make your detox a safe and comfortable one. Understanding that this is an incredibly challenging process, detox centers work hard to make it as easy and pleasant for patients as possible.

The first step to getting well is always withdrawing from the very substances that lie at the heart of your addiction. Rehab centers are excellent places for the withdrawal process as they set the stage for lasting success in recovery. If you want to regain your freedom and reclaim control of your life, we are here to help. Get in touch with us today by calling 800-737-0933.

Is Detoxing from Drugs and Alcohol Really Worth It?

If you’re looking to change your life and undergo a detox program, you may be wondering if it’s really worth it. Detoxing can be a difficult experience and the painful symptoms of withdrawal are often what keep many people from getting clean. If this sounds like something you’re struggling with, please continue reading.

The Effects of Continuing Drug and Alcohol Abuse

Although the symptoms of detoxification and drug or alcohol withdrawal are painful, the damages that these substances are doing to your body may be irreversible. Detoxification will be a temporary pain, while the lasting effects of drug or alcohol addiction can lead to the end of your life. Weighing out the benefits, gain, and risks of detoxing can help you reason through making the decision and finding the resolve to make this life-altering change.

The Risk and Benefits of Detox

It’s important to examine the risks and benefits of a detox program. Understanding the struggles you may face will help you be prepared and stay in the program. Knowing the benefits that await you after recovery can also help keep you motivated if things get tough.

Risks

  • Withdrawal symptoms. Withdrawal can be incredibly unpleasant and may often lead to avoiding getting treatment for an addiction. This means you will likely experience nausea, headaches, mood swings and difficulty sleeping while going through withdrawal. The symptoms will also depend on the substance you are detoxing from.
  • Less barrier to emotional pain. If what lead you to seek out drugs or alcohol was the desire to use these substances to help cope with a trauma or an emotionally painful circumstance, you may be finding yourself having to face those things after detoxing. This means it will be extra important for you to find healthy tools and coping skills to improve these circumstances.

Benefits

  • A new lease on life. If you have felt your life is over, you may find that the battle against addiction does not have to be a losing one. You can regain your courage, confidence, and ambition for leading a life you want to live. There are many individuals who have struggled with addiction then go on to lead successful and meaningful lives, many of them going on to help others who have also struggled with addiction.
  • Healthiness. While struggling with an addiction, managing your health can be an uphill battle. The deteriorating effects of drug and alcohol abuse damage many of your major organs and can prevent you from thriving. Once you get clean, you may find your health improving in ways you haven’t seen in years.
  • Better relationships. When you are struggling with an addiction, family, and friends may not be able to reach you. If your life is being consumed with the ongoing battle, it’s hard to make space to connect and build your relationships. After recovery, many people find they’re able to pick up relationships that had been set aside during their abuse.
  • A Bright Future. Once you have dealt with the troubles of addiction and been able to move beyond it, you may feel a renewed confidence that if you can get through this, you can get through anything. With this mentality, doors can open. If you have had any dreams in life, you can now revisit them and begin to work towards that brighter future.

Planning For a Successful Detox Program

Detoxing can be tough, but it can bring so many benefits to your life. To help you set yourself up for successful, be sure to carefully develop a plan for recovery. Utilizing multiple means of support can help negate some of the difficult symptoms and improve the benefits you experience after detoxing.

Tips to Help Detoxing

  • Seek the help of a qualified and supportive counselor. Ongoing counseling can be life-changing for many people. Finding someone to work with who you can trust can help you build a refuge where you can share the struggles and pains you are going through.
  • Enter into a quality detox program. Finding somewhere that understands the specific drug you are detoxing from and has the facilities that can help you will help to improve their ability to help you detox.
  • Seek the support of loved ones and family. Celebrate your small accomplishments with those who love you.
  • Find a nearby support group and build a network that will encourage and celebrate your progress with you.

If you’re ready to get help, reach out to one of our counselors today and we can begin building a recovery plan for you. Contact us any time at 800-737-0933

Suboxone for Addiction Recovery

Suboxone is a useful tool that is often implemented to fight addiction. Suboxone is a brand-name drug that is a mixture of buprenorphine (an opioid alternative that is not as addictive as traditional opiates) and naloxone (an opioid-reversal drug that treats symptoms of withdrawal and overdose). Classified as a schedule III (3) drug, Suboxone itself does have the potential for physical and/or psychological dependence, and in rare cases can even be misused and abused. It’s important for potential Suboxone candidates to be aware of this so that they can make an informed decision as to whether or not they feel Suboxone would be an appropriate and effective tool to use during recovery. Suboxone is available in both dissolvable oral films and traditional tablets.

When used in conjunction with traditional addiction therapies, as well as both regular and random drug testing, providers have reported a higher rate of success among their patients. When used in this fashion, Suboxone is considered to be MAT – medication-assisted treatment.

How does Suboxone work?

Suboxone works in two ways. First, the buprenorphine, which is a type of opiate, functions in the brain the same way other opiates do – by binding to opiate receptors and tricking the brain into thinking it is being treated by a traditional opiate. Secondly, the naloxone stays present in the body to prevent both withdrawal from traditional opiates, as well as overdose. Buprenorphine is technically a partial opioid agonist, and in the brain, it works as a step-down from traditional, stronger opiates. In taking the place of other opiates, the buprenorphine in Suboxone both tricks the brain into thinking it is still receiving traditional opiates and protects against withdrawal and overdose thanks to the inclusion of naloxone.

Why Suboxone is effective in aiding addiction recovery.

Suboxone is effective because it replaces traditional opiates, while not being nearly as dangerous nor as addictive as traditional opiates. Federal mandates have made Suboxone both accessible and affordable, and with the film version specifically, a lack of pre-authorization requirements means no hoops to jump through in order to obtain Suboxone. Doctors and psychiatrists alike are licensed to prescribe Suboxone, and addiction clinics are able and willing to set up clients with both therapy and MAT – Suboxone as medication-assisted treatment.

How to use Suboxone: dosage and frequency.

Since Suboxone works in the brain in a similar fashion as regular opiates, users report pain relief, calmness, a lack of both cravings and withdrawal symptoms, and an improved overall sense of well-being. However, it is important to take Suboxone as prescribed and to be aware of how long it lasts in the body, in order to achieve optimal effectiveness.

Once in the body, it can take up to 37 hours for Suboxone to wear off, and a full eight days before blood and urine tests no longer detect traces of the drug. With such a long half-life, users report needing less Suboxone in relation to other opiates. Of course, there are factors that determine how much Suboxone a user will need, and how long the medication will last in their system. These factors include body weight, age, and abuse history. It is for this reason that it is best to undergo a thorough physical prior to being prescribed Suboxone. What is good for the goose is not always good for the gander.

No two addicts — nor their addictions — are alike. And depending on how you respond to Suboxone, as well as changes in your body, health, and lifestyle, you may find that over time you may need to increase or decrease the amount of Suboxone you take in a day, or even in a dose. Some users respond best from one dose in a 24 hour period, while others, particularly users who have digestive mal-absorption issues, may do better with splitting up one dose into two or three smaller doses.

Most importantly, work in conjunction with your therapist and doctor to ensure you are on the proper Suboxone prescription. Take your medication as prescribed, and if you do experience any cravings or withdrawal symptoms, report these right away so that your medical providers can adjust your dosage — and perhaps your therapy regimen — accordingly. Call us today at 800-737-0933.

Will Rehab Programs Help Address Environmental Substance Abuse Triggers?

Triggers come in many shapes and sizes. Some of them will surprise you; a song that comes on the radio you used to shoot up to, or a street sign brings back flashes of the place you used to meet your dealer. There are different types of triggers that can cause relapse, and all of them are covered in a good substance abuse treatment program.

Types of Substance Abuse Triggers

Every trigger can be broken down into different categories: physical, emotional and environmental are the main three. Physical triggers are often intertwined with your environment; sights, smells and sounds that all bring back memories of when you used to drink or do drugs.

Emotional triggers can be influenced by your environment as well; objects, people and familiar places all carry memories that can bring up old feelings you may have once used drugs to cope with.

Your environment may not be somewhere easy to avoid; many people live with others who abuse drugs or drink regularly, whether it’s a partner, their family or roommates. Staying sober means you have to find ways to either avoid these triggers to change your environment altogether.

Many rehabs offer sober housing for people whose previous environment’s aren’t productive to their recovery.

How Rehab Helps You Overcome With Triggers

Coping with substance abuse triggers takes patience and skill; it won’t always be easy, no matter how well you know what to do. Even the best coping strategies can’t always take away the urge to relapse, which is why having an escape plan and accountability partner are important components of recovery.

How you respond to a trigger will vary on any given day; you may face something triggering on a good day and be able to move past it with relative ease. If you’ve been feeling low, though, a minor trigger can push you over the edge.

That’s why the best rehab programs are designed to do more than just teach you how to handle triggers; they’ll help develop emotional intelligence, build resilience, learn how to cope with stress and manage tough situations in healthy ways.

Types of Therapy for Substance Abuse Triggers

Avoidance is a useful strategy, but it isn’t always feasible. Plus, if you only rely on never seeing a trigger as your way of dealing with it, you’re more likely to relapse if you’re ever faced with it. Different types of substance abuse therapies have their own way of helping people learn how to cope with their triggers.

Cognitive behavior therapy, for example, emphasizes recognition and healthy coping skills in addition to avoidance. While you should steer clear of any environmental triggers whenever possible, it’s important to also know how to recognize them and know how to react when they do arise.

Relapse prevention therapy is one of the most effective forms of coping with triggers; you’ll be able to learn about the subtle warning signs of relapse including increased thoughts of using substances, downplaying your feelings about using again and planning ways you could control your use better this time around.

Look for a rehab that offers relapse prevention during treatment as well as continued therapy. Attending support groups, entering outpatient therapy and attending individual counseling sessions can help you avoid succumbing to triggers.

Managing Substance Abuse Triggers

Your sobriety is the most important thing in your life; everything else is depending on it. Does this mean that you can’t bounce back if you relapse? No, but it does mean you should do everything in your power to avoid having to deal with the guilt, shame, embarrassment and hopelessness that comes from using again.

Identifying some of the most common environmental triggers for substance abuse can be a helpful part of planning your life after rehab. Some of these may surprise you.

– Holiday celebrations and birthday parties
– Social gatherings
– Having free time and being alone
– Feeling bored
– Being offered a drink
– Seeing other people drink, smoke or do drugs, even just on TV
– Loneliness

Cravings don’t last forever, no matter how strong they are. If you can find a way to get away from a trigger as soon as possible, it will be easier to deal with the aftermath. Of course, all of this happens day by day, and the foundation is laid during your time in a licensed rehab.

To learn more about recovering from substance abuse, contact us today. Whether you’re looking for outpatient therapy, local support groups or a residential program, we’re always available to help connect you with the best rehabs near you. Contact us any time at 800-737-0933

Do You Have to Be Christian to Go to Christian Rehab Centers?

Rehab is often a necessary process for any person trying to get free from addiction. There are many types of rehab facilities that help people to recover from drug and alcohol abuse. Many of them are standard treatment facilities that help people regardless of their background or religious belief. However, some of them are operated on certain religious principles. Christian rehab centers are one example of a faith-based organization that provides recovery services. The services provided by these recovery organizations are designed to help people whether they believe in Christianity or not.

Services Provided by Faith-Based Christian Rehab Centers

By law, a rehab center must provide certain recovery services for people in need. If they don’t, they cannot legally claim to be a rehab center. Also, they won’t be able to help people to overcome addiction. Each rehab facility requirements will vary by state. However, there are some regulations and laws that all recovery facilities must meet. These regulations include:

• They must have the right type of treatment programs for individuals addicted to opioid substances.

• They must have licensed professionals to provide addiction treatment medications and services.

• They usually are required to take patients and generally cannot reject them based off their personal or religious beliefs.

So, a Christian organization cannot simply turn people away just because they don’t believe in their doctrine. If a person chooses not to enroll in a faith-based rehab center that is up to them. Sometimes, a person can be assigned to a faith-based Christian program by the courts. In situations such as these an individual might not be accepted into a facility if the sponsoring organization feels as if they are not able to help them. Courts will usually comply with such requests and try to figure out an alternative way to provide treatment services for a person needing rehab.

You also should know that a Christian facility cannot alter rehab services to create their own programs. All rehab programs must adhere to state and federal guidelines. However, they can add their own unique belief system if it doesn’t interfere with the mandatory laws and regulations that are needed to operate a facility.

An Unbeliever can Receive Treatment from a Christian Rehab Center

Once again, a person doesn’t have to be a Christian to receive help from a Christian recovery facility. You should also know that any facility that stops an addict from getting recovery services could be illegal. Sometimes, a Christian facility might be the best choice for an unbelieving addict, or it might be the only place where they can receive aid. Even a privately funded rehab program must be careful about how they deal with unbelieving addicts. Just because they receive private funding this does not mean they can automatically reject people for unbelief. Also, when the government backs a rehab program, that facility must make sure they are not doing anything that violates a person’s constitutional rights.

What if an unbeliever doesn’t care for Christian doctrine?

Not everybody believes in Jesus. Not everybody wants to live a Christian lifestyle. However, that does not mean that an addict couldn’t benefit from a Christian based recovery program. Many Christian based programs use the teachings and wisdom of Jesus Christ and the Bible in general. While they might not agree with the Bible’s teachings, they can benefit from some of its tenants during the recovery process.

An unbelieving addict will have to carefully consider rejecting a Christian based treatment program. That program might be the best choice for them reaching sobriety. However, a Christian based program cannot accept an unbeliever and then throw them out just because they are having a hard time accepting or following doctrinal rules. As a long as a patient is following the rules of a facility and is not doing anything to harm, jeopardize or destroy life or property within a facility; they can still receive treatment.

Thankfully, many Christian rehab organizations don’t turn people away. Their goal is to follow the example of Jesus by helping people to lift their burden, to find hope and to be made whole. If you’re suffering from addiction, don’t worry about what you personally believe. Call us at 800-737-0933 and we will help you to overcome your struggles with drugs or alcohol.