Will 28 Days in Rehab Be Enough?

Everyone has to follow their own path to sobriety, and knowing how long to stay in rehab is an important decision along the journey. Depending on the severity of your addiction, a traditional 28 or 30-day program may not be enough to give you the skills and confidence you need to stay clean and avoid a relapse.

Ultimately, the decision of how long to stay in rehab will rest on you. It’s not about how long someone thinks you should go. It’s about how long you know you need to be there.

What to Expect from 28-Day Rehab Programs?

A 28-day program is the standard recommendation for people who do not have prior experience with addiction treatment. The 28-day program is broken into four blocks, each lasting for a total of seven days – in other words, a month of treatment.

The substance abuse treatment techniques used in 28-day programs focus heavily on psychotherapy and cognitive therapy. Support groups, one-on-one counseling, and skill-building courses will be heavily implemented throughout the duration of treatment.

Each week builds off the last, helping you undo your addiction from the inside out and developing the coping strategies and healthy habits you need to live a successful, sober life.

Do I Need Inpatient or Outpatient Rehab?

Inpatient addiction treatment offers a greater level of control over your own recovery. You get to remove yourself from your current environment, avoiding any triggers and resources that will make it easy to continue using.

Many inpatient programs start at 30 days, but there are many programs that last 60 or even 90 days. Speaking with the staff at rehab and a substance abuse counselor will help you make the best choice for you.

It’s important to understand that no rehab is a cure-all for addiction. You have to be committed to your recovery and willing to extend an olive branch to the staff and counselors trying to help. Someone who is determined to get clean and stay sober will have a better outcome after 28 days of treatment than a half-hearted person who spends 90 days in rehab.

While it’s natural to be fearful treatment won’t work or hesitant to new ideas, you must commit yourself to be fully present during treatment. This is the only way you’ll experience the greatest impact.

What if I Can’t Afford a 30-day Treatment Program?

Although there are many financing options available, some people simply cannot attend residential rehab, but that doesn’t mean they’re out of luck. Outpatient therapy can be an effective addiction treatment too, and Intensive Outpatient Programs (IOPs) can be just as effective as inpatient treatment programs for many people.

How Long Should I Go to Rehab?

You should, first and foremost, get as much help as you can afford and access. Any treatment is better than none. If you can only attend one addiction meeting per week at a local facility, by all means, go. Even if you’re trying to save up for a longer stay at a 28-day facility, you should never forego treatment entirely because you can’t access everything you need right away.

There may be cases where 28-days or even 90 days aren’t enough. In this case, extended programs are available that can last anywhere from six months to a year, and they are designed to help a person fully integrate themselves into a new life with guidance, assistance, and counseling.

Many substance use disorders are tied to mental illness, and the first-time diagnosis in rehab isn’t uncommon. You may require a greater length of treatment if you are tackling addiction alongside a mental health condition such as depression, anxiety, bipolar disorder or schizophrenia.

These guidelines are mere opportunities for people who are looking to get treatment. Rehab comes in many different forms, and there is always a way to get help regardless of your financial status, family obligations and housing arrangements.

Are you ready to take the next step? Call us today at 800-737-0933 and speak to one of our trained representatives. We can help you come up with the perfect treatment plan for you and connect you with the rehab you’ve been waiting for.