Is Suboxone Only Used During Detox?

Suboxone is a medication that is prescribed to treat opioid use disorder. It is a combination of buprenorphine and naloxone. Suboxone is used to decrease the appearance of opioid withdrawal symptoms. It is a long-acting medication and lasts for approximately 24 hours. Suboxone is a film that is placed in the cheek or under the tongue when administered. The side effects of suboxone can include constricted pupils, low blood pressure, lethargy, and respiratory depression. The risk of overdosing on suboxone is drastically lower than overdosing on another opioid like heroin. Suboxone was approved for use in the United States for medical purposes in 2002.

The long-term outcomes of suboxone as a treatment for opioid use disorder are better than quitting opioid use overall. Cravings for opioids are decreased when using suboxone, which prevents individuals from seeking out other opioids to use. Suboxone is a first-line treatment for opioid use disorder and has been shown as effective in the treatment and long-term recovery for individuals who were dependent on opioids in the past. Suboxone is typically prescribed during detox and in doctors offices. Individuals are given their prescription and they do not have to be monitored, unlike individuals who must go into a clinic each day to receive their dose of methadone.

Individuals who are stable and are not able to visit a clinic each day to receive medication may prescribed suboxone. Further, individuals who have other medical conditions that visit their doctor regularly may be prescribed suboxone. Other individuals who may be prescribed suboxone include those who have jobs that require them to remain alert and are not able to be under a sedating medication like methadone. Suboxone is also recommended to treat individuals who may be affected negatively by methadone use. These populations include individuals who abuse alcohol, the elderly, individuals who take large doses of benzodiazepines, and individuals with a low level of tolerance to opioids. Further, suboxone is prescribed to individuals who are engaging in therapy and counseling in order to treat their opioid use disorder. The use of suboxone in combination with therapy is more successful in treating opioid use disorder than treating it with suboxone alone.

If you would like more information regarding suboxone therapy or treatment for opioid use disorder, call us today at 800-737-0933.

How Do I Tell if the Rehab Facilities Near Me Are Any Good?

When you feel as though your entire life is spinning out of control due to substance abuse, it’s imperative that you find a rehab center that can provide the services you need to get your life back on track. Whether you are seeking a rehab facility for yourself or for someone close to you, finding the right treatment program is critical. It’s not uncommon for many people looking for a treatment center to wonder whether a facility near them is any good. This is one of the most important decisions you will make when it comes to addiction recovery, so it is important to know what to look for in a facility.

Numerous factors need to be taken into consideration in choosing a substance abuse treatment center. Among those factors include whether the facility in question offers the specific services that the person struggling with addiction needs. Whether or not the treatment facility offers after-care and follow-up services should also be considered. Taking the time to learn as much as you can about a facility can help to guide you in choosing the right program for yourself or your loved one.

Finding Out About the Services Offered by an Addiction Treatment Center

In determining whether or a facility is the right choice, consider whether the program offers a dual diagnosis. Many individuals struggling to overcome addiction also have other clinical conditions, such as anxiety, depression, post-traumatic stress disorder, or eating disorders. It’s also not uncommon for the individual to not even be aware that he or she also has other disorders. For this reason, it’s important to select a facility that offers a dual diagnosis. In a program with a dual diagnosis, incoming clients are provided with an assessment to determine whether they are also struggling with other disorders. Clients who also have other clinical conditions can benefit from receiving treatment not only for their addiction but also for their other conditions.

A solid addiction treatment program should also provide a holistic approach to treatment. This means that the program should not just focus on treating the addiction with counseling services but should also provide other forms of treatment that target body, mind, and spirit. Such forms of treatment might include:• Individual and group counseling• Meditation• Nutritional counseling• Stress relief training

Other Factors to Consider When Selecting an Addiction Treatment Program

Additionally, it’s important to consider other factors in determining whether an addiction treatment program is a right choice for your needs. For instance, take some time to research the facility that you are considering and find out whether the program has longevity. Generally, it’s a good idea to steer away from any treatment program that has not been in business for a while. Although some such facilities might be perfectly fine, a facility that hasn’t been in business very long could eventually end up failing if they utilize unlawful or unethical business practices. Overall, treatment centers that have been open longer typically have longevity due to the fact that they provide good service and adhere to ethical standards.

Furthermore, you should try to stay away from any treatment center that provides guarantees for success rates. It is simply impossible for a treatment center to provide a guarantee of success for an individual in recovery. Ultimately, it is up to that individual as to whether he or she will continue following the treatment plan after leaving the facility. Ideally, it’s important to look for a program that offers ongoing support group meetings even after clients leave the treatment center.

Do You Need a Treatment Center Near You?

It’s only natural to have a desire to enter a treatment program near you or choose one within a close vicinity for your loved one. One thing to keep in mind is that close proximity does not necessarily mean that a treatment facility is the best choice for your needs or the needs of your loved one. Keep in mind that when you or your loved one enters a treatment program, it will be imperative that he or she be able to fully focus on treatment.

Finding the right addiction treatment program may seem as though it is a daunting task, especially given the number of options available. If you are still uncertain as to whether a facility might be the right choice, it’s a good idea to contact the facility directly and obtain as much information as possible, including the various services offered.

If you are ready to take that next step, call us today at 800-737-0933
to learn about our addiction treatment center in Southwest Florida.

Why Is Outpatient Treatment After Rehab So Important?

When people think of drug and alcohol rehab, what usually comes to mind is an inpatient program in which a patient stays in a facility for a month. They spend that time detoxing, treating their withdrawal symptoms, and attending therapy sessions address the roots of their addictions. That's all very important, but addiction treatment doesn't end there.

As anyone who has ever struggled with drugs and alcohol can tell you, addiction is a lifelong struggle. A patient might be over their physical addiction, but there are always underlying factors that led to substance abuse in the first place such as depression, anxiety, an abusive home life, or chronic pain. These issues often don't go away just because someone is physically clean; they can persist throughout life and lead to a relapse. This is why outpatient treatment is so important.

Rehab is the First Step

In many ways, undergoing detox and inpatient rehab is only the first step in overcoming an addiction. It may be a very important first step, but it is a first step nevertheless. What it does is allow patients to become physically healthy and overcome the need to constantly use drugs and alcohol to be free of pain and withdrawal. When that happens, the real healing can begin in the form of ongoing therapy that can last for years.

The Benefit of Outpatient Treatment

\In its simplest form, outpatient treatment keeps patients accountable so they don't relapse and start using drugs and alcohol again, but it's often more than that. We've already talked about how outpatient therapy allows patients to address the underlying psychological issues that may have drove them to drugs in the first place, but it can also provide a strong support system if they engage in group therapy. That support system is crucial since it surrounds patients with people who understand what they are going through and provides them with positive influences to replace the peers who may have encouraged risky behavior. The most important thing to remember is that the initial inpatient rehab is only a small part of addiction recovery, yet it's something that most people fail to realize. The treatment that comes after is just as important, if not more so. It's the reason why most good treatment programs include inpatient and outpatient treatment programs instead of just the standard detox that most people imagine.

If you or a loved one is struggling with an addiction to drugs or alcohol, always remember that there is hope for you. It will be a long and difficult road to recovery, but it is one that will be worth it in the end. For more information about the programs that may be available to you, contact us today at 800-737-0933. We will be more than happy to answer your questions and provide the help you need.

Can You Do an Outpatient Detox if You Can’t Miss Work?

It is not always such an easy matter to obtain treatment for drug abuse. There is no shortage of addiction treatment centers and programs around Florida and the country. Yet despite this, there are a variety of considerations that can make it harder to access such treatment than it should ideally be. Among the most common complaints of individuals struggling with an addiction is that their medical professional will likely recommend inpatient detox and other rehab treatment when they have to be at their daily jobs.

The problem for most working professionals is that they can not simply disappear from their workplace for a few weeks of intensive inpatient treatment. It is not so well known that the overwhelming majority of people struggling with addiction have jobs and keep up mostly normal lives. The SAMHSA Substance Abuse & Mental Health Services Administration reports that a stunning 76 percent of individuals who struggle with drug and alcohol abuse have jobs. There are far too many individuals who worry that stepping forward to get help will be a blow to their jobs or careers, potentially costing them their positions. The good news is that the government has enacted several laws to protect individuals who suffer from addiction disorders. These safeguard them from discrimination in the workplace and especially from losing their jobs for addiction that is now treated as a legitimate mental illness.

Inpatient Rehab Is Not the Only Addiction Treatment OptionThe important thing to keep in mind is that this inpatient rehab is not the only means of getting help for such addictions. It is especially helpful for those people who have a more serious addiction who believe that they will not resist future relapse temptations or those who have already suffered one or more relapses in their past. The fact is that living in such a facility literally 24 hours each day over a period of weeks will not be optional for all people. The alternative outpatient rehab permits those individuals who need to keep up with their everyday lives to do so. They will attend the treatment center and program several times each week for medical supervision and treatment, support group meetings, counseling, and drug tests.

Government Laws Protect Your Rehab Program RightsTwo major pieces of legislation protect American workers and their jobs when you seek out rehab program treatment for drug addiction. This is the ADA Americans With Disabilities Act as well as the FMLA Family & Medical Leave Act. These ensure that those with addictions will not be discriminated against so that they can take advantage of the help that they require in treatment without being fired from their essential jobs.

The fact is that after entering one of the rehab programs, you become completely protected by the ADA. You can not be fired for addiction-related reasons or for inconveniences caused by the treatment requirements, regardless of whether or not you miss work as a result of such treatment. In the event that you are fired, you are able to file charges for discrimination versus your employer. This is true for all government employers (including local and state government) and private firms who have at least 15 employees.

You Are Entitled to 12 Weeks of Medical Leave for Addiction Disorder TreatmentThe FMLA allows for qualified employees to take advantage of 12 weeks of medical leave surrounding addiction treatment and disorders every year. The law can not make employers pay you for that time, but they are required to make it available it to you. If you are a contract or part-time employee, it may not be an available option.

The law also enables you to apply for disability benefits during your treatment so that you do not have to do without compensation for weeks of work missed. This is an option for many people who find that they need inpatient detox to have effective drug addiction treatment. The caveat is that this proves to be a complex and somewhat difficult process to successfully complete. You must demonstrate that you do not earn more than the present income limit in order to become qualified for such disability. The other restrictions are as follows:

  • Not earning more than $1,000 each month
  • The disability cannot exceed a year
  • The addiction issue is significantly affecting your working capabilities

It is still an option and worth looking into if your job will not pay you for the missed weeks of work should you find it necessary to become an inpatient at a drug rehab facility. This is especially the case if this addiction disorder is more severe and has been ongoing. If you are ready to seek out help, our counselors are here for you now. Please contact us today at 800-737-0933 to speak with one of our assistants 24 hours per day.

Karen’s Kula May 2019

Hello Alumni and Yogis,
 
April has come and gone. The month of New Beginnings. April was Inspiring Spring into FULL bloom. Life is filled with new beginnings and abundant opportunities! 
 
May is here the month of Transformation! Encouraging us to be open enough to begin to step out of our comfort zone and into this new, vibrant, colorful world with infinite possibilities. Take a deep breath in, let it go..... Pause, look around, notice all the little shifts that happen each and every day. Be Amazed!!! When fear and doubt creep in, as they always do - Take a deep breath in, let it go.... Pause, look around, notice and remind yourself - I can do it! I trust that things happen for a reason! I am supported! I am important! Move forward and watch how life shifts from fear and anxiety, to ease and curiosity! We practice - a body at ease can not have disease! All these reminders. All these messages are teaching you to LOVE YOURSELF - one breath, one day at a time, over and over and over again!
 
Love Yourself - Journey To The Heart by Melody Beattie
 
No matter what, love yourself.
 
Love yourself, even if it feels like the world around you is irked with you, even if it feels like those you've counted on most have gone away, even if you wonder if God has abandoned you.
 
When it feels like the journey has stopped, the magic is gone, and you've been left sitting on the curb, love yourself. When you're confused and angry about how things are going or how they've gone, love yourself. No matter what happens or where you are, love yourself. No matter if you aren't certain where you're going or if there's anyplace left to go, love yourself.
 
This situation will change, this time will pass, and the magic will return.
So will joy and faith. You will feel connected again - to yourself, God,
the universe and life. But the first thing to do is love yourself. And all
the good you want will follow <3
 
I love you all! I would like to send out a Great Big, Beautiful, Deep Breath and HUG to all the alumni who are celebrating Mother's Day this weekend!!!! To all the alumni's MOMS near and far. And extra SPECIAL love to those Moms in Heaven looking down on you. Who are wrapping you up in their love each and every day! XOXOXOXOXO Namaste' the light in me honors and sees the light in each and every one of you!
 
Love, Karen
Genesis House Yoga Instructor

To all the mothers of an addict

My daughter is an addict and it has been hell for many Mother’s Days. I want to share my experience with my addiction to my daughter, and her addiction to drugs and alcohol.
Loving her and wanting to give my life for her, to take her pain, and end mine.
Denial, Hope Springs Eternal, upsurge my love and enabling her addiction, try one more method, read one more article, one more counselor.
 
I know I can finally SAY ONE MORE EXAMPLE OR WORDS OF ADVICE THAT WILL MAKE THE DIFFERENCE, take her eyes and see the light!
 
I knew I could do it for her. Denial seeps back into my corroded mind to save MY sanity. Yes, I had to convince her to change friends, go to college, find a passion.
I didn’t realize she had a passion; drugs.
 
I could not give up on her, instead, I gave up on myself. Good mothers continue to give away themselves to save their precious child. But, said child does not have her mother’s goal or needs.
 
Mother continues to fall prey to unrelenting conniving and manipulation from
her. Money, threats, kindness, love, promises, surveillance, rehabs and more words.
I became gutted and empty. I had to stop my selflessness to save her for me and save myself.
I had to really love her and LET GO. That is when I realized how much intervention I needed. Addiction is a family disease. REPEAT: Addiction is a family disease.
 
With the help of God and so many people my daughter made the choice to begin recovery at Genesis House. I had nothing to do with her decision. My amazing daughter has been in recovery for over 10 years and works arduously to maintain it.
 
I thought my part was complete even though she always said to me “Mom, think about doing the 12 steps in al-anon or nar-anon.” I did not need them, only addicts do.
 
Oh, the ego. Just recently, I went to a Nar-anon meeting to support a friend whose has been struggling with her daughter’s addiction. I thought I never needed such a group. LOL. My first daily reading in the SESH Book spoke of a parent who was still suffering for 35 years after his daughter had stopped using. He was still suffering because he had never gone to a Twelve Step Program.
 
Eureka! God has a sense of humor and now I celebrate this Mother's Day rejoicing that I have found myself on the path of recovery and beginning the Twelve Steps.
 
My Mother’s Day gift from my daughter, when I revealed my enlightenment of needing the Twelve Steps, was “well Mom, that is refreshing. I have been thinking that for years.
 
To all Mothers of Addicts, there is always a way to find yourself. My prayers are with you.
 
 
-Gene D.
Mother of a 2008 alumnae Skyler N.

Genesis House would like to wish everyone a Happy Mother’s Day!

Dear Mom,
 
As a kid, I did not know what life had in store for me. And although you always believed in me, you did not know the life I had in store for YOU!
 
I would like to say I started off life hopeful for my future but that is not my story. My life started in a house of chaos, yelling, fear and distress of your marriage. Many time I felt I was to blame for you and daddy fighting and other times I just blamed you. I wanted to be daddy’s little girl so badly and spent a lifetime chasing that dream. My perspective of a man’s love for me has always been grounded in fear of being abandoned and a belief chasing a person or doing back flips for their love is “normal.” The toxic interactions I saw as a child, became the same interactions in my relationships. You can say you did the right thing eventually and were able to separate yourself from the marriage. Today, I can agree that is commendable for a mother to show her children but it is also the reason I began a resentment as a kid. There were times as a child, I thought my dad left because of me- I was unlovable. But mostly I blamed him leaving on you since you stopped chasing and fighting for his love the way I did. With a child mentality, I did not understand the situation. I only knew that I wanted a family, like all the other kids. I wish I knew then what I know now, to see you were not to blame and most importantly- neither was I.
 
In time, I grew to be a teenager- still full of resentment for what I lacked and trying to fill a big void inside of myself. No matter how many problems I threw at you or how difficult I could be, you always loved me and did your best to deal with my anger. But unfortunately, your life took a sharp turn when I found a solution, or way to fill the void, down a spiraling path of drugs and alcohol. Once this lifestyle began, many years went by of behavior that cause you and the family a great deal of harm. There were many sleepless nights for you when I would not call or come home. The lies, manipulation, broken promises, disrespect, stealing, and everything else I had to do to maintain the lifestyle. When I was using, it was never that I did not care about you or consciously chose drugs over you- it was survival. There came a point that I did not have a choice to use or not use drugs- it controlled me.
 
Any family that has experienced addiction understand how dangerous the lifestyle can be. What many families do not always understand is that addiction is a disease and going to treatment for a short period does not always “fix” the problem. You understand addiction, at times it felt like too well! The manipulation became harder and the spiraling walls grew narrow. At the time, I was very angry you started to see the addiction for what it really was- not your daughter as a victim. You knew I did have a choice and kept pushing me to see that. The disease of addiction wanted me to believe I could never get clean and at the time, it honestly felt like the easier path. Boy was I wrong and looking back I am grateful you learned enough to help me to see I could get clean.
 
Not long after I was at crisis twice in one week for suicidal idealizations, I got on a plane to Florida and checked into Genesis House. The time I was there I began to see what life could be- without drugs and it did not look like anything my addiction said it would be like. There were times it was hard but having you in my corner is always a blessing. You may not always be where I can see you, but you are always right on time when I need you. 
 
In recovery, I have learned so much, and we have been able to work on our relationship. Please find comfort today hearing me explain there was nothing could have done for me to avoid it, it was my journey. I thank you for never giving up on me and still believing in me at my worst. Our story may not be perfect, but we are able to say we went through a lot- made it to the other side and are stronger because of it! Today, I know anything is possible and see hope in my life. I am not perfect, I make mistakes and fall short some days but if I stay vigilant in my recovery, things always work out.
 
Happy Mother’s Day!
 
-Skyler N.

Is Is Opiate Detox Dangerous if You Don’t Get Medical Supervision?

Opiate drugs that are commonly abused include heroin and prescription painkillers including Oxycontin, Morphine, and Fentanyl. Withdrawal and detox from opioids can create symptoms of withdrawal within hours after the last dose taken. The symptoms can last for several days up to a week or longer. Withdrawal from opioids without medical supervision may not be fatal, but it may lead to the use of opioids again in order to relieve the withdrawal symptoms.

Signs of withdrawal from opiates may be mild to severe and depend on individual factors. Individual factors include how much of a substance an individual has been using and how long they have been using the substance. Further, the type of opioid that has been taken, the way in which the drug was taken (i.e., intravenously, orally, smoked, nasal inhalation), any underlying health or mental conditions, or any co-morbid mental health issues. Previous trauma, family history of addiction, biological factors, environmental factors, and stressful surroundings may also affect the way in which withdrawal symptoms emerge and appear.

Withdrawal symptoms from opioid substances include:

  • Muscle cramping
  • Depression
  • Anxiety
  • Cravings to use opiates
  • Agitation
  • Depression
  • Nausea

Options for Detox

There are a number of methods for treatment and detox for the removal of opiates from the body. Some treatment methods are more in-depth and comprehensive than others. Medical detox includes both psychological and pharmacological treatment methods while under the supervision of a team of medical and mental health professionals within a safe and secure setting. Standard detox is able to take place on an outpatient basis (i.e., outside the hospital setting). The withdrawal symptoms related to opiate detoxification are very uncomfortable and medical detox may provide the most comfortable and secure setting for treatment.

Within a medical detox, vital signs (e.g., blood pressure, body temperature, heart rate, and respiration levels) are able to be monitored closely) Further, medical professionals are able to prescribe and administer medications that may make the detox process more comfortable and allow for the regulation of the body and brain functioning. Mental health professionals will also be available to provide evaluations and assess levels of stabilization during detox. There is no specific timeline for detox from opioids, but it typically lasts between five and seven days.

If you or a loved one is struggling with opiate addiction or seeking to begin detox from opiates, please contact us at 800-737-0933. Our counselors are available 24 hours a day and are able to provide you with information specific to your case and needs.

What Can You Expect from a Medical Detox Center?

When someone is dealing with addiction and ready to get help, one of the first steps is detox or the process of stopping drug or alcohol use. This process can involve some uncomfortable or dangerous physical symptoms — which is where a medical detox center comes in. These centers are staffed with doctors and nurses who are trained in addition and detox, so they can help your loved one get through withdrawal safely.

Detox is almost always uncomfortable; in some cases, it can be life-threatening. Medical detox centers monitor the symptoms, help manage pain, and provide invaluable support for both mental and physical health. This process helps keep the patient as comfortable as possible. When the detox is over, most people are ready to continue on with addiction treatment. For many people with addiction, the fear of the unknown is serious; when that’s the case, it’s helpful to know exactly what to expect when you take a friend or family member to a medical detox center.

Consultation, Evaluation, and Admission to a Medical Detox Center

When you arrive at a medical detox center, the first step is an evaluation and consultation. Your loved one will meet with a substance abuse specialist to discuss the situation. This person, sometimes in combination with an admissions professional, will figure out what’s needed during the detox process. They will come up with a care plan that takes into account factors such as:

  • History of drug or alcohol use
  • The current level of drugs or alcohol in your system
  • Prior treatment experience
  • Medical history and current health issues
  • Mental health concerns

It’s important to encourage your loved one to be completely honest during this process; even when it’s hard, this honesty helps the medical team create the most comfortable detox plan. During the intake process, the health professional will also request drug testing. This helps the center figure out exactly what substances are in the person’s system, so they can create an appropriate plan for detox. Once they have a plan, the medical team will explain it to you thoroughly — at the end of the process, you should know exactly what to expect and understand exactly what the doctors and nurses will do. If you’re happy with the treatment plan, you’ll need to fill out intake forms and be admitted to the facility.

Stabilizing the Patient

The next step in medical detox is stabilization. During this stage, your loved one will stay in the detox facility. Since there are no more drugs and alcohol coming into their system, they will start to go into withdrawal. Exact withdrawal symptoms vary dramatically based on the substance and the person’s history. The doctors and nurses at the facility help keep the patient comfortable during the process. They may prescribe medications to help control pain or keep the patient safe. In some cases, the medical staff delivers fluids and nutritional supplements if the patient can’t keep down water and food. Most importantly, they provide constant supervision, so your loved one is always safe and unable to relapse.

Another important part of medical detox is psychological support. Detox is stressful, so the facility’s mental health staff are a key part of the process. They take away some of the fear by explaining what to expect, and they provide a soothing, comforting presence during the worst moments. This support is instrumental in getting your loved one through the fear and anxiety that comes with detoxing.

Preparing for the Next Steps

For most people with addiction, medical detox on its own isn’t enough to treat the problem. It stabilizes them, so they’re mentally and physically strong enough to undergo further treatment. This might include a rehab center or outpatient therapy, depending on the situation.

At the end of the medical detox process, when the substances are out of your loved one’s body and they’re thinking clearly, the healthcare team will talk about the next steps. Usually, with the help of a counselor, they’ll come up with a plan moving forward. Most importantly, they help prepare the patient mentally for the things they can expect in treatment and make them aware of their options. This process helps the person feel that there is hope, and that help for addiction is available.

If you or a loved one is in need of medical detox, or if you simply want to find out more about addiction treatment options, we’re just a call away. We can help you figure out the best next step for your unique situation; just call us today at 800-737-0933.

Protecting Your Privacy When You Go Into Rehab

When you think about going into treatment for your addiction, you might have concerns about your privacy. Maybe you're a public figure or maybe you're concerned about your boss, clients, coworkers or even certain family members finding out. Don't let that worry stop you. All medical treatments are protected by strict privacy laws, and that's especially true of addiction treatment.

Going to rehab is nothing new for public figures and celebrities. Many of them have spoken openly about the importance of getting help for their addictions. That is their choice. If you don't want the word to get out, it won't. You can go into treatment without letting anyone know except those you choose to tell.

Privacy and Confidentiality in Alcohol and Drug Treatment

Following is a rundown of the laws that protect your privacy when getting any kind of medical treatment. Please note that none of this should be interpreted as legal advice. If you want detailed information, set your mind at rest by consulting a qualified lawyer.

  • The Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act (HIPAA) is a federal law that forbids medical facilities from revealing information about your treatment to anyone that you don't designate. Your insurance company will get the information, however, if you use insurance to pay for treatment.
  • Under the federal Confidentiality of Substance Use Disorder Patient Records Act, the facility you attend cannot disclose that you were treated for substance abuse.
  • Under the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission (EEOC) regulations, employers are not allowed to ask about your substance abuse. If you have a criminal conviction related to drug or alcohol use, however, they are entitled to that information.
  • Your state may have local laws that protect patient confidentiality and restrict access to medical records.
  • There are exceptions to these laws. If you are involved in a criminal, custody or legal battle, or you have a medical emergency, the information may legally be disclosed to parties who request it.

Will Private Drug Rehab Programs Use Discretion if You're a Public Figure?

You are entitled to complete discretion when you go into treatment. You can feel confident that going into rehab is something that only you and your loved ones know about. Nobody needs to know your private business when you choose to get help for drug or alcohol addiction. Fear of being found out has held too many people back from getting sober. Don't let that fear keep you locked in a cycle of addiction and hopelessness.

Choose a Facility That Specializes in High-Profile Clients

Some private addiction facilities specialize in treating high-profile and celebrity clients. If you choose one of those, you can be certain that the staff is used to conducting every step of the treatment with strict confidentiality.

  • If you are undergoing medically-supervised detox, it will be done in a comfortable, private room.
  • Your individual counseling sessions are strictly confidential.
  • You don't have to reveal your full name at sobriety support group meetings.
  • Your admission and evaluation are conducted under the strictest discretion.

We Can Help

Don't let fears about revealing your substance abuse keep you away from treatment. Our counselors are trained to answer your questions and find the treatment facility that's right for you. You can call our counselors 24-7 at 800-737-0933.