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02.18.2019

Is an Opiate Detox in Florida Ever Dangerous?

Trying to withdraw from opiates on your own can be a dangerous and potentially life-threatening move. Considering the risk to health and life, an opiate detox at a Florida rehab is perhaps the safest way to end your addiction to opiates.

Professional treatment at an accredited rehab is not only safe, but it also offers an opportunity to uncover underlying reasons for your addiction. It allows you to get treatment for mental health disorders linked to drug abuse. It caters to family members and loved ones by involving them in specialized family therapy sessions. And, it equips you with tools and skills to manage drug use triggers to reduce the chance of relapse during and after rehab.

Tapering Off Opiates With Medically-Assisted Detox

Opiates, also called opioids, are drugs made from the opium poppy plant. They are commonly prescribed for treating chronic pain. Codeine, Oxycodone, Fentanyl, Morphine, and Hydrocodone are some examples of prescription opioids. However, opiates are used illicitly in a more raw and potent form and are called “street drugs.”

Heroin is a widely abused “street” drug. It is highly addictive and is the reason why many individuals between the ages of 18-30 undergo opiate detox in Florida. They know that quitting opiates “cold turkey” and going through detox on their own increases the risk of relapse or overdose.

Tapering off the substance is the best way to gradually remove it from the body and allow the body and brain to slowly return to a state of “normalcy.” Medication may be administered to you during detox by a trained professional to assist in managing severe withdrawal symptoms.

Opiate Withdrawal Symptoms

Opiate withdrawal symptoms may begin within 6-30 hours after the last dose. Factors such as how severe the addiction is and what type of drug is involved will determine when symptoms begin. Short-acting opiates produce symptoms within 6-12 hours while long-acting opiates do so around 30 hours following the last use. One or more of these symptoms could develop and may vary in severity from person to person:

  • Strong cravings
  • Runny nose or teary eyes
  • Nausea, vomiting, or diarrhea
  • Excessive sweating
  • Irritability
  • Restlessness
  • Insomnia
  • Persistent yawning
  • Aggressing
  • Anxiety
  • Muscle aches or stomach cramps
  • Mood swings
  • Increased heart rate or blood pressure

Opiate Withdrawal Timeline

Opiate withdrawal can be done at an inpatient or outpatient program. Inpatient rehabs allow you to live-in for the duration of treatment while outpatient centers offer you the opportunity to continue to live at home, work, and care for family members. Nevertheless, both programs have proven to provide effective detox services and therapy.

However, each person’s detox experience is unique. Withdrawal symptoms and the length of time it takes to completely withdraw depend on the level of addiction, the type of drug abused, dosage, and how the brain reacts to the removal of the drug from the body. Days 1-7 is reportedly the most difficult stage. The entire detox process may last several weeks to several months.

The following is a general withdrawal timeline that may be helpful in letting you know what to expect:

Days 1-7: The first and second day is marked by symptoms such as strong cravings, compulsive drug-seeking, restlessness, sweating, trouble sleeping, and muscle aches. Other symptoms may develop around days 3-5 and may include nausea, vomiting, tremors, dilated pupil, increased heart rate, high blood pressure, and stomach ache. Some individuals experience diarrhea, chills, and abdominal cramps.

Day 7 and onwards: Around the end of the first week, there is usually a marked improvement in physical symptoms. At the same time, psychological symptoms start to kick in. Anxiety, depression, insomnia, irritability, emotional outbursts, remorse, and impulsive behaviors are common. By now, the desire to use drugs is not as strong as the first week. Once you’re stabilized, you may transition into therapy to begin the second stage of addiction treatment.

Finding a Detox Center Near You

Finding the right detox center may pose a bit of challenge since you may prefer to connect with one that can provide the services to match your needs. If you live in South Florida, you can locate a treatment center and give them a call to find out what types of programs they offer and how to get admitted.

During the evaluation, the medical team will recommend either outpatient or residential treatment depending on your recovery needs. Addiction treatment programs are usually comprehensive and include referral to behavioral therapy to help reduce the risk of relapse after formal treatment ends.

Just remember that sobriety involves a desire to overcome drug addiction, a positive mindset towards treatment, and a commitment to staying sober. Call one of our counselors today at 800-737-0933.

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