Will You Ever Feel “Ready” for a Treatment Center in Lake Worth, FL?

If you have already tried to quit drinking or using your drug of choice, you already know that the addiction has a powerful hold over you. On top of the control your substance abuse problem has over you, you may feel uncertain about going into a Lake Worth, FL treatment center. There are a lot of rumors and myths that cause people to fear the prospect of addiction treatment, but, deep down, you know it's really your only alternative.

How do you know you're really ready to put yourself in the hands of a Lake Worth, FL treatment center? If you're thinking about it, you already know the answer, but you may be afraid to admit it to yourself. You just have to realize that addiction only ever ends in one of two ways. Either you get the help you need, or your substance abuse worsens until you suffer a fatal overdose. If you still feel unsure, or hesitant, there are some signs that you can identify within yourself that suggest it's time for addiction treatment.

Maybe My Addiction Isn't Bad Enough

In a 2012 survey, it was discovered that only 10% of people struggling with addiction ever sought treatment. When asked why they never committed to an organized addiction treatment plan, the respondents said they didn't feel their substance abuse problem was severe enough. Although there's an assumption that you have to hit rock bottom in order to benefit from treatment, this is a completely false myth. The only criteria for addiction treatment is believing that you need help to quit. Even if it's just one drink, or one dose a day, there's no shame in asking for help.

You may still want to know just how severe your addiction has become. Basically, if your substance abuse is interfering with your education or career, or if it's affecting your family and social relationships, you do have a severe addiction. In diagnosing an addiction, Lake Worth treatment center counselors use a sliding scale to determine the severity of the substance abuse problem. The factors they consider are:

  • Inability to control substance use
  • Inability to quit without help
  • Time spent trying to obtain the substance
  • Severity or frequency of cravings
  • Failing to meet responsibilities
  • Damaged relationships
  • Loss of interest in healthier activities
  • Dangerous or criminal drug-seeking behavior
  • A tolerance to the substance
  • The severity of withdrawal symptoms

My Friends Say I'm Fine

Even if you fear you may have an addiction problem, your friends may disagree and try to convince you that you don't need help. If this sounds like your situation, try to take an honest look at the substance use behaviors of those friends. If they also excessively use or like to party frequently, they may be afraid of losing your company. While that's only natural, it's not really helping you to live a better life.

Alternatively, your friends may not recognize your need for help, because they don't know the extent of your addiction. Often, people will hide their substance abuse from close friends and family members. If you have been doing this, you have to keep in mind that the opinion you're hearing is not based in fact. If you really want an honest opinion, you will have to tell your friends everything.

Your Addiction is Getting Worse

When you don't seek help when you know you need it, you're only hurting yourself. As you continue to use, you'll build up stronger and stronger tolerances, which means you'll have to keep using more of the substance to achieve the same effect. Eventually, you'll be using just to feel "normal," while the substance is damaging your mind and body.

In truth, you may never feel ready for rehab, even when your brain and body are telling you otherwise. It's far better to seek help and find out later that you didn't need it, rather than continuously risk your life on dangerous substance abuse. If you think you have a problem and you can't function without a dose or a drink, that may be all of the indications you need to know you're ready for treatment.

Even if you're still unsure, call one of our counselors at 800-737-0933 to discuss your situation. They can help you determine if addiction treatment can help you and which types of treatment plans are best for you. Depending on the severity of your addiction, you may even be able to receive treatment on an outpatient basis. Our counselors are available 24 hours a day to offer the help you need.